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Transportation solar wind and hydrogen powers modern cargo ships | Upload General

Solar Wind And Hydrogen Powers Modern Cargo Ships

by: Hans van der Broek
solar wind and hydrogen powers modern cargo ships | Upload

With a target to halve its huge carbon footprint, the race is on to find new technologies to green the world's shipping fleet. In this article, solar wind and hydrogen powers modern cargo ships, you read about the current amazing technologies.

Finland and Japan: Hydrogen-Powered Ship Designs

An increasing number of projects seek to develop hydrogen-based power technologies that can be commercially viable for the shipping industry. Among the advancing projects is one in Finland studying green hydrogen production for use in the ferries. Simultaneously, a public-private partnership was recently formed in Japan to study and develop hydrogen fuel cells for the commercial shipping industry.

One of the fields of study is green hydrogen. In Europe, they are looking at coupling with the offshore wind power generation sector to produce hydrogen from renewable energy. Driven by wind energy, the concept is that the electrolysis process that splits water into hydrogen and oxygen elements would create renewable energy.

Topeka, bow, ship, water, hydrogen, cargo ship

The Wilhelmsen shipping company and its partners received NOK 80 million in EU support to build a cargo ship powered by hydrogen. The ship, which will be the world’s first hydrogen-powered cargo ship, will be launched in 2024, according to E24.

In Finland, Flexens Oy is completing a feasibility study that focuses on creating green hydrogen that would be used to fuel ferries in the Aland archipelago. Due to the excellent wind power production conditions in Åland, Flexens expects that green hydrogen can achieve production costs competitive with fossil fuels. The feasibility study looks at combining the production of green hydrogen with fueling the region’s ferries.

With 90 inhabited islands and a population of 30,000, the region relies on its ferries. A research study found in 2015 that maritime transport accounted for about 70 percent of Aland’s emissions. The study estimated that the emissions amounted to 753 thousand tons of carbon dioxide equivalents each year.

The feasibility study, which is expected to be completed in November, provides the first estimate for the technical and economic feasibility of the concept covering hydrogen production at a wind farm and using hydrogen in fuel cells to power ferries in the Åland archipelago. For the next phase of the project, Flexens working with the Government of Aland, has submitted a grant application to the EU Innovation Fund to advance the project towards investments. They are currently projecting that the project could be realized with the first applications of the technologies possible in 2024.

The following year, 2025, a Japanese partnership hopes to operate its first hydrogen fuel cell vessel. The plan calls for an approximately 100-foot long ferry to carry 100 people at over 12 mph speeds. Kansai Electric Power, Iwatani, Namura Shipbuilding, the Development Bank of Japan, and the Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology are collaborating on the feasibility study for the vessel powered by hydrogen fuel cells. The project will also incorporate the development of the fueling to supply hydrogen to the vessel.

Recommended: Hydrogen Future Fuel Makes The World: ‘Now’

Wind-Powered Swedish Transatlantic Cargo Ship.

The wind is great. It’s proving to be one of the most useful forms of renewable energy of our generation and helps nations reduce reliance on coal and fossil fuels to generate power. In most cases, when it comes to wind, we need to use massive turbines to convert moving air into kinetic energy that can then be converted into electrical energy using inverters and generators. That power then finds its way directly to the grid to charge our electric cars and boats or store it in batteries to use later.

That’s all cumbersome; it takes a lot of time and energy to build wind farms and infrastructure, which then comes with a maintenance overhead. Imagine if we could harness the power of wind directly. Think about it, why spend all that time and money when we can have our cars or boats propelled forward by the wind?

boat, sales, sea
Photo by Wallenius Marine

We could put vast pieces of material, like fixed kites, to catch the wind and drag ourselves forward. That’s what one group of Swedish engineers has done with its latest car transporting sea vessel. A Swedish consortium, including the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, maritime consultancy SSPA, and lead by ship designers Wallenius Marine has developed the wind-Powered Car Carrier or wPCC for short.

Modern Cargo Ships: Windpower For The wPCC

The wPCC uses four sails or wings mounted on its roof to catch the wind and propel it forward. It’s not as fast as fossil fuel cargo ships, but it’s substantially greener. It’s a transatlantic ship capable of carrying up to 7,000 vehicles and reducing emissions for the crossing by 90%. And it’s powered directly by the wind. Look at those big fins on top of it; I’m going to call them sails.

The consortium reckons that the wPCC should be ready for its maiden sailing voyage by 2024. Hopefully, it’ll still be windy by then. The only downside of using wind power is that it will take about twice as long to cross the Atlantic. Typically, cargo ship journeys take seven days; the wPCC would take about 12.

For safety reasons and for getting in and out of the harbor, the boat does have additional engines. It seems the boat‘s designers are yet to fully nail down this aspect, but it will hopefully use electric motors to maintain its sustainable ethos.

Wind-Powered Cargo Ship wPCC: Dimensions

Designers say it's 200 meters long, 40 meters wide, and 100 meters tall, including the sails. That’s a little shorter than the average container ship but far taller. The sails themselves are about 80 meters tall.

boat, 2 sails, water
Solar And Wind Power Makes The Current Cargo Ship Sail

After a commitment last month to cut greenhouse gas emissions from shipping by at least 50% by 2050, the race is on to find new technologies that can green the 50,000-strong global shipping fleet. Wind power is one of the options being discussed.
International shipping accounts for more than 2% of global carbon dioxide emissions, roughly the same as aircraft. But the 2015 Paris agreement to fight climate change left control of the shipping industry emissions to the International Maritime Organisation. While environment groups applauded the agreement to cut hard and deep by 2050, they pointed out that it falls far short of technically achievable. A report published just before the meeting by the International Transport Forum (ITF), a thinktank run by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), found that the industry could achieve up to 95% decarbonization as early as 2035 using the maximum deployment of currently known technologies.

What do cargo ships use for fuel?

The heavy, thick fuel has been used in the cargo shipping and cruise line industry for years because it is inexpensive, especially compared to other fuels. After oil has been refined into diesel, gasoline or jet fuel, bunker fuel is what's left over at the refinery.

Low-Tech Solutions

The good news is that easy-to-do low-tech solutions can deliver a lot. Maersk, the world's most extensive container shipping line, has already discovered it can cut fuel use by 30% by merely steaming more slowly. Because of the wide availability of cheap (and often dirty) fuel, shipping has traditionally been wasteful. Most merchant ships are made of heavy steel rather than lighter aluminum and don't bother with obvious energy-saving measures like low-friction hull coatings or recovering waste heat. More slender ship designs alone could cut fuel use and hence emissions by 10-15% at slow speeds and up to 25% at high speeds, says the ITF. But replacing the existing fleet would take time.

Recommended: Solar Boat Hydrofoil From The TU-Delft: The Netherlands

The average age of today's shipping fleet is 25 years. Rules of energy efficiency for new ships introduced by the IMO in 2013 will only fully come into force from 2030, meaning that any switch to slender vessels would not apply to most ships at sea until mid-century or beyond. According to the ITF, much could be done more quickly by retrofitting existing ships with technology to cut their fuel use and, hence, emissions. Here are just four: Fitting ships’ bows with a bulbous extension below the water line reduce drag enough to cut emissions 2-7%. A technique is known as air lubrication, which pumps compressed air below the hull to create a carpet of bubbles, also reduces drag and can cut emissions by a further 3%.
Replacing one propeller with two rotating opposite directions recovers slipstream energy and can make efficiency gains of 8-15%. Cleaning the hull and painting it with a low-friction coating can deliver gains of up to 5%. Entirely new ships Putting together better designs and better fuel will create entirely new kinds of boats in the future. And the blueprints are already being drawn up.

The Aquarius Ecoship, a cargo ship devised by a Japanese company called Eco Marine Power, is driven by a phalanx of rigid sails and solar panels. The same system could power oil tankers, cruise ships, and much else. The designers admit that it would not eliminate the need for conventional fuel: Even with large batteries to store solar and wind energy, back-up would be needed. But it could cut emissions by 40 percent.
Eco Marine Power Boat solar, wind, water
Photo by Courtesy of Eco Marine Power. The Aquarius Eco Ship concept design incorporates innovative solar and wind power. 



                                                  Aquarius Eco Ship - low emission ship design concept

                                              Solar And Wind Power Makes The Current Sail Cargo Ship

 

Going one better, the Japanese shipping line NYK boasts that its design for a 350m-long container ship, the Super Eco Ship 2030, would use LNG to make hydrogen to run fuel cells. Backed up by solar panels covering the entire ship and 4,000 square meters of sails to catch the wind, the combination could cut emissions by 70%. Or for a completely zero-carbon option, engineers at Wallenius Wilhelmsen, a Scandinavian shipping line, offer the E/S Orcelle, a lightweight cargo ship designed to transport up to 10,000 cars (electric, we trust) on eight decks.

It would be powered by electricity, half coming directly from wind, solar, and wave energy—the other half from converting some of that energy into hydrogen to power fuel cells. The company says the ship could be afloat by 2025. Today's ships are, in many respects, almost indistinguishable from those of a century ago. But the IMO decision to finally get with the global climate agenda has fired the starting gun on what is set to be a race to create a new standard for low-carbon shipping that should be the norm just a few decades from now.

Recommended: Solar And Wave Energy To Power Autonomous Ship: The AutoNaut

Banishing Conventional Fuel

Some of the most significant gains will require banishing conventional petroleum-based fuel, says the Sustainable Shipping Initiative, a progressive industry ginger group whose members include cruise lines and commodities shipping lines. Innovations ranging from biofuels to liquefied natural gas (LNG), sails to catch the wind, and hydrogen to solar panels have been proposed. Each has its benefits and drawbacks, and nobody is putting all their money on one solution.

Biofuels are problematic because they take land to grow, though specially engineered crops such as algae could change that, says the ITF. While electric engines already operate on some short ferry journeys, the sheer weight and space taken up by batteries on oceangoing ships make them unviable until there are breakthroughs in lithium-ion batteries.

One innovation already underway is converting ships to run on LNG. There are already more than a hundred LNG-fuelled ships globally. A new generation of giant cruise ships powered this way and carrying up to 7,000 passengers will be launched by MSC Cruises starting 2022.

What is LNG stand for?
Liquefied natural gas (LNG) is a composition of methane and some mixture of ethane used to convert natural gas to liquid form for ease and safety of storage transport.


Some LNG ships claim a reduction in CO2 emissions of 15%, though that depends crucially on keeping leakage of the greenhouse gas methane to a minimum in ships and bunkers.
Viking Grace red and white colored boat at sea with rotor sail
Photo by Tuukka Ervasti/Lloyd’s Register. LNG-powered Viking Grace boasts the first ship-based ‘rotor sail.’ 

The first LNG-powered cruise ship is the Viking Grace, operating between Finland and Sweden. This vessel has another claim to fame. This April also boasts the first ship-based rotor sail to capture power from the wind. Rotor sails have a large spinning cylinder amidships. Wind hitting the rotor creates a vertical force that can power the ship, a phenomenon known as the Magnus effect. The Viking Line says the extra power will reduce the ship’s CO2 emissions by 900 metric tonnes (1,000 tons) per year.

Hydrogen-Powered Ships Sail Closer To Market

Havyard announced that it is currently developing a pilot of a hydrogen system that could help large ships sail emission-free over long distances. The project that Havyard Group is working on - with Havyard Design and Solutions and Norwegian Electric Systems - will become the biggest of its kind for ships.

With the first phase of development complete, the company is now entering into the approval stage for its hydrogen system, together with Linde Engineering as tank supplier and PowerCell Sweden AB as the fuel cell supplier. Kristian Osnes, project manager at Havyard Group, said in a statement that Linde Engineering was the right partner in the search for solutions that will ensure safe storage and control barriers for cryogenic hydrogen onboard ships. "The regulations for these solutions have not yet been developed, and we are pleased to have Linde on-board when entering the approval process, which we expect to be challenging," he said.

Recommended: Hydrogen-Powered Tug Launched In Antwerp: Unique In Belgium

Hydrogen-Powered Ships: PowerCell

The fuel cell technology provider, PowerCell, has previously worked with Bosch in the car industry. Osnes added that fuel cells have similarities with the battery technology, and the cooperation will provide maritime solutions to take the goal of zero-emissions one step further.

Graph hydrogen ship

Hydrogen-Powered Ships Sail Closer To Market: Pilot-E

The project is part of Pilot-E, a Norwegian financing initiative to support environmentally friendly products and services that reduce emissions. Havyard Group is also working together with Sintef and Prototech, while the Norwegian Electric Systems will provide green technology expertise.

"The system we are developing is designed in modules and can be installed both in new builds and retrofitted in existing ships. In this way, we will contribute to the development of large-scale vessels that can sail emission-free over long distances, or to significant emission cuts from vessels that use hybrid propulsion systems," said Kristian Voksøy Steinsvik, head of research and development at Havyard Group.

World’s First Fully Electric, Zero-Emission Bunker Tanker

Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, Ltd. (MOL) and e5 Lab. Inc. (e5 Lab), which is working to develop and promote electrically powered zero-emission vessels, has concluded a Memorandum Of Understanding (MOU) to conduct a joint study of a hybrid, pure car carrier equipped with a hydrogen fuel cell system and large-capacity batteries (hydrogen hybrid PCC).

electric tanker

Hydrogen Hybrid PCC Zero Emission Tanker

The companies aim to develop a hydrogen hybrid PCC, which do not emit carbon dioxide (CO2), sulfur oxides (SOx), nitrogen oxides (NOx), or particulate matter (PM) while underway in coastal waters or ports; in other words, achieving 'zero emissions,' since its propulsive force would come from electricity supplied by the hydrogen fuel cell system and large-capacity batteries.

Recommended: Hydrogen-Powered Energy Observer Reaches London: The Future

When navigating in the open sea, the hydrogen hybrid PCC’s motor would be powered by an LNG-fueled generator and the large-capacity batteries, resulting in significantly lower emissions than current vessels equipped with diesel engines that run on heavy oil.

electric white grey bulk carrier

MOL has worked to realize zero emissions of vessels while in ports since it announced its future vision for the next-generation series 'ISHIN-I' car carrier in 2009. In 2012, it launched the world’s first hybrid car carrier, the Emerald Ace, which is equipped with the world’s largest-scale solar power generation system and batteries. The hydrogen hybrid PCC concept marks a further step ahead from these past projects. The company is pursuing the possibility of introducing more comprehensive and more advanced technologies to zero emissions.

Recommended: Solar Powered Silent 55 Yacht Allows You To Cruise The World

Both companies will first conduct technological and business feasibility studies of the hydrogen hybrid PCC. When they gain positive results, they will move on to the next phase of joint development for a practical hydrogen hybrid PCC based on the results.

MOL and e5 Lab continually engage in measures to reduce merchant vessels’ environmental impact by taking full advantage of both companies’ wide-ranging technological knowledge to ensure the shipping industry's sustainable growth.

                                        drawing electric bulk tanker

MOL has worked to realize zero emissions of vessels while in ports since it announced its future vision for the next-generation series 'ISHIN-I' car carrier in 2009. In 2012, it launched the world’s first hybrid car carrier, the Emerald Ace, which is equipped with the world’s largest-scale solar power generation system and batteries. The hydrogen hybrid PCC concept marks a further step ahead from these past projects. The company is pursuing the possibility of introducing more comprehensive and more advanced technologies to zero emissions.

While the consumer world is forging ahead to cleaner forms of transport, the commercial world is still lagging, particularly sea-bound haulage. So it’s great to see such innovation to create sustainable transport of the future.

NOTE: WhatsOrb does not have enough information to verify this video and cannot vouch for its accuracy. This video is for information purposes only.

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Recommended: Solar And Hydrogen Boats Win The Future: France, Monaco

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Hans van der Broek, founder

Founder and CEO of WhatsOrb, world traveller, entrepreneur and environmental activist. Hans has countless ideas and has set up several businesses in the Netherlands and abroad. He also has an opinion on everything and unlimited thoughts about how to create a better world. He likes hiking and has climbed numerous five-thousanders (mountain summits of at least 5000m or 16,404 feet in elevation)

 

Hans-Japan - 9 WEEKS AGO
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Fixed metal sails and other solutions like Flettner rotors, have failed already multiple times in the past due to high maintenance costs, scheduling problems snd others. Also I find it very difficult to comprehend what will happen to a ship in a Yolanda-type of storm with 300 km/h wind speeds. Kite sail support makes sense, but fixed sails as main propulsion, I am not convinced. We are currently concentrating on large-scale renewable, carbon-neutral VLSFO fuel production with 0.2% or 0.1% sulfur that will require no change of infra-structure or modifications to engines. This can make a substantial change to the CO2 balance of the shipping industry over the next 10 years.
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Capt Indranil Ghosh - 57 WEEKS AGO
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Extremely informational and informative.
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Hans - 57 WEEKS AGO
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Thanks for your enthusiastic reply. I'm curious where you find this article. Did you find the WhatsOrb-Site or was the link somewhere else posted. Thanks in advance. Hans van der Broek
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Hans van der Broek, founder

Founder and CEO of WhatsOrb, world traveller, entrepreneur and environmental activist. Hans has countless ideas and has set up several businesses in the Netherlands and abroad. He also has an opinion on everything and unlimited thoughts about how to create a better world. He likes hiking and has climbed numerous five-thousanders (mountain summits of at least 5000m or 16,404 feet in elevation)

 

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Solar Wind And Hydrogen Powers Modern Cargo Ships

With a target to halve its huge carbon footprint, the race is on to find new technologies to green the world's shipping fleet. In this article, solar wind and hydrogen powers modern cargo ships, you read about the current amazing technologies. Finland and Japan: Hydrogen-Powered Ship Designs An increasing number of projects seek to develop hydrogen-based power technologies that can be commercially viable for the shipping industry. Among the advancing projects is one in Finland studying green hydrogen production for use in the ferries. Simultaneously, a public-private partnership was recently formed in Japan to study and develop hydrogen fuel cells for the commercial shipping industry. One of the fields of study is green hydrogen. In Europe, they are looking at coupling with the offshore wind power generation sector to produce hydrogen from renewable energy. Driven by wind energy, the concept is that the electrolysis process that splits water into hydrogen and oxygen elements would create renewable energy. The Wilhelmsen shipping company and its partners received NOK 80 million in EU support to build a cargo ship powered by hydrogen. The ship, which will be the world’s first hydrogen-powered cargo ship, will be launched in 2024, according to E24. In Finland, Flexens Oy is completing a feasibility study that focuses on creating green hydrogen that would be used to fuel ferries in the Aland archipelago. Due to the excellent wind power production conditions in Åland, Flexens expects that green hydrogen can achieve production costs competitive with fossil fuels. The feasibility study looks at combining the production of green hydrogen with fueling the region’s ferries. With 90 inhabited islands and a population of 30,000, the region relies on its ferries. A research study found in 2015 that maritime transport accounted for about 70 percent of Aland’s emissions. The study estimated that the emissions amounted to 753 thousand tons of carbon dioxide equivalents each year. The feasibility study, which is expected to be completed in November, provides the first estimate for the technical and economic feasibility of the concept covering hydrogen production at a wind farm and using hydrogen in fuel cells to power ferries in the Åland archipelago. For the next phase of the project, Flexens working with the Government of Aland, has submitted a grant application to the EU Innovation Fund to advance the project towards investments. They are currently projecting that the project could be realized with the first applications of the technologies possible in 2024. The following year, 2025, a Japanese partnership hopes to operate its first hydrogen fuel cell vessel. The plan calls for an approximately 100-foot long ferry to carry 100 people at over 12 mph speeds. Kansai Electric Power, Iwatani, Namura Shipbuilding, the Development Bank of Japan, and the Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology are collaborating on the feasibility study for the vessel powered by hydrogen fuel cells. The project will also incorporate the development of the fueling to supply hydrogen to the vessel. Recommended:  Hydrogen Future Fuel Makes The World: ‘Now’ Wind-Powered Swedish Transatlantic Cargo Ship. The wind is great. It’s proving to be one of the most useful forms of renewable energy of our generation and helps nations reduce reliance on coal and fossil fuels to generate power. In most cases, when it comes to wind, we need to use massive turbines to convert moving air into kinetic energy that can then be converted into electrical energy using inverters and generators. That power then finds its way directly to the grid to charge our electric cars and boats or store it in batteries to use later. That’s all cumbersome; it takes a lot of time and energy to build wind farms and infrastructure, which then comes with a maintenance overhead. Imagine if we could harness the power of wind directly. Think about it, why spend all that time and money when we can have our cars or boats propelled forward by the wind? Photo by Wallenius Marine We could put vast pieces of material, like fixed kites, to catch the wind and drag ourselves forward. That’s what one group of Swedish engineers has done with its latest car transporting sea vessel. A Swedish consortium, including the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, maritime consultancy SSPA, and lead by ship designers Wallenius Marine has developed the wind-Powered Car Carrier or wPCC for short. Modern Cargo Ships: Windpower For The wPCC The wPCC uses four sails or wings mounted on its roof to catch the wind and propel it forward. It’s not as fast as fossil fuel cargo ships, but it’s substantially greener. It’s a transatlantic ship capable of carrying up to 7,000 vehicles and reducing emissions for the crossing by 90%. And it’s powered directly by the wind. Look at those big fins on top of it; I’m going to call them sails. The consortium reckons that the wPCC should be ready for its maiden sailing voyage by 2024. Hopefully, it’ll still be windy by then. The only downside of using wind power is that it will take about twice as long to cross the Atlantic. Typically, cargo ship journeys take seven days; the wPCC would take about 12. For safety reasons and for getting in and out of the harbor, the boat does have additional engines. It seems the boat‘s designers are yet to fully nail down this aspect, but it will hopefully use electric motors to maintain its sustainable ethos. Wind-Powered Cargo Ship wPCC: Dimensions Designers say it's 200 meters long, 40 meters wide, and 100 meters tall, including the sails. That’s a little shorter than the average container ship but far taller. The sails themselves are about 80 meters tall. Solar And Wind Power Makes The Current Cargo Ship Sail After a commitment last month to cut greenhouse gas emissions from shipping by at least 50% by 2050, the race is on to find new technologies that can green the 50,000-strong global shipping fleet. Wind power is one of the options being discussed. International shipping accounts for more than 2% of global carbon dioxide emissions, roughly the same as aircraft. But the 2015 Paris agreement to fight climate change left control of the shipping industry emissions to the International Maritime Organisation. While environment groups applauded the agreement to cut hard and deep by 2050, they pointed out that it falls far short of technically achievable. A report published just before the meeting by the International Transport Forum (ITF), a thinktank run by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), found that the industry could achieve up to 95% decarbonization as early as 2035 using the maximum deployment of currently known technologies. What do cargo ships use for fuel? The heavy, thick fuel has been used in the cargo shipping and cruise line industry for years because it is inexpensive, especially compared to other fuels. After oil has been refined into diesel, gasoline or jet fuel, bunker fuel is what's left over at the refinery. Low-Tech Solutions The good news is that easy-to-do low-tech solutions can deliver a lot. Maersk, the world's most extensive container shipping line, has already discovered it can cut fuel use by 30% by merely steaming more slowly. Because of the wide availability of cheap (and often dirty) fuel, shipping has traditionally been wasteful. Most merchant ships are made of heavy steel rather than lighter aluminum and don't bother with obvious energy-saving measures like low-friction hull coatings or recovering waste heat. More slender ship designs alone could cut fuel use and hence emissions by 10-15% at slow speeds and up to 25% at high speeds, says the ITF. But replacing the existing fleet would take time. Recommended: Solar Boat Hydrofoil From The TU-Delft: The Netherlands The average age of today's shipping fleet is 25 years. Rules of energy efficiency for new ships introduced by the IMO in 2013 will only fully come into force from 2030, meaning that any switch to slender vessels would not apply to most ships at sea until mid-century or beyond. According to the ITF, much could be done more quickly by retrofitting existing ships with technology to cut their fuel use and, hence, emissions. Here are just four: Fitting ships’ bows with a bulbous extension below the water line reduce drag enough to cut emissions 2-7%. A technique is known as air lubrication, which pumps compressed air below the hull to create a carpet of bubbles, also reduces drag and can cut emissions by a further 3%. Replacing one propeller with two rotating opposite directions recovers slipstream energy and can make efficiency gains of 8-15%. Cleaning the hull and painting it with a low-friction coating can deliver gains of up to 5%. Entirely new ships Putting together better designs and better fuel will create entirely new kinds of boats in the future. And the blueprints are already being drawn up. The Aquarius Ecoship, a cargo ship devised by a Japanese company called Eco Marine Power, is driven by a phalanx of rigid sails and solar panels . The same system could power oil tankers, cruise ships, and much else. The designers admit that it would not eliminate the need for conventional fuel: Even with large batteries to store solar and wind energy, back-up would be needed. But it could cut emissions by 40 percent. Photo by Courtesy of Eco Marine Power. The Aquarius Eco Ship concept design incorporates innovative solar and wind power.  {youtube}                                                   Aquarius Eco Ship - low emission ship design concept                                               Solar And Wind Power Makes The Current Sail Cargo Ship   Going one better, the Japanese shipping line NYK boasts that its design for a 350m-long container ship, the Super Eco Ship 2030, would use LNG to make hydrogen to run fuel cells. Backed up by solar panels covering the entire ship and 4,000 square meters of sails to catch the wind, the combination could cut emissions by 70%. Or for a completely zero-carbon option, engineers at Wallenius Wilhelmsen, a Scandinavian shipping line, offer the E/S Orcelle, a lightweight cargo ship designed to transport up to 10,000 cars (electric, we trust) on eight decks. It would be powered by electricity, half coming directly from wind, solar, and wave energy—the other half from converting some of that energy into hydrogen to power fuel cells. The company says the ship could be afloat by 2025. Today's ships are, in many respects, almost indistinguishable from those of a century ago. But the IMO decision to finally get with the global climate agenda has fired the starting gun on what is set to be a race to create a new standard for low-carbon shipping that should be the norm just a few decades from now. Recommended:  Solar And Wave Energy To Power Autonomous Ship: The AutoNaut Banishing Conventional Fuel Some of the most significant gains will require banishing conventional petroleum-based fuel, says the Sustainable Shipping Initiative, a progressive industry ginger group whose members include cruise lines and commodities shipping lines. Innovations ranging from biofuels to liquefied natural gas (LNG), sails to catch the wind, and hydrogen to solar panels have been proposed. Each has its benefits and drawbacks, and nobody is putting all their money on one solution. Biofuels are problematic because they take land to grow, though specially engineered crops such as algae could change that, says the ITF. While electric engines already operate on some short ferry journeys, the sheer weight and space taken up by batteries on oceangoing ships make them unviable until there are breakthroughs in lithium-ion batteries. One innovation already underway is converting ships to run on LNG. There are already more than a hundred LNG-fuelled ships globally. A new generation of giant cruise ships powered this way and carrying up to 7,000 passengers will be launched by MSC Cruises starting 2022. What is LNG stand for? Liquefied natural gas (LNG) is a composition of methane and some mixture of ethane used to convert natural gas to liquid form for ease and safety of storage transport. Some LNG ships claim a reduction in CO2 emissions of 15%, though that depends crucially on keeping leakage of the greenhouse gas methane to a minimum in ships and bunkers. Photo by Tuukka Ervasti/Lloyd’s Register. LNG-powered Viking Grace boasts the first ship-based ‘rotor sail.’  