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Waste curbing plastic waste by tattooed avocados and shampoo bars | Upload Household

Curbing Plastic Waste By Tattooed Avocados And Shampoo Bars

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by: Hans van der Broek
curbing plastic waste by tattooed avocados and shampoo bars | Upload

The first global analysis of all mass–produced plastics refers to the 'near-permanent contamination of the natural environment with plastic waste'. From shops offering individually-wrapped bananas to apples packaged in tubes, plastic is everywhere. And news that fish are mistaking plastic debris for food, is just one example of the negative environmental impacts.
So where is progress happening? We asked readers to send us examples and here we explore three ways businesses are trying to curb plastics use. Do you have other examples? Add them to the comments below.

Minimising plastic wate and packaging

If you’ve been at the receiving end of an online purchase that has come swamped in plastic in an oversized box you’ll know how frustrating it can be. The answer seems simple, pack the product in something smaller and minimise the need for so-called void fillers such as polystyrene chips inside. Yet companies are often constrained by the limited range of box sizes available.

Meet Slimbox, a machine which helps companies create customised packaging boxes in-house to reduce cardboard and filler waste. Slimbox CEO Filip Roose says he’s aware how important return on investment is to his customers. "We’ve calculated that if a company sends at least 30 packages a day then it should get a return on investment after approximately two years," says Roose. "The more they send, the shorter this timeframe."
As well as reducing costs over time, Roose highlights the environmental benefits: "Yes you reduce packaging use, but you also reduce carbon emissions by being able to transport more packages at once."

Solution for waste of packaging

We always owned a printing company. Finding right-sized boxes was one of our daily struggles. To remedy this problem, we built a machine that customizes boxes in-house in every shape en every size, called the Slimbox. The boxes are only made out of recycled paper and cardboard. By this we want to stop the waste of packagingmaterials and save our planet.
Sent via guardian witness

Refills

A number of shops now offer people the ability to bring in their own Tupperware, bottles and jars to refill with items like pulses, nuts, grains and washing-up liquid. 'Ditch plastic straws', experts and campaigners on how to cut plastic waste. 

  • Splosh has taken this concept online, enabling customers to buy concentrated laundry and cleaning product refills, which arrive by post in plastic pouches that can then be posted back to the company free of charge for re-use. "The problem of plastic waste cannot be solved while we still buy from supermarkets, because single-use plastics are essential to their business model,” says Angus Grahame, founder of Splosh. Splosh’s refillable concentrates, says Grahame, enable customers to cut plastic waste for most laundry, home cleaning and personal care products by around 95%. “We believe the move to the circular economy is about massive new business model opportunity rather than tweaking decades old systems as the likes of Unilever are trying to do," he adds. “The value destruction to existing brands when it happens, and it will happen quickly, will be awesome." Splosh laundry detergent: one bottle you reuse countless times. Refills v concentrated, which top up with water yourself - arrive in the post. Even better, the refills come in boxes that fit through the letterbox and which can be recycled. Finally, you can send back the pouches that the concentrate comes in to be re-used.
  • London’s Borough Market has pledgedto phase out sales of all single-use plastic bottles over the next six months, offering free drinking water from newly installed fountains instead.
  • Similarly, some bars and restaurants have started to ban straws in an effort to reduce the volume of plastics that end up in the oceans. The city of Seattle is taking this a step further next month with its Strawless Septembercampaign to get local businesses to switch to paper alternatives where necessary, and ditch straws altogether where possible.
  • Despite Marks & Spencer’s 'apple tubes  and plastic-wrapped plastic cutlery, the company has been exploring innovative alternatives to plastic packaging. By tattooing avocados rather than using produce stickers, for example, it intends to save 10 tonnes of plastic labels and backing paper and five tonnes of adhesive every year.
  • Cosmetics company Lush takes a very clear position when it comes to packaging: the ideal is none at all (approximately half of Lush products can be purchased without any packaging, according to the company website). By creating a solid shampoo bar, Lush claims it saves nearly 6m plastic bottles globally every year. What’s more, since the bars are more concentrated than liquid shampoo, less is needed per wash, resulting in lower carbon emissions from transportation. Refuse, reduce, reuse, recycle. Package free soaps!
    Lush Cosmetics follows all of these guiding conservation principles. I'm so glad they offer package-free solid bar products, as well as products packaged in recycled pots and bottles. And they've been doing it for a long time! This is nothing new and I remain hopeful that this environmental consciousness will continue to grow among other businesses.

https://www.whatsorb.com/category/waste

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Hans van der Broek, founder

Founder and CEO of WhatsOrb, world traveller, entrepreneur and environmental activist. Hans has countless ideas and has set up several businesses in the Netherlands and abroad. He also has an opinion on everything and unlimited thoughts about how to create a better world. He likes hiking and has climbed numerous five-thousanders (mountain summits of at least 5000m or 16,404 feet in elevation)

 

Hans van der Broek, founder

Founder and CEO of WhatsOrb, world traveller, entrepreneur and environmental activist. Hans has countless ideas and has set up several businesses in the Netherlands and abroad. He also has an opinion on everything and unlimited thoughts about how to create a better world. He likes hiking and has climbed numerous five-thousanders (mountain summits of at least 5000m or 16,404 feet in elevation)

 

Curbing Plastic Waste By Tattooed Avocados And Shampoo Bars

The first global analysis of all mass–produced plastics refers to the 'near-permanent contamination of the natural environment with plastic waste'. From shops offering individually-wrapped bananas to apples packaged in tubes, plastic is everywhere. And news that fish are mistaking plastic debris for food, is just one example of the negative environmental impacts. So where is progress happening? We asked readers to send us examples and here we explore three ways businesses are trying to curb plastics use. Do you have other examples? Add them to the comments below. Minimising plastic wate and packaging If you’ve been at the receiving end of an online purchase that has come swamped in plastic in an oversized box you’ll know how frustrating it can be. The answer seems simple, pack the product in something smaller and minimise the need for so-called void fillers such as polystyrene chips inside. Yet companies are often constrained by the limited range of box sizes available. Meet Slimbox, a machine which helps companies create customised packaging boxes in-house to reduce cardboard and filler waste. Slimbox CEO Filip Roose says he’s aware how important return on investment is to his customers. "We’ve calculated that if a company sends at least 30 packages a day then it should get a return on investment after approximately two years," says Roose. "The more they send, the shorter this timeframe." As well as reducing costs over time, Roose highlights the environmental benefits: "Yes you reduce packaging use, but you also reduce carbon emissions by being able to transport more packages at once." Solution for waste of packaging We always owned a printing company. Finding right-sized boxes was one of our daily struggles. To remedy this problem, we built a machine that customizes boxes in-house in every shape en every size, called the Slimbox. The boxes are only made out of recycled paper and cardboard. By this we want to stop the waste of packagingmaterials and save our planet. Sent via guardian witness Refills A number of shops now offer people the ability to bring in their own Tupperware, bottles and jars to refill with items like pulses, nuts, grains and washing-up liquid. 'Ditch plastic straws', experts and campaigners on how to cut plastic waste.  Splosh has taken this concept online, enabling customers to buy concentrated laundry and cleaning product refills, which arrive by post in plastic pouches that can then be posted back to the company free of charge for re-use. "The problem of  plastic waste cannot be solved while we still buy from supermarkets, because single-use plastics are essential to their business model,” says Angus Grahame, founder of Splosh. Splosh’s refillable concentrates, says Grahame, enable customers to cut plastic waste for most laundry, home cleaning and personal care products by around 95%. “We believe the move to the circular economy is about massive new business model opportunity rather than tweaking decades old systems as the likes of Unilever are trying to do," he adds. “The value destruction to existing brands when it happens, and it will happen quickly, will be awesome." Splosh laundry detergent: one bottle you reuse countless times. Refills v concentrated, which top up with water yourself - arrive in the post. Even better, the refills come in boxes that fit through the letterbox and which can be recycled. Finally, you can send back the pouches that the concentrate comes in to be re-used. London’s Borough Market has pledgedto phase out sales of all single-use plastic bottles over the next six months, offering free drinking water from newly installed fountains instead. Similarly, some bars and restaurants have  started to ban straws in an effort to reduce the volume of plastics that end up in the oceans. The city of Seattle is taking this a step further next month with its Strawless Septembercampaign to get local businesses to switch to paper alternatives where necessary, and ditch straws altogether where possible. Despite Marks & Spencer’s 'apple tubes  and plastic-wrapped plastic cutlery, the company has been exploring innovative alternatives to plastic packaging. By tattooing avocados rather than using produce stickers, for example, it intends to save 10 tonnes of plastic labels and backing paper and five tonnes of adhesive every year. Cosmetics company Lush takes a very clear position when it comes to packaging: the ideal is none at all (approximately half of Lush products can be purchased without any packaging, according to the company website). By creating a solid shampoo bar, Lush claims it saves nearly 6m plastic bottles globally every year. What’s more, since the bars are more concentrated than liquid shampoo, less is needed per wash, resulting in lower carbon emissions from transportation. Refuse, reduce, reuse, recycle . Package free soaps! Lush Cosmetics follows all of these guiding conservation principles. I'm so glad they offer package-free solid bar products, as well as products packaged in recycled pots and bottles. And they've been doing it for a long time! This is nothing new and I remain hopeful that this environmental consciousness will continue to grow among other businesses. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/waste
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