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Transportation business air travel going green  zero emissions | Upload Battery

Business Air Travel Going Green: Zero Emissions

by: Sharai Hoekema
business air travel going green  zero emissions | Upload

With global air travel ranking amongst the most damaging of climate change culprits, it was only a matter of time before people started taking notice and slowly altering their behavior in an attempt to save the planet. It has by now led to a concept of ‘flight-shaming,’ spurred by teenager Greta Thunberg, where people are increasingly preceding air travel in favor of cleaner alternatives.

Business Air Travel: Suffering From A Large Carbon Footprint

Several countries have noticed a remarkable decline in the number of people deciding to get on the airplane to a destination holiday or business trip. People now travel by other means, like by train, or opt for holidays closer to home or teleconferencing over physical meetings. Unfortunately, the number of people who do frequently travel on commercial flights is still high, putting a significant strain on our environment.

When was the first private business jet made?
History of the Private Business Jet. The first Lear Jet flight took place in 1963 and many regard this as the first private jet flight.

plane, Lear Jet
The first Learjet 28 Longhorn (Serial Number 28-001). The late Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon, had flown this same airplane.

However, it is not only commercial air travel that adds to the bill of carbon emissions. In particular smaller jet travel, including business jets, should be frowned upon. Their carbon footprint is enormous, yet demand is growing ever so rapidly, with more and more celebrities, business executives, and politicians using them for their business. People who are notoriously passionate about the climate, including Prince Harry and Bernie Sanders, still use private jets for their business. The hypocrisy is real.

Let’s face it: private jets are bad for the environment. Although they are smaller and not burning as much fuel, they generally carry far fewer people - making the personal carbon footprint of private jet passengers much higher. Estimates have put this number at about ten times that of people traveling commercially.

Recommended: Facebook Solar Planes For Network Internet Connectivity

Alternatives To Business Air Travel

Does this mean we should banish private jets altogether? Well, not necessarily. There is a multitude of options available through which those who prefer to travel in style can lower their carbon footprint, or reduce it to zero altogether. People can offset their carbon emissions or opt for planes fuelled by greener or utterly renewable energy sources.


                                                Liquid Hydrogen Jet Aircraft: A Carbon-Free Flying Future?

One of those greener planes is the Eather One. Or, at least, it is so conceptually. This plane, developed by designer Michal Bonikowski, has replaced the fuel tanks and battery banks by a system that uses the air friction across its wings and airframe to power an advanced engine. A radical concept, but if it works, it is sure to be the Kickstarter of a significant power shift in the valuable private jet market. It would effectively be a fully electric plane that does not use any scarce resources or energy sources.

What was the first business jet?
On 2 October 1966 the first large business jet first flew, the 65,500 pounds (29.7 t) MTOW Grumman Gulfstream II, powered by two 11,400 pounds-force (51 kN) Rolls-Royce Spey turbofans. From 1967 to the late 70s, 258 were built and it led to the ongoing Gulfstream Aerospace long range family.

Recommended: Transport By Airships: Back To The Future With Zeppelins

Eather One Uses In-Flight Friction To Power Engines

The air friction fuel is available as needed, in unlimited supplies - as long as the plane is flying at high speed. It gathers its energy through the triboelectric nanogenerators in the wings, directly converting mechanical energy into electrical energy needed to power the plane. These generators are powered by the friction caused by vibrations in the airframe and the bend of the wings. The air molecules are “caught” from the troposphere and stratosphere, capturing their energy in the process.

Airplane, front, sky
The Eather One

As this form of energy is ready-made, and continuously available on-demand, there is no need for large battery packs for storage. Instead, a smaller battery pack will suffice, making the plane both lighter and smaller. This smaller pack is still needed as there might be some frictionless points, in particular at the beginning and the end of the flight, during take-off and landing. 

Recommended: How A Fossil Fuel Seaplane Got Converted Into An e-Plane

Groundbreaking Ideas Do Not Have To Be Practical

There is a lot that can be said for this idea - and probably even more so that can be said against it. Yes, it sounds like a concept more suited for a sci-fi movie than for real-life business travel. Developer Bonikowski has openly admitted so: “I enjoy all attempts to revolutionize flying,” a statement that seems abundant when looking at his portfolio of flight-related concepts.

Who owns the largest private jet?

The Airbus 380 is the world's biggest private jet and the most expensive. Its price tag is around $500 million. The aircraft is fit for a prince. Its owner is the Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal al-Saud.

The chances are that we never will see an Eather One gracing the skies. But that is not the point. The point is to keep coming up with ideas so visionary and forward-thinking that others cannot look past them when designing their own, more moderate, prototypes. If the Wright Brothers, Emilia Earhart, or Leonardo Da Vinci had indeed let themselves be held back by feasibility and listened to nay-sayers, we probably still would not have hit the skies.

Recommended: Green Trains Or Flying High? Travel The Globe Sustainable

Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below.
We try to respond the same day.

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Click on 'Register' or push the button 'Write An Article' on the 'HomePage.'

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Business Air Travel Going Green: Zero Emissions

With global air travel ranking amongst the most damaging of climate change culprits, it was only a matter of time before people started taking notice and slowly altering their behavior in an attempt to save the planet. It has by now led to a concept of ‘flight-shaming,’ spurred by teenager Greta Thunberg, where people are increasingly preceding air travel in favor of cleaner alternatives. Business Air Travel: Suffering From A Large Carbon Footprint Several countries have noticed a remarkable decline in the number of people deciding to get on the airplane to a destination holiday or business trip. People now travel by other means, like by train, or opt for holidays closer to home or teleconferencing over physical meetings. Unfortunately, the number of people who do frequently travel on commercial flights is still high, putting a significant strain on our environment. When was the first private business jet made? History of the Private Business Jet. The first Lear Jet flight took place in 1963 and many regard this as the first private jet flight. The first Learjet 28 Longhorn (Serial Number 28-001). The late Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon, had flown this same airplane. However, it is not only commercial air travel that adds to the bill of carbon emissions. In particular smaller jet travel, including business jets, should be frowned upon. Their carbon footprint is enormous, yet demand is growing ever so rapidly, with more and more celebrities, business executives, and politicians using them for their business. People who are notoriously passionate about the climate, including Prince Harry and Bernie Sanders, still use private jets for their business. The hypocrisy is real. Let’s face it: private jets are bad for the environment. Although they are smaller and not burning as much fuel, they generally carry far fewer people - making the personal carbon footprint of private jet passengers much higher. Estimates have put this number at about ten times that of people traveling commercially. Recommended:  Facebook Solar Planes For Network Internet Connectivity Alternatives To Business Air Travel Does this mean we should banish private jets altogether? Well, not necessarily. There is a multitude of options available through which those who prefer to travel in style can lower their carbon footprint, or reduce it to zero altogether. People can offset their carbon emissions or opt for planes fuelled by greener or utterly renewable energy sources. {youtube}                                                 Liquid Hydrogen Jet Aircraft: A Carbon-Free Flying Future? One of those greener planes is the Eather One. Or, at least, it is so conceptually. This plane, developed by designer Michal Bonikowski, has replaced the fuel tanks and battery banks by a system that uses the air friction across its wings and airframe to power an advanced engine. A radical concept, but if it works, it is sure to be the Kickstarter of a significant power shift in the valuable private jet market. It would effectively be a fully electric plane that does not use any scarce resources or energy sources. What was the first business jet? On 2 October 1966 the first large business jet first flew, the 65,500 pounds (29.7 t) MTOW Grumman Gulfstream II, powered by two 11,400 pounds-force (51 kN) Rolls-Royce Spey turbofans. From 1967 to the late 70s, 258 were built and it led to the ongoing Gulfstream Aerospace long range family. Recommended:  Transport By Airships: Back To The Future With Zeppelins Eather One Uses In-Flight Friction To Power Engines The air friction fuel is available as needed, in unlimited supplies - as long as the plane is flying at high speed. It gathers its energy through the triboelectric nanogenerators in the wings, directly converting mechanical energy into electrical energy needed to power the plane. These generators are powered by the friction caused by vibrations in the airframe and the bend of the wings. The air molecules are “caught” from the troposphere and stratosphere, capturing their energy in the process. The Eather One As this form of energy is ready-made, and continuously available on-demand, there is no need for large battery packs for storage. Instead, a smaller battery pack will suffice, making the plane both lighter and smaller. This smaller pack is still needed as there might be some frictionless points, in particular at the beginning and the end of the flight, during take-off and landing.   Recommended:  How A Fossil Fuel Seaplane Got Converted Into An e-Plane Groundbreaking Ideas Do Not Have To Be Practical There is a lot that can be said for this idea - and probably even more so that can be said against it. Yes, it sounds like a concept more suited for a sci-fi movie than for real-life business travel. Developer Bonikowski has openly admitted so: “I enjoy all attempts to revolutionize flying,” a statement that seems abundant when looking at his portfolio of flight-related concepts. Who owns the largest private jet? The Airbus 380 is the world's biggest private jet and the most expensive. Its price tag is around $500 million. The aircraft is fit for a prince. Its owner is the Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal al-Saud. The chances are that we never will see an Eather One gracing the skies. But that is not the point. The point is to keep coming up with ideas so visionary and forward-thinking that others cannot look past them when designing their own, more moderate, prototypes. If the Wright Brothers, Emilia Earhart, or Leonardo Da Vinci had indeed let themselves be held back by feasibility and listened to nay-sayers, we probably still would not have hit the skies. Recommended:  Green Trains Or Flying High? Travel The Globe Sustainable Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about traveling by train? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations