Close Welcome writers, influencers and dreamers, make the world a greener place
Register here
Forgot password
Forgot password
or
or

Close
Close Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations
Close Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations
Close Reset password
your profile is 33% complete:
33%
Update profile Close
Close WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-Change

For writers, influencers and dreamers who want to make the world a greener place.

WhatsOrb reaches monthly about 28.000 thousand visitors who want - like you - to make the world a greener place. Share your expertise and all can benefit.

Become an influencer and write and share sustainable news and innovations globally
Are you a writer or do you have ideas about sustainability which you want to share? Register and share your green knowledge and news. WhatsOrb offers you global exposure for your article.

If your article meets certain standards, you receive promotional gains like Facebook promotions and Google Ads advertising.

Transportation the flying v will be the future of traveling | Upload General

The Flying V Will Be The Future Of Traveling

by: Joris Zuid
the flying v will be the future of traveling | Upload

The Flying-V is a design for a highly energy-efficient long-distance aeroplane. The aircraft’s design integrates the passenger cabin, the cargo hold and the fuel tanks in the wings, creating a spectacular v-shape. Its improved aerodynamic shape and reduced weight will mean it uses 20% less fuel than the Airbus A350, today’s most advanced aircraft. 

Flying-V Idea Of TU Berlin Student Justus Benad

In the summer of 2020 the scaled flight model of the Flying-V completed a successful maiden flight. In the Flying-V – originally an idea of TU Berlin student Justus Benad during his thesis project at Airbus Hamburg – the passenger cabin, cargo hold and fuel tanks are integrated in its wing structure. The design is not as long as an Airbus A350, but it has the same wing span. This allows the Flying-V to use the present infrastructure at airports, such as gates and runways.

man, model plane, trees
Photo by TU Berlin/ Christian Kielmann. Flying-V – originally an idea of TU Berlin student Justus Benad. 

The Flying V's Passenger Capacity

The Flying-V carries about the same number of passengers -  314 in the standard configuration – and the same amount of cargo, 160 m3. Project leader at TU Delft, Dr. Roelof Vos: “The Flying-V is smaller than the A350 and has less inflow surface area compared to the available amount of volume. The result is less resistance. That means the Flying-V needs less fuel for the same distance.”

Stretching Out In Economy Class In The-V

Professor of Applied Ergonomics and Design Peter Vink and industrial design engineer Thomas Rotte made the designs for the new, oval shaped cabin. The Flying-V can be fitted with a traditional cabin, but Vink and Rotte designed an experimental cabin that is lightweight, comfortable for passengers and that still holds the same number of passengers as an Airbus A350. It contains four different seating options: lounge chairs, group seating, individual seats and collapsible beds.

Interior Flying V

Photo By The TU Delft, Netherlands. Interior of the Flying V

Interior, chairs Flying V, person

Flying On Sustainable Energy

The Flying-V is one of TU Delft's lines of research into making aviation more sustainable. Dean Henri Henri Werij: "Ultimately, we have to fly entirely on sustainable energy. CO2-neutral. If CO2 is still released during the flight, for example because we then fly on synthetic kerosene, the same amount of CO2 will be used to produce those fuels. At Delft University of Technology, we are investigating how we are going to achieve this. For example, we are investigating new forms of propulsion, such as electric and electric hybrid, the climate impact of aviation and air traffic operations, such as airports.

Recommended: Electric Flying With Eviation’s Alice Commuter Plane: Israel

Flying V’s Successful Maiden Flight

In July 2020 a team of researchers, engineers and a drone pilot of TU Delft travelled to an airbase in Germany for a week of test flight, together with a team from Airbus. That’s where the successful maiden flight of the scaled flight model took place.  



                                                                              Flying-V first test flight


Flying V And Collecting Data

PhD candidate Nando van Arnhem is the drone pilot of the project team. He controlled the scaled flight model via radio link. His task: take-off, fly a number of test manoeuvres and approaches until the batteries are nearly empty and land. The goals were:   

  • To show that the aircraft can perform a sustained flight based on predicted flight mechanical behaviour. 
  • To obtain an initial data set on its flight characteristics. 

And Nando succeeded. The scaled model made a successful maiden flight.

Flying V flying
Photo by TU Delft, Netherlands.

Recommended: Electric Flying Boat Flying High: The Candela 7

Results

  • The flight generated a lot of interesting data and knowledge, such as: 
  • Rotation on take-off was performed easily and occurred at a speed of 80 km/h. The plane’s thrust was good and flight speeds and angles were as predicted. 
  • The centre of gravity of the aircraft was located slightly more towards the rear than had been calculated in advance. For the test flight the team put extra weight into the nose and placed the landing gear a little bit further to the front of the aircraft. If the centre of gravity isn’t in the right location, the aircraft can become unstable.  
  • During the test week the team has had to repair the antenna to improve the telemetry. 
  • The current design shows ‘wobbling’, in a technical term, Dutch Roll. That makes it difficult to keep the wings level and caused the aircraft to have a somewhat rough landing. Aerodynamic calculations had predicted this behaviour, but now that is has been demonstrated in a real flight, the team will be able to adjust the aircraft accordingly.

What’s Next?

With the collected data from the first flight, the team will be able to make an aerodynamic model of the scaled flight model. This model makes it possible to calculate exactly in what ways the scale model will need to be adapted. The team will also prepare the aircraft for new flight tests. For this, they will for example need to repair the nose landing gear.

Why is testing with scaled flight models important?

Test flights involving scaled flight models is important, because you only really know how an aircraft design performs if you fly it in dynamic circumstances. Tests in a wind tunnel are also important, but these only give a static picture. Also: by flying an aircraft design you can show that the design is not just promising on paper. 

Building The Flying V Scale Model

Took around 1,5 years from viable concept to maiden flight of the scaled flight test model.  

The Flying-V-team built the scale model in-house with assistance from composites experts of the university. Some components, in particular some metal parts of the landing gear, had to be custom made by other suppliers. 

The scale model has a combination of commercial and custom-made in-house systems to control the plane and measure all of the relevant flight data.

The Flying-V team

Technical project leader: Dr. Roelof Vos, Assistant Professor of Flight Performance and Propulsion, chief engineer Malcom Brown, composites expert Frank van Wissen, electronics expert Alberto Ruiz Garcia, CAD designer Daniel Atherstone and two master's students. PhD student Nando van Arnhem is the certified drone pilot.

Cover photo by Edwin Wallet/TU Delft

Article original from the TU Delft, Netherlands

Recommended: Sustainable Air Travel: Climate Change Mindset And Tips

Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below.
We try to respond the same day.

Like to write your article about sustainable traveling?
Send your writing & scribble with a photo to [email protected], and we will write an interesting article based on your input.

Messange
You
Share this post

I'm especially interested in new Hydrogen techniques. I'm convinced that - in the near future - Hydrogen will surpass the development of solar or wind as alternative energy source. Safety concerns will find a solution and Hydrogen will be applied massively in all forms of transportation. 

I'm especially interested in new Hydrogen techniques. I'm convinced that - in the near future - Hydrogen will surpass the development of solar or wind as alternative energy source. Safety concerns will find a solution and Hydrogen will be applied massively in all forms of transportation. 

Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations
SIGN UP FOR MONTHLY TIPS & TRICKS
More like this:

