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Waste recycling human waste in space  tools and food | Upload General

Recycling Human Waste In Space: Tools And Food

by: Hans van der Broek
recycling human waste in space  tools and food | Upload

Companies and researchers are clamoring ways to make long space travel possible safe, and financially viable, but could urine be the unexpected solution? The problems associated with sending astronauts out to faraway places, however, are complex. Recycling human waste in space: tools and food are the results!

Recycling Human Waste In Space: Everything Needed

Assuming you have the vehicle, fuel, correct environment, and oxygen required, you still need to make sure that your human passengers are fed, have access to water, and have the tools necessary to complete whatever tasks they are issued. To this end, long-haul space travel poses challenges. With limited space and only so many resources on board, how do you make sure astronauts have everything they need?

Recycling Waste Will Get Also Important In Space

According to scientists from Clemson University, astronauts themselves could fill the gap in resources by donating their urine and exhaled carbon dioxide (CO2). While presenting their research at the National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the team, led by Mark Blenner, Ph.D., said that these products could be converted into chemicals to create plastic tools that may replace lost or broken ones. 

Recommended: Sustainable Bicycle From Recycled Plastic. Great!

Recycled urine is already utilized by astronauts onboard the International Space Station (ISS). Using molecules gained from human waste makes it possible to gain polyesters and material for printable plastics and additional nutrients. This could be a significant development in space-faring. The conversion of such material could mean less fuel would be used to carry replacement tools and food, and astronauts may also be able to make longer journeys without being deprived of essential nutrients, such as omega-3 fatty acids.

Dubbed the 'Atom economy,' Blenner says such recycling will become 'really important' for future missions if astronauts make journeys that span beyond a few years.

Recommended: Solar Panel Recycling: Photovoltaics Rebirth

Blenders' team is currently working on a biological system that includes strains of the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, which requires both nitrogen and carbon to grow. This kind of yeast can absorb nitrogen from untreated urine, and carbon comes from the astronaut's exhaled breaths. However, in the latter case, photosynthetic cyanobacteria or algae is necessary to use CO2.

One engineered yeast strain can produce omega-3 fatty acids. At the same time, another can now produce monomers for conversion to polyester polymers usable by 3D printers to print out replacement tools. For now, the yeast can only produce a small amount of these useful materials, but the researchers are now developing ways to increase efficiency and output. However, they are also looking at ways the yeast could be used to advantage on Earth, such as fish farms and aquaculture.

"We're learning that Y. lipolytica is quite a bit different than other yeast in their genetics and biochemical nature," Blenner says. "Every new organism has some amount of quirkiness that you have to focus on and understand better."

Cover photo by TechSpot

Source ZD-Net.com, Human waste to transform into plastic parts on long space journeys

Before you go!

Recommended: Gravitricity: Fast, Versatile Energy Storage Solution, UK

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We try to respond the same day.

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Hans van der Broek, founder

Founder and CEO of WhatsOrb, world traveller, entrepreneur and environmental activist. Hans has countless ideas and has set up several businesses in the Netherlands and abroad. He also has an opinion on everything and unlimited thoughts about how to create a better world. He likes hiking and has climbed numerous five-thousanders (mountain summits of at least 5000m or 16,404 feet in elevation)

 

Hans van der Broek, founder

Founder and CEO of WhatsOrb, world traveller, entrepreneur and environmental activist. Hans has countless ideas and has set up several businesses in the Netherlands and abroad. He also has an opinion on everything and unlimited thoughts about how to create a better world. He likes hiking and has climbed numerous five-thousanders (mountain summits of at least 5000m or 16,404 feet in elevation)

 

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Recycling Human Waste In Space: Tools And Food

Companies and researchers are clamoring ways to make long space travel possible safe, and financially viable, but could urine be the unexpected solution? The problems associated with sending astronauts out to faraway places, however, are complex. Recycling human waste in space: tools and food are the results! Recycling Human Waste In Space: Everything Needed Assuming you have the vehicle, fuel, correct environment, and oxygen required, you still need to make sure that your human passengers are fed, have access to water, and have the tools necessary to complete whatever tasks they are issued. To this end, long-haul space travel poses challenges. With limited space and only so many resources on board, how do you make sure astronauts have everything they need? Recycling Waste Will Get Also Important In Space According to scientists from Clemson University, astronauts themselves could fill the gap in resources by donating their urine and exhaled carbon dioxide (CO2). While presenting their research at the National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the team, led by Mark Blenner, Ph.D., said that these products could be converted into chemicals to create plastic tools that may replace lost or broken ones.  Recommended:  Sustainable Bicycle From Recycled Plastic. Great! Recycled urine is already utilized by astronauts onboard the International Space Station (ISS). Using molecules gained from human waste makes it possible to gain polyesters and material for printable plastics and additional nutrients. This could be a significant development in space-faring. The conversion of such material could mean less fuel would be used to carry replacement tools and food, and astronauts may also be able to make longer journeys without being deprived of essential nutrients, such as omega-3 fatty acids. Dubbed the 'Atom economy,' Blenner says such recycling will become 'really important' for future missions if astronauts make journeys that span beyond a few years. Recommended:  Solar Panel Recycling: Photovoltaics Rebirth Blenders' team is currently working on a biological system that includes strains of the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, which requires both nitrogen and carbon to grow. This kind of yeast can absorb nitrogen from untreated urine, and carbon comes from the astronaut's exhaled breaths. However, in the latter case, photosynthetic cyanobacteria or algae is necessary to use CO2. One engineered yeast strain can produce omega-3 fatty acids. At the same time, another can now produce monomers for conversion to polyester polymers usable by 3D printers to print out replacement tools. For now, the yeast can only produce a small amount of these useful materials, but the researchers are now developing ways to increase efficiency and output. However, they are also looking at ways the yeast could be used to advantage on Earth, such as fish farms and aquaculture. "We're learning that Y. lipolytica is quite a bit different than other yeast in their genetics and biochemical nature," Blenner says. "Every new organism has some amount of quirkiness that you have to focus on and understand better." Cover photo by TechSpot Source ZD-Net.com,  Human waste to transform into plastic parts on long space journeys Before you go! Recommended:  Gravitricity: Fast, Versatile Energy Storage Solution, UK Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about recycling? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
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