Waste

About: <p><strong>Waste is something unwanted or is material we cannot use anymore. Waste is any material or product that is worthless, defective, or of any use. In the near past, it had hardly any economic value anymore. Still, nowadays, there are plenty of people and organizations recycling waste and making from the regained parts again valuable material for reuse&mdash;the Circular Economy at work.</strong></p> <h2>Waste, Refuse, Recycle: Towards A Circular Economy</h2> <p>Even better is a zero waste environment. That means no waste is sent to landfills. A zero-waste lifestyle means: using fewer resources, eating healthier, saving money, and less negative impact on the environment. Go for the 5 R&rsquo;s: refuse, reduce, reuse, recycle, and rot.</p> <p>By reducing waste, we can make a big difference. If there was an urge to develop waste reduction ideas and sustainable recycling solutions and share these topics globally, it&rsquo;s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers, and influencers to write about waste reduction, your experiences, and expectations for the future at home and globally.&nbsp;</p> <p>Boost Global Sustainability Now, that&rsquo;s what you can do together with WhatsOrb.&nbsp;<a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/newsletter/your-shared-sustainable-ideas-make-our-earth-a-better-place">What's in for me?</a></p>
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Waste categorybanner Recycling

Plastic Particle Pollution: Caught In Action
Four master's students call themselves the Tyre Collective, from Imperial College London and the Royal College of Art designed a tire attachment to reduce transport pollution. Plastic particle pollution: caught in action. Plastic Particle Pollution: Tires The tire attachment is a device that captures microplastic particles from tires once they are emitted. The tire attachment, which won the UK James Dyson award, could decrease the harmful pollution by road transport. Tires wear out, but why? Every time a vehicle accelerates, brakes, or turns a corner, the tires wear due to friction with the road. Thousands of small particles end up in the air. In Europe alone, this results in 500,000 tonnes of plastic tire particles. Worldwide, it is estimated that tire wear is responsible for almost half of the particulate emissions from road transport. After pollution in the ocean, this is the worst microplastic pollutant. The winning tool is placed on the wheel and uses electrostatics to gather the emitted particles using air currents around a rotating wheel. The prototype collected 60 percent of all tire particles floating in the air in a controlled environment on a trial installation. Recommended:  Unique In The World: Roads Turn Into Electricity A Passion For The Environment The four master's students (Siobhan Anderson, Hanson Cheng, M Deepak Mallya, and Hugo Richardson) said they have a passion for the environment. They use design to have a significant impact on society. "As a team, our strength lies in our diversity," said Hugo Richardson. We all come from different places globally and have a great deal of knowledge in architecture, biomechanics, product design, and mechanical engineering. Caught In Action "Normally, tires wear down, but nobody thinks about where it goes." The students were shocked to find out that tire pollution is the worst kind after ocean pollution. At the Tyre Collective, they look at capture tire wear at the source. They recycle the particles and reuse them for new tires or other materials. For example, they printed business cards using ink made of the captured tire dust. They want to create a closed-loop system. {youtube}                                         The Tyre Collective - capturing micro-plastic pollution from tire wear A recent study by the Norwegian Institute for Air Research has shown that more than 200,000 tonnes of small plastic particles are pumped from the roads into the oceans every year. The problem may get more severe if the UK increases the use of electric cars. They are heavier than comparable diesel or petrol models. So, more electric vehicles mean more wear on tires. Before you go! Recommended:  Solar Panel Recycling: Photovoltaics Rebirth Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about recycling? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Four master's students call themselves the Tyre Collective, from Imperial College London and the Royal College of Art designed a tire attachment to reduce transport pollution. Plastic particle pollution: caught in action. Plastic Particle Pollution: Tires The tire attachment is a device that captures microplastic particles from tires once they are emitted. The tire attachment, which won the UK James Dyson award, could decrease the harmful pollution by road transport. Tires wear out, but why? Every time a vehicle accelerates, brakes, or turns a corner, the tires wear due to friction with the road. Thousands of small particles end up in the air. In Europe alone, this results in 500,000 tonnes of plastic tire particles. Worldwide, it is estimated that tire wear is responsible for almost half of the particulate emissions from road transport. After pollution in the ocean, this is the worst microplastic pollutant. The winning tool is placed on the wheel and uses electrostatics to gather the emitted particles using air currents around a rotating wheel. The prototype collected 60 percent of all tire particles floating in the air in a controlled environment on a trial installation. Recommended:  Unique In The World: Roads Turn Into Electricity A Passion For The Environment The four master's students (Siobhan Anderson, Hanson Cheng, M Deepak Mallya, and Hugo Richardson) said they have a passion for the environment. They use design to have a significant impact on society. "As a team, our strength lies in our diversity," said Hugo Richardson. We all come from different places globally and have a great deal of knowledge in architecture, biomechanics, product design, and mechanical engineering. Caught In Action "Normally, tires wear down, but nobody thinks about where it goes." The students were shocked to find out that tire pollution is the worst kind after ocean pollution. At the Tyre Collective, they look at capture tire wear at the source. They recycle the particles and reuse them for new tires or other materials. For example, they printed business cards using ink made of the captured tire dust. They want to create a closed-loop system. {youtube}                                         The Tyre Collective - capturing micro-plastic pollution from tire wear A recent study by the Norwegian Institute for Air Research has shown that more than 200,000 tonnes of small plastic particles are pumped from the roads into the oceans every year. The problem may get more severe if the UK increases the use of electric cars. They are heavier than comparable diesel or petrol models. So, more electric vehicles mean more wear on tires. Before you go! Recommended:  Solar Panel Recycling: Photovoltaics Rebirth Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about recycling? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Plastic Particle Pollution: Caught In Action
Plastic Particle Pollution: Caught In Action
Unique In The World: Roads Turn Into Electricity
In our modern world, there is one thing that we certainly do not lack. Asphalt, everywhere we look. Roads, highways, parking lots - it is everywhere. ‘Asphalt’ has become the synonymous term for everything grey, mass-built, enormous, and ominous at the same time. Now, there is one company looking to repair this somewhat damaged image of asphalt - by recycling old tar Asphalt and turning it into useful building materials, heat, and electricity. Unique In The World:  100% Recycling A 100% recycling process is unique in and of itself. Pretty much all recycling processes do leave some kind of waste behind. Not this one, as designed by the Dutch company Recycling Kombinatie REKO BV. Back in 2018, construction began on its second thermal cleaning installation (REKO II-plant) in the Rotterdam port area. This cleaning installation is slated to convert up to 1.2 million tonnes of residual materials, which is a mix of tar-bearing asphalt, and roofing felt. Instead, will be turned into primary resources, including sand, gravel, electricity, and heat. 'The REKO crew'. To build a 'machine' this big you need courage, imagination, and the right decision taking! REKO is a producer of sand, gravel, and fillers for mineral-based residuals (urban mining). Asphalt is its main resource and therefore invaluable in its value chain. This asphalt is largely sourced from road construction projects and can no longer be used due to its tar-holding contents, something that is forbidden in construction. It can, however, still be used for its mineral residuals. At the start of the 21st century, REKO BV worked hard on a brand new, highly innovative process, meant as a thermal cleaning of these mineral residuals. Eventually, this research project paid off and led to the very first thermal cleaning installation for Tar Asphalt, built back in 2006 (REKO I-plant). Ever since this installation has had no problems converting up to 600,000 tonnes of mineral residuals per year. This means that over its lifetime, the installation has produced nearly 7,5 million tonnes of sand and gravel for the Dutch building industry. Recommended:  Waste: The Netherlands Creates New Material From Sewage Burning Up Damaging Components The process is fascinating. The asphalt is thermally cleaned in a rotating kiln, at temperatures of 1000 degrees Celsius. This means that all the damaging organic components in the asphalt - including tar - fully burn up. Eventually, this thermal cleaning process leads to clean sand, gravel, and filler, ready for its second life in the construction industry. The other product of this process is the extremely hot waste gas, that allows for a re-capture of energy in the form of steam with the use of a steam boiler, that is subsequently converted to electricity in a steam turbine. Inside the 'tube' - the rotating kiln - where the asphalt is thermally cleaned Each year, the existing installation (REKO I) produces some 30,000 megawatts of electricity - the rough equivalent of the amount of power used by 7,500 households on an annual basis. A significant amount, but it could be even more efficient. This is what the new installation (REKO II) in the Port of Rotterdam is cut out to do. It uses more modern techniques, while also benefiting from the 12+ years of experience that REKO now gained in the field of thermal cleaning. Not only does it use less energy, but it also generates more: it can generate sufficient electricity to power at least 50,000 households for a year. A significant improvement over the previous version that is. Recommended:  Circular-Economy Gets Game-Changer Ioniqua: PET Poster Child Of The Circular Economy This processing technique is the poster child of the circular economy, where residual materials are fully converted, and the chain is genuinely closed. No waste of any kind, only clean sand and gravel and energy and heat. It merely takes the polluting tar-bearing asphalt and processes it in a way that all the polluting and dangerous components are destroyed. That is what REKO does and hopes to do for a much larger market. In the past, only the Netherlands explicitly ruled that tar-bearing asphalt could no longer be used in construction. By now, Belgium has followed, and the rest of Europe is not far behind. This development in the international market makes the new installation even more attractive. Because of the size of the installation, combined with the large-scale reclaiming of the released energy, REKO can decrease the costs to it's customers   According to David Heijkoop, director at REKO: “ Because of the size of our installation, combined with the large-scale reclaiming of the released energy, we can decrease the costs to our customers. Combined with the very favorable location of REKO in the Port of Rotterdam, in a region where is a great lack of sand and gravel which is normally imported from Belgium and Germany – and the possibility that we can transport tar-bearing asphalt over water -, gives us an excellent starting point for the rest of Europe ." World’s Largest Recycling Factory The new installation is set to become the world’s largest recycling factory for polluted building materials. And while you might correctly assume that the burning of the asphalt requires quite a bit of energy, the materials that burn - including the forbidden tar - release up to four or five times more power than that goes in. Plus, the new installation has the added feature of providing heat as well as electricity. This heat can be transported as hot water to the district heating in the surrounding area. A nice extra is that there is a choice between the amount of electricity and heat generated: meaning, if the city of Rotterdam requires more heat, REKO can deliver this. If it is not needed, for instance, during hot summer months, then it can all be converted into electricity. Once again, a genius move that many will benefit from. To check the whole process of the world’s largest recycling factory you need a state to the art control room! The installation does, therefore, not only serve the company by producing the sand, gravel, and filler that it sells but also the environment and the surrounding area—triple win. “ REKO can produce about one and a half million tonnes of clean sand and gravel. This also means that a lot less sand and gravel has to be dug up, which means that the landscape will be impacted much less—finally, nothing of what REKO processes have to be disposed of. None of the harmful elements will end up in the environment—another good thing for the landscape and nature. Ships will no longer be transporting imported sand and gravel that has been dug up in other countries. Instead, they will bring tar-bearing asphalt that we will convert into clean sand and gravel, which can be put to good use in the Dutch construction industry. It is the circular economy. ” If everything goes according to plan, the installation is set to become operational in a few months, by September 2020. Then it will start to turn old tar containing roads into new building materials, electricity, and heat - without any harmful emissions or residuals. Now that’s the kind of thinking that we need to save the world. Before you go! Recommended:  Solar Panel Recycling: Photovoltaics Rebirth Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about recycling? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
In our modern world, there is one thing that we certainly do not lack. Asphalt, everywhere we look. Roads, highways, parking lots - it is everywhere. ‘Asphalt’ has become the synonymous term for everything grey, mass-built, enormous, and ominous at the same time. Now, there is one company looking to repair this somewhat damaged image of asphalt - by recycling old tar Asphalt and turning it into useful building materials, heat, and electricity. Unique In The World:  100% Recycling A 100% recycling process is unique in and of itself. Pretty much all recycling processes do leave some kind of waste behind. Not this one, as designed by the Dutch company Recycling Kombinatie REKO BV. Back in 2018, construction began on its second thermal cleaning installation (REKO II-plant) in the Rotterdam port area. This cleaning installation is slated to convert up to 1.2 million tonnes of residual materials, which is a mix of tar-bearing asphalt, and roofing felt. Instead, will be turned into primary resources, including sand, gravel, electricity, and heat. 'The REKO crew'. To build a 'machine' this big you need courage, imagination, and the right decision taking! REKO is a producer of sand, gravel, and fillers for mineral-based residuals (urban mining). Asphalt is its main resource and therefore invaluable in its value chain. This asphalt is largely sourced from road construction projects and can no longer be used due to its tar-holding contents, something that is forbidden in construction. It can, however, still be used for its mineral residuals. At the start of the 21st century, REKO BV worked hard on a brand new, highly innovative process, meant as a thermal cleaning of these mineral residuals. Eventually, this research project paid off and led to the very first thermal cleaning installation for Tar Asphalt, built back in 2006 (REKO I-plant). Ever since this installation has had no problems converting up to 600,000 tonnes of mineral residuals per year. This means that over its lifetime, the installation has produced nearly 7,5 million tonnes of sand and gravel for the Dutch building industry. Recommended:  Waste: The Netherlands Creates New Material From Sewage Burning Up Damaging Components The process is fascinating. The asphalt is thermally cleaned in a rotating kiln, at temperatures of 1000 degrees Celsius. This means that all the damaging organic components in the asphalt - including tar - fully burn up. Eventually, this thermal cleaning process leads to clean sand, gravel, and filler, ready for its second life in the construction industry. The other product of this process is the extremely hot waste gas, that allows for a re-capture of energy in the form of steam with the use of a steam boiler, that is subsequently converted to electricity in a steam turbine. Inside the 'tube' - the rotating kiln - where the asphalt is thermally cleaned Each year, the existing installation (REKO I) produces some 30,000 megawatts of electricity - the rough equivalent of the amount of power used by 7,500 households on an annual basis. A significant amount, but it could be even more efficient. This is what the new installation (REKO II) in the Port of Rotterdam is cut out to do. It uses more modern techniques, while also benefiting from the 12+ years of experience that REKO now gained in the field of thermal cleaning. Not only does it use less energy, but it also generates more: it can generate sufficient electricity to power at least 50,000 households for a year. A significant improvement over the previous version that is. Recommended:  Circular-Economy Gets Game-Changer Ioniqua: PET Poster Child Of The Circular Economy This processing technique is the poster child of the circular economy, where residual materials are fully converted, and the chain is genuinely closed. No waste of any kind, only clean sand and gravel and energy and heat. It merely takes the polluting tar-bearing asphalt and processes it in a way that all the polluting and dangerous components