The Flying V Will Be The Future Of Traveling

The Flying-V is a design for a highly energy-efficient long-distance aeroplane. The aircraft’s design integrates the passenger cabin, the cargo hold and the fuel tanks in the wings, creating a spectacular v-shape. Its improved aerodynamic shape and reduced weight will mean it uses 20% less fuel than the Airbus A350, today’s most advanced aircraft.  Flying-V Idea Of TU Berlin Student Justus Benad In the summer of 2020 the scaled flight model of the Flying-V completed a successful maiden flight. In the Flying-V – originally an idea of TU Berlin student Justus Benad during his thesis project at Airbus Hamburg – the passenger cabin, cargo hold and fuel tanks are integrated in its wing structure. The design is not as long as an Airbus A350, but it has the same wing span. This allows the Flying-V to use the present infrastructure at airports, such as gates and runways. Photo by  TU Berlin/ Christian Kielmann.  Flying-V – originally an idea of TU Berlin student Justus Benad.  The Flying V's Passenger Capacity The Flying-V carries about the same number of passengers -  314 in the standard configuration – and the same amount of cargo, 160 m3. Project leader at TU Delft, Dr. Roelof Vos: “The Flying-V is smaller than the A350 and has less inflow surface area compared to the available amount of volume. The result is less resistance. That means the Flying-V needs less fuel for the same distance.” Stretching Out In Economy Class In The-V Professor of Applied Ergonomics and Design Peter Vink and industrial design engineer Thomas Rotte made the designs for the new, oval shaped cabin. The Flying-V can be fitted with a traditional cabin, but Vink and Rotte designed an experimental cabin that is lightweight, comfortable for passengers and that still holds the same number of passengers as an Airbus A350. It contains four different seating options: lounge chairs, group seating, individual seats and collapsible beds. Photo By The TU Delft, Netherlands. Interior of the Flying V Flying On Sustainable Energy The Flying-V is one of TU Delft's lines of research into making aviation more sustainable. Dean Henri Henri Werij: "Ultimately, we have to fly entirely on sustainable energy. CO2-neutral. If CO2 is still released during the flight, for example because we then fly on synthetic kerosene, the same amount of CO2 will be used to produce those fuels. At Delft University of Technology, we are investigating how we are going to achieve this. For example, we are investigating new forms of propulsion, such as electric and electric hybrid, the climate impact of aviation and air traffic operations, such as airports. Recommended:  Electric Flying With Eviation’s Alice Commuter Plane: Israel Flying V’s Successful Maiden Flight In July 2020 a team of researchers, engineers and a drone pilot of TU Delft travelled to an airbase in Germany for a week of test flight, together with a team from Airbus. That’s where the successful maiden flight of the scaled flight model took place.   {youtube}                                                                               Flying-V first test flight Flying V And Collecting Data PhD candidate Nando van Arnhem is the drone pilot of the project team. He controlled the scaled flight model via radio link. His task: take-off, fly a number of test manoeuvres and approaches until the batteries are nearly empty and land. The goals were:    To show that the aircraft can perform a sustained flight based on predicted flight mechanical behaviour.  To obtain an initial data set on its flight characteristics.  And Nando succeeded. The scaled model made a successful maiden flight. Photo by TU Delft, Netherlands. Recommended:  Electric Flying Boat Flying High: The Candela 7 Results The flight generated a lot of interesting data and knowledge, such as:  Rotation on take-off was performed easily and occurred at a speed of 80 km/h. The plane’s thrust was good and flight speeds and angles were as predicted.  The centre of gravity of the aircraft was located slightly more towards the rear than had been calculated in advance. For the test flight the team put extra weight into the nose and placed the landing gear a little bit further to the front of the aircraft. If the centre of gravity isn’t in the right location, the aircraft can become unstable.   During the test week the team has had to repair the antenna to improve the telemetry.  The current design shows ‘wobbling’, in a technical term, Dutch Roll. That makes it difficult to keep the wings level and caused the aircraft to have a somewhat rough landing. Aerodynamic calculations had predicted this behaviour, but now that is has been demonstrated in a real flight, the team will be able to adjust the aircraft accordingly. What’s Next? With the collected data from the first flight, the team will be able to make an aerodynamic model of the scaled flight model. This model makes it possible to calculate exactly in what ways the scale model will need to be adapted. The team will also prepare the aircraft for new flight tests. For this, they will for example need to repair the nose landing gear. Why is testing with scaled flight models important? Test flights involving scaled flight models is important, because you only really know how an aircraft design performs if you fly it in dynamic circumstances. Tests in a wind tunnel are also important, but these only give a static picture. Also: by flying an aircraft design you can show that the design is not just promising on paper.  Building The Flying V Scale Model Took around 1,5 years from viable concept to maiden flight of the scaled flight test model.   The Flying-V-team built the scale model in-house with assistance from composites experts of the university. Some components, in particular some metal parts of the landing gear, had to be custom made by other suppliers.  The scale model has a combination of commercial and custom-made in-house systems to control the plane and measure all of the relevant flight data. The Flying-V team Technical project leader: Dr. Roelof Vos, Assistant Professor of Flight Performance and Propulsion, chief engineer Malcom Brown, composites expert Frank van Wissen, electronics expert Alberto Ruiz Garcia, CAD designer Daniel Atherstone and two master's students. PhD student Nando van Arnhem is the certified drone pilot. Cover photo by Edwin Wallet/TU Delft Article original from the TU Delft, Netherlands Recommended:  Sustainable Air Travel: Climate Change Mindset And Tips Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about sustainable traveling? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations