Waste

About: <h1>Waste, refuse, recycle: towards a circulair economy</h1> <p>Waste is something unwanted or are materials we cannot use anymore. Waste is any material or product which is worthless, defect or of any use. In the near past it had hardly any economic value anymore but nowadays there are plenty people and organisations which are recycling waste and make from the regained parts again valuable material for reuse. The Circular Economy at work.</p> <p>Even better is a zero waste environment. That means no waste send to landfills. A zero waste lifestyle means: using less resources, eating healthier, saving money and less negative impact on the environment. Go for the 5 R&rsquo;s: refuse, reduce, reuse, recycle and rot.</p> <p>By reducing waste we can make a big difference. If there was an urge to come up with waste reduction ideas and sustainable recycle solutions and share these topics globally it&rsquo;s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about waste reduction your experiences and expectations for the future at home and globally.&nbsp;</p> <p>Global Sustainability X-change, that&rsquo;s what you can do together with WhatsOrb.&nbsp;<a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/blog/your-shared-sustainable-ideas-make-our-earth-a-better-place">What's in for me?</a></p>
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Are Bio Based Bottles Good For The Environment?
The Paper Bottle Project and brewer Carlsberg think both that it is a great idea. Prototypes were produced from virgin pulp derived from the Scandinavian forests and are ‘fully recyclable’. Shaping a path towards a sustainable bio-based paper bottle solution. Challenge innovators and designers, they understand that packaging plays as much a role in the consumer experience as it does in creating waste. Today, we also know that we have the power to answer to both consumer and environmental demands by challenging conventional packaging and developing alternatives that will one day become the norm. Replacing materials that threaten our planet and minimise waste, ultimately, lending a hand to shape a path towards a more sustainable future. Are Paper Bottles A Sustainable Possibility? The Paper Bottle Project does and created a collaborative platform between BillerudKorsnäs, Grow, multi-disciplinary experts in tech and leading Brand Partners of various categories. Together we embark on an explorative journey with a mission to create a bio-based paper bottle solution that leaves a minimal to neutral environmental footprint for global benefit. For the design of this new bottle solution, it was important that the structural and graphic language not only mirror our collaborative process but also embody the natural harmony between material, design and manufacturing. The result became an interplay of form and identity that could appeal to a broad range of potential brand owners, and yet represent a unique visual language with characteristics that stay true to the origins of the material. What makes packaging sustainable? Sustainable Packaging Reduces Use Of Resources The use of sustainable packaging can also play a role in the amount of energy it takes to package a product or make the actual packaging itself. It can reduce solid waste, water usage, electricity and emissions. Made of virgin pulp derived from the Scandinavian forests, the visual direction for the concept’s design as we like to say, was born from the woods. Does Brewer Carlsberg Also Wants To Produce A ‘Paper Bottle’ For Its Beer? Carlsberg has released details of two new ‘paper bottle’ research prototypes it’s working on. In an announcement made during the C40 World Mayors Summit in Copenhagen, the Danish brewing giant said the; ‘Green Fibre Bottle’ prototypes were produced from sustainably sourced wood fibres and ‘fully recyclable’. The business has been developing the idea since 2015, working with packaging experts and academics on the project. An ‘inner barrier’ is used to ensure the bottles can carry beer. One prototype uses a recycled polyethylene terephthalate polymer film barrier, which acts as a thin internal lining. The other uses what Carlsberg described as a ‘100% bio-based’ polyethylene furanoate polymer film barrier. The prototypes will now be tested, with Carlsberg stating that its eventual aim was to produce a ‘100% bio-based bottle without polymers’. Carlsberg is ‘pleased with the progress on the Green Fibre Bottle so far’. {youtube}                                                      Are Bio Based Bottles Good For The Environment?                           Carlsberg Unveils PAPER Beer Bottles Made from Sustainably Sourced Recyclable Wood While we are not completely there yet, the two prototypes are an important step towards realizing our ultimate ambition of bringing this breakthrough to market. The company would continue to work with experts to ‘overcome remaining technical challenges’. Carlsberg is one of many major international firms looking to change the way it packages products. Is Eco-friendly Packaging, The Next Thing In Craft Beer? For a research team in Scotland designing an environmentally friendly packaging for craft beer made with an unusual material is this the case! Cuantec - a bio-tech firm backed by the University of Strathclyde alongside three investors including the Scottish Investment Bank - says it is using the remains of shellfish to manufacture bio-degradable six-pack rings, potentially saving millions of animals each year which are killed by entanglement. Recommended:  Sustainability Single-Use Care Products: Glorified Garbage The scientists in Motherwell, North Lanarkshire, were originally working towards a degradable alternative to food packaging, but believe they are just months away from a breakthrough which could see beer firms adopting the new ‘plastic rings’ later this year. Cuantec partnered with local brewery Jaw Brew to create the new can connectors, and says success would turn the business ‘from a research company into a production company’. If they get the science right in the next six months, they could be available by the end of the year. Tests are done in the lab and resulted in strong ideas for the formulation. The firm’s chief operating officer Dr Ryan Taylor, an analytical chemist and alumnus of Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, began working on the project in Spring 2017. He received support in establishing the company from his alma mater through the Strathclyde Entrepreneurs Fund, which invests in business ventures by the University community. Around 100 million marine mammals are affected each year by plastic waste, according to a study by the University of Plymouth, while hundreds of thousands of animals die as a result of being caught in plastic rings. Recommended:  Plastic Waste And Turtles: A Worldwide Fatal Attraction The firm intends to launch the bio degradable rings in the drinks market by 2020, and recently launched a crowdfunding campaign to secure € 173,000 worth of investment to hire more staff and expand its facilities. Murray-Green said the firm already has customers lined up. Plastic pollution has hit the headlines and people are starting to realise that everything they do has an impact. We bring home more plastic than we do food, it’s ridiculous. Everything is packaged and wrapped in some form of it. We can’t change the food industry overnight, but at least we can make a contribution to stopping the damage that these choices have done. What packaging is the most environmentally friendly? Recycled cardboard environmental packaging. For bulk packaging and items of all shapes and sizes, cardboard may still be the answer. However, cardboard can still be environmentally friendly, providing you choose cardboard from sustainable sources. Are there Wine Producers Who Are Interested In Eco Friendly Packaging? In the world of wine, it can be difficult to stand out from the crowd. But as this collection proves, it is still possible to reinvent the wheel (or bottle) and push the boundaries of design in innovative and eco-friendly inventive ways. While most producers will tell you that the liquid is the most important part of the production process (and it ultimately is), packaging plays a vital role in the marketing of a brand, even more so considering today’s tech-savvy, choice-rich, brand-hopping consumer base. Making wine more accessible, interesting and appealing should be a priority for any brand, with the label and packaging one of the most effective tools in a producer’s arsenal. Rather than being a short-lived novelty or gimmick, the most successful and original designs are executed with a specific need in mind, whether its accessibility, education, convenience, fighting for an eco-minded cause, or even fulfilling the needs of the admittedly niche space travelling wine lover. Extravagant design for design’s sake of course has its place, as does tradition. But the most memorable products are those that push the boundaries of expectation with a clear purpose, resulting in a truly unique, striking or practical design – either fabulously flamboyant or so simple you wonder why no-one thought of it sooner. Omdesign 2016 Acorn Port Planter This clever, eco-friendly packaging comes from Portuguese design agency Omdesign.  In keeping with its ethos of wanting to give back to nature, its latest design comprises a bottle of 2012 LBV Port inside a cork gift tube. Inside the tube is a real acorn, covered with soil, encouraging consumers to take part in. Portugal’s Cork Oak Forest Preservation Efforts. Once the tree begins to grow, the recipient can replant it to a permanent position in the ground and mark the area with the wooden ring from the centre of the package, creating a lasting monument to its design. The base can later be reused to collect more acorns and renew the cycle. Omdesign has won the award for Best Sustainable Packaging at the Drinks Business Awards. Blossom Cava Bouquet Sustainable Package Turning design on its head, quite literally, this wine bottle design from Norway’s PackLab for Sweden’s Stella Wines, part of the Solera Beverage Group, is intended to be upended and carried by the neck, mimicking a bunch of flowers. Why bother to take a bunch of flowers and a bottle of wine to a dinner party when you gift both in one handy package? Garcon Wines Flattened Wine Bottle Garcon Wines is a start-up company, launched by entrepreneur Joe Revell, which claims to be the first wine home delivery service that is able to post wine through a customers’ letterbox thanks to its flattened wine bottle design. The bottles, which are 100% recyclable, have the same 750ml volume of a conventional glass wine bottle but have been flattened and made longer so they can fit through a letterbox. The bottle itself is 34 centimetre in length, about 5 centimetre taller than a regular wine bottle but around half as thick. The bottles are packed in cardboard boxes. Earlier this year, the company officially  launched its flat ‘letterbox-friendly’ wine bottle in the UK, having partnered with online florist, Bloom & Wild. Customers can purchase a flattened bottle of Merlot or Sauvignon Blanc, both from Chile, along with a bunch of flowers, if they wish. Wasem Double Insulated Wine Bottle  A German design company unveiled what is claims is the ‘world’s first double-layer wine bottle’ which keeps wine cold without the need to put it back in the cooler. Called ‘Cooleo’, the bottle has already been adopted by German winery Wasem, which has ordered 6,000 bottles to house its Pinot Noir rosé and dry Riesling. The double-walled bottle provides an insulating layer which helps to keep drinks cold, removing the need to put the bottle back in the fridge, the brand claims. It is made from hand-blown Borosilicate glass, which ‘has outstanding clarity and scratch-resistant durability’ flattened wine bottle. It is sealed with a glass Vinolok closure meaning that the bottle can be up-cycled and reused. Kim Soohee, founder and CEO of the design company Our Wonderful World, which has launched the product, hopes that people will also customise the bottle using different designs, graphics, artwork and wines. Recommended:  Hydrogen Powered Gin: Sustainable Gin Could Become Reality Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
The Paper Bottle Project and brewer Carlsberg think both that it is a great idea. Prototypes were produced from virgin pulp derived from the Scandinavian forests and are ‘fully recyclable’. Shaping a path towards a sustainable bio-based paper bottle solution. Challenge innovators and designers, they understand that packaging plays as much a role in the consumer experience as it does in creating waste. Today, we also know that we have the power to answer to both consumer and environmental demands by challenging conventional packaging and developing alternatives that will one day become the norm. Replacing materials that threaten our planet and minimise waste, ultimately, lending a hand to shape a path towards a more sustainable future. Are Paper Bottles A Sustainable Possibility? The Paper Bottle Project does and created a collaborative platform between BillerudKorsnäs, Grow, multi-disciplinary experts in tech and leading Brand Partners of various categories. Together we embark on an explorative journey with a mission to create a bio-based paper bottle solution that leaves a minimal to neutral environmental footprint for global benefit. For the design of this new bottle solution, it was important that the structural and graphic language not only mirror our collaborative process but also embody the natural harmony between material, design and manufacturing. The result became an interplay of form and identity that could appeal to a broad range of potential brand owners, and yet represent a unique visual language with characteristics that stay true to the origins of the material. What makes packaging sustainable? Sustainable Packaging Reduces Use Of Resources The use of sustainable packaging can also play a role in the amount of energy it takes to package a product or make the actual packaging itself. It can reduce solid waste, water usage, electricity and emissions. Made of virgin pulp derived from the Scandinavian forests, the visual direction for the concept’s design as we like to say, was born from the woods. Does Brewer Carlsberg Also Wants To Produce A ‘Paper Bottle’ For Its Beer? Carlsberg has released details of two new ‘paper bottle’ research prototypes it’s working on. In an announcement made during the C40 World Mayors Summit in Copenhagen, the Danish brewing giant said the; ‘Green Fibre Bottle’ prototypes were produced from sustainably sourced wood fibres and ‘fully recyclable’. The business has been developing the idea since 2015, working with packaging experts and academics on the project. An ‘inner barrier’ is used to ensure the bottles can carry beer. One prototype uses a recycled polyethylene terephthalate polymer film barrier, which acts as a thin internal lining. The other uses what Carlsberg described as a ‘100% bio-based’ polyethylene furanoate polymer film barrier. The prototypes will now be tested, with Carlsberg stating that its eventual aim was to produce a ‘100% bio-based bottle without polymers’. Carlsberg is ‘pleased with the progress on the Green Fibre Bottle so far’. {youtube}                                                      Are Bio Based Bottles Good For The Environment?                           Carlsberg Unveils PAPER Beer Bottles Made from Sustainably Sourced Recyclable Wood While we are not completely there yet, the two prototypes are an important step towards realizing our ultimate ambition of bringing this breakthrough to market. The company would continue to work with experts to ‘overcome remaining technical challenges’. Carlsberg is one of many major international firms looking to change the way it packages products. Is Eco-friendly Packaging, The Next Thing In Craft Beer? For a research team in Scotland designing an environmentally friendly packaging for craft beer made with an unusual material is this the case! Cuantec - a bio-tech firm backed by the University of Strathclyde alongside three investors including the Scottish Investment Bank - says it is using the remains of shellfish to manufacture bio-degradable six-pack rings, potentially saving millions of animals each year which are killed by entanglement. Recommended:  Sustainability Single-Use Care Products: Glorified Garbage The scientists in Motherwell, North Lanarkshire, were originally working towards a degradable alternative to food packaging, but believe they are just months away from a breakthrough which could see beer firms adopting the new ‘plastic rings’ later this year. Cuantec partnered with local brewery Jaw Brew to create the new can connectors, and says success would turn the business ‘from a research company into a production company’. If they get the science right in the next six months, they could be available by the end of the year. Tests are done in the lab and resulted in strong ideas for the formulation. The firm’s chief operating officer Dr Ryan Taylor, an analytical chemist and alumnus of Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, began working on the project in Spring 2017. He received support in establishing the company from his alma mater through the Strathclyde Entrepreneurs Fund, which invests in business ventures by the University community. Around 100 million marine mammals are affected each year by plastic waste, according to a study by the University of Plymouth, while hundreds of thousands of animals die as a result of being caught in plastic rings. Recommended:  Plastic Waste And Turtles: A Worldwide Fatal Attraction The firm intends to launch the bio degradable rings in the drinks market by 2020, and recently launched a crowdfunding campaign to secure € 173,000 worth of investment to hire more staff and expand its facilities. Murray-Green said the firm already has customers lined up. Plastic pollution has hit the headlines and people are starting to realise that everything they do has an impact. We bring home more plastic than we do food, it’s ridiculous. Everything is packaged and wrapped in some form of it. We can’t change the food industry overnight, but at least we can make a contribution to stopping the damage that these choices have done. What packaging is the most environmentally friendly? Recycled cardboard environmental packaging. For bulk packaging and items of all shapes and sizes, cardboard may still be the answer. However, cardboard can still be environmentally friendly, providing you choose cardboard from sustainable sources. Are there Wine Producers Who Are Interested In Eco Friendly Packaging? In the world of wine, it can be difficult to stand out from the crowd. But as this collection proves, it is still possible to reinvent the wheel (or bottle) and push the boundaries of design in innovative and eco-friendly inventive ways. While most producers will tell you that the liquid is the most important part of the production process (and it ultimately is), packaging plays a vital role in the marketing of a brand, even more so considering today’s tech-savvy, choice-rich, brand-hopping consumer base. Making wine more accessible, interesting and appealing should be a priority for any brand, with the label and packaging one of the most effective tools in a producer’s arsenal. Rather than being a short-lived novelty or gimmick, the most successful and original designs are executed with a specific need in mind, whether its accessibility, education, convenience, fighting for an eco-minded cause, or even fulfilling the needs of the admittedly niche space travelling wine lover. Extravagant design for design’s sake of course has its place, as does tradition. But the most memorable products are those that push the boundaries of expectation with a clear purpose, resulting in a truly unique, striking or practical design – either fabulously flamboyant or so simple you wonder why no-one thought of it sooner. Omdesign 2016 Acorn Port Planter This clever, eco-friendly packaging comes from Portuguese design agency Omdesign.  In keeping with its ethos of wanting to give back to nature, its latest design comprises a bottle of 2012 LBV Port inside a cork gift tube. Inside the tube is a real acorn, covered with soil, encouraging consumers to take part in. Portugal’s Cork Oak Forest Preservation Efforts. Once the tree begins to grow, the recipient can replant it to a permanent position in the ground and mark the area with the wooden ring from the centre of the package, creating a lasting monument to its design. The base can later be reused to collect more acorns and renew the cycle. Omdesign has won the award for Best Sustainable Packaging at the Drinks Business Awards. Blossom Cava Bouquet Sustainable Package Turning design on its head, quite literally, this wine bottle design from Norway’s PackLab for Sweden’s Stella Wines, part of the Solera Beverage Group, is intended to be upended and carried by the neck, mimicking a bunch of flowers. Why bother to take a bunch of flowers and a bottle of wine to a dinner party when you gift both in one handy package? Garcon Wines Flattened Wine Bottle Garcon Wines is a start-up company, launched by entrepreneur Joe Revell, which claims to be the first wine home delivery service that is able to post wine through a customers’ letterbox thanks to its flattened wine bottle design. The bottles, which are 100% recyclable, have the same 750ml volume of a conventional glass wine bottle but have been flattened and made longer so they can fit through a letterbox. The bottle itself is 34 centimetre in length, about 5 centimetre taller than a regular wine bottle but around half as thick. The bottles are packed in cardboard boxes. Earlier this year, the company officially  launched its flat ‘letterbox-friendly’ wine bottle in the UK, having partnered with online florist, Bloom & Wild. Customers can purchase a flattened bottle of Merlot or Sauvignon Blanc, both from Chile, along with a bunch of flowers, if they wish. Wasem Double Insulated Wine Bottle  A German design company unveiled what is claims is the ‘world’s first double-layer wine bottle’ which keeps wine cold without the need to put it back in the cooler. Called ‘Cooleo’, the bottle has already been adopted by German winery Wasem, which has ordered 6,000 bottles to house its Pinot Noir rosé and dry Riesling. The double-walled bottle provides an insulating layer which helps to keep drinks cold, removing the need to put the bottle back in the fridge, the brand claims. It is made from hand-blown Borosilicate glass, which ‘has outstanding clarity and scratch-resistant durability’ flattened wine bottle. It is sealed with a glass Vinolok closure meaning that the bottle can be up-cycled and reused. Kim Soohee, founder and CEO of the design company Our Wonderful World, which has launched the product, hopes that people will also customise the bottle using different designs, graphics, artwork and wines. Recommended:  Hydrogen Powered Gin: Sustainable Gin Could Become Reality Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Are Bio Based Bottles Good For The Environment?
Are Bio Based Bottles Good For The Environment?
Waste: The Netherlands Creates New Material From Sewage
There is a new sustainable raw material available, taken from the excess granular sludge released during the treatment of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Epe, the Netherlands. This new sustainable raw material is made possible by the Dutch Water Authority Vallei en Veluwe. Construction Of The Installation The board of Vallei en Veluwe has given the green light for the development of an installation who can carry out this process. In the spring of 2020, it has to be finished and working. Material From Sewage Has Unique Features {youtube}                                                            This video is only available in the Dutch language                                                    Waste: The Netherlands Creates New Material From Sewage                                                     Kaumera Nereda Gum - samenwerkende partners in beeld   The sustainable and biological raw material, Kaumera Nereda Gum, has a few exceptional qualities. It can retain water, but also repel it. This offers various possibilities for its use in the agriculture and horticulture, the paper industry and the construction sector.  For example, if you add Kaumera to the soil, fertilisers can be retained much longer. But you can add Kaumera as well to concrete floors, for a better coating. It last longer and its hardening better. Recommended:  Bioplastic From Fish Scale And Skin Composts Quickly: UK Circular Economy What is a circular economy? A circular economy (often referred to simply as ‘circularity’) is an economic system aimed at eliminating waste and the continual use of resources. Circular systems employ reuse, sharing, repair, remanufacturing and recycling to create a close-loop system, minimising the use of resource inputs and the creation of waste, pollution and carbon emissions The goal of the national government is to have a completely circular economy by 2050 in the country. To achieve that goal, Kaumera could play an important role as raw material. Tanja Klip-Martin, chair of the Water Authority, says: "together with our partners, we are fully committed to the research, production and application of Kaumera to achieve this goal". Sewage Purification Technology What are the different types of wastewater? Types of wastewater: Wastewater comes in three main types namely Blackwater, Graywater and Yellow water. This is wastewater that originates from toilet fixtures, dishwashers, and food preparation sinks. It is made up of all the things that you can imagine going down the toilets, bath and sink drains. The raw material is obtained from the sewage sludge generated by Nereda's sewage technology. In 2012, the Vallei en Veluwe Water Board was the world' s first to start utilising this technology in Epe. There is way less energy needed to purify the sewage water. This innovative and organic method of wastewater treatment is now used in more and more installations all over the world. Recommended:  Agriculture, Using Wastewater As Natural Fertilizer: Mexico Creating New Material From Sewage In Two factories Within a year, the Vallei en Veluwe Water Authority and the Rijn en IJssel Water Authority work together to build two factories. A factory will open in Zutphen in the autumn of 2019. This factory will take Kaumera from wastewater from the dairy industry. Next to the factory in Zutphen, there will be an operational factory in Epe in the spring of 2020. They also extract Kaumera, but then from municipal sewage water. A lot of people are happy with this innovation; the extraction of Kaumera from wastewater is widely supported in this sector. Next to Rijn en IJssel, Vallei en Veluwe, the water authorities of Noorderzijlvest, Vechtstromen, Waterbedrijf Limburg and Hoogheemraadschap de Stichtse Rijnlanden are also involved. Working Together A lot of companies worked together to make it possible to extract Kaumera. They all have their knowledge and expertise to recover, process and market this new raw material. At this way, they are all working together to create a sustainable, circular economy. This all can be created and developed, thanks to the financial contributions of the Province of Gelderland, the European Union (LIFE), and the Ministry of Economic Affairs (DEI). Collaboration and innovation are essential to make things happen. Before you go! Recommended:  Climate Change Efforts On Reducing CO2 Why Not Recycle It? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
There is a new sustainable raw material available, taken from the excess granular sludge released during the treatment of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Epe, the Netherlands. This new sustainable raw material is made possible by the Dutch Water Authority Vallei en Veluwe. Construction Of The Installation The board of Vallei en Veluwe has given the green light for the development of an installation who can carry out this process. In the spring of 2020, it has to be finished and working. Material From Sewage Has Unique Features {youtube}                                                            This video is only available in the Dutch language                                                    Waste: The Netherlands Creates New Material From Sewage                                                     Kaumera Nereda Gum - samenwerkende partners in beeld   The sustainable and biological raw material, Kaumera Nereda Gum, has a few exceptional qualities. It can retain water, but also repel it. This offers various possibilities for its use in the agriculture and horticulture, the paper industry and the construction sector.  For example, if you add Kaumera to the soil, fertilisers can be retained much longer. But you can add Kaumera as well to concrete floors, for a better coating. It last longer and its hardening better. Recommended:  Bioplastic From Fish Scale And Skin Composts Quickly: UK Circular Economy What is a circular economy? A circular economy (often referred to simply as ‘circularity’) is an economic system aimed at eliminating waste and the continual use of resources. Circular systems employ reuse, sharing, repair, remanufacturing and recycling to create a close-loop system, minimising the use of resource inputs and the creation of waste, pollution and carbon emissions The goal of the national government is to have a completely circular economy by 2050 in the country. To achieve that goal, Kaumera could play an important role as raw material. Tanja Klip-Martin, chair of the Water Authority, says: "together with our partners, we are fully committed to the research, production and application of Kaumera to achieve this goal". Sewage Purification Technology What are the different types of wastewater? Types of wastewater: Wastewater comes in three main types namely Blackwater, Graywater and Yellow water. This is wastewater that originates from toilet fixtures, dishwashers, and food preparation sinks. It is made up of all the things that you can imagine going down the toilets, bath and sink drains. The raw material is obtained from the sewage sludge generated by Nereda's sewage technology. In 2012, the Vallei en Veluwe Water Board was the world' s first to start utilising this technology in Epe. There is way less energy needed to purify the sewage water. This innovative and organic method of wastewater treatment is now used in more and more installations all over the world. Recommended:  Agriculture, Using Wastewater As Natural Fertilizer: Mexico Creating New Material From Sewage In Two factories Within a year, the Vallei en Veluwe Water Authority and the Rijn en IJssel Water Authority work together to build two factories. A factory will open in Zutphen in the autumn of 2019. This factory will take Kaumera from wastewater from the dairy industry. Next to the factory in Zutphen, there will be an operational factory in Epe in the spring of 2020. They also extract Kaumera, but then from municipal sewage water. A lot of people are happy with this innovation; the extraction of Kaumera from wastewater is widely supported in this sector. Next to Rijn en IJssel, Vallei en Veluwe, the water authorities of Noorderzijlvest, Vechtstromen, Waterbedrijf Limburg and Hoogheemraadschap de Stichtse Rijnlanden are also involved. Working Together A lot of companies worked together to make it possible to extract Kaumera. They all have their knowledge and expertise to recover, process and market this new raw material. At this way, they are all working together to create a sustainable, circular economy. This all can be created and developed, thanks to the financial contributions of the Province of Gelderland, the European Union (LIFE), and the Ministry of Economic Affairs (DEI). Collaboration and innovation are essential to make things happen. Before you go! Recommended:  Climate Change Efforts On Reducing CO2 Why Not Recycle It? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Waste: The Netherlands Creates New Material From Sewage
Waste: The Netherlands Creates New Material From Sewage
Bioplastic From Fish Scale And Skin Composts Quickly: UK
Did you know we do not have to use single-use plastic for our bread or fruit? Lucy Hughes is a graduate from the University of Sussex and made a MarinaTex out of fish waste to create a compostable alternative. She won the UK James Dyson Award this year for her design. MarinaTex From Fish Scale And Skin  Lucy used for her MarinaTex design fish skin and scales and waste products, which were usually buried or burned in a dump. The material is translucent and flexible, so the ideal candidate for disposable packagings, such as sandwich packs and bags. But, more importantly, it will be decomposed within four to six weeks in home composts or food waste bins. Recommended:  Microplastics Can Be Moved From The Ocean: Is It Harming Us? Lucy created the MarinaTex as her final-year project, and she thought it would be useful to have an environmental benefit as well. She wanted to challenge herself to use other materials, and so it all started with a waste dream. "For me, a good design is something that bridges the gap between behaviours, business and our planet." {youtube}                                              Bioplastic From Fish Scale And Skin Composts Quickly: UK                                       Fish scale bioplastic wins UK James Dyson Award for student design Unlike some of the current biodegradable plastics, Hughes' biomaterial would not need separate waste collection infrastructure for its disposal. Another advantage of the product is that it is energy efficient to produce, and because it is based on waste, it does not burden the earth's natural resources. According to the UK Sea Fish Industry Authority, the UK produces almost 500,000 tonnes of waste every year by fish processing. Lucy says that the waste from only one Atlantic cod is capable of producing 1,400 MarinaTex bags.   What does bioplastic mean? Bioplastics are plastic materials produced from renewable biomass sources, such as vegetable fats and oils, corn starch, straw, woodchips, sawdust, recycled food waste, etc. Bioplastic can be made from agricultural by-products and also from used plastic bottles and other containers using microorganisms.   Hughes had to do more than 100 experiments to came up with this final design of refined bioplastic mixture. It all happened on the kitchen stove in her student dorm. MarinaTex is strong, with high tensile strength. It is sustainable and is not at the expense of quality. Are you convinced as well? Before you go! Recommended:  Sustainable Bicycle Is Made From Recycled Plastic In Brazil Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Did you know we do not have to use single-use plastic for our bread or fruit? Lucy Hughes is a graduate from the University of Sussex and made a MarinaTex out of fish waste to create a compostable alternative. She won the UK James Dyson Award this year for her design. MarinaTex From Fish Scale And Skin  Lucy used for her MarinaTex design fish skin and scales and waste products, which were usually buried or burned in a dump. The material is translucent and flexible, so the ideal candidate for disposable packagings, such as sandwich packs and bags. But, more importantly, it will be decomposed within four to six weeks in home composts or food waste bins. Recommended:  Microplastics Can Be Moved From The Ocean: Is It Harming Us? Lucy created the MarinaTex as her final-year project, and she thought it would be useful to have an environmental benefit as well. She wanted to challenge herself to use other materials, and so it all started with a waste dream. "For me, a good design is something that bridges the gap between behaviours, business and our planet." {youtube}                                              Bioplastic From Fish Scale And Skin Composts Quickly: UK                                       Fish scale bioplastic wins UK James Dyson Award for student design Unlike some of the current biodegradable plastics, Hughes' biomaterial would not need separate waste collection infrastructure for its disposal. Another advantage of the product is that it is energy efficient to produce, and because it is based on waste, it does not burden the earth's natural resources. According to the UK Sea Fish Industry Authority, the UK produces almost 500,000 tonnes of waste every year by fish processing. Lucy says that the waste from only one Atlantic cod is capable of producing 1,400 MarinaTex bags.   What does bioplastic mean? Bioplastics are plastic materials produced from renewable biomass sources, such as vegetable fats and oils, corn starch, straw, woodchips, sawdust, recycled food waste, etc. Bioplastic can be made from agricultural by-products and also from used plastic bottles and other containers using microorganisms.   Hughes had to do more than 100 experiments to came up with this final design of refined bioplastic mixture. It all happened on the kitchen stove in her student dorm. MarinaTex is strong, with high tensile strength. It is sustainable and is not at the expense of quality. Are you convinced as well? Before you go! Recommended:  Sustainable Bicycle Is Made From Recycled Plastic In Brazil Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Bioplastic From Fish Scale And Skin Composts Quickly: UK
