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Waste empty batteries  a source of energy  the reborn light | Upload Recycling

Empty Batteries, A Source Of Energy: The Reborn Light

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by: Hans van der Broek
empty batteries  a source of energy  the reborn light | Upload

If you have a battery that is nearly empty or can no longer generate enough power to run a device, you can throw it away or you can see if there is not another clock that is no longer running. It requires less power and can probably continue on that 'empty' battery.
Man standing between streetlight and #Nissan Leaf

An empty battery, would you throw it away?

The same principle is now used by Nissan for their 'second-life' (not to be confused with the game) batteries that they get from electric vehicles. Those batteries can no longer store enough electricity to drive an electric car for many miles, but they are far from useless.

Nissan, in collaboration with 4R Energy Corporation, has now announced the Reborn Light, a street lamp powered by solar energy that uses old Leaf batteries to store extra energy. Independence The street lamps not only have a separate (and beautiful!) Design, they are also more practical than regular street lamps, especially in Japan where the threat of earthquakes and the associated disruption of the electricity network is always lurking.
Because the lamp can generate its own energy and store it in the battery, it also works when the central power supply no longer works.
The test lamps are now installed in Japanese Namie, a small village not far from the Fukushima nuclear reactor that was melted in the 2011 catastrophe.

If the lamps work well there, Nissan wants to extend the test. As they say: "more than 17 percent of mankind still lives without electricity, these kinds of solutions can change their lives." Now Nissan is not the only one that has realized that old batteries can still have a lot of usefulness after being removed from electric cars, but this form is very practical and certainly useful in more countries.

By: dutchcowboys.nl. Photo's by: Nissan

https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/transportation/battery

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Hans van der Broek, founder

Founder and CEO of WhatsOrb, world traveller, entrepreneur and environmental activist. Hans has countless ideas and has set up several businesses in the Netherlands and abroad. He also has an opinion on everything and unlimited thoughts about how to create a better world. He likes hiking and has climbed numerous five-thousanders (mountain summits of at least 5000m or 16,404 feet in elevation)

 

Hans van der Broek, founder

Founder and CEO of WhatsOrb, world traveller, entrepreneur and environmental activist. Hans has countless ideas and has set up several businesses in the Netherlands and abroad. He also has an opinion on everything and unlimited thoughts about how to create a better world. He likes hiking and has climbed numerous five-thousanders (mountain summits of at least 5000m or 16,404 feet in elevation)

 

Empty Batteries, A Source Of Energy: The Reborn Light

If you have a battery that is nearly empty or can no longer generate enough power to run a device, you can throw it away or you can see if there is not another clock that is no longer running. It requires less power and can probably continue on that 'empty' battery. An empty battery, would you throw it away? The same principle is now used by Nissan for their 'second-life' (not to be confused with the game) batteries that they get from electric vehicles. Those batteries can no longer store enough electricity to drive an electric car for many miles, but they are far from useless. Nissan, in collaboration with 4R Energy Corporation, has now announced the Reborn Light, a street lamp powered by solar energy that uses old Leaf batteries to store extra energy. Independence The street lamps not only have a separate (and beautiful!) Design, they are also more practical than regular street lamps, especially in Japan where the threat of earthquakes and the associated disruption of the electricity network is always lurking. Because the lamp can generate its own energy and store it in the battery , it also works when the central power supply no longer works. The test lamps are now installed in Japanese Namie, a small village not far from the Fukushima nuclear reactor that was melted in the 2011 catastrophe. If the lamps work well there, Nissan wants to extend the test. As they say: "more than 17 percent of mankind still lives without electricity, these kinds of solutions can change their lives." Now Nissan is not the only one that has realized that old batteries can still have a lot of usefulness after being removed from electric cars , but this form is very practical and certainly useful in more countries. By: dutchcowboys.nl. Photo's by: Nissan https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/transportation/battery
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