The first LNG-powered cruise ship is the Viking Grace, operating between Finland and Sweden. This vessel has another claim to fame. This April also boasts the first ship-based rotor sail to capture power from the wind. Rotor sails have a large spinning cylinder amidships. Wind hitting the rotor creates a vertical force that can power the ship, a phenomenon known as the Magnus effect. The Viking Line says the extra power will reduce the ship’s CO2 emissions by 900 metric tonnes (1,000 tons) per year. Hydrogen-Powered Ships Sail Closer To Market Havyard announced that it is currently developing a pilot of a hydrogen system that could help large ships sail emission-free over long distances. The project that Havyard Group is working on - with Havyard Design and Solutions and Norwegian Electric Systems - will become the biggest of its kind for ships. With the first phase of development complete, the company is now entering into the approval stage for its hydrogen system, together with Linde Engineering as tank supplier and PowerCell Sweden AB as the fuel cell supplier. Kristian Osnes, project manager at Havyard Group, said in a statement that Linde Engineering was the right partner in the search for solutions that will ensure safe storage and control barriers for cryogenic hydrogen onboard ships. "The regulations for these solutions have not yet been developed, and we are pleased to have Linde on-board when entering the approval process, which we expect to be challenging," he said. Recommended:  Hydrogen-Powered Tug Launched In Antwerp: Unique In Belgium Hydrogen-Powered Ships: PowerCell The fuel cell technology provider, PowerCell, has previously worked with Bosch in the car industry. Osnes added that fuel cells have similarities with the battery technology, and the cooperation will provide maritime solutions to take the goal of zero-emissions one step further. Hydrogen-Powered Ships Sail Closer To Market: Pilot-E The project is part of Pilot-E, a Norwegian financing initiative to support environmentally friendly products and services that reduce emissions. Havyard Group is also working together with Sintef and Prototech, while the Norwegian Electric Systems will provide green technology expertise. "The system we are developing is designed in modules and can be installed both in new builds and retrofitted in existing ships. In this way, we will contribute to the development of large-scale vessels that can sail emission-free over long distances, or to significant emission cuts from vessels that use hybrid propulsion systems," said Kristian Voksøy Steinsvik, head of research and development at Havyard Group. World’s First Fully Electric, Zero-Emission Bunker Tanker Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, Ltd. (MOL) and e5 Lab. Inc. (e5 Lab), which is working to develop and promote electrically powered zero-emission vessels, has concluded a Memorandum Of Understanding (MOU) to conduct a joint study of a hybrid, pure car carrier equipped with a hydrogen fuel cell system and large-capacity batteries (hydrogen hybrid PCC). Hydrogen Hybrid PCC Zero Emission Tanker The companies aim to develop a hydrogen hybrid PCC, which do not emit carbon dioxide (CO2), sulfur oxides (SOx), nitrogen oxides (NOx), or particulate matter (PM) while underway in coastal waters or ports; in other words, achieving 'zero emissions,' since its propulsive force would come from electricity supplied by the hydrogen fuel cell system and large-capacity batteries. Recommended:  Hydrogen-Powered Energy Observer Reaches London: The Future When navigating in the open sea, the hydrogen hybrid PCC’s motor would be powered by an LNG-fueled generator and the large-capacity batteries, resulting in significantly lower emissions than current vessels equipped with diesel engines that run on heavy oil. MOL has worked to realize zero emissions of vessels while in ports since it announced its future vision for the next-generation series 'ISHIN-I' car carrier in 2009. In 2012, it launched the world’s first hybrid car carrier, the Emerald Ace, which is equipped with the world’s largest-scale solar power generation system and batteries. The hydrogen hybrid PCC concept marks a further step ahead from these past projects. The company is pursuing the possibility of introducing more comprehensive and more advanced technologies to zero emissions. Recommended:  Solar Powered Silent 55 Yacht Allows You To Cruise The World Both companies will first conduct technological and business feasibility studies of the hydrogen hybrid PCC. When they gain positive results, they will move on to the next phase of joint development for a practical hydrogen hybrid PCC based on the results. MOL and e5 Lab continually engage in measures to reduce merchant vessels’ environmental impact by taking full advantage of both companies’ wide-ranging technological knowledge to ensure the shipping industry's sustainable growth.                                          MOL has worked to realize zero emissions of vessels while in ports since it announced its future vision for the next-generation series 'ISHIN-I' car carrier in 2009. In 2012, it launched the world’s first hybrid car carrier, the Emerald Ace, which is equipped with the world’s largest-scale solar power generation system and batteries. The hydrogen hybrid PCC concept marks a further step ahead from these past projects. The company is pursuing the possibility of introducing more comprehensive and more advanced technologies to zero emissions. While the consumer world is forging ahead to cleaner forms of transport, the commercial world is still lagging, particularly sea-bound haulage. So it’s great to see such innovation to create sustainable transport of the future. NOTE: WhatsOrb does not have enough information to verify this video and cannot vouch for its accuracy. This video is for information purposes only. Before you go! Recommended:  Solar And Hydrogen Boats Win The Future: France, Monaco Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about new ways of propulsion for cargo ships? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
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