Bioplastic From Fish Scale And Skin Composts Quickly: UK
Recycling Asphalt Generates Massive Amount Of Electricity
REKO has started the construction of a new thermal cleaning installation in Rotterdam that will completely convert 1.2 million tonnes of residual materials into primary raw materials, electricity and heat. The realization of this project involves an investment of 125 million euros. REKO, Recycling Combination REKO B.V, is a producer of sand, gravel and fillers from mineral residues. The company mainly uses asphalt as raw material from road construction and roof leather from utility construction. REKO developed its innovative process specifically intended for the thermal cleaning of these mineral residues. This led to the first thermal cleaning installation that was commissioned by REKO in 2006. In this installation, all harmful substances present in the asphalt burn completely. The thermal cleaning process results in clean sand, gravel and filler - ready for reuse . Also, the installation provides hot waste gases from which energy is recovered in the form of steam, and later on, electricity via a steam turbine. Approximately 30 thousand megawatts of electricity are generated per year: the same amount that approximately 7,500 households on yearly basis. In the past 12 years, 7.2 million tonnes of clean sand and gravel have been produced for the Dutch construction industry. The largest recycle capacity in the world The new installation is considerably more efficient because it uses the most new techniques. Moreover, the 12 years of experience that REKO has gained in the field of thermal cleaning has been incorporated into this installation. The new installation not only uses less energy, but also generates considerably more energy. It can generate electricity for as many as 50,000 households. In addition, the installation is made suitable for supplying heat in addition to electricity. The REKO processing technology is a textbook example for circular economy, in which residual materials are 100% converted into new raw materials. With the new installation, REKO has the largest capacity in the world to fully recycle this type of contaminated building material. Recycling for a European market In the past, coal tar was used as a binder in the production of asphalt, which contains polluting polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, better known as PAHs. In the Netherlands, since 2001, tar-containing asphalt can no longer be used in the production of new asphalt. The tar-containing asphalt granulate must be processed in a way that the polluting components, such as PAHs, are completely destroyed. At the time, the Dutch legislator was the first in Europe with the requirement to permanently remove paks from the chain. This year, the Flemish government followed this example. REKO fulfills the government's objective of removing these harmful substances from the environment . The newest thermal cleaning installation is partly built considering the development of the international market. David Heijkoop, director of REKO: “Due to the size of our installation, in combination with the large-scale recovery of the energy released, we can reduce the costs for our customers. Also, the location of REKO in the port of Rotterdam provides an excellent starting position for the rest of Europe: we can supply over water. When realized that the Netherlands imports 20 million tons of sand and gravel as primary raw materials for construction from abroad every year, it becomes clear that we can partly meet that need," he adds.  REKO will soon be able to supply around 1.5 million tonnes of clean sand and gravel annually. Electricity and heat The thermal cleaning installation uses energy to ignite the combustible components in the asphalt and roof leather. Through the process, four to five times more energy is released then used. In the existing installation, that energy is used to generate electricity. The new installation makes this conversion to electricity much more efficient, and also supplies heat in the form of hot water. The Port of Rotterdam Authority is contributing € 1 million for the realization of this specific part of the installation. The installation will be able to flexibly choose to what extent the energy released during the cleaning process will be converted into heat and / or electricity. When the heat is not required, the installation will convert the energy into electricity. The work on the construction of the new thermal cleaning installation has already started. According to planning, the new installation will be commissioned in mid-2020. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/waste
REKO has started the construction of a new thermal cleaning installation in Rotterdam that will completely convert 1.2 million tonnes of residual materials into primary raw materials, electricity and heat. The realization of this project involves an investment of 125 million euros. REKO, Recycling Combination REKO B.V, is a producer of sand, gravel and fillers from mineral residues. The company mainly uses asphalt as raw material from road construction and roof leather from utility construction. REKO developed its innovative process specifically intended for the thermal cleaning of these mineral residues. This led to the first thermal cleaning installation that was commissioned by REKO in 2006. In this installation, all harmful substances present in the asphalt burn completely. The thermal cleaning process results in clean sand, gravel and filler - ready for reuse . Also, the installation provides hot waste gases from which energy is recovered in the form of steam, and later on, electricity via a steam turbine. Approximately 30 thousand megawatts of electricity are generated per year: the same amount that approximately 7,500 households on yearly basis. In the past 12 years, 7.2 million tonnes of clean sand and gravel have been produced for the Dutch construction industry. The largest recycle capacity in the world The new installation is considerably more efficient because it uses the most new techniques. Moreover, the 12 years of experience that REKO has gained in the field of thermal cleaning has been incorporated into this installation. The new installation not only uses less energy, but also generates considerably more energy. It can generate electricity for as many as 50,000 households. In addition, the installation is made suitable for supplying heat in addition to electricity. The REKO processing technology is a textbook example for circular economy, in which residual materials are 100% converted into new raw materials. With the new installation, REKO has the largest capacity in the world to fully recycle this type of contaminated building material. Recycling for a European market In the past, coal tar was used as a binder in the production of asphalt, which contains polluting polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, better known as PAHs. In the Netherlands, since 2001, tar-containing asphalt can no longer be used in the production of new asphalt. The tar-containing asphalt granulate must be processed in a way that the polluting components, such as PAHs, are completely destroyed. At the time, the Dutch legislator was the first in Europe with the requirement to permanently remove paks from the chain. This year, the Flemish government followed this example. REKO fulfills the government's objective of removing these harmful substances from the environment . The newest thermal cleaning installation is partly built considering the development of the international market. David Heijkoop, director of REKO: “Due to the size of our installation, in combination with the large-scale recovery of the energy released, we can reduce the costs for our customers. Also, the location of REKO in the port of Rotterdam provides an excellent starting position for the rest of Europe: we can supply over water. When realized that the Netherlands imports 20 million tons of sand and gravel as primary raw materials for construction from abroad every year, it becomes clear that we can partly meet that need," he adds.  REKO will soon be able to supply around 1.5 million tonnes of clean sand and gravel annually. Electricity and heat The thermal cleaning installation uses energy to ignite the combustible components in the asphalt and roof leather. Through the process, four to five times more energy is released then used. In the existing installation, that energy is used to generate electricity. The new installation makes this conversion to electricity much more efficient, and also supplies heat in the form of hot water. The Port of Rotterdam Authority is contributing € 1 million for the realization of this specific part of the installation. The installation will be able to flexibly choose to what extent the energy released during the cleaning process will be converted into heat and / or electricity. When the heat is not required, the installation will convert the energy into electricity. The work on the construction of the new thermal cleaning installation has already started. According to planning, the new installation will be commissioned in mid-2020. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/waste
Recycling Asphalt Generates Massive Amount Of Electricity
Recycling Asphalt Generates Massive Amount Of Electricity
Combing Plastic Waste Out Oceans: Competition For Boyan Slat
A problem that has been discussed frequently and intensively: the amount of plastic that winds up in the earth’s oceans. At this point in time, it adds up to more than 13 million tons that ends up in the water each year - which makes up 70% of all marine litter items.   An incredible and unbelievable number, that has spurred governments to take action. Recently, the EU passed legislation that is to drastically cut down the use of single-use products by banning those products from the market for which an alternative is readily available and affordable.   As explained by First Vice-President Frans Timmermans: “ Plastic waste is undeniably a big issue and Europeans need to act together to tackle this problem, because plastic waste ends up in our air, our soil, our oceans, and in our food. Today's proposals will reduce single use plastics on our supermarket shelves through a range of measures. We will ban some of these items, and substitute them with cleaner alternatives so people can still use their favourite products .” Getting rid of the plastic waste Although this is a great effort at reducing the amount of plastic that ends up in our seas, it does not change any of the waste that is already floating around - nor will it completely solve the issue. Thankfully, more and more initiatives are arising that seek to combat the problem. One of these originates from the young German architect Marcella Hansch, who came up with a closed-loop platform that would best be described as a comb. Hansch came up with this idea while diving in Cape Verde, where she saw more plastic than fish. She learned from closer research that if the current plastic trend continues, there would be more plastic in the ocean by 2050 than fish. Determined to prevent this from happening, she created a filter system and fine-tuned it during her years in university, taking on extra engineering courses and studying ocean currents and different types of algae. {youtube}                                          Combing Plastic Waste Out Oceans: Competition For Boyan Slat               Pacific Garbage Screening - how architecture could save our oceans | Marcella Hansch | TEDxDresden A closed-loop platform that does not produce waste Eventually, her design took on the shape of a closed-loop system that does not generate any kind of waste. The combination of a bulbous shape and a extensive system of underwater channels are supposed to calm the ocean currents, which allows the plastic - which is lighter than water - to float to the surface from the depths of up to 30 meters that it could have been dragged under to, after which it can be skimmed off by the platform. This does not require any kind of filters or nets. After picking up the waste , her ultimate goal was to recycle it - which proved to be quite a laborious task, as the plastic’s molecular structure has been destroyed by the influence of the salt water, making it nearly impossible to recycle. This is why she came up with the original plan of running the waste through a plasma gasification process, that would convert the plastic to hydrogen and carbon dioxide - with the hydrogen serving as a energy source for the fuel cells powering the platform. Simultaneously, the carbon dioxide could serve as a nutrient for the algae cultures growing on the platform. Unfortunately, this approach did not make its way into the final product - as it would not have worked, according to Hansch. Yet she and her team are fully dedicated to finding a workable solution. Meanwhile, they are looking to roll out the project to get it operational soon, through the NGO Pacific Garbage Screening, that runs on volunteers (mostly engineering students) and donations, alongside support from the university of Aachen.   Testing the ‘Waste Comb’ and prototyping The system is extensively tried and tested on its validity, efficiency and feasibility, leading up to the quick development of a prototype - that will be taken out in the field to experience the real, harsh conditions of ocean life in a ‘safer’ setting, to find out whether it can hold up. For this, the team is actively raising funds and investors to help it get started. Why it would be interesting to check out this initiative? Well, for starters, because it is a scientifically and logically sound idea to rid the oceans of the plastics that are currently weighing it down. And yes, there are a large number of alternatives out there - the Ocean Cleanup initiative, and the Great Bubble Barrier, just to mention a few - but as Pacific Garbage Sceening’s Hansch strikingly put it, “ there's enough plastic in the ocean for everyone .” Before you go! Recommended:  Waste In Oceans: Plastic Soup And The Great Bubble Barrier Did you like the article? Leave below a comment. We will reply the same day!
A problem that has been discussed frequently and intensively: the amount of plastic that winds up in the earth’s oceans. At this point in time, it adds up to more than 13 million tons that ends up in the water each year - which makes up 70% of all marine litter items.   An incredible and unbelievable number, that has spurred governments to take action. Recently, the EU passed legislation that is to drastically cut down the use of single-use products by banning those products from the market for which an alternative is readily available and affordable.   As explained by First Vice-President Frans Timmermans: “ Plastic waste is undeniably a big issue and Europeans need to act together to tackle this problem, because plastic waste ends up in our air, our soil, our oceans, and in our food. Today's proposals will reduce single use plastics on our supermarket shelves through a range of measures. We will ban some of these items, and substitute them with cleaner alternatives so people can still use their favourite products .” Getting rid of the plastic waste Although this is a great effort at reducing the amount of plastic that ends up in our seas, it does not change any of the waste that is already floating around - nor will it completely solve the issue. Thankfully, more and more initiatives are arising that seek to combat the problem. One of these originates from the young German architect Marcella Hansch, who came up with a closed-loop platform that would best be described as a comb. Hansch came up with this idea while diving in Cape Verde, where she saw more plastic than fish. She learned from closer research that if the current plastic trend continues, there would be more plastic in the ocean by 2050 than fish. Determined to prevent this from happening, she created a filter system and fine-tuned it during her years in university, taking on extra engineering courses and studying ocean currents and different types of algae. {youtube}                                          Combing Plastic Waste Out Oceans: Competition For Boyan Slat               Pacific Garbage Screening - how architecture could save our oceans | Marcella Hansch | TEDxDresden A closed-loop platform that does not produce waste Eventually, her design took on the shape of a closed-loop system that does not generate any kind of waste. The combination of a bulbous shape and a extensive system of underwater channels are supposed to calm the ocean currents, which allows the plastic - which is lighter than water - to float to the surface from the depths of up to 30 meters that it could have been dragged under to, after which it can be skimmed off by the platform. This does not require any kind of filters or nets. After picking up the waste , her ultimate goal was to recycle it - which proved to be quite a laborious task, as the plastic’s molecular structure has been destroyed by the influence of the salt water, making it nearly impossible to recycle. This is why she came up with the original plan of running the waste through a plasma gasification process, that would convert the plastic to hydrogen and carbon dioxide - with the hydrogen serving as a energy source for the fuel cells powering the platform. Simultaneously, the carbon dioxide could serve as a nutrient for the algae cultures growing on the platform. Unfortunately, this approach did not make its way into the final product - as it would not have worked, according to Hansch. Yet she and her team are fully dedicated to finding a workable solution. Meanwhile, they are looking to roll out the project to get it operational soon, through the NGO Pacific Garbage Screening, that runs on volunteers (mostly engineering students) and donations, alongside support from the university of Aachen.   Testing the ‘Waste Comb’ and prototyping The system is extensively tried and tested on its validity, efficiency and feasibility, leading up to the quick development of a prototype - that will be taken out in the field to experience the real, harsh conditions of ocean life in a ‘safer’ setting, to find out whether it can hold up. For this, the team is actively raising funds and investors to help it get started. Why it would be interesting to check out this initiative? Well, for starters, because it is a scientifically and logically sound idea to rid the oceans of the plastics that are currently weighing it down. And yes, there are a large number of alternatives out there - the Ocean Cleanup initiative, and the Great Bubble Barrier, just to mention a few - but as Pacific Garbage Sceening’s Hansch strikingly put it, “ there's enough plastic in the ocean for everyone .” Before you go! Recommended:  Waste In Oceans: Plastic Soup And The Great Bubble Barrier Did you like the article? Leave below a comment. We will reply the same day!
Combing Plastic Waste Out Oceans: Competition For Boyan Slat
Combing Plastic Waste Out Oceans: Competition For Boyan Slat
Waste

Waste, refuse, recycle: towards a circulair economy

Waste is something unwanted or are materials we cannot use anymore. Waste is any material or product which is worthless, defect or of any use. In the near past it had hardly any economic value anymore but nowadays there are plenty people and organisations which are recycling waste and make from the regained parts again valuable material for reuse. The Circular Economy at work.

Even better is a zero waste environment. That means no waste send to landfills. A zero waste lifestyle means: using less resources, eating healthier, saving money and less negative impact on the environment. Go for the 5 R’s: refuse, reduce, reuse, recycle and rot.

By reducing waste we can make a big difference. If there was an urge to come up with waste reduction ideas and sustainable recycle solutions and share these topics globally it’s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about waste reduction your experiences and expectations for the future at home and globally. 

Global Sustainability X-change, that’s what you can do together with WhatsOrb. What's in for me?

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