Transportation

About: <h1>Sustainable transport by car, boat, bike and plane</h1> <p>Sustainable transport has low impact on the environment. It is &lsquo;green&rsquo;. <a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/category/transportation">Sustainable transport</a> is finding the balance between current- and future transportation needs. Replacing fossil fuel transportation by battery, hybrid, hydrogen, wind or solar for cars, trucks, boats, planes and other means of transportation is not enough. We also need to reduce traffic by sharing sustainable transportation like: carpooling, cycling and walking.</p> <p>Transport has a significant influence on the environment. It uses about 20% from our energy sources and produces about 25% CO2 emissions.</p> <p>If there was an urge to come up with sustainable transport solutions and share these topics globally it&rsquo;s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about sustainable transport, your experiences and expectations for the future at home and globally. <br /><br />Global Sustainability X-change, that&rsquo;s what you can do together with WhatsOrb.&nbsp;<a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/blog/your-shared-sustainable-ideas-make-our-earth-a-better-place">What's in for me?</a></p>
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Transportation categorybanner Cycling

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Sustainable Electric Cycling: Speed Pedelec Or On Hydrogen
In many countries cycling is a way of life, but for us it is so normal. The Netherlands is the perfect cycling country. With 22 million bicycles, special parking garages, 32,000 kilometers of cycle paths, cycle highways and public transport bicycles at almost all train stations. In the meantime, the electric bike is gaining ground and more and more smart gadgets are coming that make the cyclist's life easier. These bikes make the car unnecessary. Electric Bicycle A few years ago, an electric bicycle was mainly something for the elderly and people with limited mobility, but that is really a thing of the past. The technology of the bikes improved, the design became more and more beautiful and the range was increased. Models appeared in the city, for recreation and for a mountainous landscape. And charging points everywhere in the Netherlands. Sustainable Electric Cycling. Just Leave Your Car Because of the arrival of the electric bicycle more and more people decide to leave the car and cycle longer distances to work. You go fast about 25 kilometers per hour. Harder can not, because there is a speed limiter on it to keep it safe. On a normal bicycle, most people get around 16 kilometers per hour, but then you have to peddle a lot. Now are already 32 % of all bikes sold were electric and this number continues to grow. Recommended:  The Solar Bike: Mix Between A Two-Wheeler And A Tesla Racing On The Speed Pedelec There is also another electric bike, the speed pedelec. This super-fast bike makes it easy to pedal 30 to 40 kilometers per hour. That is just as fast as a scooter and that is why the rules are the same. A helmet is mandatory and the bicycle is not allowed on the bike path in the built-up area, but there is a lot of disagreement about it. The speed pedelec is especially popular with people who travel long distances between home and work and like to do so by bike. Bike On Hydrogen Now the bicycle on hydrogen is also approaching. A French start-up Pragma Industries develops this bicycle. The cost price is now 7,500 euros and that is still far too much for a consumer. But the company is working on a cheaper model. The advantage of a bicycle on hydrogen is that charging is done in a few minutes, while an electric bike has to be plugged in for a few hours. Recommended:  Hydrogen Powered Bikes In Production: Biarritz, France Smart Gadgets For Locks Bicycles are also increasingly equipped with smart and technological extras. For example, the Swedish company Kronan Bike developed a bicycle with a steel basket in front, which also functions as a bicycle lock. Another company, Ilockit, makes locks that are connected to your smartphone. If you walk away from your bike, the lock will close. If you come back, it will open. And if someone tries to steal your bike, you get a message. Never 'Lose' Your Bike Again For people who have always lost their bikes in crowded garages, there is the WheelReveal. On your bike you stick a sticker that communicates with an app on your phone. Based on GPS you can always find your own bike again. Always LED Light In The Dark And of course there is something new for lighting too. No broken front lights, or loose lights, because with the lighting of Revolights Eclipse + you stick four thin strips of LED lighting on your tires and spokes. They automatically turn on when it gets dark and you are visible from all sides. Cycling is and remains the ideal mode of transport in the Netherlands and with all these developments, it only becomes more attractive. We are curious what you think of it. Do you already cycle electrically? Or do you prefer to kick yourself solidly? See those gadgets, or stay with the old familiar chain lock. We would like to hear it! Before you go! Recommended:  Electric Bike Buying Guide For Starters And Professionals Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
In many countries cycling is a way of life, but for us it is so normal. The Netherlands is the perfect cycling country. With 22 million bicycles, special parking garages, 32,000 kilometers of cycle paths, cycle highways and public transport bicycles at almost all train stations. In the meantime, the electric bike is gaining ground and more and more smart gadgets are coming that make the cyclist's life easier. These bikes make the car unnecessary. Electric Bicycle A few years ago, an electric bicycle was mainly something for the elderly and people with limited mobility, but that is really a thing of the past. The technology of the bikes improved, the design became more and more beautiful and the range was increased. Models appeared in the city, for recreation and for a mountainous landscape. And charging points everywhere in the Netherlands. Sustainable Electric Cycling. Just Leave Your Car Because of the arrival of the electric bicycle more and more people decide to leave the car and cycle longer distances to work. You go fast about 25 kilometers per hour. Harder can not, because there is a speed limiter on it to keep it safe. On a normal bicycle, most people get around 16 kilometers per hour, but then you have to peddle a lot. Now are already 32 % of all bikes sold were electric and this number continues to grow. Recommended:  The Solar Bike: Mix Between A Two-Wheeler And A Tesla Racing On The Speed Pedelec There is also another electric bike, the speed pedelec. This super-fast bike makes it easy to pedal 30 to 40 kilometers per hour. That is just as fast as a scooter and that is why the rules are the same. A helmet is mandatory and the bicycle is not allowed on the bike path in the built-up area, but there is a lot of disagreement about it. The speed pedelec is especially popular with people who travel long distances between home and work and like to do so by bike. Bike On Hydrogen Now the bicycle on hydrogen is also approaching. A French start-up Pragma Industries develops this bicycle. The cost price is now 7,500 euros and that is still far too much for a consumer. But the company is working on a cheaper model. The advantage of a bicycle on hydrogen is that charging is done in a few minutes, while an electric bike has to be plugged in for a few hours. Recommended:  Hydrogen Powered Bikes In Production: Biarritz, France Smart Gadgets For Locks Bicycles are also increasingly equipped with smart and technological extras. For example, the Swedish company Kronan Bike developed a bicycle with a steel basket in front, which also functions as a bicycle lock. Another company, Ilockit, makes locks that are connected to your smartphone. If you walk away from your bike, the lock will close. If you come back, it will open. And if someone tries to steal your bike, you get a message. Never 'Lose' Your Bike Again For people who have always lost their bikes in crowded garages, there is the WheelReveal. On your bike you stick a sticker that communicates with an app on your phone. Based on GPS you can always find your own bike again. Always LED Light In The Dark And of course there is something new for lighting too. No broken front lights, or loose lights, because with the lighting of Revolights Eclipse + you stick four thin strips of LED lighting on your tires and spokes. They automatically turn on when it gets dark and you are visible from all sides. Cycling is and remains the ideal mode of transport in the Netherlands and with all these developments, it only becomes more attractive. We are curious what you think of it. Do you already cycle electrically? Or do you prefer to kick yourself solidly? See those gadgets, or stay with the old familiar chain lock. We would like to hear it! Before you go! Recommended:  Electric Bike Buying Guide For Starters And Professionals Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Sustainable Electric Cycling: Speed Pedelec Or On Hydrogen
Sustainable Electric Cycling: Speed Pedelec Or On Hydrogen
Bicycles Without Battery: We Just Forgot They Are Cleanest
Bicycles were introduced in the late 19th century in Europe, and by the early 21st century, more than 1 billion were in existence at a given time. These numbers far exceed the number of cars, both in total and ranked by the number of individual models produced. They are the principal means of transportation in many regions. They also provide a popular form of recreation, and have been adapted for use as children's toys, general fitness, military and police applications, courier services, bicycle racing and bicycle stunts. The basic shape and configuration of a typical upright or "safety bicycle", has changed little since the first chain-driven model was developed around 1885. However, many details have been improved, especially since the advent of modern materials and computer-aided design. These have allowed for a proliferation of specialized designs for many types of cycling. The bicycle's invention has had an enormous effect on society, both in terms of culture and of advancing modern industrial methods. Several components that eventually played a key role in the development of the automobile were initially invented for use in the bicycle, including ball bearings, pneumatic tires, chain-driven sprockets and tension-spoked wheels. Flying Pigeon is a Chinese state-owned bicycle company based in Tianjin, a direct-controlled municipality, in North-eastern China.Since 1950, more than 500 million Flying Pigeon PA-02 bicycles have been made Bicycles Without Battery, so Many Choices! When trying to decide on the best type of bike, think about these questions: Who do you ride with? What do they ride? What have you had in the past that you liked? What have you had in the past that you disliked? Where would you like to ride your new bike? If you are buying a bike to ride with a group of friends, buy something similar to what they ride. You will not be able to keep up with road bikes if you are on a mountain bike or cruiser. And a road bike cannot go on the dirt or the sand. If you enjoyed a three speed as a child, you may find this a fun bike again. If you disliked the road bike you bought a few years ago, perhaps a mountain bike would be better. Bicycles for on the roads Road bicycles are designed to be ridden fast on smooth pavement. They have smooth, skinny tires and "drop" handlebars, and can be used for on-road racing. They are usually lighter than other types of bicycles. They can be ridden on paved trails, but most people find them uncomfortable and unstable on unpaved trails. Most road bikes are not capable of carrying heavy loads, so are not very suitable for commuting or touring. Cyclocross Bicycles Cyclocross bicycles are a special type of road bike designed to be raced on a mixed surface course (combination of pavement, unpaved trails, gravel, grass). They have a drop handlebar like regular road bikes, but the tires are a littler wider for more off-road traction, and they have a different style of brake that helps to prevent mud buildup in the frame. Cyclocross bicycles are sometimes called 'cross bikes or cx bikes for short. Touring Bicycles Touring bicycles are another special type of road bike. They are designed to be ridden on pavement, but are more durable for use on self-supported long-distance riding. They have all of the necessary mounting bolts for cargo racks and fenders, and although they still have a drop handlebar, they usually have a more relaxed frame design so that the rider is more upright, for more comfort when riding long distances for multiple days at a time. They have a lower gear range compared to regular road bikes, to allow for carrying heavy loads up steep hills. They also make good commuter bicycles, because of their durability and ability to carry heavy loads. Adventure Road Bicycles Adventure Road Bicycles are one of the newest categories of bicycle. They are sometimes called all-road bikes, any-road bikes, or gravel bikes, and are the most versatile sub-category of road bike. Similar to cyclocross bikes, they have drop handlebars and the ability to use wider tires. The frame geometry is longer and more upright compared to a cyclocross bike, however, making these bikes more suitable for long days in the saddle, light touring, and commuting. Triathlon/Time Trial Bicycles Triathlon/Time Trial Bicycles are road bikes with a special design that maximizes their aerodynamic properties. The handlebars are also a special aerodynamic design that allows you to crouch forward while riding, to minimize the wind resistance against your body. Triathlon/time trial races usually have staggered starts, where each racer starts on his/her own; these bicycles are usually not allowed to be used in mass-start races. Fitness Bicycles Fitness Bicycles have most of the advantages of regular road bikes--lightweight frames and relatively narrow tires for efficiency on pavement--with a flat or upright handlebar. These bikes are designed for people who want a light, high-performance bike, but don't like the drop-handlebar riding position of a regular road bike. These bicycles are sometimes called flat-bar road bikes or performance hybrid bikes. Most of them can accept somewhat wider tires, to make them suitable for use on unpaved trails. They usually have the ability to mount cargo racks and fenders, which make them good commuter bikes. Bicycle inventions {youtube} Bicycles Without Battery: We Just Forgot They Are Cleanest. New bicycle inventionst that are on another level Track/Fixed-Gear Bicycles Track/Fixed-Gear Bicycles or fixies are designed to be ridden on a velodrome, which is a banked oval track specifically for bicycle racing. Some commuters prefer track bikes, however, due to their simple design, which makes them easy to maintain. They have a single gear that does not provide the ability to coast, so if the bike is moving, your feet must be pedaling. For even more simplicity, some riders prefer to not have brakes, since the fixed-gear mechanism can act as a brake. Most track bikes have drop handlebars, but some riders outfit theirs with flat or upright handlebars. Mountain Bicycles Mountain Bicycles are design for riding rough off-road trails. They have flat or upright handlebars, and a very low gear range for pedaling up steep trails. Most mountain bikes have some type of shock absorbers or suspension. Mountain bikes with front suspension only are called hardtails; mountain bikes with both front and rear suspension are called full-suspension bikes or duallies. Mountain bikes with no suspension are called rigid. Mountain bikes can be outfitted for use as touring or commuting bikes, although they would not be as light or efficient as traditional touring or commuting bikes. Fat bikes, with their extremely wide tires, are included in the mountain bike category. Hybrid Bicycles Hybrid Bicycles were originally conceived to provide the advantages of both road bikes and mountain bikes. Their large, padded seats and upright handlebars provide a comfortable riding position, and are best for casual riding around the neighborhood or bike paths, short-distance commuting, and errands around town. They can be ridden on paved roads, but are not as lightweight or efficient as road bikes. They are ideal for paved or unpaved bike trails, but are not appropriate for rough off-road mountain bike trails. The tires are usually a medium-width with a semi-smooth tread, to provide a fairly smooth ride on pavement, but enough grip and cushion on unpaved trails. Most hybrid bikes have front suspension to smooth out small bumps, but some are fully rigid. Hybrid bikes used to also be referred to as cross bikes, but that term is not used any more in order to avoid confusion with cyclocross bikes (see above). Dual-Sport Bicycles Dual-Sport Bicycles are a sub-category of hybrid bikes oriented towards riders who want the multi-surface versatility of a hybrid bike, but want a little more aggressive style and riding position. They have a flat or upright handlebar, although not as upright as regular hybrid bikes; they usually have a smaller, more performance-oriented seat, rather than a large comfort seat. Most have front suspension. Dual-sport bikes make good commuter bikes, and are also good for touring on unpaved trails. Cruiser Bicylces Cruiser Bicycles are similar to hybrid bikes, in that they are designed for casual riding, and have a very comfortable, upright riding position, and a large, comfortable seat. Cruisers usually have wide "balloon" tires, and handlebars that are even more upright, and in some cases, swept back compared to hybrid bikes. Most cruiser bikes are single-speed or 3-speed, and have the old-fashioned coaster brake (where you pedal backwards to stop). They can be used for short-distance commuting and errands, as long as your route is fairly flat. Some cruiser bike manufacturers make a wide array of colorful models available, to suit the fashion tastes of any bike afficionado. Flat-Foot Comfort Bicycles Flat-Foot Comfort Bicycles are a sub-category of cruiser bikes. They have an elongated frame design that pushes the pedals a few inches forward of the seat. This allows you to ride with the seat low enough so that you can place your feet flat on the ground when you are stopped, but you still get the full extension of your legs while pedaling. All Electra Bicycle Company bikes have the flat-foot technology; some other manufacturers have created their own flat-foot designs. City Bicycles The term "city bike" doesn't really refer to a specific category of bikes; it's more of a general descriptive term. They might also be called "commuter" or "urban" bikes, although many of the bikes listed on this page can be used quite well for riding and commuting in a city. However, there is a certain type of bike that some people have in mind when they use the term "city bike." This bike has characteristics of both a hybrid bike and a cruiser bike--usually the upright riding position of a cruiser, but the wheel size of a hybrid bike. A city bike might also have some or all of these features that make it more amenable to riding in regular clothes, as opposed to cycling-specific clothing: Fenders Chain guard Skirt guard on rear wheel A city bike might also have an internally-geared rear hub for ease of use and maintenance, and a built-in generator and lights for safety when riding after dark. These bikes are also sometimes called "Dutch bikes," because of their resemblance to the everyday bikes used in Amsterdam and other bike-friendly European cities. Recommended:  The Bicycle Metropolis: Why Still Investing In Car Parking? BMX Bicycles BMX Bicycles are popular with kids because of their small size, but they are used by adults and kids alike for various styles of trick and stunt riding. Folding Bicycles Folding Bicycles are ideal for those who need to travel with their bike, want a bike to keep on their boat or plane, or who live in small apartments and don't have a lot of storage space. They're also good for commuters who need to take their bike on a bus or train for part of their commute, or who don't have a safe place to park their bike at work. Most folding bikes have smaller wheels, which makes the bike a little less efficient and trickier to handle than a standard bike, but most folding bike fans feel the benefits outweigh the disadvantages. Recumbent Bicycles Recumbent Bicycles have a long, low design and a full-size seat with a backrest. Recumbents are available in two-wheel and three-wheel designs. Many recumbent riders feel that they are the most comfortable option available for bicycling. However, they are more difficult to pedal up hills, and they can be a challenge to carry from one place to another in a motor vehicle. Tandem Bicycles Tandem Bicycles are "bicycles built for two." They come in all styles, from cruiser tandems and hybrid tandems for the bike path or boardwalk, off-road mountain bike tandems, and high-performance road racing tandems. Adult Tricycles Adult Trikes are ideal for older folks who still want to get around under their own power, or those with balance issues or other special needs. They are also popular in environmentally-consious industrial/warehouse applications. By: Century Cycles. Cover photo by: Maria Soledad Recommended:  Sustainable Transport And Training: The Me-Mover Netherlands
Bicycles were introduced in the late 19th century in Europe, and by the early 21st century, more than 1 billion were in existence at a given time. These numbers far exceed the number of cars, both in total and ranked by the number of individual models produced. They are the principal means of transportation in many regions. They also provide a popular form of recreation, and have been adapted for use as children's toys, general fitness, military and police applications, courier services, bicycle racing and bicycle stunts. The basic shape and configuration of a typical upright or "safety bicycle", has changed little since the first chain-driven model was developed around 1885. However, many details have been improved, especially since the advent of modern materials and computer-aided design. These have allowed for a proliferation of specialized designs for many types of cycling. The bicycle's invention has had an enormous effect on society, both in terms of culture and of advancing modern industrial methods. Several components that eventually played a key role in the development of the automobile were initially invented for use in the bicycle, including ball bearings, pneumatic tires, chain-driven sprockets and tension-spoked wheels. Flying Pigeon is a Chinese state-owned bicycle company based in Tianjin, a direct-controlled municipality, in North-eastern China.Since 1950, more than 500 million Flying Pigeon PA-02 bicycles have been made Bicycles Without Battery, so Many Choices! When trying to decide on the best type of bike, think about these questions: Who do you ride with? What do they ride? What have you had in the past that you liked? What have you had in the past that you disliked? Where would you like to ride your new bike? If you are buying a bike to ride with a group of friends, buy something similar to what they ride. You will not be able to keep up with road bikes if you are on a mountain bike or cruiser. And a road bike cannot go on the dirt or the sand. If you enjoyed a three speed as a child, you may find this a fun bike again. If you disliked the road bike you bought a few years ago, perhaps a mountain bike would be better. Bicycles for on the roads Road bicycles are designed to be ridden fast on smooth pavement. They have smooth, skinny tires and "drop" handlebars, and can be used for on-road racing. They are usually lighter than other types of bicycles. They can be ridden on paved trails, but most people find them uncomfortable and unstable on unpaved trails. Most road bikes are not capable of carrying heavy loads, so are not very suitable for commuting or touring. Cyclocross Bicycles Cyclocross bicycles are a special type of road bike designed to be raced on a mixed surface course (combination of pavement, unpaved trails, gravel, grass). They have a drop handlebar like regular road bikes, but the tires are a littler wider for more off-road traction, and they have a different style of brake that helps to prevent mud buildup in the frame. Cyclocross bicycles are sometimes called 'cross bikes or cx bikes for short. Touring Bicycles Touring bicycles are another special type of road bike. They are designed to be ridden on pavement, but are more durable for use on self-supported long-distance riding. They have all of the necessary mounting bolts for cargo racks and fenders, and although they still have a drop handlebar, they usually have a more relaxed frame design so that the rider is more upright, for more comfort when riding long distances for multiple days at a time. They have a lower gear range compared to regular road bikes, to allow for carrying heavy loads up steep hills. They also make good commuter bicycles, because of their durability and ability to carry heavy loads. Adventure Road Bicycles Adventure Road Bicycles are one of the newest categories of bicycle. They are sometimes called all-road bikes, any-road bikes, or gravel bikes, and are the most versatile sub-category of road bike. Similar to cyclocross bikes, they have drop handlebars and the ability to use wider tires. The frame geometry is longer and more upright compared to a cyclocross bike, however, making these bikes more suitable for long days in the saddle, light touring, and commuting. Triathlon/Time Trial Bicycles Triathlon/Time Trial Bicycles are road bikes with a special design that maximizes their aerodynamic properties. The handlebars are also a special aerodynamic design that allows you to crouch forward while riding, to minimize the wind resistance against your body. Triathlon/time trial races usually have staggered starts, where each racer starts on his/her own; these bicycles are usually not allowed to be used in mass-start races. Fitness Bicycles Fitness Bicycles have most of the advantages of regular road bikes--lightweight frames and relatively narrow tires for efficiency on pavement--with a flat or upright handlebar. These bikes are designed for people who want a light, high-performance bike, but don't like the drop-handlebar riding position of a regular road bike. These bicycles are sometimes called flat-bar road bikes or performance hybrid bikes. Most of them can accept somewhat wider tires, to make them suitable for use on unpaved trails. They usually have the ability to mount cargo racks and fenders, which make them good commuter bikes. Bicycle inventions {youtube} Bicycles Without Battery: We Just Forgot They Are Cleanest. New bicycle inventionst that are on another level Track/Fixed-Gear Bicycles Track/Fixed-Gear Bicycles or fixies are designed to be ridden on a velodrome, which is a banked oval track specifically for bicycle racing. Some commuters prefer track bikes, however, due to their simple design, which makes them easy to maintain. They have a single gear that does not provide the ability to coast, so if the bike is moving, your feet must be pedaling. For even more simplicity, some riders prefer to not have brakes, since the fixed-gear mechanism can act as a brake. Most track bikes have drop handlebars, but some riders outfit theirs with flat or upright handlebars. Mountain Bicycles Mountain Bicycles are design for riding rough off-road trails. They have flat or upright handlebars, and a very low gear range for pedaling up steep trails. Most mountain bikes have some type of shock absorbers or suspension. Mountain bikes with front suspension only are called hardtails; mountain bikes with both front and rear suspension are called full-suspension bikes or duallies. Mountain bikes with no suspension are called rigid. Mountain bikes can be outfitted for use as touring or commuting bikes, although they would not be as light or efficient as traditional touring or commuting bikes. Fat bikes, with their extremely wide tires, are included in the mountain bike category. Hybrid Bicycles Hybrid Bicycles were originally conceived to provide the advantages of both road bikes and mountain bikes. Their large, padded seats and upright handlebars provide a comfortable riding position, and are best for casual riding around the neighborhood or bike paths, short-distance commuting, and errands around town. They can be ridden on paved roads, but are not as lightweight or efficient as road bikes. They are ideal for paved or unpaved bike trails, but are not appropriate for rough off-road mountain bike trails. The tires are usually a medium-width with a semi-smooth tread, to provide a fairly smooth ride on pavement, but enough grip and cushion on unpaved trails. Most hybrid bikes have front suspension to smooth out small bumps, but some are fully rigid. Hybrid bikes used to also be referred to as cross bikes, but that term is not used any more in order to avoid confusion with cyclocross bikes (see above). Dual-Sport Bicycles Dual-Sport Bicycles are a sub-category of hybrid bikes oriented towards riders who want the multi-surface versatility of a hybrid bike, but want a little more aggressive style and riding position. They have a flat or upright handlebar, although not as upright as regular hybrid bikes; they usually have a smaller, more performance-oriented seat, rather than a large comfort seat. Most have front suspension. Dual-sport bikes make good commuter bikes, and are also good for touring on unpaved trails. Cruiser Bicylces Cruiser Bicycles are similar to hybrid bikes, in that they are designed for casual riding, and have a very comfortable, upright riding position, and a large, comfortable seat. Cruisers usually have wide "balloon" tires, and handlebars that are even more upright, and in some cases, swept back compared to hybrid bikes. Most cruiser bikes are single-speed or 3-speed, and have the old-fashioned coaster brake (where you pedal backwards to stop). They can be used for short-distance commuting and errands, as long as your route is fairly flat. Some cruiser bike manufacturers make a wide array of colorful models available, to suit the fashion tastes of any bike afficionado. Flat-Foot Comfort Bicycles Flat-Foot Comfort Bicycles are a sub-category of cruiser bikes. They have an elongated frame design that pushes the pedals a few inches forward of the seat. This allows you to ride with the seat low enough so that you can place your feet flat on the ground when you are stopped, but you still get the full extension of your legs while pedaling. All Electra Bicycle Company bikes have the flat-foot technology; some other manufacturers have created their own flat-foot designs. City Bicycles The term "city bike" doesn't really refer to a specific category of bikes; it's more of a general descriptive term. They might also be called "commuter" or "urban" bikes, although many of the bikes listed on this page can be used quite well for riding and commuting in a city. However, there is a certain type of bike that some people have in mind when they use the term "city bike." This bike has characteristics of both a hybrid bike and a cruiser bike--usually the upright riding position of a cruiser, but the wheel size of a hybrid bike. A city bike might also have some or all of these features that make it more amenable to riding in regular clothes, as opposed to cycling-specific clothing: Fenders Chain guard Skirt guard on rear wheel A city bike might also have an internally-geared rear hub for ease of use and maintenance, and a built-in generator and lights for safety when riding after dark. These bikes are also sometimes called "Dutch bikes," because of their resemblance to the everyday bikes used in Amsterdam and other bike-friendly European cities. Recommended:  The Bicycle Metropolis: Why Still Investing In Car Parking? BMX Bicycles BMX Bicycles are popular with kids because of their small size, but they are used by adults and kids alike for various styles of trick and stunt riding. Folding Bicycles Folding Bicycles are ideal for those who need to travel with their bike, want a bike to keep on their boat or plane, or who live in small apartments and don't have a lot of storage space. They're also good for commuters who need to take their bike on a bus or train for part of their commute, or who don't have a safe place to park their bike at work. Most folding bikes have smaller wheels, which makes the bike a little less efficient and trickier to handle than a standard bike, but most folding bike fans feel the benefits outweigh the disadvantages. Recumbent Bicycles Recumbent Bicycles have a long, low design and a full-size seat with a backrest. Recumbents are available in two-wheel and three-wheel designs. Many recumbent riders feel that they are the most comfortable option available for bicycling. However, they are more difficult to pedal up hills, and they can be a challenge to carry from one place to another in a motor vehicle. Tandem Bicycles Tandem Bicycles are "bicycles built for two." They come in all styles, from cruiser tandems and hybrid tandems for the bike path or boardwalk, off-road mountain bike tandems, and high-performance road racing tandems. Adult Tricycles Adult Trikes are ideal for older folks who still want to get around under their own power, or those with balance issues or other special needs. They are also popular in environmentally-consious industrial/warehouse applications. By: Century Cycles. Cover photo by: Maria Soledad Recommended:  Sustainable Transport And Training: The Me-Mover Netherlands
Bicycles Without Battery: We Just Forgot They Are Cleanest
Electric Bicycles And Cars Were Ones Classic Models: Retro
Does your heart skip a beat when you spot a vintage car, for example, a Volkswagen Beetle or a Fiat 500? Or do you like riding your traditional bike? Good news for the retro fanatic: with an e-bike conversion kit you can easily transform your retro two-wheeler into a high-performance power-assisted bike. The next step? More and more environment friendly classical cars are being made. In this article, we tell you all about the most recent developments around electric transport – retro style. The increasingly popularity of e-bikes E-bikes are becoming increasingly popular all over the globe. If you look at Europe alone, electric bicycles account for almost half of all bicycle sales. For some time now, the number of e-bike manufacturers has exploded to satisfy each and every customer demand and to propose a model adapted to all possible tastes and uses – like the love for retro transport. We get why the Europeans are so enthusiastic about the e-bike: cycling on an e-bike is comfortable and well suited for long distances. You can move very quickly with very little effort. An e-bike can easily replace a car or scooter in a sustainable way. Even the traditional manufacturers of scooters, motorcycles or cars such as Lamborghini, Peugeot and BMW have started to propose their own models of e-bikes. Today, anyone can buy a brand new e-bike: the prices start around a 1.000 euros. In different cities all over the world an e-bike can also be rented via various sharing services. Turn your traditional two-wheeler into an e-bike Are you just too attached to your old and trusted two-wheeler? The purchase of a brand new electric bicycle is no longer necessary: with an e-bike conversion kit, you can transform your bike into an e-bike. And not just an e-bike: a high-performance power-assisted bike connected to your smartphone. Cool! When you are done with installing the conversion kit, your traditional bike will work the same as a ´normal´ e-bike, the engine is activated by pedalling and will stop when the brakes are activated or if the pedalling stops. Without too much effort, the newly made e-bike will be able to reach 25 km per hour - even with the most basic setup. There are even conversion kits that can allow exceeding 80 km per hour. Before ordering those, it makes good sense to pay close attention to the legislation in your country to necessary insurance coverage in order to be prepared in case of an accident or a fall. In most cases, the e-bike should have a maximum continuous rated power of 0.25 kW, of which “the output is progressively reduced and finally cut off as the vehicle reaches a speed of 25km/h (15.5mph) or if the cyclist stops pedalling." {youtube} Motorized wheels or a motor in the pedal block The simplest for these e-bike transformations is to replace one of the wheels with a new wheel, equipped with a motor and a battery. The French start-up Rool'in, for example, offers these motorized wheels. The provided battery recharges in four hours via a standard electrical outlet and will provide power for a range of 50 to 60 kilometers. Since 2015, Rool'in sells motorized wheels of all sizes that fit all types of bicycles. The pricetag? A 26-inch wheel costs around 400 euros, the price for a 28-inch wheel is 800 euros. If you want to connect your self-converted electric bicycle to your smartphone, the best choice is the VeloKit. This wheel, which will cost you 900 euro, comes with five gears that you can operate via your telephone. A popular brand that offers these kind of models for city bikes, mountain biking, cross-country or racing bikes is Befang. Some of the models are comptatible with different kind of smartphones. Several riding modes of driving are available. These include a pedestrian mode to circulate at low speed without pedalling or to advance at full speed without pedalling, and to vary the gears according to the road. Give your familiar traditional bike an electric upgrade with these conversion kits! Rechargeable classic rides What´s next? Well, if you just fitted your retro classical bicycle with an E-bike conversion kit you could start thinking about the next step: an environment friendly and groovy electric classical car. You are lucky - more and more classic electric cars are turned electric. Many manufacturers are working on environmentally friendly version of classics. Fiat, for example, has already promised an electric Fiat 500 in 2020. Also, Volkswagen is rumoured to be working on an electric VW Beetle . Curious which of the coolest electric retro cars you can take out for a sustainable drive in the near future? Nobe 100: a beautiful retro three-wheeled electric "car"  The electric Luka EV will take you to the sixties Like the 1960’s? This is the electric car for you. The Luka EV by MV Motors was influenced by the Volkswagen Karmann Ghia and the Volvo P1800. The retro style takes you right to the sixties. A combination of a lightweight car and the battery pack means up to 300km (186 miles) driving range - and the battery can also charge up to 80 per cent in around an hour.  Electric Carice Mk1: the perfect electric car for a sporty ride Inspired by the 50's vintage Porsche models, this electric car is cooler than cool. And also unique. Initially, only 10 are being made (but more will roll off the production line if demand is there). We can already see ourselves drive this two-seater sports car! This cool E-Type Jaguar is E-lectric Jaguar has also brought an electric car on the market: the stylish E-Type Jaguar. This electric Jaguar has a driving range up to 170 miles using a 40kWh lithium-ion battery pack, which will be fully recharged in around six or seven hours. Note that you can choose from various options, like a modern or a  vintage interior . That is why there is no list price for this car. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/transportation
Does your heart skip a beat when you spot a vintage car, for example, a Volkswagen Beetle or a Fiat 500? Or do you like riding your traditional bike? Good news for the retro fanatic: with an e-bike conversion kit you can easily transform your retro two-wheeler into a high-performance power-assisted bike. The next step? More and more environment friendly classical cars are being made. In this article, we tell you all about the most recent developments around electric transport – retro style. The increasingly popularity of e-bikes E-bikes are becoming increasingly popular all over the globe. If you look at Europe alone, electric bicycles account for almost half of all bicycle sales. For some time now, the number of e-bike manufacturers has exploded to satisfy each and every customer demand and to propose a model adapted to all possible tastes and uses – like the love for retro transport. We get why the Europeans are so enthusiastic about the e-bike: cycling on an e-bike is comfortable and well suited for long distances. You can move very quickly with very little effort. An e-bike can easily replace a car or scooter in a sustainable way. Even the traditional manufacturers of scooters, motorcycles or cars such as Lamborghini, Peugeot and BMW have started to propose their own models of e-bikes. Today, anyone can buy a brand new e-bike: the prices start around a 1.000 euros. In different cities all over the world an e-bike can also be rented via various sharing services. Turn your traditional two-wheeler into an e-bike Are you just too attached to your old and trusted two-wheeler? The purchase of a brand new electric bicycle is no longer necessary: with an e-bike conversion kit, you can transform your bike into an e-bike. And not just an e-bike: a high-performance power-assisted bike connected to your smartphone. Cool! When you are done with installing the conversion kit, your traditional bike will work the same as a ´normal´ e-bike, the engine is activated by pedalling and will stop when the brakes are activated or if the pedalling stops. Without too much effort, the newly made e-bike will be able to reach 25 km per hour - even with the most basic setup. There are even conversion kits that can allow exceeding 80 km per hour. Before ordering those, it makes good sense to pay close attention to the legislation in your country to necessary insurance coverage in order to be prepared in case of an accident or a fall. In most cases, the e-bike should have a maximum continuous rated power of 0.25 kW, of which “the output is progressively reduced and finally cut off as the vehicle reaches a speed of 25km/h (15.5mph) or if the cyclist stops pedalling." {youtube} Motorized wheels or a motor in the pedal block The simplest for these e-bike transformations is to replace one of the wheels with a new wheel, equipped with a motor and a battery. The French start-up Rool'in, for example, offers these motorized wheels. The provided battery recharges in four hours via a standard electrical outlet and will provide power for a range of 50 to 60 kilometers. Since 2015, Rool'in sells motorized wheels of all sizes that fit all types of bicycles. The pricetag? A 26-inch wheel costs around 400 euros, the price for a 28-inch wheel is 800 euros. If you want to connect your self-converted electric bicycle to your smartphone, the best choice is the VeloKit. This wheel, which will cost you 900 euro, comes with five gears that you can operate via your telephone. A popular brand that offers these kind of models for city bikes, mountain biking, cross-country or racing bikes is Befang. Some of the models are comptatible with different kind of smartphones. Several riding modes of driving are available. These include a pedestrian mode to circulate at low speed without pedalling or to advance at full speed without pedalling, and to vary the gears according to the road. Give your familiar traditional bike an electric upgrade with these conversion kits! Rechargeable classic rides What´s next? Well, if you just fitted your retro classical bicycle with an E-bike conversion kit you could start thinking about the next step: an environment friendly and groovy electric classical car. You are lucky - more and more classic electric cars are turned electric. Many manufacturers are working on environmentally friendly version of classics. Fiat, for example, has already promised an electric Fiat 500 in 2020. Also, Volkswagen is rumoured to be working on an electric VW Beetle . Curious which of the coolest electric retro cars you can take out for a sustainable drive in the near future? Nobe 100: a beautiful retro three-wheeled electric "car"  The electric Luka EV will take you to the sixties Like the 1960’s? This is the electric car for you. The Luka EV by MV Motors was influenced by the Volkswagen Karmann Ghia and the Volvo P1800. The retro style takes you right to the sixties. A combination of a lightweight car and the battery pack means up to 300km (186 miles) driving range - and the battery can also charge up to 80 per cent in around an hour.  Electric Carice Mk1: the perfect electric car for a sporty ride Inspired by the 50's vintage Porsche models, this electric car is cooler than cool. And also unique. Initially, only 10 are being made (but more will roll off the production line if demand is there). We can already see ourselves drive this two-seater sports car! This cool E-Type Jaguar is E-lectric Jaguar has also brought an electric car on the market: the stylish E-Type Jaguar. This electric Jaguar has a driving range up to 170 miles using a 40kWh lithium-ion battery pack, which will be fully recharged in around six or seven hours. Note that you can choose from various options, like a modern or a  vintage interior . That is why there is no list price for this car. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/transportation
Electric Bicycles And Cars Were Ones Classic Models: Retro
Electric Bicycles And Cars Were Ones Classic Models: Retro
Urban Mobility: The 15 Friendliest Bike Cities In the World
Trends come and go, but simple designs stand the test of time, which you can notice clearly in urban mobility nowadays. You have autonomous cars, dock-less pogo sticks, but the bicycle continues to be the most shimmering, reliable and practical answer to urban mobility. A lot of cities change their infrastructure and expanding facilities to accommodate bicycles in their town as a new way of transportation while improving urban livability. Bicycle friendly We want to check pro-cycling efforts and initiatives taken by cities all over the world, to see which city is the most bicycle-friendly. Therefore, we present the Copenhagenize Index, which shows us a holistic and comprehensive ranking of the friendliest cities around the world. They evaluated on culture, streetscape design and ambition. They made a top 3 that is on the top for years. Copenhagen retains the top spot, Amsterdam is second, followed by another Dutch city Utrecht. But we see some action in other cities as well; it is no longer only the Danish and the Dutch cities that take biking seriously. Antwerp and Bordeaux are following, as well as Bogotá, Taipei and Vancouver. They all want to make their city better urban centres for the bicycle. Many cities want to change with regards to the bike as main transport, but for now, you will find the world's 15 most bicycle-friendly cities below. ( Scroll down for bicycle rental prices ) Copenhagen It is easy to see why Copenhagen remains the first place in ranking: 62 per cent of the inhabitants travel to work or school by bike. Every day, Copenhageners cycle 894,000 miles. The government built four bicycle bridges (some are still under construction), and there are a lot of regional cycle highways. Only the mayor has to have more attention for bikes. At this moment, bicycles do not have the highest priority anymore in this Danish capital. If Copenhagen wants to remain a global inspiration, they need to find a way to focus more on sustainable mobility and less on car parking spots. Photo by: Maksym Potapenko  Amsterdam Amsterdam has returned at spot 2 in the Copenhagenize Index ranking. Amsterdam released a new ambitious plan for 2022 to improve bicycle parking and the existing infrastructure. There are about 11,000 new inhabitants coming to Amsterdam every year, so the city is developing "royal routes" to accommodate more bikes. They want to expand existing cycle lanes to reduce stress during rush hours. With these new plans, Amsterdam could show us innovations and, perhaps, more extensive facilities, stricter enforcement of mopeds, and more precise signposts. Who knows, with the next Index, Amsterdam could take back the throne of Copenhagen. ( Also interesting:  Sustainable Picnic Charging Point, 'Tablet': The Netherlands ) Utrecht Many cities in the Netherlands are bike-friendly, but Utrecht shows a willingness to embrace innovations, to push boundaries. Politicians are helping as well because they want to reduce cars and are prioritizing pedalling over driving. {youtube}                               Friendliest Bike Cities In the World. Utrecht, get cars out the city and bicycles in They want to double bicycle commuting traffic by 2030. To stay in the top 3, Utrecht needs to focus on an improved signposts system to benefit visitors and commuters. There is also a lack of bicycle parking spaces in the city centre. Hopefully, they can fix that problem. Photo by: Robin Benzrihem Antwerp In the last two years, Antwerp has built upon a reputation as a bicycle-friendly city. Initiatives, civil actions and professional expertise have helped the city forward. Antwerp's recent city plan has a focus on improving and connecting the cycling network through traffic light management and improvements to intersections. Also, they want to reduce car speed limits to 30 kilometres per hour in most of the streets. They expand their bicycle parking facilities at train stations, and they want better cycle highways. The only thing is that politicians need to see the role of cycling in Antwerp. It is an efficient and modern mode of transportation. Besides, a better cycle network is required, so that there are fewer accidents. Oslo Once upon a time, Oslo said they were too snowy or hilly to cycle. In 2017, officials made the bold move to ban cars from the city centre and to invest substantially in calm traffic, such as biking and walking. Oslo is renovating but is still coping with small problems, such as unprotected streets. They need to continue with the focus on bicycles and investments to become a genuinely bicycle-friendly city in the next year. Photo by: Robin Benzrihem Paris Years and years, cyclists shared their road with buses driving around. Now, Paris is building dedicated cycle lanes, including safe facilities on the Champs-Elysées. Local politicians wanted new cycling facilities in spite of what the fierce opposition said. The result of local politicians: more children are riding their bike than ever before. A focus point for Paris is attention to the details of the facilities, how they connect to intersections, and how they meet cyclists of all ages and abilities. Bring on better communication to show the benefits of cycling for Parisians, and how to enjoy these new facilities. Vienna Vienna has an active policy and took a lot of effort in communication to improve cycling infrastructure. They are modest in investments but are trying to do something. How could they rank higher in the Index? Vienna could invest more in separate and better cycle highways. That would improve a lot. Photo by: 30daysreplay.de (PR & Marketing) Helsinki Helsinki had the ambitious goal for 2025 to be the world's best metropolis of sustainable transport. At this moment, 11 per cent of the Finnish population is riding a bike, they have more than 800 miles of bicycle infrastructure, and 12 miles of cycle highways and more to come). A significant boulevard for cyclists needs to be built by 2020. The fix in Helsinki: We see a lot of positive improvements, but there is a shortage of finance that can lead to problems for all the (cycling) plans. So, crowdfunding would be an option for Finland. Photo by: Morgana Bartolomei Bogotá Bogotá, capital of Colombia, still has a metropolis, full of cars driving around and poor air quality. Bogotá earned some points on the Index because of the positive influence for cycling in South America. Also, they organize the famous Ciclovía, a weekly Sunday activity that closes the streets to cars so that citizens can cycle or walk around the block. The problem in Bogotá is that you have to wear a helmet; it is unsafe riding around on your bike with cars driving by. They need a new signposting system for cyclists, a new bicycle government policy and new guidelines for the design of the bicycle infrastructure. ( Also interesting:  Sustainable Bamboo Traffic Sign For Safe Cities: Netherlands ) Barcelona Barcelona, the Catalan capital of Catalonia, continues to serve as a model of urban mobility innovation. They have an extensive network and an improved cycling plan around the city. They want to double the cycling network to 190 miles by the end of the year so that Barcelona can remain in the top 20 most cycling-friendly cities in the world. Barcelona should focus on expanding its roads so that everyone feels more comfortable and safer. It will also be a good idea to expand the cycling routes along the coastline and Montjuïc to give new urban connectivity. Ljubljana Unfortunately, Ljubljana has dropped on the Index this year; it still deserves a place in this top 15. They have an urgent desire for innovation and bicycle-friendly development. Inhabitants of all ages are riding a bike. Parking is the main problem for cyclists. There are not as many as needed, and they are not safe. This is a barrier to new cyclists. Also, there needs to be a better cycling network to create better protection and width. Photo by: Aneta Pawlik  Berlin The 2015 Volksentscheid Fahrrad was a significant disruption for urban mobility in the German capital. With more than 100,000 signatures, the 2015 referendum forced the Senate to build a more bicycle-friendly city. And now Berlin hopes to be able to realise this ambitious decision with an updated bicycle plan. The problem in Berlin: The ambitious goals of the cycling plan follow relatively vague timelines, awaiting more detailed strategies. There is an incoherent mix of cycling infrastructure, and they need to be adapted to be consistent and meet intuitive design standards. In addition, sufficient space must be built for cargo bikes. ( Also interesting:  Electric-Bike Mamachari Is Japan’s Moms Favourite Smart Idea ) Tokyo Tokyo can be called the city of the cyclist for years. Not because of its extensive infrastructure, but because it is one of the world's largest metropolis where millions of people cycle their Mamachari Bikes. They use these bikes to bring children to school, pick up, goods, going to work and going to train stations and stores. They are one of the largest and best cycling cities in the world, but they need a better safety network for cyclists. There is a high demand but an insufficient supply. Taiwan Taiwan is known as a production centre for the bicycle industry and has earned the title of "bicycle kingdom". Taipei has grown over the past ten years, launched the successful YouBike bike and started building a network of cycling infrastructure. They were invited - as the first Asian city - to organise the Velo-City conference in 2016. Mayor Ko, a strong supporter of cyclists, wants to triple the number of bicycle paths in the city centre by the end of the year. Taipei's problem is air pollution, which is a problem for many inhabitants. If they want to improve air quality, they have to reduce car traffic and use the bicycle instead of the car. Montreal Montreal is the only North American city on the Index since 2011 but faces removal from the rankings if they do not want to innovate. In 2017, Valérie Plante won the elections and gave a positive message about cycling infrastructure and new investments in public transport. The news showed the world the most adventurous cycling project Montreal has ever seen: The Réseau Express Vélo. It is a network of 114 miles of protected one-way bike paths across the island. The problem is that no one is changing the bike lanes as they are today. The bike paths are poorly painted, the road surface in Montreal is in a bad state, and there are too little protected facilities for cyclists. They have to tackle this problem in order to remain in the top 15 most bicycle-friendly cities in the world. As you can see there is a variety between the most bicycle-friendly cities in the world: European, Asian, North and South-American. They all can use some improvements to make their city more bicycle-friendly. But still, there is a great development going on if this number of cities are willing to improve their city, just to make it more sustainable and better. We have mentioned Vancouver in the first paragraph, but it is still not in the top 15. They need to improve more to get in this Copenhagenize Index. If you are looking for a bicycle-friendly place to stay, just give a look at this top 15 and you are ready to go.  Do you like to write about your own bike tour experience? Register today and share your adventures!  People also ask Copenhagen Prices Bicycle rentals Amsterdam Prices Bicycles rentals Utrecht Prices bicycle rentals Antwerpen Prices bicycle rentals Oslo Prices bicycle rentals Paris Prices bicycles rentals Vienna Prices bicycle rentals Helsinki Prices bicycle rentals Bogota Prices bicycle rentals Barcelona Prices bicycle rentals Ljubljana Prices bicycle rentals Berlin Prices bicycle rentals Tokyo Prices bicycle rentals Taiwan Prices bicycle rentals Montreal Prices bicycle rentals ( Extra:  Electric Bike Buying Guide For Starters And Professionals )
Trends come and go, but simple designs stand the test of time, which you can notice clearly in urban mobility nowadays. You have autonomous cars, dock-less pogo sticks, but the bicycle continues to be the most shimmering, reliable and practical answer to urban mobility. A lot of cities change their infrastructure and expanding facilities to accommodate bicycles in their town as a new way of transportation while improving urban livability. Bicycle friendly We want to check pro-cycling efforts and initiatives taken by cities all over the world, to see which city is the most bicycle-friendly. Therefore, we present the Copenhagenize Index, which shows us a holistic and comprehensive ranking of the friendliest cities around the world. They evaluated on culture, streetscape design and ambition. They made a top 3 that is on the top for years. Copenhagen retains the top spot, Amsterdam is second, followed by another Dutch city Utrecht. But we see some action in other cities as well; it is no longer only the Danish and the Dutch cities that take biking seriously. Antwerp and Bordeaux are following, as well as Bogotá, Taipei and Vancouver. They all want to make their city better urban centres for the bicycle. Many cities want to change with regards to the bike as main transport, but for now, you will find the world's 15 most bicycle-friendly cities below. ( Scroll down for bicycle rental prices ) Copenhagen It is easy to see why Copenhagen remains the first place in ranking: 62 per cent of the inhabitants travel to work or school by bike. Every day, Copenhageners cycle 894,000 miles. The government built four bicycle bridges (some are still under construction), and there are a lot of regional cycle highways. Only the mayor has to have more attention for bikes. At this moment, bicycles do not have the highest priority anymore in this Danish capital. If Copenhagen wants to remain a global inspiration, they need to find a way to focus more on sustainable mobility and less on car parking spots. Photo by: Maksym Potapenko  Amsterdam Amsterdam has returned at spot 2 in the Copenhagenize Index ranking. Amsterdam released a new ambitious plan for 2022 to improve bicycle parking and the existing infrastructure. There are about 11,000 new inhabitants coming to Amsterdam every year, so the city is developing "royal routes" to accommodate more bikes. They want to expand existing cycle lanes to reduce stress during rush hours. With these new plans, Amsterdam could show us innovations and, perhaps, more extensive facilities, stricter enforcement of mopeds, and more precise signposts. Who knows, with the next Index, Amsterdam could take back the throne of Copenhagen. ( Also interesting:  Sustainable Picnic Charging Point, 'Tablet': The Netherlands ) Utrecht Many cities in the Netherlands are bike-friendly, but Utrecht shows a willingness to embrace innovations, to push boundaries. Politicians are helping as well because they want to reduce cars and are prioritizing pedalling over driving. {youtube}                               Friendliest Bike Cities In the World. Utrecht, get cars out the city and bicycles in They want to double bicycle commuting traffic by 2030. To stay in the top 3, Utrecht needs to focus on an improved signposts system to benefit visitors and commuters. There is also a lack of bicycle parking spaces in the city centre. Hopefully, they can fix that problem. Photo by: Robin Benzrihem Antwerp In the last two years, Antwerp has built upon a reputation as a bicycle-friendly city. Initiatives, civil actions and professional expertise have helped the city forward. Antwerp's recent city plan has a focus on improving and connecting the cycling network through traffic light management and improvements to intersections. Also, they want to reduce car speed limits to 30 kilometres per hour in most of the streets. They expand their bicycle parking facilities at train stations, and they want better cycle highways. The only thing is that politicians need to see the role of cycling in Antwerp. It is an efficient and modern mode of transportation. Besides, a better cycle network is required, so that there are fewer accidents. Oslo Once upon a time, Oslo said they were too snowy or hilly to cycle. In 2017, officials made the bold move to ban cars from the city centre and to invest substantially in calm traffic, such as biking and walking. Oslo is renovating but is still coping with small problems, such as unprotected streets. They need to continue with the focus on bicycles and investments to become a genuinely bicycle-friendly city in the next year. Photo by: Robin Benzrihem Paris Years and years, cyclists shared their road with buses driving around. Now, Paris is building dedicated cycle lanes, including safe facilities on the Champs-Elysées. Local politicians wanted new cycling facilities in spite of what the fierce opposition said. The result of local politicians: more children are riding their bike than ever before. A focus point for Paris is attention to the details of the facilities, how they connect to intersections, and how they meet cyclists of all ages and abilities. Bring on better communication to show the benefits of cycling for Parisians, and how to enjoy these new facilities. Vienna Vienna has an active policy and took a lot of effort in communication to improve cycling infrastructure. They are modest in investments but are trying to do something. How could they rank higher in the Index? Vienna could invest more in separate and better cycle highways. That would improve a lot. Photo by: 30daysreplay.de (PR & Marketing) Helsinki Helsinki had the ambitious goal for 2025 to be the world's best metropolis of sustainable transport. At this moment, 11 per cent of the Finnish population is riding a bike, they have more than 800 miles of bicycle infrastructure, and 12 miles of cycle highways and more to come). A significant boulevard for cyclists needs to be built by 2020. The fix in Helsinki: We see a lot of positive improvements, but there is a shortage of finance that can lead to problems for all the (cycling) plans. So, crowdfunding would be an option for Finland. Photo by: Morgana Bartolomei Bogotá Bogotá, capital of Colombia, still has a metropolis, full of cars driving around and poor air quality. Bogotá earned some points on the Index because of the positive influence for cycling in South America. Also, they organize the famous Ciclovía, a weekly Sunday activity that closes the streets to cars so that citizens can cycle or walk around the block. The problem in Bogotá is that you have to wear a helmet; it is unsafe riding around on your bike with cars driving by. They need a new signposting system for cyclists, a new bicycle government policy and new guidelines for the design of the bicycle infrastructure. ( Also interesting:  Sustainable Bamboo Traffic Sign For Safe Cities: Netherlands ) Barcelona Barcelona, the Catalan capital of Catalonia, continues to serve as a model of urban mobility innovation. They have an extensive network and an improved cycling plan around the city. They want to double the cycling network to 190 miles by the end of the year so that Barcelona can remain in the top 20 most cycling-friendly cities in the world. Barcelona should focus on expanding its roads so that everyone feels more comfortable and safer. It will also be a good idea to expand the cycling routes along the coastline and Montjuïc to give new urban connectivity. Ljubljana Unfortunately, Ljubljana has dropped on the Index this year; it still deserves a place in this top 15. They have an urgent desire for innovation and bicycle-friendly development. Inhabitants of all ages are riding a bike. Parking is the main problem for cyclists. There are not as many as needed, and they are not safe. This is a barrier to new cyclists. Also, there needs to be a better cycling network to create better protection and width. Photo by: Aneta Pawlik  Berlin The 2015 Volksentscheid Fahrrad was a significant disruption for urban mobility in the German capital. With more than 100,000 signatures, the 2015 referendum forced the Senate to build a more bicycle-friendly city. And now Berlin hopes to be able to realise this ambitious decision with an updated bicycle plan. The problem in Berlin: The ambitious goals of the cycling plan follow relatively vague timelines, awaiting more detailed strategies. There is an incoherent mix of cycling infrastructure, and they need to be adapted to be consistent and meet intuitive design standards. In addition, sufficient space must be built for cargo bikes. ( Also interesting:  Electric-Bike Mamachari Is Japan’s Moms Favourite Smart Idea ) Tokyo Tokyo can be called the city of the cyclist for years. Not because of its extensive infrastructure, but because it is one of the world's largest metropolis where millions of people cycle their Mamachari Bikes. They use these bikes to bring children to school, pick up, goods, going to work and going to train stations and stores. They are one of the largest and best cycling cities in the world, but they need a better safety network for cyclists. There is a high demand but an insufficient supply. Taiwan Taiwan is known as a production centre for the bicycle industry and has earned the title of "bicycle kingdom". Taipei has grown over the past ten years, launched the successful YouBike bike and started building a network of cycling infrastructure. They were invited - as the first Asian city - to organise the Velo-City conference in 2016. Mayor Ko, a strong supporter of cyclists, wants to triple the number of bicycle paths in the city centre by the end of the year. Taipei's problem is air pollution, which is a problem for many inhabitants. If they want to improve air quality, they have to reduce car traffic and use the bicycle instead of the car. Montreal Montreal is the only North American city on the Index since 2011 but faces removal from the rankings if they do not want to innovate. In 2017, Valérie Plante won the elections and gave a positive message about cycling infrastructure and new investments in public transport. The news showed the world the most adventurous cycling project Montreal has ever seen: The Réseau Express Vélo. It is a network of 114 miles of protected one-way bike paths across the island. The problem is that no one is changing the bike lanes as they are today. The bike paths are poorly painted, the road surface in Montreal is in a bad state, and there are too little protected facilities for cyclists. They have to tackle this problem in order to remain in the top 15 most bicycle-friendly cities in the world. As you can see there is a variety between the most bicycle-friendly cities in the world: European, Asian, North and South-American. They all can use some improvements to make their city more bicycle-friendly. But still, there is a great development going on if this number of cities are willing to improve their city, just to make it more sustainable and better. We have mentioned Vancouver in the first paragraph, but it is still not in the top 15. They need to improve more to get in this Copenhagenize Index. If you are looking for a bicycle-friendly place to stay, just give a look at this top 15 and you are ready to go.  Do you like to write about your own bike tour experience? Register today and share your adventures!  People also ask Copenhagen Prices Bicycle rentals Amsterdam Prices Bicycles rentals Utrecht Prices bicycle rentals Antwerpen Prices bicycle rentals Oslo Prices bicycle rentals Paris Prices bicycles rentals Vienna Prices bicycle rentals Helsinki Prices bicycle rentals Bogota Prices bicycle rentals Barcelona Prices bicycle rentals Ljubljana Prices bicycle rentals Berlin Prices bicycle rentals Tokyo Prices bicycle rentals Taiwan Prices bicycle rentals Montreal Prices bicycle rentals ( Extra:  Electric Bike Buying Guide For Starters And Professionals )
Urban Mobility: The 15 Friendliest Bike Cities In the World
Electric Bike Buying Guide For Starters And Professionals
Few trends have caught on so well in recent years as the electric bicycles, or e-bikes. It feels like only yesterday that we had to rely on our own two legs and pure muscle strength to power our trusty two-wheelers. Yet ever since the introduction of the first electric battery-powered bike, more and more people have quite literally made the rather smooth transition. Not only does it require less effort and physical exertion to get from A to B, it might also get you there faster. Most e-bike owners will praise the freedom of choice that an e-bike brings to their lives. It really does add an extra dimension to your trip. You can choose to switch the battery on or off at any given time, meaning that you can start off by peddling ferociously and turn on the ‘engine’ as soon as you get tired, are facing an uphill road or just a rather hefty head wind. This will allow you to travel further and to different places, safe in the knowledge that you can always get back home. Decline of the regular bike All kinds of bicyclists have switched to the e-variety in recent years. This trend is clearly visible in the sales numbers of ‘regular’ pedal bikes, that have fallen flat or declined steadily. Bike stores are scrambling to get their inventory sold, often relying on specific target groups - such as students (who need a cheap means of transport), sporters (who require sport bikes or mountain bikes) or young children (who are just learning how to ride a bike). Yet the market has not nearly been as profitable as it has been in the past. Combined with the double or even triple digit growth seen in the e-bike industry, it is not surprising that more and more retailers are putting their money - and store space, indeed - on the electronic bikes instead. When walking into a bike store, you will find yourself dazzled by the available options. Extra powerful battery? Sports edition? E-city bike? Or perhaps the e-carrier bike? We have come a long way in a very short time. From a half-dozen producers back in the early 2010s, producing only a handful of models, we now find ourselves choosing between thousands of different types. Are you one of the unlucky consumers, having found yourself in this jungle of e-bikes? Are you considering buying one but are you blinded by the overwhelming choice? Then read on, as we might just have some helpful tips on how to narrow down the playing field. Start by setting your budget One of the best pieces of advice that we can give you, is to start by determining a realistic budget. And by ‘realistic’ we mean a budget that both fits your wallet and the average market prices. Roughly, the e-bike market can be divided in 5 price categories - ranging from budget to luxurious. The price will mostly be representative of the quality of the bike, although ‘quality’ in this mainly refers to the actual bicycle components, not so much the electronic elements. To give you a better idea of brands and prices for each of those categories, we will break them down one by one. Budget e-bikes: $300-$500 ( €269- €448) Realistically, if you are looking to get an e-bike for anything less than $300 (€269), you better reconsider the whole idea to start with. But if your budget falls within the $300-$500 (€269-€448) range, you will be happy to find some very affordable e-bikes. Pretty much all of these are imported from China and other Asian countries. Xiaomi is a big name that has recently gotten into the e-bike game One of the brands that you could consider is Xiaomi, a relatively new face in the e-bike industry. In their native China, they introduced some models that are available locally for some $261 (€234) and $375 (€336), although when imported, prices are more in the range of $400-$500 (€358-€448). Another remarkable entry on the list is Amazon; although it is somewhat dubious whether their products can still be classified as being a bike. The Amazon e-bikes do not have any actual pedals, although they have the physical appearance of a bike. Perhaps it would be better to refer to them as scooters instead, although they are priced economically at $399 (€357). Yes, those e-bikes are very cheap. This low price does, however, come at a cost - pun intended. You do pretty much get what you pay for. The bike parts are subpar and of relatively low quality, meaning that these bikes will inevitably break down - sometimes faster than you would like them to. The battery cells are rather cheap as well, providing a rather limited range. Economical e-bikes: $500-$1.000 (€448-€896) If you are looking for slightly more “bang for your buck”, you would do well to look at the slightly higher price categories. Economical e-bikes are priced between $500 and $1000, yet this will buy you a bike of a significantly higher quality and with a much larger range. The parts used are better, simple as that - allowing you to get more out of your precious bike. One of the bikes that fall in this category is the Swagtron EB-5, retailing at the lower end of the range, at $500 (€448). Although its range is pretty good and it boosts sufficient power, you will find it to be a rather limited vehicle with just 1 gear in pedaling mode. This makes it tricky to really ride your bike on uneven terrain or when faced with a strong headwind; despite the relatively low gear you will find it in. On the other hand, you will want to switch to battery power when riding faster than 10 mph, to make sure that you are not spinning out of control. {youtube} Another brand that falls into this category is Ancheer, offering e-bikes for some $600 to $700 (€537-€627). At this price point, you cannot expect too much from the two-wheeler, although it is a pretty decent option. It will definitely do what it is supposed to do: help you get