are destroyed. That is what REKO does and hopes to do for a much larger market. In the past, only the Netherlands explicitly ruled that tar-bearing asphalt could no longer be used in construction. By now, Belgium has followed, and the rest of Europe is not far behind. This development in the international market makes the new installation even more attractive. Because of the size of the installation, combined with the large-scale reclaiming of the released energy, REKO can decrease the costs to it's customers   According to David Heijkoop, director at REKO: “ Because of the size of our installation, combined with the large-scale reclaiming of the released energy, we can decrease the costs to our customers. Combined with the very favorable location of REKO in the Port of Rotterdam, in a region where is a great lack of sand and gravel which is normally imported from Belgium and Germany – and the possibility that we can transport tar-bearing asphalt over water -, gives us an excellent starting point for the rest of Europe ." World’s Largest Recycling Factory The new installation is set to become the world’s largest recycling factory for polluted building materials. And while you might correctly assume that the burning of the asphalt requires quite a bit of energy, the materials that burn - including the forbidden tar - release up to four or five times more power than that goes in. Plus, the new installation has the added feature of providing heat as well as electricity. This heat can be transported as hot water to the district heating in the surrounding area. A nice extra is that there is a choice between the amount of electricity and heat generated: meaning, if the city of Rotterdam requires more heat, REKO can deliver this. If it is not needed, for instance, during hot summer months, then it can all be converted into electricity. Once again, a genius move that many will benefit from. To check the whole process of the world’s largest recycling factory you need a state to the art control room! The installation does, therefore, not only serve the company by producing the sand, gravel, and filler that it sells but also the environment and the surrounding area—triple win. “ REKO can produce about one and a half million tonnes of clean sand and gravel. This also means that a lot less sand and gravel has to be dug up, which means that the landscape will be impacted much less—finally, nothing of what REKO processes have to be disposed of. None of the harmful elements will end up in the environment—another good thing for the landscape and nature. Ships will no longer be transporting imported sand and gravel that has been dug up in other countries. Instead, they will bring tar-bearing asphalt that we will convert into clean sand and gravel, which can be put to good use in the Dutch construction industry. It is the circular economy. ” If everything goes according to plan, the installation is set to become operational in a few months, by September 2020. Then it will start to turn old tar containing roads into new building materials, electricity, and heat - without any harmful emissions or residuals. Now that’s the kind of thinking that we need to save the world. Before you go! Recommended:  Solar Panel Recycling: Photovoltaics Rebirth Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about recycling? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Unique In The World: Roads Turn Into Electricity
Unique In The World: Roads Turn Into Electricity
Your Future After Death: Weird And Eco Friendly
People are trying to live a more durable life, so it is not a surprise that green death is a more discussed topic. More than 80 percent of the British choose cremation over funerals, due to the premiums of space. But they have to know that with each cremation, about 250 kg of carbon dioxide emits into the atmosphere. Become Plant Food We all work towards a greener life. People have been searching online for green burials or natural funerals. New innovators and companies rise to meet this demand. Take an example from Beverly Hills star Luke Perry. He died in 2019 and got buried in a so-called mushroom suit. A mushroom suit burial is a remarkable eco-friendly gift to nature. The suit is made of organic cotton and lined with specialist mushroom spores. The person wearing it will soon be covered with growing mushrooms. Their remains will feed the fungi which rapidly decompose organic matter and remove toxic substances from the environment, in turn providing nutrients to the soil and surrounding plants. Become A Coral Reef In the late 1980s, artificial reefs, made of natural concrete, became an option for cremation. In the United States of America, you have Eternal Reefs, living legacies that memorialize our loved ones. Cremated remains of our loved ones are mixed with concrete to create a so-called 'pearl.' Loved ones can engrave the pearl with plaquettes and inscriptions, while the concrete is still wet. Then, the pearl is left at the bottom of the ocean, to be a new habit for fish and other sea life. We destroyed a lot of natural reefs, and with the artificial reefs, we can restore the damage humans made. Recommended:  Agriculture Under Water: Farming Deep At Sea In Italy Photo by: Francesco Ungaro Become The Earth Washington is the first place in the United States, where human composting remains is allowed. The concept is that when there are only natural elements in an enclosed area, such as wood chips, straw, and other greenery, bodies decompose faster than in a coffin. The process claims an 80% reduction in CO2 emissions than cremation. {youtube}                                                                             How natural burial works Within a month, bodies will become nutrient-rich soil in a warm, oxygenated environment. The resulting ground gets returned to the family of the departed, which is the perfect end for enthusiastic gardeners. Or it can be donated to nature conservation groups. Recommended:  CO2 Footprint Reduction: 5 Innovative Solutions Become A Tree The Italian designers Raoul Pretzel en Anna Citelli created a new funeral option that gives the body back to the world. They created the Capsula Mundi, which means 'world capsule' in Latin, is an egg-shaped, organic coffin in which the body gets buried in the fetal position. Once in the ground, the biodegradable shell breaks down, supplying nutrients to a tree planted just above the capsule. Bodies sealed in a coffin cannot create fertile soil. In this way, it is possible, and the tree above helps to purify the air. Be Washed Down The Drain Only in Canada and the US, there is an option for water cremation. The body gets placed in a steel container filled with a solution of alkaline and potassium hydroxide. Then it is being heated to approximately 180C. That is 800C cooler than the 980C reached during traditional cremation. Soft tissues and organs of the body get broken down into a suspension of aqueous molecules that get washed down the drain. The remaining bones are giving back to the family of the deceased. It claims to reduce co2 enormously compared to a regular cremation. The only by-product is sterile liquid. The UK has concerns about the antiseptic liquid, while the US flushes it down the drain. Before you go! Recommended: g ardening Organic Is Good For You, The Soil, Flora, And Fauna . Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about eco-friendly products? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
People are trying to live a more durable life, so it is not a surprise that green death is a more discussed topic. More than 80 percent of the British choose cremation over funerals, due to the premiums of space. But they have to know that with each cremation, about 250 kg of carbon dioxide emits into the atmosphere. Become Plant Food We all work towards a greener life. People have been searching online for green burials or natural funerals. New innovators and companies rise to meet this demand. Take an example from Beverly Hills star Luke Perry. He died in 2019 and got buried in a so-called mushroom suit. A mushroom suit burial is a remarkable eco-friendly gift to nature. The suit is made of organic cotton and lined with specialist mushroom spores. The person wearing it will soon be covered with growing mushrooms. Their remains will feed the fungi which rapidly decompose organic matter and remove toxic substances from the environment, in turn providing nutrients to the soil and surrounding plants. Become A Coral Reef In the late 1980s, artificial reefs, made of natural concrete, became an option for cremation. In the United States of America, you have Eternal Reefs, living legacies that memorialize our loved ones. Cremated remains of our loved ones are mixed with concrete to create a so-called 'pearl.' Loved ones can engrave the pearl with plaquettes and inscriptions, while the concrete is still wet. Then, the pearl is left at the bottom of the ocean, to be a new habit for fish and other sea life. We destroyed a lot of natural reefs, and with the artificial reefs, we can restore the damage humans made. Recommended:  Agriculture Under Water: Farming Deep At Sea In Italy Photo by: Francesco Ungaro Become The Earth Washington is the first place in the United States, where human composting remains is allowed. The concept is that when there are only natural elements in an enclosed area, such as wood chips, straw, and other greenery, bodies decompose faster than in a coffin. The process claims an 80% reduction in CO2 emissions than cremation. {youtube}                                                                             How natural burial works Within a month, bodies will become nutrient-rich soil in a warm, oxygenated environment. The resulting ground gets returned to the family of the departed, which is the perfect end for enthusiastic gardeners. Or it can be donated to nature conservation groups. Recommended:  CO2 Footprint Reduction: 5 Innovative Solutions Become A Tree The Italian designers Raoul Pretzel en Anna Citelli created a new funeral option that gives the body back to the world. They created the Capsula Mundi, which means 'world capsule' in Latin, is an egg-shaped, organic coffin in which the body gets buried in the fetal position. Once in the ground, the biodegradable shell breaks down, supplying nutrients to a tree planted just above the capsule. Bodies sealed in a coffin cannot create fertile soil. In this way, it is possible, and the tree above helps to purify the air. Be Washed Down The Drain Only in Canada and the US, there is an option for water cremation. The body gets placed in a steel container filled with a solution of alkaline and potassium hydroxide. Then it is being heated to approximately 180C. That is 800C cooler than the 980C reached during traditional cremation. Soft tissues and organs of the body get broken down into a suspension of aqueous molecules that get washed down the drain. The remaining bones are giving back to the family of the deceased. It claims to reduce co2 enormously compared to a regular cremation. The only by-product is sterile liquid. The UK has concerns about the antiseptic liquid, while the US flushes it down the drain. Before you go! Recommended: g ardening Organic Is Good For You, The Soil, Flora, And Fauna . Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about eco-friendly products? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Your Future After Death: Weird And Eco Friendly
Your Future After Death: Weird And Eco Friendly
Solar Panel Recycling: Photovoltaics Rebirth
The energy sector has gone through a drastic change, and the gradual transition to renewable energy sources is more than visible. But what may look durable, does not stay that way. This is at least the most occurring concern concerning photovoltaic (PV) solar panels. The Lifetime of Solar Panels Solar panels glimmering in the sun are an icon of all that is green. But while generating electricity through photovoltaics is indeed better for the environment than burning fossil fuels, several incidents have linked the manufacture of these shining symbols of environmental virtue to a trail of chemical pollution. And it turns out that the time it takes to compensate for the energy used and the greenhouse gases emitted in photovoltaic panel production varies substantially by technology and geography. Recommended:  Tiny House WikiHouse With Solar Panels On Roof And Walls They are a long-lasting source of energy, only dependent on solar radiation, and able to supply electricity to our homes. But what happens to solar panels if they don't work efficiently? Discover their journey through the process of recycling in the infographic below: What is the lifespan of solar panels? A lot of people ask this question when they consider solar panels. Research has shown that the lifespan of solar panels is about 30 years before they are dismantled. A 20 percent reduction in power can occur during the lifespan of photovoltaic panels. The maximum reduction is 10 percent between the first 10 and 12 years. This would be 20 percent when the PV panels reach 25 years. In reality, the efficiency of solar panels will decrease by only 6 to 8 percent. So, the lifespan of solar panels could be longer than officially stated. Disposal of Solar Panels From a regulatory point of view, PV panel waste still falls under the general waste classification. At the EU level, there is a single exception, where PV panels are defined as e-waste in the Directive on Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE). The management of waste from photovoltaic panels is regulated by this Directive, as a complement to other regulatory frameworks. Photo by: Ricardo Arduengo. Solar panel debris lies scattered in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in Humacao, Puerto Rico Manufacturers of solar cells are legally obliged to fulfill specific legal requirements and recycling standards to ensure that solar panels are not becoming a burden to the environment. Photovoltaic manufacturers have been working with government agencies and have thought of several ways to deal with the waste from solar energy. Solar Panel Waste We need to recycle because otherwise, there would be 60 million tons of Photovoltaic panels waste lying in landfills by 2050. The solar cells contain a specific amount of toxic substances, and that would not be a sustainable way to generate energy. {youtube}                                                                Will renewables end up as more landfills? It is a myth that solar panels are not recyclable. It needs time and research to see the full potential of adequate recycling of all solar panel parts. This is why it is necessary for recycling and designing work closely together so that the ability to recycle is guaranteed by using mindful eco-designs. Recommended:  Waste: The Netherlands Creates New Material From Sewage Solar Panel Recycling Processes There are two different main types of solar panels. They both need a different recycling approach. You have solar panels bases on silicon and based on thin-film. At this moment, solar panels based on silicon occurs more often, but that would not imply that the materials of thin-film cells would not be of significant value Research has shown that there are a lot of technologies in recycling solar panels. Some of them show a result of 96% recycling efficiency. They strive to do better in the future. Recommended:  Wind Turbines: Waste From These Blade Runners? Silicon-Based Solar Panel Recycling The process of recycling silicon-based PV panels starts with the disassembly of the actual product to split the aluminum and glass parts. You can reuse almost every piece (95%) of the glass, while all the exterior metal parts are used for the repainting of cell frames. The other materials are heated at 500°C in a thermal processing unit to facilitate bonding between the cell elements. Due to the extreme heat, the embedded plastic evaporates, making the silicon cells ready for further processing. The supported technology makes sure that even plastic is not wasted and is therefore reused as a heat source for further thermal processing. Thin-Film Based Solar Panel Recycling Thin-film based panels are processed more drastically in comparison to silicon panels. First, you need to place them in a shredder. That ensures that the particles are no bigger than 4-5mm. At this size, the lamination holds the inner materials together, breaks, and can, therefore, be removed. The remaining material exists of both liquid and solid substances. A rotating screw is used to separate these remaining materials. Recommended:  Designing Business Models: Reciprocity And Circularity Liquids undergo a dewatering and precipitation process to guarantee their purity. The resulting material goes through metal processing to completely separate the different semiconductor components. However, on average, 95% of the semiconductor material is reused. Solids are polluted with so-called interlayers, which are lighter in weight and can be eliminated by a vibrating surface. The Future Benefits of Solar Waste Management We know now solar panels are recyclable. But are there any other benefits for the economy? Recycling Photovoltaic panels will create more green jobs. PV recycling will recover around £11 billion in recoverable value by 2050. This makes it possible to produce 2 billion new panels, without investing in raw materials. As a result of the ongoing price reductions of solar energy, more households and companies are choosing to invest in solar energy systems. This will create even more economic opportunities in the solar cell recycling sector. Before you go! Recommended:  Gravitricity: Fast, Versatile Energy Storage Solution, UK Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about recycling of renewables? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
The energy sector has gone through a drastic change, and the gradual transition to renewable energy sources is more than visible. But what may look durable, does not stay that way. This is at least the most occurring concern concerning photovoltaic (PV) solar panels. The Lifetime of Solar Panels Solar panels glimmering in the sun are an icon of all that is green. But while generating electricity through photovoltaics is indeed better for the environment than burning fossil fuels, several incidents have linked the manufacture of these shining symbols of environmental virtue to a trail of chemical pollution. And it turns out that the time it takes to compensate for the energy used and the greenhouse gases emitted in photovoltaic panel production varies substantially by technology and geography. Recommended:  Tiny House WikiHouse With Solar Panels On Roof And Walls They are a long-lasting source of energy, only dependent on solar radiation, and able to supply electricity to our homes. But what happens to solar panels if they don't work efficiently? Discover their journey through the process of recycling in the infographic below: What is the lifespan of solar panels? A lot of people ask this question when they consider solar panels. Research has shown that the lifespan of solar panels is about 30 years before they are dismantled. A 20 percent reduction in power can occur during the lifespan of photovoltaic panels. The maximum reduction is 10 percent between the first 10 and 12 years. This would be 20 percent when the PV panels reach 25 years. In reality, the efficiency of solar panels will decrease by only 6 to 8 percent. So, the lifespan of solar panels could be longer than officially stated. Disposal of Solar Panels From a regulatory point of view, PV panel waste still falls under the general waste classification. At the EU level, there is a single exception, where PV panels are defined as e-waste in the Directive on Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE). The management of waste from photovoltaic panels is regulated by this Directive, as a complement to other regulatory frameworks. Photo by: Ricardo Arduengo. Solar panel debris lies scattered in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in Humacao, Puerto Rico Manufacturers of solar cells are legally obliged to fulfill specific legal requirements and recycling standards to ensure that solar panels are not becoming a burden to the environment. Photovoltaic manufacturers have been working with government agencies and have thought of several ways to deal with the waste from solar energy. Solar Panel Waste We need to recycle because otherwise, there would be 60 million tons of Photovoltaic panels waste lying in landfills by 2050. The solar cells contain a specific amount of toxic substances, and that would not be a sustainable way to generate energy. {youtube}                                                                Will renewables end up as more landfills? It is a myth that solar panels are not recyclable. It needs time and research to see the full potential of adequate recycling of all solar panel parts. This is why it is necessary for recycling and designing work closely together so that the ability to recycle is guaranteed by using mindful eco-designs. Recommended:  Waste: The Netherlands Creates New Material From Sewage Solar Panel Recycling Processes There are two different main types of solar panels. They both need a different recycling approach. You have solar panels bases on silicon and based on thin-film. At this moment, solar panels based on silicon occurs more often, but that would not imply that the materials of thin-film cells would not be of significant value Research has shown that there are a lot of technologies in recycling solar panels. Some of them show a result of 96% recycling efficiency. They strive to do better in the future. Recommended:  Wind Turbines: Waste From These Blade Runners? Silicon-Based Solar Panel Recycling The process of recycling silicon-based PV panels starts with the disassembly of the actual product to split the aluminum and glass parts. You can reuse almost every piece (95%) of the glass, while all the exterior metal parts are used for the repainting of cell frames. The other materials are heated at 500°C in a thermal processing unit to facilitate bonding between the cell elements. Due to the extreme heat, the embedded plastic evaporates, making the silicon cells ready for further processing. The supported technology makes sure that even plastic is not wasted and is therefore reused as a heat source for further thermal processing. Thin-Film Based Solar Panel Recycling Thin-film based panels are processed more drastically in comparison to silicon panels. First, you need to place them in a shredder. That ensures that the particles are no bigger than 4-5mm. At this size, the lamination holds the inner materials together, breaks, and can, therefore, be removed. The remaining material exists of both liquid and solid substances. A rotating screw is used to separate these remaining materials. Recommended:  Designing Business Models: Reciprocity And Circularity Liquids undergo a dewatering and precipitation process to guarantee their purity. The resulting material goes through metal processing to completely separate the different semiconductor components. However, on average, 95% of the semiconductor material is reused. Solids are polluted with so-called interlayers, which are lighter in weight and can be eliminated by a vibrating surface. The Future Benefits of Solar Waste Management We know now solar panels are recyclable. But are there any other benefits for the economy? Recycling Photovoltaic panels will create more green jobs. PV recycling will recover around £11 billion in recoverable value by 2050. This makes it possible to produce 2 billion new panels, without investing in raw materials. As a result of the ongoing price reductions of solar energy, more households and companies are choosing to invest in solar energy systems. This will create even more economic opportunities in the solar cell recycling sector. Before you go! Recommended:  Gravitricity: Fast, Versatile Energy Storage Solution, UK Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about recycling of renewables? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Solar Panel Recycling: Photovoltaics Rebirth
Solar Panel Recycling: Photovoltaics Rebirth
Sustainable Packaging
If you are a sucker for doing it yourself projects , you are probably familiar with all the great things you can make out of materials such as paper, wool, and carton. These DIY-projects are an excellent way to pass the time, and in some cases, a great way to save money.  Creative And Innovative Also, if you recycle waste material for your projects, you are doing not only yourself but the environment a sustainable favor. The well-known brand Samsung likes the idea of this creative recycling and creates eco-friendly packaging that can easily be turned into cat houses, remote control cases, and magazine racks. If you order one of Samsung's lifestyle TV's, such as The Sero, The Serif or The Frame, it will arrive in this new eco- friendly packaging. This sustainable packaging is made from corrugated cardboard, that is produced in an environment- friendly way. The design on the cardboard will spark the curiosity of the customer. There is a funny dot matrix on each side of the packaging that helps to cut the boxes more efficiently and will inspire to use the material for other purposes. {youtube}                                                                PlanetFirst - Samsung's Green Initiative Of course, Samsung will help with those purposes: in the manual, costumers can find ideas to reuse the cardboard. You can make cat houses, a remote- control case (for your brand new TV accessories), and even shelves from the eco- packaging. The package comes with good news for the less creative among us. By scanning the QR code on the box, you will find a step-by-step manual to reuse the packaging. Creative and innovative: Samsung was deservedly rewarded with the CES Innovation Award. Recommended: Sustainability Single-Use Care Products: Glorified Garbage Sustainable Packaging: Fight Paper Pollution Paper pollution is a huge problem, as the packaging makes up one third or more of trash, globally. Sustainable packing is much needed. With Samsung´s eco-packaging, the company hopes to contribute to reduce paper waste and inspire their consumers to recycle – and to co-design their sustainable packaging. Together with influential design magazine Dezeen, Samsung will host a global design race for its eco- packaging. “We believe that we can provide our younger generation with a new experience that considers the environment as an important way to express themselves,” said Kangwook Chun, Executive Vice President and Head of the Product Strategy Team for the Visual Display Business at Samsung Electronics to The Korea Bizwire. Before you go! Recommended:  Waste Recycling Refined: Waste Into High-Quality Products Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about sustainable packaging? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
If you are a sucker for doing it yourself projects , you are probably familiar with all the great things you can make out of materials such as paper, wool, and carton. These DIY-projects are an excellent way to pass the time, and in some cases, a great way to save money.  Creative And Innovative Also, if you recycle waste material for your projects, you are doing not only yourself but the environment a sustainable favor. The well-known brand Samsung likes the idea of this creative recycling and creates eco-friendly packaging that can easily be turned into cat houses, remote control cases, and magazine racks. If you order one of Samsung's lifestyle TV's, such as The Sero, The Serif or The Frame, it will arrive in this new eco- friendly packaging. This sustainable packaging is made from corrugated cardboard, that is produced in an environment- friendly way. The design on the cardboard will spark the curiosity of the customer. There is a funny dot matrix on each side of the packaging that helps to cut the boxes more efficiently and will inspire to use the material for other purposes. {youtube}                                                                PlanetFirst - Samsung's Green Initiative Of course, Samsung will help with those purposes: in the manual, costumers can find ideas to reuse the cardboard. You can make cat houses, a remote- control case (for your brand new TV accessories), and even shelves from the eco- packaging. The package comes with good news for the less creative among us. By scanning the QR code on the box, you will find a step-by-step manual to reuse the packaging. Creative and innovative: Samsung was deservedly rewarded with the CES Innovation Award. Recommended: Sustainability Single-Use Care Products: Glorified Garbage Sustainable Packaging: Fight Paper Pollution Paper pollution is a huge problem, as the packaging makes up one third or more of trash, globally. Sustainable packing is much needed. With Samsung´s eco-packaging, the company hopes to contribute to reduce paper waste and inspire their consumers to recycle – and to co-design their sustainable packaging. Together with influential design magazine Dezeen, Samsung will host a global design race for its eco- packaging. “We believe that we can provide our younger generation with a new experience that considers the environment as an important way to express themselves,” said Kangwook Chun, Executive Vice President and Head of the Product Strategy Team for the Visual Display Business at Samsung Electronics to The Korea Bizwire. Before you go! Recommended:  Waste Recycling Refined: Waste Into High-Quality Products Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about sustainable packaging? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Sustainable Packaging
Sustainable Packaging
Waste

Waste is something unwanted or is material we cannot use anymore. Waste is any material or product that is worthless, defective, or of any use. In the near past, it had hardly any economic value anymore. Still, nowadays, there are plenty of people and organizations recycling waste and making from the regained parts again valuable material for reuse—the Circular Economy at work.

Waste, Refuse, Recycle: Towards A Circular Economy

Even better is a zero waste environment. That means no waste is sent to landfills. A zero-waste lifestyle means: using fewer resources, eating healthier, saving money, and less negative impact on the environment. Go for the 5 R’s: refuse, reduce, reuse, recycle, and rot.

By reducing waste, we can make a big difference. If there was an urge to develop waste reduction ideas and sustainable recycling solutions and share these topics globally, it’s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers, and influencers to write about waste reduction, your experiences, and expectations for the future at home and globally. 

Boost Global Sustainability Now, that’s what you can do together with WhatsOrb. What's in for me?

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