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Waste in space will be fetched by the CubeSail garbage truck
The room is ready for a cleaning. There is so much junk floating around that missiles, satellites and spaceships can fly to pieces. The first garbage truck will therefore soon be transported to the universe. The chance of collisions becomes greater, says Ron Noomen, assistant professor of astrodynamics and satellite systems at TU Delft. "Artmen who no longer function sometimes keep floating around or they fall apart from old age. Sometimes leftovers of fuel or batteries explode in satellites whose useful life is at an end. For example, rocket stages also float through space. With more and more rockets, satellites and space debris, it is understandable that objects can crash against each other. Even a 2-millimeter particle can cause enormous damage to a satellite." 7,500 tonnes of waste junk above our heads There is an estimated 7,500 tonnes of junk above our heads. That is why the British send a 'rubbish collection truck' into space this winter. Their invention, the CubeSail, is a three kilo box with no garbage collectors in fluorescent jackets, but a kind of safety net. The CubeSail can be attached to satellites or rocket motors. When they are no longer needed, a screen of five by five meters is unfolded out of the box. The space waste flies into orbits in which the still working satellites and space stations float. Since the then Soviet Union launched in October 1957 the Sputnik which was the first satellite in space. Roughly six thousand were followed. Half of these satellites are still operational according to the American space agency NASA. A large part of the satellites is intended for communication, the GPS on the navigation system in the car, or observing, for example, the oceans or forests on the earth. Armed conflicts are also being sent more and more through space. Countries use their satellites for precision guidance of weapons or for the control of unmanned aircraft. When the satellites and missiles are at the end of their lifespan, they drop towards the earth, where they eventually burn in the atmosphere or, in the case of large specimens, crash into the ocean. The decline is so slow that they get in the way of working satellites and spaceships. The CubeSail can offer a solution to that problem, but according to Noomen, waste will always float in space. "If the debris has already gone, it sometimes takes hundreds of years. Therefore, in manned space flights, capsules are provided with an extra thick skin around the spaceship. The layer is not resistant to collisions with large debris, but it keeps small waste reasonably good.'' If the debris starts to decline, it could take hundreds of years American and a Russian communications satellite collided In 2009, the area experienced its first serious traffic accident. At about 800 kilometers above Siberia, an American and a Russian communications satellite collided. As a result of the collision two large clouds of rubble arose. Agreements have been made for international waters and airspace on earth. A well-functioning treaty about what is and is not allowed in space does not yet exist. Russia and China proposed in 2008 to draw up a code of conduct, but the United States was bothering. Later, Moscow and Beijing rejected a proposal from the US and the European Union. In the meantime, space organizations from many countries have agreed to cancel deposited thrusters and satellites that are no longer being used. They return to the earth in a controlled manner or are taken to an orbit where they do not pose a threat to space traffic. Cleaning up the debris a bigger problem than the rubble itself That appointment was also badly needed, says Noomen. "The amount of waste could grow because everyone did what they wanted. Space agencies now adhere to the strict rules to limit the amount of debris left in space. The question is whether the emerging commercial space companies will do so. If they just leave their internet satellites lying around, cleaning will look like mopping with an open tap.' Even though debris is the biggest problem in space travel, the polluters seem to still find the costs of cleaning up the debris a bigger problem than the rubble itself." The British University of Surrey is now taking the lead, even if it is a trial. Under the name 'RemoveDebris' is now a 17 million euro space shuttle ready that serves as a garbage truck. The CubeSail will be connected to the international space station ISS. There the British will try different techniques to clean up the waste. There is a harpoon for bringing in large pieces. Also 'test waste' is used, which is taken away and brought back to earth. The intention is that future garbage trucks with debris will be burn out in the atmosphere. Gerben van 't Hof https://www.whatsorb.com/category/waste
The room is ready for a cleaning. There is so much junk floating around that missiles, satellites and spaceships can fly to pieces. The first garbage truck will therefore soon be transported to the universe. The chance of collisions becomes greater, says Ron Noomen, assistant professor of astrodynamics and satellite systems at TU Delft. "Artmen who no longer function sometimes keep floating around or they fall apart from old age. Sometimes leftovers of fuel or batteries explode in satellites whose useful life is at an end. For example, rocket stages also float through space. With more and more rockets, satellites and space debris, it is understandable that objects can crash against each other. Even a 2-millimeter particle can cause enormous damage to a satellite." 7,500 tonnes of waste junk above our heads There is an estimated 7,500 tonnes of junk above our heads. That is why the British send a 'rubbish collection truck' into space this winter. Their invention, the CubeSail, is a three kilo box with no garbage collectors in fluorescent jackets, but a kind of safety net. The CubeSail can be attached to satellites or rocket motors. When they are no longer needed, a screen of five by five meters is unfolded out of the box. The space waste flies into orbits in which the still working satellites and space stations float. Since the then Soviet Union launched in October 1957 the Sputnik which was the first satellite in space. Roughly six thousand were followed. Half of these satellites are still operational according to the American space agency NASA. A large part of the satellites is intended for communication, the GPS on the navigation system in the car, or observing, for example, the oceans or forests on the earth. Armed conflicts are also being sent more and more through space. Countries use their satellites for precision guidance of weapons or for the control of unmanned aircraft. When the satellites and missiles are at the end of their lifespan, they drop towards the earth, where they eventually burn in the atmosphere or, in the case of large specimens, crash into the ocean. The decline is so slow that they get in the way of working satellites and spaceships. The CubeSail can offer a solution to that problem, but according to Noomen, waste will always float in space. "If the debris has already gone, it sometimes takes hundreds of years. Therefore, in manned space flights, capsules are provided with an extra thick skin around the spaceship. The layer is not resistant to collisions with large debris, but it keeps small waste reasonably good.'' If the debris starts to decline, it could take hundreds of years American and a Russian communications satellite collided In 2009, the area experienced its first serious traffic accident. At about 800 kilometers above Siberia, an American and a Russian communications satellite collided. As a result of the collision two large clouds of rubble arose. Agreements have been made for international waters and airspace on earth. A well-functioning treaty about what is and is not allowed in space does not yet exist. Russia and China proposed in 2008 to draw up a code of conduct, but the United States was bothering. Later, Moscow and Beijing rejected a proposal from the US and the European Union. In the meantime, space organizations from many countries have agreed to cancel deposited thrusters and satellites that are no longer being used. They return to the earth in a controlled manner or are taken to an orbit where they do not pose a threat to space traffic. Cleaning up the debris a bigger problem than the rubble itself That appointment was also badly needed, says Noomen. "The amount of waste could grow because everyone did what they wanted. Space agencies now adhere to the strict rules to limit the amount of debris left in space. The question is whether the emerging commercial space companies will do so. If they just leave their internet satellites lying around, cleaning will look like mopping with an open tap.' Even though debris is the biggest problem in space travel, the polluters seem to still find the costs of cleaning up the debris a bigger problem than the rubble itself." The British University of Surrey is now taking the lead, even if it is a trial. Under the name 'RemoveDebris' is now a 17 million euro space shuttle ready that serves as a garbage truck. The CubeSail will be connected to the international space station ISS. There the British will try different techniques to clean up the waste. There is a harpoon for bringing in large pieces. Also 'test waste' is used, which is taken away and brought back to earth. The intention is that future garbage trucks with debris will be burn out in the atmosphere. Gerben van 't Hof https://www.whatsorb.com/category/waste
Waste in space will be fetched by the CubeSail garbage truck
Waste in space will be fetched by the CubeSail garbage truck
Recycling human waste in space into plastic tools and food
Companies and researchers are clamoring for ways to make long space travel possible safe, and financially viable, but could urine be the unexpected solution? The problems associated with sending astronauts out to far away places, however, are complex. Assuming you have the vehicle, fuel, correct environment, and oxygen required, you still need to make sure that your human passengers are fed, have access to water, and have the tools necessary to complete whatever tasks they are issued. To this end, long-haul space travel poses challenges. With limited space and only so many resources on board, how do you make sure astronauts have everything they need? Recycling from waste will get very important in space According to scientists from Clemson University, astronauts themselves could fill the gap in resources, by donating their urine and exhaled carbon dioxide (CO2). While presenting their research at the National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the team, led by Mark Blenner, Ph.D., said that these products could be converted into chemicals in order to create  plastic tools that may replace lost or broken ones.  Recycled urine is already utilized by astronauts on board the International Space Station (ISS), but by using molecules gained from human waste, it is possible to gain not only polyesters and material for printable plastics, but additional nutrients. This could be a significant development in space-faring, as the conversion of such material could mean less fuel would be used to carry replacement tools and food, and astronauts may also be able to make longer journeys without being deprived of essential nutrients, such as omega-3 fatty acids. Dubbed the 'Atom economy,' Blenner says such recycling  will becoming 'really important' for future missions if astronauts are going to make journeys which span beyond a few years. Blenners' team are currently working on a biological system which includes strains of the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, which requires both nitrogen and carbon to grow. This kind of yeast is able to absorb nitrogen from untreated urine, and carbon comes from the astronaut's exhaled breaths. However, in the latter case, photosynthetic cyanobacteria or algae is necessary to use CO2. One engineered yeast strains is able to produce omega-3 fatty acids, while another is now able to produce monomers for conversion to polyester polymers usable by 3D printers to print out replacement tools. For now, the yeast is only able to produce a small amount of these useful materials, but the researchers are now developing ways to increase efficiency and output. However, they are also looking at ways the yeast could be used to advantage on Earth, such as for fish farms and aquaculture. "We're learning that Y. lipolytica is quite a bit different than other yeast in their genetics and biochemical nature," Blenner says. "Every new organism has some amount of quirkiness that you have to focus on and understand better." Cover photo by: techSpot https://www.whatsorb.com/category/waste
Companies and researchers are clamoring for ways to make long space travel possible safe, and financially viable, but could urine be the unexpected solution? The problems associated with sending astronauts out to far away places, however, are complex. Assuming you have the vehicle, fuel, correct environment, and oxygen required, you still need to make sure that your human passengers are fed, have access to water, and have the tools necessary to complete whatever tasks they are issued. To this end, long-haul space travel poses challenges. With limited space and only so many resources on board, how do you make sure astronauts have everything they need? Recycling from waste will get very important in space According to scientists from Clemson University, astronauts themselves could fill the gap in resources, by donating their urine and exhaled carbon dioxide (CO2). While presenting their research at the National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the team, led by Mark Blenner, Ph.D., said that these products could be converted into chemicals in order to create  plastic tools that may replace lost or broken ones.  Recycled urine is already utilized by astronauts on board the International Space Station (ISS), but by using molecules gained from human waste, it is possible to gain not only polyesters and material for printable plastics, but additional nutrients. This could be a significant development in space-faring, as the conversion of such material could mean less fuel would be used to carry replacement tools and food, and astronauts may also be able to make longer journeys without being deprived of essential nutrients, such as omega-3 fatty acids. Dubbed the 'Atom economy,' Blenner says such recycling  will becoming 'really important' for future missions if astronauts are going to make journeys which span beyond a few years. Blenners' team are currently working on a biological system which includes strains of the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, which requires both nitrogen and carbon to grow. This kind of yeast is able to absorb nitrogen from untreated urine, and carbon comes from the astronaut's exhaled breaths. However, in the latter case, photosynthetic cyanobacteria or algae is necessary to use CO2. One engineered yeast strains is able to produce omega-3 fatty acids, while another is now able to produce monomers for conversion to polyester polymers usable by 3D printers to print out replacement tools. For now, the yeast is only able to produce a small amount of these useful materials, but the researchers are now developing ways to increase efficiency and output. However, they are also looking at ways the yeast could be used to advantage on Earth, such as for fish farms and aquaculture. "We're learning that Y. lipolytica is quite a bit different than other yeast in their genetics and biochemical nature," Blenner says. "Every new organism has some amount of quirkiness that you have to focus on and understand better." Cover photo by: techSpot https://www.whatsorb.com/category/waste
Recycling human waste in space into plastic tools and food
Recycling human waste in space into plastic tools and food
Waste

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