around town in a fairly efficient manner. Yet most parts will still be of lower quality, meaning that their lifespan will be limited and that the frame might feel a bit wobbly. Are you still unsure whether e-bikes are for you? Then this would be a good category to get started with, as the options are still relatively affordable and the bikes are good enough to last you for quite some time, provided that you use them responsibly. Mid-range e-bikes: $1.000-$2.500 (€896-€2.239) The Rayvolt Cruzer electric bike Already decided that you are serious about e-bikes? Then a budget between $1,000 (€896)and $2,500 (€2.239)would be feasible for getting a bike that is both qualitative and economical. Generally, bikes that fall in this category use both electrical and bicycle components that are of a really good quality, meaning that they will live up to all the expectations of experienced e-bike users. So whereas doubting consumers would do well to start off in the economical e-bike category, more experienced and convinced users are probably doing well to take a close look at this mid-range category. As soon as prices rise above the $1,000 (€896)mark, you will notice that the bike’s parts - including brakes, tires and frames - will be produced by more well-known manufacturers. This serves to confirm that the bikes are indeed much more ‘complete’. Companies that you will find offering e-bikes in this price category include Rad Power Bikes and Blix Bikes, brands that combine an attractive price with very decent and acceptable mainstream e-bikes. Paying this little extra will also pay off in the time you get to enjoy the bike: they can easily last up to 5 years, provided you take good care of them. Premium e-bikes: $2.500-$5.000 (€2.239-€4.478) Got some extra money to spend? Then you will find yourself spoiled for choice in this relatively wide price range. You cannot go wrong with an e-bike over $2,500 (€2.239), as the quality will undoubtedly be good. All the parts used for premium e-bikes are carefully developed and tested, guaranteeing their effective functioning; no budget, entry-level parts to be seen here. Some of the big name brands that have developed motors for these bikes include Bosch, Shimano, Yamaha and Panasonic. These respectable names in the industry guarantee a powerful bike with a good range; which especially becomes obvious when comparing them to some of the hub motors that are used for the mid-range and budget e-bikes. These cheaper motors do not usually have whole a lot of options available, while the more exclusive motors used for this category are more suitable for cyclists hoping to combine their electric power with active pedaling. E-bikes that you might want to check out if this is your budget range are the Priority Embark, Raleigh Redux, Trek Supper Commuter, Cero One and Yamaha Wabash. All great bike options that provide both comfort, quality and price-effectiveness. Priority Embark with its Gates Carbon Belt Drive system A small note of caution, though. Yes, bikes in this price range do fall in the category ‘premium’ - but it does not necessarily make them tick all of the ‘premium’ boxes. There are some manufacturers who have traditionally charged relatively high prices for an e-bike that is not living up to the general quality standard upheld by its peers. High innovation or R&D fees might force some of them to set prices that do not realistically reflect the quality of the bike. Always check general reviews for e-bikes and pay special attention to the price-quality aspect. Luxury e-bikes: $5.000-$10.000 (€4.478-€8.955) Ok, so unless you count yourself lucky enough to be able to spend the same amount on your e-bike as some would on a small car, this category might not necessarily be for you. Granted, it will buy you an e-bike that is made using components of the highest end of the market. Yet most of the electrical work will be pretty much similar to what you would get for a $3,000 e-bike. So, what makes up this difference in price? A $7.000 (€6.272) Haibike downhill electric bike.  Well, most of it goes towards really expensive parts that boost your bike’s luxury level. This includes electronic shifters and belt drive options, as well as luxurious handles, saddles, suspension and tires. A $10,000 (€8.955) e-bike will surely be a royal ride: especially when driving on a rocky surface or mountainous area. Brands to consider include the Stromer ST5 or the Haibike. Continue deciding on the bike type Decided on a price that you are comfortable with? Then you can narrow down the search by browsing the different types of bikes available. Roughly, the available e-bikes can be divided in the following categories: Electric commuter bikes : The most commonly used bike all around the world, the type that people will ride around their town to get from A to B. To work, school, the supermarket, the gym. Commuters will normally stay on the streets, meaning that the bikes are not high-maintenance. Instead, they should be efficient and light - making sure that pedaling is smooth and parking is easy. Tires are typically narrower, just like the saddles. These are not made for long trips, anyhow: just like the electric option is a nice add-on when biking home after a long day of work, but not requiring a large range. Brands include the Raleigh Redux, Yamaha Wabash and GenZe 200. Electric folding bikes : Although some might argue that this category can be grouped with the commuter bikes, we thought it was worth pointing out as a separate option. E-folding bikes are extremely portable and compact, often capable of being folded up to a small package the size of a suitcase. This makes them perfect for those who want to bring along their bikes on public transport, in the car or on holidays. On the downside, it is more likely for compromises to have been made in the bike design, opting for smaller and more compact parts - even if that means that they are of a lower quality. Provided that you do not ride it for long periods at a time, this should not bother you too much. Make sure to look at Oyama CX and E8D II if you are interested in this option. Electric cruiser bikes : As the name implies, cruiser bikes are designed for fun cruising trips. For taking out your e-bike and going on lengthy tours in a leisurely fashion. Whether you are cruising down the coastline and boulevards of beachfront towns or enjoying the flowing landscapes, this is for you. E-cruiser bikes are designed to look stylish while providing optimal comfort through a plush seat and high handlebars. Pedals are mounted forward, once again adding ergonomic benefits for the rider. This comfort does take a slight toll on the maneuverability and weight of the bike, although this should not matter if you are in for the low-action, enjoyable bike rides. Pedego and Rayvolt are some names that you should definitely check out if this sounds like your type of bike. Electric mountain bikes : These bikes will be great if being outdoors and going off the beaten path is your main plan for the e-bike. E-mountain bikes on the lower price ranges are actually just fine for regular street travel too, while the high-end versions (including Haibike and Greyp) can even let you drive down mountains and making drops and jumps of several meters while making you feel as if you are driving down a well-paved road. That is the benefit of paying for the extra suspension and thick, strong tires.                   Full suspension Haibike on left, hardtail Magnum Peak on right  Electric cargo bikes : Cargo bikes were never meant to be flashy or particularly eye-catching in a fashion sense. Instead, they are meant to be hauling cargo - both live cargo, like children or pets, and actual stuff. Some bikes include front buckets or covered pods, while others have side-platforms next to the back wheels, allowing for a better distribution of weight. If you want, options like racks, bags and child carriers are available to further customize your bike to your exact liking. Just keep in mind that these definitely will not be the lightest, nor the most agile e-bikes out there. Brands worth your consideration include the Yuba Supermarché and CERO One. Specialty electric bikes : A pretty wide category that encompasses everything that does not fit in any of the previously mentioned categories. This includes electric tandem bicycles - boasting two seats and two sets of pedals as a fun way of biking for couples -; electric tricycles - for those with disabilities or problems balancing their two-wheeled bike -; or electric recumbent bikes - where the rider relaxes back in a seat instead of perched up on the saddle, almost as if driving a kart. If you are interested in those, you will be happy to know that they are already available to the market as e-bikes. Final consideration Eventually, it is essential that both price and bike type match up if you are hoping to find your perfect e-bike. Using our guidelines above, you will be happy to find that you are able to quickly narrow down the playing field to only a handful of suitable bikes that both fit your preferences and your wallet. After that, our best advice is to compare all remaining options and read user reviews - perhaps even visit a store or two for a test ride. And soon, you will be whizzing around town on your own perfect electric two wheeler! https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/transportation/cycling
Few trends have caught on so well in recent years as the electric bicycles, or e-bikes. It feels like only yesterday that we had to rely on our own two legs and pure muscle strength to power our trusty two-wheelers. Yet ever since the introduction of the first electric battery-powered bike, more and more people have quite literally made the rather smooth transition. Not only does it require less effort and physical exertion to get from A to B, it might also get you there faster. Most e-bike owners will praise the freedom of choice that an e-bike brings to their lives. It really does add an extra dimension to your trip. You can choose to switch the battery on or off at any given time, meaning that you can start off by peddling ferociously and turn on the ‘engine’ as soon as you get tired, are facing an uphill road or just a rather hefty head wind. This will allow you to travel further and to different places, safe in the knowledge that you can always get back home. Decline of the regular bike All kinds of bicyclists have switched to the e-variety in recent years. This trend is clearly visible in the sales numbers of ‘regular’ pedal bikes, that have fallen flat or declined steadily. Bike stores are scrambling to get their inventory sold, often relying on specific target groups - such as students (who need a cheap means of transport), sporters (who require sport bikes or mountain bikes) or young children (who are just learning how to ride a bike). Yet the market has not nearly been as profitable as it has been in the past. Combined with the double or even triple digit growth seen in the e-bike industry, it is not surprising that more and more retailers are putting their money - and store space, indeed - on the electronic bikes instead. When walking into a bike store, you will find yourself dazzled by the available options. Extra powerful battery? Sports edition? E-city bike? Or perhaps the e-carrier bike? We have come a long way in a very short time. From a half-dozen producers back in the early 2010s, producing only a handful of models, we now find ourselves choosing between thousands of different types. Are you one of the unlucky consumers, having found yourself in this jungle of e-bikes? Are you considering buying one but are you blinded by the overwhelming choice? Then read on, as we might just have some helpful tips on how to narrow down the playing field. Start by setting your budget One of the best pieces of advice that we can give you, is to start by determining a realistic budget. And by ‘realistic’ we mean a budget that both fits your wallet and the average market prices. Roughly, the e-bike market can be divided in 5 price categories - ranging from budget to luxurious. The price will mostly be representative of the quality of the bike, although ‘quality’ in this mainly refers to the actual bicycle components, not so much the electronic elements. To give you a better idea of brands and prices for each of those categories, we will break them down one by one. Budget e-bikes: $300-$500 ( €269- €448) Realistically, if you are looking to get an e-bike for anything less than $300 (€269), you better reconsider the whole idea to start with. But if your budget falls within the $300-$500 (€269-€448) range, you will be happy to find some very affordable e-bikes. Pretty much all of these are imported from China and other Asian countries. Xiaomi is a big name that has recently gotten into the e-bike game One of the brands that you could consider is Xiaomi, a relatively new face in the e-bike industry. In their native China, they introduced some models that are available locally for some $261 (€234) and $375 (€336), although when imported, prices are more in the range of $400-$500 (€358-€448). Another remarkable entry on the list is Amazon; although it is somewhat dubious whether their products can still be classified as being a bike. The Amazon e-bikes do not have any actual pedals, although they have the physical appearance of a bike. Perhaps it would be better to refer to them as scooters instead, although they are priced economically at $399 (€357). Yes, those e-bikes are very cheap. This low price does, however, come at a cost - pun intended. You do pretty much get what you pay for. The bike parts are subpar and of relatively low quality, meaning that these bikes will inevitably break down - sometimes faster than you would like them to. The battery cells are rather cheap as well, providing a rather limited range. Economical e-bikes: $500-$1.000 (€448-€896) If you are looking for slightly more “bang for your buck”, you would do well to look at the slightly higher price categories. Economical e-bikes are priced between $500 and $1000, yet this will buy you a bike of a significantly higher quality and with a much larger range. The parts used are better, simple as that - allowing you to get more out of your precious bike. One of the bikes that fall in this category is the Swagtron EB-5, retailing at the lower end of the range, at $500 (€448). Although its range is pretty good and it boosts sufficient power, you will find it to be a rather limited vehicle with just 1 gear in pedaling mode. This makes it tricky to really ride your bike on uneven terrain or when faced with a strong headwind; despite the relatively low gear you will find it in. On the other hand, you will want to switch to battery power when riding faster than 10 mph, to make sure that you are not spinning out of control. {youtube} Another brand that falls into this category is Ancheer, offering e-bikes for some $600 to $700 (€537-€627). At this price point, you cannot expect too much from the two-wheeler, although it is a pretty decent option. It will definitely do what it is supposed to do: help you get around town in a fairly efficient manner. Yet most parts will still be of lower quality, meaning that their lifespan will be limited and that the frame might feel a bit wobbly. Are you still unsure whether e-bikes are for you? Then this would be a good category to get started with, as the options are still relatively affordable and the bikes are good enough to last you for quite some time, provided that you use them responsibly. Mid-range e-bikes: $1.000-$2.500 (€896-€2.239) The Rayvolt Cruzer electric bike Already decided that you are serious about e-bikes? Then a budget between $1,000 (€896)and $2,500 (€2.239)would be feasible for getting a bike that is both qualitative and economical. Generally, bikes that fall in this category use both electrical and bicycle components that are of a really good quality, meaning that they will live up to all the expectations of experienced e-bike users. So whereas doubting consumers would do well to start off in the economical e-bike category, more experienced and convinced users are probably doing well to take a close look at this mid-range category. As soon as prices rise above the $1,000 (€896)mark, you will notice that the bike’s parts - including brakes, tires and frames - will be produced by more well-known manufacturers. This serves to confirm that the bikes are indeed much more ‘complete’. Companies that you will find offering e-bikes in this price category include Rad Power Bikes and Blix Bikes, brands that combine an attractive price with very decent and acceptable mainstream e-bikes. Paying this little extra will also pay off in the time you get to enjoy the bike: they can easily last up to 5 years, provided you take good care of them. Premium e-bikes: $2.500-$5.000 (€2.239-€4.478) Got some extra money to spend? Then you will find yourself spoiled for choice in this relatively wide price range. You cannot go wrong with an e-bike over $2,500 (€2.239), as the quality will undoubtedly be good. All the parts used for premium e-bikes are carefully developed and tested, guaranteeing their effective functioning; no budget, entry-level parts to be seen here. Some of the big name brands that have developed motors for these bikes include Bosch, Shimano, Yamaha and Panasonic. These respectable names in the industry guarantee a powerful bike with a good range; which especially becomes obvious when comparing them to some of the hub motors that are used for the mid-range and budget e-bikes. These cheaper motors do not usually have whole a lot of options available, while the more exclusive motors used for this category are more suitable for cyclists hoping to combine their electric power with active pedaling. E-bikes that you might want to check out if this is your budget range are the Priority Embark, Raleigh Redux, Trek Supper Commuter, Cero One and Yamaha Wabash. All great bike options that provide both comfort, quality and price-effectiveness. Priority Embark with its Gates Carbon Belt Drive system A small note of caution, though. Yes, bikes in this price range do fall in the category ‘premium’ - but it does not necessarily make them tick all of the ‘premium’ boxes. There are some manufacturers who have traditionally charged relatively high prices for an e-bike that is not living up to the general quality standard upheld by its peers. High innovation or R&D fees might force some of them to set prices that do not realistically reflect the quality of the bike. Always check general reviews for e-bikes and pay special attention to the price-quality aspect. Luxury e-bikes: $5.000-$10.000 (€4.478-€8.955) Ok, so unless you count yourself lucky enough to be able to spend the same amount on your e-bike as some would on a small car, this category might not necessarily be for you. Granted, it will buy you an e-bike that is made using components of the highest end of the market. Yet most of the electrical work will be pretty much similar to what you would get for a $3,000 e-bike. So, what makes up this difference in price? A $7.000 (€6.272) Haibike downhill electric bike.  Well, most of it goes towards really expensive parts that boost your bike’s luxury level. This includes electronic shifters and belt drive options, as well as luxurious handles, saddles, suspension and tires. A $10,000 (€8.955) e-bike will surely be a royal ride: especially when driving on a rocky surface or mountainous area. Brands to consider include the Stromer ST5 or the Haibike. Continue deciding on the bike type Decided on a price that you are comfortable with? Then you can narrow down the search by browsing the different types of bikes available. Roughly, the available e-bikes can be divided in the following categories: Electric commuter bikes : The most commonly used bike all around the world, the type that people will ride around their town to get from A to B. To work, school, the supermarket, the gym. Commuters will normally stay on the streets, meaning that the bikes are not high-maintenance. Instead, they should be efficient and light - making sure that pedaling is smooth and parking is easy. Tires are typically narrower, just like the saddles. These are not made for long trips, anyhow: just like the electric option is a nice add-on when biking home after a long day of work, but not requiring a large range. Brands include the Raleigh Redux, Yamaha Wabash and GenZe 200. Electric folding bikes : Although some might argue that this category can be grouped with the commuter bikes, we thought it was worth pointing out as a separate option. E-folding bikes are extremely portable and compact, often capable of being folded up to a small package the size of a suitcase. This makes them perfect for those who want to bring along their bikes on public transport, in the car or on holidays. On the downside, it is more likely for compromises to have been made in the bike design, opting for smaller and more compact parts - even if that means that they are of a lower quality. Provided that you do not ride it for long periods at a time, this should not bother you too much. Make sure to look at Oyama CX and E8D II if you are interested in this option. Electric cruiser bikes : As the name implies, cruiser bikes are designed for fun cruising trips. For taking out your e-bike and going on lengthy tours in a leisurely fashion. Whether you are cruising down the coastline and boulevards of beachfront towns or enjoying the flowing landscapes, this is for you. E-cruiser bikes are designed to look stylish while providing optimal comfort through a plush seat and high handlebars. Pedals are mounted forward, once again adding ergonomic benefits for the rider. This comfort does take a slight toll on the maneuverability and weight of the bike, although this should not matter if you are in for the low-action, enjoyable bike rides. Pedego and Rayvolt are some names that you should definitely check out if this sounds like your type of bike. Electric mountain bikes : These bikes will be great if being outdoors and going off the beaten path is your main plan for the e-bike. E-mountain bikes on the lower price ranges are actually just fine for regular street travel too, while the high-end versions (including Haibike and Greyp) can even let you drive down mountains and making drops and jumps of several meters while making you feel as if you are driving down a well-paved road. That is the benefit of paying for the extra suspension and thick, strong tires.                   Full suspension Haibike on left, hardtail Magnum Peak on right  Electric cargo bikes : Cargo bikes were never meant to be flashy or particularly eye-catching in a fashion sense. Instead, they are meant to be hauling cargo - both live cargo, like children or pets, and actual stuff. Some bikes include front buckets or covered pods, while others have side-platforms next to the back wheels, allowing for a better distribution of weight. If you want, options like racks, bags and child carriers are available to further customize your bike to your exact liking. Just keep in mind that these definitely will not be the lightest, nor the most agile e-bikes out there. Brands worth your consideration include the Yuba Supermarché and CERO One. Specialty electric bikes : A pretty wide category that encompasses everything that does not fit in any of the previously mentioned categories. This includes electric tandem bicycles - boasting two seats and two sets of pedals as a fun way of biking for couples -; electric tricycles - for those with disabilities or problems balancing their two-wheeled bike -; or electric recumbent bikes - where the rider relaxes back in a seat instead of perched up on the saddle, almost as if driving a kart. If you are interested in those, you will be happy to know that they are already available to the market as e-bikes. Final consideration Eventually, it is essential that both price and bike type match up if you are hoping to find your perfect e-bike. Using our guidelines above, you will be happy to find that you are able to quickly narrow down the playing field to only a handful of suitable bikes that both fit your preferences and your wallet. After that, our best advice is to compare all remaining options and read user reviews - perhaps even visit a store or two for a test ride. And soon, you will be whizzing around town on your own perfect electric two wheeler! https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/transportation/cycling
Electric Bike Buying Guide For Starters And Professionals
Transportation

Sustainable transport by car, boat, bike and plane

Sustainable transport has low impact on the environment. It is ‘green’. Sustainable transport is finding the balance between current- and future transportation needs. Replacing fossil fuel transportation by battery, hybrid, hydrogen, wind or solar for cars, trucks, boats, planes and other means of transportation is not enough. We also need to reduce traffic by sharing sustainable transportation like: carpooling, cycling and walking.

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