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Tiny Houses tiny houses  about having a smaller footprint | Upload Tinyhouses

Tiny Houses: About Having A Smaller Footprint

by: Hans van der Broek
tiny houses  about having a smaller footprint | Upload

In the sixties, I went camping with my parents. The tent was made from ‘heavy’ cotton and was not always waterproof. I still can remember the smell inside. A mixture of fresh forest scent, prepared food, coffee, and in the morning, a mix of sleeping odor, the wakening nature around us, and the stench from the ‘pee bucket.’

It felt like an adventure to be away from ‘home’ in a new area where I built small huts from branches and leaves with other children I met during our holiday or summer weekends.
VW, tent camping black and white

Camping Started Long Before The Tiny Houses Movement

My grandparents had a small caravan. My grandfather had built it himself. It was a large, floppy shelter on wheels. But it was cozy and more comfortable than our tent. There were seats, curtains for the windows and with some handiness the benches could be turned into a sleeping place with a ‘real’ mattress. There even was a built-in small gas stove and a sink. The last had to be filled with water out of a yellow jerrycan where after the dishes were done, the plug got removed and the water somewhere left the caravan by a small rubber tube and disappeared into the grass.

My parents bought a Paradiso (folding-trailer) in the seventies. It was a little more luxurious than a tent and was faster to set up. The next step was a caravan with seats, a small fully equipped kitchen and even a tiny toilet and shower. Water was pumped into a built-in reservoir and gave the possibility to take showers. A very small little house which was nice to stay in for a few weeks where after it was great to go home again - to my own room - and appreciate the available space.
red and white camping car
The Paradiso

Recommended: Tiny Houses And Cutting-Edge Architectural Ideas

First Encounters With My Tent, Bunks, And Refuges

When I started to go on holiday by myself, I often went into the mountains with my friends carrying a backpack with a lightweight tent. Sometimes we stayed in small cabins for a night. These cabins existed out of a few bunks and had a stove. Washing was done outside. A sink was made from a hollowed tree trunk and water came natural by gravity and was… ice cold.
On later occasions, we sometimes rented a small cabin stored with ‘all you need’ equipment, including a fridge. Water storage was done in a water tank on poles, so there was sufficient pressure to shower and do the dishes.
stone shelter in forrest with chimney
Of course, we were on a holiday and camping mood, so it did not matter that certain smells started to mix up during our stay. The toilet door was not stink-resistant. The scent of onions could be present for at least one day, and even our clothes started to take over this odor. After a day walks, our socks were left outside because inside the smell would be just a little too much.
Refuges often gave one or two nights shelter. Together with many other hikers, we would lay on a lifted frame with planks where on top, we could put our Thermarest mattresses and sleeping bags. A refuge keeper would prepare breakfast and dinner on request. It was like staying with a temporary family—a tiny hikers house.

Recommended: Tiny House The Exbury Egg: Off-Grid Workspace

Trailers & Cabins And Bungalow Parks

In many countries where I have been like the US, New-Zealand, Australia, and even Turkey, trailers & cabins are reasonable accommodations to have a short stay. Nowadays, they are fully equipped and are a little bit like at home.
The sleeping space still stays in ‘camping mode’. You have to climb up the stairs to disappear between the sheets in a cramped space in the loft. Or moving items in the living space to change the couch into a double bed. So far so good if it is for a few weeks.

My girlfriend and I are both easy going but to be together in ‘one room’ for a while sometimes takes its toll. We both got used to a certain kind of privacy. If my girlfriend had to do something for her job or just wanted to be alone to read a book there was always this ‘grumbling’ man around ha, ha.

Recommended: Tiny House Mobile Minimalistic Housing: The aVOID

Tiny Houses: Romanticizing The Lives Of The Poor

The trailer parks in the US house thousands of people. Especially after the real estate collapse in 2008. Many people had to take refuge in these trailers because they had lost their homes.
In the Netherlands, there are many ‘Bungalow Parks’ which cater to the same group. People who get also divorced often find temporary or long-term solutions by staying in a 'Bungalow Park' because rents are unprecedented and unaffordable.

Recommended: Tiny House Plug-In-Plug-Out Boat Of Punta Del Mar

In many cities, it takes at least eight years to make any chance of finding social housing. Officially it is not allowed to live in these parks long term, but the government often ‘turns a blind eye.’
People make lovely little gardens around their trailer or ‘bungalow’, veranda’s to sit in the afternoon and some people grow their own vegetables. Romantic, but this often finds its origin in an emergency.
Tiny house with garden and tree

Recommended: Urban Agriculture Growing Food On A Rooftop

We Have Arrived In The Tiny House Era

So now we arrived in the ‘Tiny House Movement’ era. Actually, it’s nothing new but it got made something new because people get more conscious about the limited amount of living space, limited resources and the understanding that we don’t need that many rooms. It’s also about being self-sufficient and minimalistic. It’s all about having a smaller ‘footprint’ on our Globe; the Earth. So far so good!

Are Tiny Houses Realistic? Finding The Balance

Now we have to find the balance between having the extreme small into something that can ‘grow on you’ (can be adjusted during your stay). It would be foolish to think that life is static and our mind is not to be subject of changes.
You want to buy a tiny house but can’t get a mortgage but only a loan? Who’s is going to build it? Do you or the company of your choice  have the right skills? Remember ‘tiny houses’ are just ‘new’! Many countries don’t allow you to live permanent in a ‘house on wheels’. What about storms and your insurance? Our climate is changing and your tiny house is more vulnerable to withstands strong winds than a brick house! Anyway, at the end you made your choice. So here you are, two of you in your ideal tiny house setting. After a few month you find out there is a baby coming. You want to start a study and need some silent space! What about your bicycles, baby car and your electric or  hybrid car? Where will you store them?
All these things you have to ask yourself and try to realize that what you want will at least be your home for about five years; otherwise your cost of living could be much higher than thought.

Two Floor Tiny Houses

two, 2 floor tiny houses
Tiny houses with a ‘second’ floor at a fixed place would make much more sense for me than the tiny trailer houses. It gives you the possibility to extend your family without moving directly,  to have some privacy, a place to be alone or to study. And you don't need to carry all your stuff if you get guests or simply if you want to go asleep.
You still will have a front- and back garden, and it will be more reliable, easy to insure, and ‘stormproof.’ You can grow your vegetables, have your solar panels, and charge your electric car in front of your house.

In 2021 WhatsOrb will start it's Tiny House 'Convert' Project. It will be a Tiny House Park with 25 lots for tiny houses. The tiny houses are designed and developed by WhatsOrb and will have a starting price from 40.000 Euro for a standard 48 m2 unit. For more information please write to [email protected]

People tend to swing from one extreme to another

Trends are often temporary and extreme in their appearance. While the ‘Tiny House Movement’ is an excellent initiative, it’s a little too radical. In a few years, we will see that there will be a separation between the real small space ‘hardliners’ and people who want something ‘in between.’ Hardliners are conscious people who want to make their resource’ footprint smaller. When it comes to tiny houses, they will have more and more houses to choose from. Tiny houses have become more flexible in space and privacy.
Because most of the people will live in cities in 2050, in my opinion, the 2-floor tiny houses will make a fair chance.

By: Hans van der Broek

Recommended: Tiny Houses Tips And Tricks: Minimalistic Living Experience

Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below.
We try to respond the same day.

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Hans van der Broek, founder

Founder and CEO of WhatsOrb, world traveller, entrepreneur and environmental activist. Hans has countless ideas and has set up several businesses in the Netherlands and abroad. He also has an opinion on everything and unlimited thoughts about how to create a better world. He likes hiking and has climbed numerous five-thousanders (mountain summits of at least 5000m or 16,404 feet in elevation)

 

Hans van der Broek, founder

Founder and CEO of WhatsOrb, world traveller, entrepreneur and environmental activist. Hans has countless ideas and has set up several businesses in the Netherlands and abroad. He also has an opinion on everything and unlimited thoughts about how to create a better world. He likes hiking and has climbed numerous five-thousanders (mountain summits of at least 5000m or 16,404 feet in elevation)

 

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Tiny Houses: About Having A Smaller Footprint

In the sixties, I went camping with my parents. The tent was made from ‘heavy’ cotton and was not always waterproof. I still can remember the smell inside. A mixture of fresh forest scent, prepared food, coffee, and in the morning, a mix of sleeping odor, the wakening nature around us, and the stench from the ‘pee bucket.’ It felt like an adventure to be away from ‘home’ in a new area where I built small huts from branches and leaves with other children I met during our holiday or summer weekends. Camping Started Long Before The Tiny Houses Movement My grandparents had a small caravan. My grandfather had built it himself. It was a large, floppy shelter on wheels. But it was cozy and more comfortable than our tent. There were seats, curtains for the windows and with some handiness the benches could be turned into a sleeping place with a ‘real’ mattress. There even was a built-in small gas stove and a sink. The last had to be filled with water out of a yellow jerrycan where after the dishes were done, the plug got removed and the water somewhere left the caravan by a small rubber tube and disappeared into the grass. My parents bought a Paradiso (folding-trailer) in the seventies. It was a little more luxurious than a tent and was faster to set up. The next step was a caravan with seats, a small fully equipped kitchen and even a tiny toilet and shower. Water was pumped into a built-in reservoir and gave the possibility to take showers. A very small little house which was nice to stay in for a few weeks where after it was great to go home again - to my own room - and appreciate the available space. The Paradiso Recommended:  Tiny Houses And Cutting-Edge Architectural Ideas First Encounters With My Tent, Bunks, And Refuges When I started to go on holiday by myself, I often went into the mountains with my friends carrying a backpack with a lightweight tent. Sometimes we stayed in small cabins for a night. These cabins existed out of a few bunks and had a stove. Washing was done outside. A sink was made from a hollowed tree trunk and water came natural by gravity and was… ice cold. On later occasions, we sometimes rented a small cabin stored with ‘all you need’ equipment, including a fridge. Water storage was done in a water tank on poles, so there was sufficient pressure to shower and do the dishes. Of course, we were on a holiday and camping mood, so it did not matter that certain smells started to mix up during our stay. The toilet door was not stink-resistant. The scent of onions could be present for at least one day, and even our clothes started to take over this odor. After a day walks, our socks were left outside because inside the smell would be just a little too much. Refuges often gave one or two nights shelter. Together with many other hikers, we would lay on a lifted frame with planks where on top, we could put our Thermarest mattresses and sleeping bags. A refuge keeper would prepare breakfast and dinner on request. It was like staying with a temporary family—a tiny hikers house. Recommended:  Tiny House The Exbury Egg: Off-Grid Workspace Trailers & Cabins And Bungalow Parks In many countries where I have been like the US, New-Zealand, Australia, and even Turkey, trailers & cabins are reasonable accommodations to have a short stay. Nowadays, they are fully equipped and are a little bit like at home. The sleeping space still stays in ‘camping mode’. You have to climb up the stairs to disappear between the sheets in a cramped space in the loft. Or moving items in the living space to change the couch into a double bed. So far so good if it is for a few weeks. My girlfriend and I are both easy going but to be together in ‘one room’ for a while sometimes takes its toll. We both got used to a certain kind of privacy. If my girlfriend had to do something for her job or just wanted to be alone to read a book there was always this ‘grumbling’ man around ha, ha. Recommended:  Tiny House Mobile Minimalistic Housing: The aVOID Tiny Houses: Romanticizing The Lives Of The Poor The trailer parks in the US house thousands of people. Especially after the real estate collapse in 2008. Many people had to take refuge in these trailers because they had lost their homes. In the Netherlands, there are many ‘Bungalow Parks’ which cater to the same group. People who get also divorced often find temporary or long-term solutions by staying in a 'Bungalow Park' because rents are unprecedented and unaffordable. Recommended:  Tiny House Plug-In-Plug-Out Boat Of Punta Del Mar In many cities, it takes at least eight years to make any chance of finding social housing. Officially it is not allowed to live in these parks long term, but the government often ‘turns a blind eye.’ People make lovely little gardens around their trailer or ‘bungalow’, veranda’s to sit in the afternoon and some people grow their own vegetables. Romantic, but this often finds its origin in an emergency. Recommended:  Urban Agriculture Growing Food On A Rooftop We  Have Arrived In The Tiny House Era So now we arrived in the ‘Tiny House Movement’ era. Actually, it’s nothing new but it got made something new because people get more conscious about the limited amount of living space, limited resources and the understanding that we don’t need that many rooms. It’s also about being self-sufficient and minimalistic. It’s all about having a smaller ‘footprint’ on our Globe; the Earth. So far so good! Are Tiny Houses Realistic? Finding The Balance Now we have to find the balance between having the extreme small into something that can ‘grow on you’ ( can be adjusted during your stay) . It would be foolish to think that life is static and our mind is not to be subject of changes. You want to buy a tiny house but can’t get a mortgage but only a loan? Who’s is going to build it? Do you or the company of your choice  have the right skills? Remember ‘tiny houses’ are just ‘new’! Many countries don’t allow you to live permanent in a ‘house on wheels’. What about storms and your insurance? Our climate is changing and your tiny house is more vulnerable to withstands strong winds than a brick house! Anyway, at the end you made your choice. So here you are, two of you in your ideal tiny house setting. After a few month you find out there is a baby coming. You want to start a study and need some silent space! What about your bicycles, baby car and your electric or  hybrid car? Where will you store them? All these things you have to ask yourself and try to realize that what you want will at least be your home for about five years; otherwise your cost of living could be much higher than thought. Two Floor Tiny Houses Tiny houses with a ‘second’ floor at a fixed place would make much more sense for me than the tiny trailer houses. It gives you the possibility to extend your family without moving directly,  to have some privacy, a place to be alone or to study. And you don't need to carry all your stuff if you get guests or simply if you want to go asleep. You still will have a front- and back garden, and it will be more reliable, easy to insure, and ‘stormproof.’ You can grow your vegetables, have your solar panels, and charge your electric car in front of your house. In 2021 WhatsOrb will start it's Tiny House 'Convert' Project. It will be a Tiny House Park with 25 lots for tiny houses. The tiny houses are designed and developed by WhatsOrb and will have a starting price from 40.000 Euro for a standard 48 m2 unit. For more information please write to [email protected] People tend to swing from one extreme to another Trends are often temporary and extreme in their appearance. While the ‘Tiny House Movement’ is an excellent initiative, it’s a little too radical. In a few years, we will see that there will be a separation between the real small space ‘hardliners’ and people who want something ‘in between.’ Hardliners are conscious people who want to make their resource’ footprint smaller. When it comes to tiny houses, they will have more and more houses to choose from. Tiny houses have become more flexible in space and privacy. Because most of the people will live in cities in 2050, in my opinion, the 2-floor tiny houses will make a fair chance. By: Hans van der Broek Recommended:  Tiny Houses Tips And Tricks: Minimalistic Living Experience Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about your tiny house experience?  Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations