Waste

About: <h1>Waste, refuse, recycle: towards a circulair economy</h1> <p>Waste is something unwanted or are materials we cannot use anymore. Waste is any material or product which is worthless, defect or of any use. In the near past it had hardly any economic value anymore but nowadays there are plenty people and organisations which are recycling waste and make from the regained parts again valuable material for reuse. The Circular Economy at work.</p> <p>Even better is a zero waste environment. That means no waste send to landfills. A zero waste lifestyle means: using less resources, eating healthier, saving money and less negative impact on the environment. Go for the 5 R&rsquo;s: refuse, reduce, reuse, recycle and rot.</p> <p>By reducing waste we can make a big difference. If there was an urge to come up with waste reduction ideas and sustainable recycle solutions and share these topics globally it&rsquo;s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about waste reduction your experiences and expectations for the future at home and globally.&nbsp;</p> <p>Global Sustainability X-change, that&rsquo;s what you can do together with WhatsOrb.&nbsp;<a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/blog/your-shared-sustainable-ideas-make-our-earth-a-better-place">What's in for me?</a></p>
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Breaking: Did You Know, All You Read About CO2 Rise Is Half The Truth
Yes, CO2 is on the rise since the start of the industrial revolution (1850). But we forget that the absorption ability from the ‘main CO2 sponge’ has halved since the 1980. In this year the CO2 was ‘only’ 338,75 ppm. Wouldn’t that be wonderful to have this number today? Half The Truth: Trees Produce Oxygen, Plankton More More than 70% of our oxygen is produced by tiny plants in the world’s oceans,  the plants are called plankton and they are also responsible from removing 50% of our carbon dioxide. All life on earth depends upon plankton for our atmosphere, for the climate and for most of our food, yet we have succeeded in destroying more than 50% of all the plankton in the world’s Oceans over the last 50 years. The problems did not start with the industrial revolution, indeed an increasing concentration of carbon dioxide actually acts as a food for most plants, and if you increase the nutrient concentration with regards to nitrogen and phosphates, coupled with a slight increase in temperature, then these are perfect conditions for growing more plankton.  Yet in the last 50 years there has been a catastrophic decline in the plankton numbers, so this is not down to climate change, what has happened? Recommended:  Does Rising CO2 Benefit Plants? The decline in the plankton and the planets life support system did not start with the industrial revolution,  it started with the ‘chemical revolution’. After the 1940's, toxic chemical discharges included; herbicides, pesticides, antibiotics, pharmaceuticals, toxic cosmetics, industrial waste and plastic. It is impossible for ‘nature’ to evolve to deal with the most toxic of chemicals produced by man because they are not natural chemicals. The number of chemicals produced are also increasing by around 15,000 different ones every day, nature has no hope of surviving such as onslaught, this is not sustainable, the planet is not sustainable. {youtube}                              Plankton all life on earth depends upon plankton, and it will be dead in 25 years                                    Breaking: Did You Know, All You Read About CO2 Rise Is Half The Truth Recommended:  Monsanto Banned At European Parliament: Brussels, Strasbourg It takes a recognition that toxic, persistent pollutants such as Oxybenzone, PCBs, fire retardants such as PBDE, organic mercury and tin are so horribly toxic that there is actually no safe level. The chemicals simple keep accumulating in the oceans, in the marine life and in the sediment. The concentration of PCBs in the deepest part of the Ocean,  the Mariana Trench at more than 10km deep has a concentration of PCBs 50 times higher than the most toxic rivers in China. Animals or plants cannot survive these conditions.  When combined with micro plastic, the plastic acts like a sponge and will adsorb many of these chemicals and amplify their concentration by as much as a million times. Plastic particles smaller than 20nm are adsorbed directly into plants, larger micron sized particles may be eaten by plankton along with all the toxic chemicals in the plastic and chemicals that have been adsorbed by the plastic.  More than 1 in 15 of all life in the oceans now contain plastic and the associated toxic chemicals. CO2 Rise: 'Oceans' Absorb CO2 We have already lost 50% of  all the plankton and currently it is declining by 1% year on year because of plastic and persistent toxic chemicals. The oceans absorb carbon dioxide, plankton plants use the carbon dioxide and produce oxygen,  but because we have lost 50% of the plankton, carbon dioxide increases quicker, and when you dissolve carbon dioxide in water it forms carbonic acid which makes the water acidic. The pH or acidity of the world’s Oceans has declined from a pH of 8.24 during the 1940's, to pH 8.04 and in accordance with data from the IPCC it will be pH 7.95 over the next 25 years.  As marine biologists, we design and operate some of the largest public aquaria life support systems, we have experienced and know for sure that if the pH were to drop to pH 7.95 then carbonate life forms start to dissolve and this will initiate a trophic cascade destabilisation of the entire marine ecosystem.  What Means All Carbonate Based Plankton Will Die? When the trophic cascade starts it will be very quick, everything will appear normal, and then over a period of perhaps only 3 years, all carbonate based plankton will die, most of the seals, birds and whales will die as well as most of the fish, and along with them, the food supply for 2 billion people. The seas will be colonised by toxic algae, bacteria, and jellyfish.  Atmospheric oxygen levels are currently dropping more than 4 times quicker than carbon dioxide is increasing,  if we lose the plankton then oxygen levels will rapidly start to decline, carbon dioxide will increase and we will have run-away climate change.  It is not a question of a different group of algae  taking over and making oxygen,  the oceanic water will gradually become more and more acidic and toxic.  Life is currently being destroyed 1000 times quicker than the last extinction event when a meteorite crashed into the Gulf of Mexico, but we all seem to be completely oblivious to what is happening like a suicide of lemmings falling off the edge of a flat earth. Carbon dioxide and the burning of fossil fuels is certainly implicated, but it is unlikely that CO2 emissions are going to decline until around 2050 , even if we stopped all CO2 emissions tomorrow, it will slow down the process, but because we are destroying the oceans and planets life support system, the ocean ecosystem will still crash and we will still have climate change and life on earth will still become impossible.  The solution starts with a realisation that there is more to climate change than the burning of coal and oil, we need to live sustainable lives and this means zero discharge of toxic chemicals, it also means zero discharge of plastic in all its forms. Recommended:  Fossil Fuel Will Dominate Energy Use Through 2050: Globally If we can stop the discharge of plastic and toxic chemicals, then the oceanic ecosystem can recover, plankton productivity would bounce back and start to use more carbon dioxide. Indeed plankton productivity is 1000 times quicker than the growth of trees, so once we take the toxic brakes off the marine ecosystem life should return and we start down the road of reversing climate change. If we had not lost 50% of the plankton productivity then the oceans would have been absorbing up to 24 Giga tons of carbon dioxide, and we would not be experiencing climate change. Due to the inertia in the system we don't have 25 years, we only have about 10 years to eliminate plastic and toxic chemical pollution. Through the Oceans a Lifeline, stop the pollution, because in 10 years it will be too late. Before you go! Recommended:  Climate Change: Water Scarcity, Hunger, Agriculture And Food Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Yes, CO2 is on the rise since the start of the industrial revolution (1850). But we forget that the absorption ability from the ‘main CO2 sponge’ has halved since the 1980. In this year the CO2 was ‘only’ 338,75 ppm. Wouldn’t that be wonderful to have this number today? Half The Truth: Trees Produce Oxygen, Plankton More More than 70% of our oxygen is produced by tiny plants in the world’s oceans,  the plants are called plankton and they are also responsible from removing 50% of our carbon dioxide. All life on earth depends upon plankton for our atmosphere, for the climate and for most of our food, yet we have succeeded in destroying more than 50% of all the plankton in the world’s Oceans over the last 50 years. The problems did not start with the industrial revolution, indeed an increasing concentration of carbon dioxide actually acts as a food for most plants, and if you increase the nutrient concentration with regards to nitrogen and phosphates, coupled with a slight increase in temperature, then these are perfect conditions for growing more plankton.  Yet in the last 50 years there has been a catastrophic decline in the plankton numbers, so this is not down to climate change, what has happened? Recommended:  Does Rising CO2 Benefit Plants? The decline in the plankton and the planets life support system did not start with the industrial revolution,  it started with the ‘chemical revolution’. After the 1940's, toxic chemical discharges included; herbicides, pesticides, antibiotics, pharmaceuticals, toxic cosmetics, industrial waste and plastic. It is impossible for ‘nature’ to evolve to deal with the most toxic of chemicals produced by man because they are not natural chemicals. The number of chemicals produced are also increasing by around 15,000 different ones every day, nature has no hope of surviving such as onslaught, this is not sustainable, the planet is not sustainable. {youtube}                              Plankton all life on earth depends upon plankton, and it will be dead in 25 years                                    Breaking: Did You Know, All You Read About CO2 Rise Is Half The Truth Recommended:  Monsanto Banned At European Parliament: Brussels, Strasbourg It takes a recognition that toxic, persistent pollutants such as Oxybenzone, PCBs, fire retardants such as PBDE, organic mercury and tin are so horribly toxic that there is actually no safe level. The chemicals simple keep accumulating in the oceans, in the marine life and in the sediment. The concentration of PCBs in the deepest part of the Ocean,  the Mariana Trench at more than 10km deep has a concentration of PCBs 50 times higher than the most toxic rivers in China. Animals or plants cannot survive these conditions.  When combined with micro plastic, the plastic acts like a sponge and will adsorb many of these chemicals and amplify their concentration by as much as a million times. Plastic particles smaller than 20nm are adsorbed directly into plants, larger micron sized particles may be eaten by plankton along with all the toxic chemicals in the plastic and chemicals that have been adsorbed by the plastic.  More than 1 in 15 of all life in the oceans now contain plastic and the associated toxic chemicals. CO2 Rise: 'Oceans' Absorb CO2 We have already lost 50% of  all the plankton and currently it is declining by 1% year on year because of plastic and persistent toxic chemicals. The oceans absorb carbon dioxide, plankton plants use the carbon dioxide and produce oxygen,  but because we have lost 50% of the plankton, carbon dioxide increases quicker, and when you dissolve carbon dioxide in water it forms carbonic acid which makes the water acidic. The pH or acidity of the world’s Oceans has declined from a pH of 8.24 during the 1940's, to pH 8.04 and in accordance with data from the IPCC it will be pH 7.95 over the next 25 years.  As marine biologists, we design and operate some of the largest public aquaria life support systems, we have experienced and know for sure that if the pH were to drop to pH 7.95 then carbonate life forms start to dissolve and this will initiate a trophic cascade destabilisation of the entire marine ecosystem.  What Means All Carbonate Based Plankton Will Die? When the trophic cascade starts it will be very quick, everything will appear normal, and then over a period of perhaps only 3 years, all carbonate based plankton will die, most of the seals, birds and whales will die as well as most of the fish, and along with them, the food supply for 2 billion people. The seas will be colonised by toxic algae, bacteria, and jellyfish.  Atmospheric oxygen levels are currently dropping more than 4 times quicker than carbon dioxide is increasing,  if we lose the plankton then oxygen levels will rapidly start to decline, carbon dioxide will increase and we will have run-away climate change.  It is not a question of a different group of algae  taking over and making oxygen,  the oceanic water will gradually become more and more acidic and toxic.  Life is currently being destroyed 1000 times quicker than the last extinction event when a meteorite crashed into the Gulf of Mexico, but we all seem to be completely oblivious to what is happening like a suicide of lemmings falling off the edge of a flat earth. Carbon dioxide and the burning of fossil fuels is certainly implicated, but it is unlikely that CO2 emissions are going to decline until around 2050 , even if we stopped all CO2 emissions tomorrow, it will slow down the process, but because we are destroying the oceans and planets life support system, the ocean ecosystem will still crash and we will still have climate change and life on earth will still become impossible.  The solution starts with a realisation that there is more to climate change than the burning of coal and oil, we need to live sustainable lives and this means zero discharge of toxic chemicals, it also means zero discharge of plastic in all its forms. Recommended:  Fossil Fuel Will Dominate Energy Use Through 2050: Globally If we can stop the discharge of plastic and toxic chemicals, then the oceanic ecosystem can recover, plankton productivity would bounce back and start to use more carbon dioxide. Indeed plankton productivity is 1000 times quicker than the growth of trees, so once we take the toxic brakes off the marine ecosystem life should return and we start down the road of reversing climate change. If we had not lost 50% of the plankton productivity then the oceans would have been absorbing up to 24 Giga tons of carbon dioxide, and we would not be experiencing climate change. Due to the inertia in the system we don't have 25 years, we only have about 10 years to eliminate plastic and toxic chemical pollution. Through the Oceans a Lifeline, stop the pollution, because in 10 years it will be too late. Before you go! Recommended:  Climate Change: Water Scarcity, Hunger, Agriculture And Food Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Breaking: Did You Know, All You Read About CO2 Rise Is Half The Truth
Sustainability Single-Use Care Products: Glorified Garbage
Sheet masks are trash. Unnecessary, they’re superfluous! They come wrapped in plastic. Sheet masks are, quite literally, pre-packaged piles of glorified garbage. Harsh, maybe but as the news cycles through stories on climate change and carbon emissions and what to do about the planet’s compounding pollution problem, it is understandable where it’s coming from. Entire cities have banned plastic straws and plastic bags. Extinction Rebellion protested at London Fashion Week while Greta Thunberg petitioned for political involvement at the United Nations  Climate Action Summit. Fashion houses are pledging carbon-neutrality. And beauty? While clean beauty is a growing category, and many brands are implementing sustainable practices, single-use items are a special cause for concern. Recommended:  Sustainable Fashion: Fungi, Roots From MycoWorks, Inspidere Sustainability Single-Use Care Products Beauty products made to use once and throw out, like makeup wipes and sheet masks, create a lot of unnecessary refuse. In the case of sheet masks, there’s a pouch, the mask, and sometimes the mask is wrapped in a plastic sheet. Usually, none of the components are recyclable and all of them end up in the trash post sheet-masking session, making it one of the more wasteful things one can do in 20 minutes or less.                                                          How to make a DIY non wasteful clay face mask Single-Use Care Products: Glorified Garbage The pouches that hold sheet masks are often a combination of aluminum and plastic, which cannot be recycled. The stiff, inner plastic sheets likely can’t be processed in recycling plants either (as is the case with a surprising amount of plastics). At best, these materials end up in a landfill; at worst, they end up in the ocean. Do facial masks work? Although there is no independent evidence that mud masks, clay masks, cream masks, or sheet masks provide any long lasting benefit to the skin, they can be hydrating, soothing and provide some keratolytic/exfoliant effect. Plastic can take hundreds of years to decompose, breaking down over time into harmful microplastics—pieces of plastic less than five millimeters long that are manufactured using different toxic and carcinogenic chemicals. Research has proven that microplastics are abundant in water, air, and the food we eat. Besides the potential health hazards of consuming microplastics, the particles release methane as they break down. Methane emissions contribute to global warming, and global warming affects our climate, creating more severe and unpredictable weather patterns that impact entire ecosystems. Single-Use Care Products: The Mask Then, of course, there’s the mask itself. Most are made with a blend of synthetic materials (nylon, plastic microfibers, polyester), which equates to laying saturated molten plastic over your face. As appealing as that sounds, there’s a downside: These “cannot be composted and must go in the garbage bin. Recent hydrogel versions are either made of synthetic polymers essentially, plastic—or eco-friendly biocellulose, but biodegradable sheet masks aren’t always better. Some come soaked in serums thick with silicones, a class of ingredients that leaves a thin, plastic-y film on the skin’s surface to create the illusion of ‘a glow’. This film is bioaccumulative, and prevents the ‘biodegradable’ biocellulose or bamboo base from fully breaking down. Instead, silicone-coated sheet masks join their synthetic counterparts in ‘leaking toxins into the soil’ for years. The same goes for under-eye masks, makeup wipes, and daily toning and exfoliating pads. Organic Cotton Masks Not Sustainable At All When you zoom out to consider the effort and emissions that go into producing the product in the first place (one organic cotton mask could require thousands of gallons of water) and the shipping materials associated with online orders, that’s a massive mountain of waste for a momentary thrill. Yet, the single-use sector continues to thrive. 'The usage of wet wipes is increasing by 15% each year and the face mask market is expected to grow to over $50 billion by 2025. Ongoing production of non-recyclable, non-compostable, and non-biodegradable products will have a considerable impact on the environment. (On a superficial note: Pollution particles will  also  have a considerable impact on your skin, hence the popularity of antioxidant beauty products. So technically, cutting down on waste isn’t only better for the earth, it’s better for your face. Is this to say that skin-care is single-handedly polluting the planet? Not at all. Rather, tracing a sheet mask’s face-to-waste-bin journey should highlight just how easy it is to reduce your environmental footprint. What is the best organic face mask? The Best Natural Face Masks For Every Skin Type: Andalou Naturals Instant Brighten & Tighten Hydro Serum Facial Mask Naturopathica Aloe Replenishing Gel Mask One Love Organics Love + Charcoal Masque Eminence Organic Skin Care Yam and Pumpkin Enzyme Peel Arcona Tea Tree Mask Inlight Beauty Chocolate Mask Sheet Masks, Choose Compostable Ones ‘Beauty Heroes’, started a zero-waste beauty section on their website because we know that customers are conscious consumers and genuinely wants to do better for the planet, they just need the tools. One of those tools is the Orgaid Organic Sheet Mask, which is 100% biodegradable and compostable, made with organic ingredients, and packaged in recyclable cardboard. When you’re done with the mask, you can place it right in your compost bin, where it leaves no evidence of its existence behind (besides your dewy, hydrated skin). Refuse, Reduce, Reuse It’s great if it’s in cardboard, and recyclable packing is awesome but it’s still an unnecessary single-use product.  Recycle , after all, enters into the equation after  reduce  and  reuse  for a reason. Refuse is even better! It’s not even having the product in the first place. Does this make you feel beautiful? Does this make you feel happy? Is the trash that this is going to create worth the moments of joy that you feel from it? Usually, the answer is no!                                                                   I Tried to Go Zero Waste for 7 Days Beauty Habits, Balance Them If you absolutely cannot bear the thought of a self-care Sunday or cross-country flight  sans  sheet mask, there’s no need to shame-spiral. If sheet masks are that one thing in life that make you super happy, more than anything else, then don’t try to get rid of your sheet mask—look for other ways to reduce your waste first. The Package Free Shop (which just closed a $4.5 million seed round led by Primary Venture Partners) is a great place to start. Bioaccumulative Ingredients, Eliminate them Cross-check your products with the Environmental Working Group’s Skin Deep database. It rates ingredients in terms of ecotoxicology and personal health, making it pretty easy to eliminate bioaccumulative substances - like silicones, triclosan, and triclocarban - from your routine. Recycling Most products’ caps, pumps, droppers, and plastic bottles - especially those of the squeeze-y variety - aren’t recyclable on a local level. However, TerraCycle, Credo, and Ayond have programs in place to collect and properly recycle these items for you. Single-Use Products, Swap Them Ahead, discover 10 sustainable (and super-luxe) skin-care products to replace your single-use sheet masks, makeup wipes, and more. You don’t ever want to have reducing your waste feel like giving something up—it’s always a positive thing. Before you go! Recommended:  Getting Healthier By Eating Sustainable Food And Taking Exercise Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Sheet masks are trash. Unnecessary, they’re superfluous! They come wrapped in plastic. Sheet masks are, quite literally, pre-packaged piles of glorified garbage. Harsh, maybe but as the news cycles through stories on climate change and carbon emissions and what to do about the planet’s compounding pollution problem, it is understandable where it’s coming from. Entire cities have banned plastic straws and plastic bags. Extinction Rebellion protested at London Fashion Week while Greta Thunberg petitioned for political involvement at the United Nations  Climate Action Summit. Fashion houses are pledging carbon-neutrality. And beauty? While clean beauty is a growing category, and many brands are implementing sustainable practices, single-use items are a special cause for concern. Recommended:  Sustainable Fashion: Fungi, Roots From MycoWorks, Inspidere Sustainability Single-Use Care Products Beauty products made to use once and throw out, like makeup wipes and sheet masks, create a lot of unnecessary refuse. In the case of sheet masks, there’s a pouch, the mask, and sometimes the mask is wrapped in a plastic sheet. Usually, none of the components are recyclable and all of them end up in the trash post sheet-masking session, making it one of the more wasteful things one can do in 20 minutes or less.                                                          How to make a DIY non wasteful clay face mask Single-Use Care Products: Glorified Garbage The pouches that hold sheet masks are often a combination of aluminum and plastic, which cannot be recycled. The stiff, inner plastic sheets likely can’t be processed in recycling plants either (as is the case with a surprising amount of plastics). At best, these materials end up in a landfill; at worst, they end up in the ocean. Do facial masks work? Although there is no independent evidence that mud masks, clay masks, cream masks, or sheet masks provide any long lasting benefit to the skin, they can be hydrating, soothing and provide some keratolytic/exfoliant effect. Plastic can take hundreds of years to decompose, breaking down over time into harmful microplastics—pieces of plastic less than five millimeters long that are manufactured using different toxic and carcinogenic chemicals. Research has proven that microplastics are abundant in water, air, and the food we eat. Besides the potential health hazards of consuming microplastics, the particles release methane as they break down. Methane emissions contribute to global warming, and global warming affects our climate, creating more severe and unpredictable weather patterns that impact entire ecosystems. Single-Use Care Products: The Mask Then, of course, there’s the mask itself. Most are made with a blend of synthetic materials (nylon, plastic microfibers, polyester), which equates to laying saturated molten plastic over your face. As appealing as that sounds, there’s a downside: These “cannot be composted and must go in the garbage bin. Recent hydrogel versions are either made of synthetic polymers essentially, plastic—or eco-friendly biocellulose, but biodegradable sheet masks aren’t always better. Some come soaked in serums thick with silicones, a class of ingredients that leaves a thin, plastic-y film on the skin’s surface to create the illusion of ‘a glow’. This film is bioaccumulative, and prevents the ‘biodegradable’ biocellulose or bamboo base from fully breaking down. Instead, silicone-coated sheet masks join their synthetic counterparts in ‘leaking toxins into the soil’ for years. The same goes for under-eye masks, makeup wipes, and daily toning and exfoliating pads. Organic Cotton Masks Not Sustainable At All When you zoom out to consider the effort and emissions that go into producing the product in the first place (one organic cotton mask could require thousands of gallons of water) and the shipping materials associated with online orders, that’s a massive mountain of waste for a momentary thrill. Yet, the single-use sector continues to thrive. 'The usage of wet wipes is increasing by 15% each year and the face mask market is expected to grow to over $50 billion by 2025. Ongoing production of non-recyclable, non-compostable, and non-biodegradable products will have a considerable impact on the environment. (On a superficial note: Pollution particles will  also  have a considerable impact on your skin, hence the popularity of antioxidant beauty products. So technically, cutting down on waste isn’t only better for the earth, it’s better for your face. Is this to say that skin-care is single-handedly polluting the planet? Not at all. Rather, tracing a sheet mask’s face-to-waste-bin journey should highlight just how easy it is to reduce your environmental footprint. What is the best organic face mask? The Best Natural Face Masks For Every Skin Type: Andalou Naturals Instant Brighten & Tighten Hydro Serum Facial Mask Naturopathica Aloe Replenishing Gel Mask One Love Organics Love + Charcoal Masque Eminence Organic Skin Care Yam and Pumpkin Enzyme Peel Arcona Tea Tree Mask Inlight Beauty Chocolate Mask Sheet Masks, Choose Compostable Ones ‘Beauty Heroes’, started a zero-waste beauty section on their website because we know that customers are conscious consumers and genuinely wants to do better for the planet, they just need the tools. One of those tools is the Orgaid Organic Sheet Mask, which is 100% biodegradable and compostable, made with organic ingredients, and packaged in recyclable cardboard. When you’re done with the mask, you can place it right in your compost bin, where it leaves no evidence of its existence behind (besides your dewy, hydrated skin). Refuse, Reduce, Reuse It’s great if it’s in cardboard, and recyclable packing is awesome but it’s still an unnecessary single-use product.  Recycle , after all, enters into the equation after  reduce  and  reuse  for a reason. Refuse is even better! It’s not even having the product in the first place. Does this make you feel beautiful? Does this make you feel happy? Is the trash that this is going to create worth the moments of joy that you feel from it? Usually, the answer is no!                                                                   I Tried to Go Zero Waste for 7 Days Beauty Habits, Balance Them If you absolutely cannot bear the thought of a self-care Sunday or cross-country flight  sans  sheet mask, there’s no need to shame-spiral. If sheet masks are that one thing in life that make you super happy, more than anything else, then don’t try to get rid of your sheet mask—look for other ways to reduce your waste first. The Package Free Shop (which just closed a $4.5 million seed round led by Primary Venture Partners) is a great place to start. Bioaccumulative Ingredients, Eliminate them Cross-check your products with the Environmental Working Group’s Skin Deep database. It rates ingredients in terms of ecotoxicology and personal health, making it pretty easy to eliminate bioaccumulative substances - like silicones, triclosan, and triclocarban - from your routine. Recycling Most products’ caps, pumps, droppers, and plastic bottles - especially those of the squeeze-y variety - aren’t recyclable on a local level. However, TerraCycle, Credo, and Ayond have programs in place to collect and properly recycle these items for you. Single-Use Products, Swap Them Ahead, discover 10 sustainable (and super-luxe) skin-care products to replace your single-use sheet masks, makeup wipes, and more. You don’t ever want to have reducing your waste feel like giving something up—it’s always a positive thing. Before you go! Recommended:  Getting Healthier By Eating Sustainable Food And Taking Exercise Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Sustainability Single-Use Care Products: Glorified Garbage
Sustainability Single-Use Care Products: Glorified Garbage
Dumpster Diving: A Hobby That Helps To Combat Food Waste
Dumpster diving. The term alone is guaranteed to put a smile on your face - whether it is one of actual enjoyment or disbelief, I am not sure. Yet this phenomenon, where people sometimes quite literally ‘dive’ in the dumpsters in their neighbourhood to hunt for thrown-away treasures, is seeing an uptake after some of its most famous proponents recently made headlines again. Food and perfectly good things thrown away With the loot varying from hundreds of left-over desserts to household equipment and sometimes even cash money, it is not hard to see why some have turned this somewhat peculiar hobby into a way of life. A fact is that we, as the collective world population, are throwing away too many perfectly good things. From food to clothes and from electronics to toys: consumerism has taken a turn for the worse, now that we discard items once we are ‘done’ with them, rather than after they have been used fully. Take the issue of food waste. Every year, an average one-third of the food that is produced in the world for the purpose of human consumption is wasted. Simply thrown away. I don’t want to risk sounding too patronising, but the old mom-trick is painfully relevant here: “You should eat your dinner, poor children in Africa would kill for it.”   And while it is a cliche of the worst kind, it unfortunately rings true. While some of us are having the luxury of discarding perfectly good food items, others are starving. The world’s wealth has always been distributed unequally - but so has the food supply. The billions and billions worth of food thrown out in the western world, simply because it is a day past the expiration date, is inexcusable.   Coming back to dumpster diving. A lot of people are claiming that they are doing it as a way of showing their outrage with consumerism and waste. Others just say that it is fun and addictive. There’s this Dutch guy, Theo Vreugdenhill, who claims that he merely tries to " save perfectly good food from the trash”. As he says, “I simply cannot stand by idly if good food is thrown away, only because there is a tiny dent in it, happens to be slightly damaged, or is nearing its expiration date. Especially when I look around and see how many people are struggling to get by. ” He is not doing it for himself, quite the contrary. He is a preacher in a local church and takes two full crates with him to service on Sunday, for those who are unable to provide in their own needs. The products that he finds? Quite diverse, actually: from cheese to beer, butter, yoghurt, fruit drinks, feta cheese, salads and fruit. Although he has also come across perfectly good vacuum cleaners and laptops in the past, which just goes to show how careless we are in what we throw away. Not everything can be found in the dumpster: most divers will agree that it are mostly perishable items, such as vegetables, fruit and bread. So you probably should not quite be ready to give up the day job and spent your days as a full-time dumpster diver: products like rice, peanut butter, soda, dish soap and detergent are pretty hard to come by.   Would you still want to try and find your inner dumpster diver and fill your fridge with leftovers? Then you can quite literally take the dive and plunge in the bins headfirst, although you could also try to talk to some shop owners yourself. Especially if your good cause stretches beyond feeding your immediate family, they might be very willing to hold on to that day’s excess for you and hand it to you in a bag instead of making you scour for it. Some other hints, as shared by experienced dumpster divers: Do not wear your Sunday’s best for the diving part - while it is not nearly as gross as many people suspect, it is not something that you want to do in your favourite shirt and jeans either. Only go dumpster diving at night, preferably after the shops are closed. This way, you avoid awkward situations with shoppers walking out of the store while you are digging around in the trash. Do not climb any fences or force open gates. Trespassing is not appreciated nor legal, so stay off private property. Stick to the curb-side. Always clean up after yourself. Leaving behind a mess of torn apart bags and scattered trash is bad taste and will most likely set some bad blood. Be a good neighbour and make sure that the people whose trash you are raiding do not mind. Be open about what it is that you are doing: you might get some funny looks from passerbys, who might even think of you as some homeless person. Talk to people who spotted you and explain what you are doing and what you have found.   Very practical: use a headlight, so that you can freely use your hands while digging; and make sure to bring plenty of bags and boxes and, preferably, a way of transporting your newfound treasures. Not quite ready to go out and dig in your community’s trash bins yet? Then you can do other things to cut back on your food waste. In order to actively encourage you to do so, you will be happy to find that there are quite a few apps that remind you to do so and give helpful hints. One of those apps is Too Good To Go , specifically designed for bargain hunters: businesses can post their leftovers in the app at steep discounts (adding up to at least 50-75%), after which shoppers can come in to collect the relatively fresh food at a great prize.   Another popular app is Olio , which allows you to share food with your local community. Handy if you are going on holiday, for instance. Your leftover food can be listed, along with a preferred pick-up point and pick-up time, and people in your community will be able to take it off your hands.   Unsung kind of does the same as Olio, except that it works with volunteers, in a charitable set-up. After posting your ‘offer’, one of the Unsung volunteers will come pick it up and deliver it to a local food bank or homeless shelter. Basically, the volunteers are the delivery guys who pick up your food and drop it off with people who need it the most. Finally, Eat Me prevents your food from going bad: it creates a timer for all the food that you have in your fridge. Scan the food as you put it in the fridge, after which it will alert you if it is about to go bad. A fun fact: this app was actually the idea of two teenage girls, who are still involved in the company. Look, I don’t care if you are digging through trashcans or donating your leftovers through one of the apps listed above. The essence remains the same: avoiding a situation where you have to throw away food while someone else in your community might be going hungry. And that is definitely something worth fighting - or dumpster diving - for. By: Metro/Sharai Hoekema Original article in Dutch  https://www.whatsorb.com/category/waste
Dumpster diving. The term alone is guaranteed to put a smile on your face - whether it is one of actual enjoyment or disbelief, I am not sure. Yet this phenomenon, where people sometimes quite literally ‘dive’ in the dumpsters in their neighbourhood to hunt for thrown-away treasures, is seeing an uptake after some of its most famous proponents recently made headlines again. Food and perfectly good things thrown away With the loot varying from hundreds of left-over desserts to household equipment and sometimes even cash money, it is not hard to see why some have turned this somewhat peculiar hobby into a way of life. A fact is that we, as the collective world population, are throwing away too many perfectly good things. From food to clothes and from electronics to toys: consumerism has taken a turn for the worse, now that we discard items once we are ‘done’ with them, rather than after they have been used fully. Take the issue of food waste. Every year, an average one-third of the food that is produced in the world for the purpose of human consumption is wasted. Simply thrown away. I don’t want to risk sounding too patronising, but the old mom-trick is painfully relevant here: “You should eat your dinner, poor children in Africa would kill for it.”   And while it is a cliche of the worst kind, it unfortunately rings true. While some of us are having the luxury of discarding perfectly good food items, others are starving. The world’s wealth has always been distributed unequally - but so has the food supply. The billions and billions worth of food thrown out in the western world, simply because it is a day past the expiration date, is inexcusable.   Coming back to dumpster diving. A lot of people are claiming that they are doing it as a way of showing their outrage with consumerism and waste. Others just say that it is fun and addictive. There’s this Dutch guy, Theo Vreugdenhill, who claims that he merely tries to " save perfectly good food from the trash”. As he says, “I simply cannot stand by idly if good food is thrown away, only because there is a tiny dent in it, happens to be slightly damaged, or is nearing its expiration date. Especially when I look around and see how many people are struggling to get by. ” He is not doing it for himself, quite the contrary. He is a preacher in a local church and takes two full crates with him to service on Sunday, for those who are unable to provide in their own needs. The products that he finds? Quite diverse, actually: from cheese to beer, butter, yoghurt, fruit drinks, feta cheese, salads and fruit. Although he has also come across perfectly good vacuum cleaners and laptops in the past, which just goes to show how careless we are in what we throw away. Not everything can be found in the dumpster: most divers will agree that it are mostly perishable items, such as vegetables, fruit and bread. So you probably should not quite be ready to give up the day job and spent your days as a full-time dumpster diver: products like rice, peanut butter, soda, dish soap and detergent are pretty hard to come by.   Would you still want to try and find your inner dumpster diver and fill your fridge with leftovers? Then you can quite literally take the dive and plunge in the bins headfirst, although you could also try to talk to some shop owners yourself. Especially if your good cause stretches beyond feeding your immediate family, they might be very willing to hold on to that day’s excess for you and hand it to you in a bag instead of making you scour for it. Some other hints, as shared by experienced dumpster divers: Do not wear your Sunday’s best for the diving part - while it is not nearly as gross as many people suspect, it is not something that you want to do in your favourite shirt and jeans either. Only go dumpster diving at night, preferably after the shops are closed. This way, you avoid awkward situations with shoppers walking out of the store while you are digging around in the trash. Do not climb any fences or force open gates. Trespassing is not appreciated nor legal, so stay off private property. Stick to the curb-side. Always clean up after yourself. Leaving behind a mess of torn apart bags and scattered trash is bad taste and will most likely set some bad blood. Be a good neighbour and make sure that the people whose trash you are raiding do not mind. Be open about what it is that you are doing: you might get some funny looks from passerbys, who might even think of you as some homeless person. Talk to people who spotted you and explain what you are doing and what you have found.   Very practical: use a headlight, so that you can freely use your hands while digging; and make sure to bring plenty of bags and boxes and, preferably, a way of transporting your newfound treasures. Not quite ready to go out and dig in your community’s trash bins yet? Then you can do other things to cut back on your food waste. In order to actively encourage you to do so, you will be happy to find that there are quite a few apps that remind you to do so and give helpful hints. One of those apps is Too Good To Go , specifically designed for bargain hunters: businesses can post their leftovers in the app at steep discounts (adding up to at least 50-75%), after which shoppers can come in to collect the relatively fresh food at a great prize.   Another popular app is Olio , which allows you to share food with your local community. Handy if you are going on holiday, for instance. Your leftover food can be listed, along with a preferred pick-up point and pick-up time, and people in your community will be able to take it off your hands.   Unsung kind of does the same as Olio, except that it works with volunteers, in a charitable set-up. After posting your ‘offer’, one of the Unsung volunteers will come pick it up and deliver it to a local food bank or homeless shelter. Basically, the volunteers are the delivery guys who pick up your food and drop it off with people who need it the most. Finally, Eat Me prevents your food from going bad: it creates a timer for all the food that you have in your fridge. Scan the food as you put it in the fridge, after which it will alert you if it is about to go bad. A fun fact: this app was actually the idea of two teenage girls, who are still involved in the company. Look, I don’t care if you are digging through trashcans or donating your leftovers through one of the apps listed above. The essence remains the same: avoiding a situation where you have to throw away food while someone else in your community might be going hungry. And that is definitely something worth fighting - or dumpster diving - for. By: Metro/Sharai Hoekema Original article in Dutch  https://www.whatsorb.com/category/waste
Dumpster Diving: A Hobby That Helps To Combat Food Waste
Dumpster Diving: A Hobby That Helps To Combat Food Waste
Municipal Solid Waste Management – How You Can Make a Difference
Every first Monday of October we celebrate World Habitat Day. First introduced in 1986, this United Nations event aims to “reflect on the state of our towns and cities, and on the basic right of all to adequate shelter”. Municipal Solid Waste Management is the main theme of this year’s celebration, and, as usual, I would like to use this opportunity to bring more awareness of the sustainability issues that are related to it and try to take a look at some of the solutions. So what is Municipal Solid Waste and how is it managed? Municipal Solid Waste consists of various types of refuse we encounter most often in our daily lives: household waste, construction and demolition debris, sanitation residue and waste from streets. There are two mains methods of managing solid waste – the centralised method, where all of the waste is collected and discarded without separation, usually into a landfill, and de-centralised method, where the waste requires prior separation into biodegradeable and non-biodegradable and is then disposed of based on its type. Once the waste is collected, there are several ways the municipality can dispose of it. In many parts of the world the most popular options are sanitary landfills and dumps. They are essentially the same – a place where all of the waste is collected in one area – with the only difference being that sanitary landfills are more concentrated and the waste’s contact with the environment is highly reduced. Dumps, on the other hand, are open areas that are exposed to the elements and animals and are often responsible for contamination of land and water. Another danger of dumps is the biodiversity impacts that they have: many species of animals that lived in the area get replaced by refuse-feeding species, such as rats and crows. These species will also spread disease and thus affect health of the residents in the area. Lastly, landfills harm the natural landscape and the smell makes them an unwanted sight in most residential areas. Another disposal method that is gaining popularity is thermal treatment. There are several types of thermal treatment, such as incineration, gasification, pyrolysis and others. This method allows to save space and is thus particularly beneficial in countries where land is scarce such as Japan. Incineration plants can also be constructed in a way that allows to harvest the energy released during the burning process and use that to generate electric power and heating. Many European countries rely heavily on this method, with Sweden actually importing trash from other countries to generate more energy. While this thermal treatment is a more sustainable alternative to landfills, there are concerns about its safety as harmful chemicals may get released into the air during the process. Many developed nations are moving towards the more sustainable thermal treatment and recycling , however according to World Bank over 90% of the waste in low-income countries is disposed of in unregulated dumps or openly burned. Effective waste management is expensive and requires specialised infrastructure, something many poor urban communities simply cannot afford. Lack of municipal resources pushes up demand for informal waste pickers and disposers - occupations that are highly dangerous and are often filled by women and children; air pollution, injuries and landfill collapses are only the few of the risks that they face on a daily basis.  And it’s not only the workers that are dealing with the waste directly that are affected by it. When waste is left untreated and unattended, it will inevitably start leaching toxic materials and pathogens into the soil and water. Many communities are left with no choice but to use the contaminated soil for farming and continue drinking the water, thereby consuming harmful chemicals. Communities that are located directly next to waste dumping sites often experience high occurrences of cancer, birth defects and various health issues. As treatment of contaminated soil and water requires use of advanced and expensive technology, it is nearly impossible to reverse the damage that was already done. Luckily, more organisations around the world are taking notice of the problem and are actively trying to help develop more affordable waste treatment methods and provide financing for waste management projects in poorer countries. While this will not help clean the areas that were already affected by waste, it will create safer disposals that will prevent further damage to the eco system. Reduce, reuse, recycle The reality is that we produce more and more trash every year and it is essential to improve the way solid waste is managed. This can be done on many levels – we should be changing the way we consume and produce various items, improving municipal governance systems, educating more capable city managers and changing our own daily habits. Naturally the best place to start making changes is ourselves, so let’s look at the ways we can contribute to better solid waste management. According to World Bank, in 2016 people living in cities produced 0.74 kilograms (1.63 lb) of waste per person per day. The first step one can take to help improve solid waste management is to produce less waste. Take a good look at what you buy and consume every week. Perhaps it is time to get yourself a nice shopper for your groceries or a stylish tumbler for your morning coffee (some coffee chains will offer you a discount for using your own tumbler!)? It is also worth researching what kind of packaging you might be able to return to the store – depending on where you live, you might be able to return glass or plastic bottles to the supermarkets and some farmers’ markets will be happy to accept empty egg cartons. Step two on the road to becoming more sustainable is reusing. This is probably something that you have heard a lot about recently when it comes to furniture and clothes – upcycling has definitely become a bit of a buzzword with many bloggers. The idea of taking objects that can no longer be used or repaired and using the parts to create something else is as old as time and it can take many forms. As an example, you could turn an old tablecloth that has stains in all the wrong places into a set of napkins, transform a picture frame into a vertical planter or use wooden pallets to make just about any piece of furniture you could think of. There are many very creative ideas to be found online and it is definitely worth taking some time to browse Pinterest or websites like www.upcyclethat.com before throwing something out. Who knows, perhaps you could turn old IKEA table into an amazing piece of art or discover a way to build a house out of pallets to keep all of your newly made pallet furniture in? Lastly, there is recycling. Normally recycling is presented as the most responsible way of managing waste, but it really should be the last step of the journey for an item. When something has already been bought and can no longer be used or transformed into something else – this is when it is time to recycle it. Recycling allows the items to be converted back into raw materials and objects, something that isn’t always possible to achieve at home. Every area will have different rules for separating recyclable materials, so please make sure to follow those as closely as possible – this is the only way you can be certain that they will get a second life. If you’re interested in this topic, click here to read more about one of the Seven Natural Wonders that is being overtaken by trash. And fashion is more your thing, click here to read why circular fashion is the trendiest choice you could make. Do you know of any waste management initiatives in your area? Or do you have interesting upcycling ideas? Share them in the comments!   https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/waste/recycling
Every first Monday of October we celebrate World Habitat Day. First introduced in 1986, this United Nations event aims to “reflect on the state of our towns and cities, and on the basic right of all to adequate shelter”. Municipal Solid Waste Management is the main theme of this year’s celebration, and, as usual, I would like to use this opportunity to bring more awareness of the sustainability issues that are related to it and try to take a look at some of the solutions. So what is Municipal Solid Waste and how is it managed? Municipal Solid Waste consists of various types of refuse we encounter most often in our daily lives: household waste, construction and demolition debris, sanitation residue and waste from streets. There are two mains methods of managing solid waste – the centralised method, where all of the waste is collected and discarded without separation, usually into a landfill, and de-centralised method, where the waste requires prior separation into biodegradeable and non-biodegradable and is then disposed of based on its type. Once the waste is collected, there are several ways the municipality can dispose of it. In many parts of the world the most popular options are sanitary landfills and dumps. They are essentially the same – a place where all of the waste is collected in one area – with the only difference being that sanitary landfills are more concentrated and the waste’s contact with the environment is highly reduced. Dumps, on the other hand, are open areas that are exposed to the elements and animals and are often responsible for contamination of land and water. Another danger of dumps is the biodiversity impacts that they have: many species of animals that lived in the area get replaced by refuse-feeding species, such as rats and crows. These species will also spread disease and thus affect health of the residents in the area. Lastly, landfills harm the natural landscape and the smell makes them an unwanted sight in most residential areas. Another disposal method that is gaining popularity is thermal treatment. There are several types of thermal treatment, such as incineration, gasification, pyrolysis and others. This method allows to save space and is thus particularly beneficial in countries where land is scarce such as Japan. Incineration plants can also be constructed in a way that allows to harvest the energy released during the burning process and use that to generate electric power and heating. Many European countries rely heavily on this method, with Sweden actually importing trash from other countries to generate more energy. While this thermal treatment is a more sustainable alternative to landfills, there are concerns about its safety as harmful chemicals may get released into the air during the process. Many developed nations are moving towards the more sustainable thermal treatment and recycling , however according to World Bank over 90% of the waste in low-income countries is disposed of in unregulated dumps or openly burned. Effective waste management is expensive and requires specialised infrastructure, something many poor urban communities simply cannot afford. Lack of municipal resources pushes up demand for informal waste pickers and disposers - occupations that are highly dangerous and are often filled by women and children; air pollution, injuries and landfill collapses are only the few of the risks that they face on a daily basis.  And it’s not only the workers that are dealing with the waste directly that are affected by it. When waste is left untreated and unattended, it will inevitably start leaching toxic materials and pathogens into the soil and water. Many communities are left with no choice but to use the contaminated soil for farming and continue drinking the water, thereby consuming harmful chemicals. Communities that are located directly next to waste dumping sites often experience high occurrences of cancer, birth defects and various health issues. As treatment of contaminated soil and water requires use of advanced and expensive technology, it is nearly impossible to reverse the damage that was already done. Luckily, more organisations around the world are taking notice of the problem and are actively trying to help develop more affordable waste treatment methods and provide financing for waste management projects in poorer countries. While this will not help clean the areas that were already affected by waste, it will create safer disposals that will prevent further damage to the eco system. Reduce, reuse, recycle The reality is that we produce more and more trash every year and it is essential to improve the way solid waste is managed. This can be done on many levels – we should be changing the way we consume and produce various items, improving municipal governance systems, educating more capable city managers and changing our own daily habits. Naturally the best place to start making changes is ourselves, so let’s look at the ways we can contribute to better solid waste management. According to World Bank, in 2016 people living in cities produced 0.74 kilograms (1.63 lb) of waste per person per day. The first step one can take to help improve solid waste management is to produce less waste. Take a good look at what you buy and consume every week. Perhaps it is time to get yourself a nice shopper for your groceries or a stylish tumbler for your morning coffee (some coffee chains will offer you a discount for using your own tumbler!)? It is also worth researching what kind of packaging you might be able to return to the store – depending on where you live, you might be able to return glass or plastic bottles to the supermarkets and some farmers’ markets will be happy to accept empty egg cartons. Step two on the road to becoming more sustainable is reusing. This is probably something that you have heard a lot about recently when it comes to furniture and clothes – upcycling has definitely become a bit of a buzzword with many bloggers. The idea of taking objects that can no longer be used or repaired and using the parts to create something else is as old as time and it can take many forms. As an example, you could turn an old tablecloth that has stains in all the wrong places into a set of napkins, transform a picture frame into a vertical planter or use wooden pallets to make just about any piece of furniture you could think of. There are many very creative ideas to be found online and it is definitely worth taking some time to browse Pinterest or websites like www.upcyclethat.com before throwing something out. Who knows, perhaps you could turn old IKEA table into an amazing piece of art or discover a way to build a house out of pallets to keep all of your newly made pallet furniture in? Lastly, there is recycling. Normally recycling is presented as the most responsible way of managing waste, but it really should be the last step of the journey for an item. When something has already been bought and can no longer be used or transformed into something else – this is when it is time to recycle it. Recycling allows the items to be converted back into raw materials and objects, something that isn’t always possible to achieve at home. Every area will have different rules for separating recyclable materials, so please make sure to follow those as closely as possible – this is the only way you can be certain that they will get a second life. If you’re interested in this topic, click here to read more about one of the Seven Natural Wonders that is being overtaken by trash. And fashion is more your thing, click here to read why circular fashion is the trendiest choice you could make. Do you know of any waste management initiatives in your area? Or do you have interesting upcycling ideas? Share them in the comments!   https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/waste/recycling
Municipal Solid Waste Management – How You Can Make a Difference
Municipal Solid Waste Management – How You Can Make a Difference
Plastic Waste And Turtles: A Worldwide Fatal Attraction
A turtle-friendly conservation project in the Galapagos islands is targeting plastic waste. The Galapagos green turtle’s favorite food is jellyfish, so wherever jellyfish are most abundant, turtles are bound to be close by. Unfortunately, plastic bags look like jellyfish when floating in the ocean, and if a turtle ingests a plastic bag, it forms a fatal blockage in the gut, usually resulting in death. This warning comes from the Galapagos Conservation Trust based in the United Kingdom and supporting turtle conservation projects since 1995. Turtles starve to death by eating plastic waste Galapagos green turtles are endangered. They differ from other marine turtles by their serrated lower jaw and a single pair of scales covering their eyes. They can reach a length of 84cm and are known to weigh up to 136kg. They are fast swimmers, travelling at speeds up to 35mph over long distances thanks to their powerful flippers. They are even able to sleep underwater, but only for a few hours at a time. The Trust is launching a new multi-year program to reduce plastic use in the Archipelago, where a ban on single-use plastic straws , bottles and bags will enter into force on 21 August 2018. The ban was promoted by the Governing Council of the Special Regime of the Galápagos. Plastic debris ingested by turtles can cause intestinal blockage resulting in malnutrition, reduced growth rates and even death. Perhaps most distressingly, turtles can starve to death because they feel full after swallowing plastic debris. A study, led by Qamar Schuyler of the University of Queensland and published in Global Change Biology, estimated that 52 percent of sea turtles worldwide have eaten plastic debris. This 10-minute video, which contains graphic content and strong language, shows researchers extracting a plastic straw from a turtle’s nostril. A recent global study by the University of Exeter indicates that many turtles die every year from ingesting plastic debris, or get injured, or die, after entanglement in plastic and other debris. The survey, covering 43 countries, found turtles are being tangled up in lost fishing nets, plastic twine and nylon fishing line, as well as six pack rings from canned drinks, plastic packaging straps, plastic balloon string, kite string, plastic packaging and discarded anchor line and seismic cables. Professor Brendan Godley, the lead author of the study, warned that as plastic  pollution increases more and more turtles are likely to become entangled. “Plastic rubbish in the oceans, including lost or discarded fishing gear which is not biodegradable, is a major threat to marine turtles,” says Godley. “We found, based on beach strandings, that more than 1,000 turtles are dying a year, after becoming tangled up, but this is almost certainly a gross underestimate. Young turtles and hatchings are particularly vulnerable to entanglement.” Turtles drown when entangled in plastic waste and fishing nets In recent years, global turtle population numbers have been falling. The fishing industry is a serious threat; although turtles are strong swimmers they often become entangled in fishing gear. Weighed down by heavy nets, they are unable to surface and subsequently drown. Other threats include invasive species and pollution. Every minute we dump the equivalent of one garbage truck of plastic into the ocean. If we carry on as usual, this is expected to increase to two per minute by 2030 and four per minute by 2050. By 2050, this could mean there will be more plastic than fish in the world’s oceans. UN Environment’s Clean Seas Campaign was launched in February 2017. It aims to increase global awareness of the need to reduce marine litter. The need for measures differs in different parts of the world. Proper waste management infrastructure is lacking in some areas, while in others the challenge involves the general public’s awareness of the impact litter has on the environment. World Turtle Day on 23 May, sponsored yearly since 2000 by American Tortoise Rescue, aims to bring attention to, and increase knowledge of and respect for, turtles and tortoises, and encourage human action to help them survive and thrive. World Sea Turtle Day on 16 June, is sponsored by the Florida-based Sea Turtle Conservancy, which was founded in 1959 by Archie Carr. World Environment Day on 5 June 2018 is hosted by India and focuses on the theme of plastic waste. This aligns with, and further develops, the December 2017 UN Environment Assembly’s “Beat Pollution” watchword. By: Petter Malvik https://www.whatsorb.com/category/waste
A turtle-friendly conservation project in the Galapagos islands is targeting plastic waste. The Galapagos green turtle’s favorite food is jellyfish, so wherever jellyfish are most abundant, turtles are bound to be close by. Unfortunately, plastic bags look like jellyfish when floating in the ocean, and if a turtle ingests a plastic bag, it forms a fatal blockage in the gut, usually resulting in death. This warning comes from the Galapagos Conservation Trust based in the United Kingdom and supporting turtle conservation projects since 1995. Turtles starve to death by eating plastic waste Galapagos green turtles are endangered. They differ from other marine turtles by their serrated lower jaw and a single pair of scales covering their eyes. They can reach a length of 84cm and are known to weigh up to 136kg. They are fast swimmers, travelling at speeds up to 35mph over long distances thanks to their powerful flippers. They are even able to sleep underwater, but only for a few hours at a time. The Trust is launching a new multi-year program to reduce plastic use in the Archipelago, where a ban on single-use plastic straws , bottles and bags will enter into force on 21 August 2018. The ban was promoted by the Governing Council of the Special Regime of the Galápagos. Plastic debris ingested by turtles can cause intestinal blockage resulting in malnutrition, reduced growth rates and even death. Perhaps most distressingly, turtles can starve to death because they feel full after swallowing plastic debris. A study, led by Qamar Schuyler of the University of Queensland and published in Global Change Biology, estimated that 52 percent of sea turtles worldwide have eaten plastic debris. This 10-minute video, which contains graphic content and strong language, shows researchers extracting a plastic straw from a turtle’s nostril. A recent global study by the University of Exeter indicates that many turtles die every year from ingesting plastic debris, or get injured, or die, after entanglement in plastic and other debris. The survey, covering 43 countries, found turtles are being tangled up in lost fishing nets, plastic twine and nylon fishing line, as well as six pack rings from canned drinks, plastic packaging straps, plastic balloon string, kite string, plastic packaging and discarded anchor line and seismic cables. Professor Brendan Godley, the lead author of the study, warned that as plastic  pollution increases more and more turtles are likely to become entangled. “Plastic rubbish in the oceans, including lost or discarded fishing gear which is not biodegradable, is a major threat to marine turtles,” says Godley. “We found, based on beach strandings, that more than 1,000 turtles are dying a year, after becoming tangled up, but this is almost certainly a gross underestimate. Young turtles and hatchings are particularly vulnerable to entanglement.” Turtles drown when entangled in plastic waste and fishing nets In recent years, global turtle population numbers have been falling. The fishing industry is a serious threat; although turtles are strong swimmers they often become entangled in fishing gear. Weighed down by heavy nets, they are unable to surface and subsequently drown. Other threats include invasive species and pollution. Every minute we dump the equivalent of one garbage truck of plastic into the ocean. If we carry on as usual, this is expected to increase to two per minute by 2030 and four per minute by 2050. By 2050, this could mean there will be more plastic than fish in the world’s oceans. UN Environment’s Clean Seas Campaign was launched in February 2017. It aims to increase global awareness of the need to reduce marine litter. The need for measures differs in different parts of the world. Proper waste management infrastructure is lacking in some areas, while in others the challenge involves the general public’s awareness of the impact litter has on the environment. World Turtle Day on 23 May, sponsored yearly since 2000 by American Tortoise Rescue, aims to bring attention to, and increase knowledge of and respect for, turtles and tortoises, and encourage human action to help them survive and thrive. World Sea Turtle Day on 16 June, is sponsored by the Florida-based Sea Turtle Conservancy, which was founded in 1959 by Archie Carr. World Environment Day on 5 June 2018 is hosted by India and focuses on the theme of plastic waste. This aligns with, and further develops, the December 2017 UN Environment Assembly’s “Beat Pollution” watchword. By: Petter Malvik https://www.whatsorb.com/category/waste
Plastic Waste And Turtles: A Worldwide Fatal Attraction
Plastic Waste And Turtles: A Worldwide Fatal Attraction
Waste

Waste, refuse, recycle: towards a circulair economy

Waste is something unwanted or are materials we cannot use anymore. Waste is any material or product which is worthless, defect or of any use. In the near past it had hardly any economic value anymore but nowadays there are plenty people and organisations which are recycling waste and make from the regained parts again valuable material for reuse. The Circular Economy at work.

Even better is a zero waste environment. That means no waste send to landfills. A zero waste lifestyle means: using less resources, eating healthier, saving money and less negative impact on the environment. Go for the 5 R’s: refuse, reduce, reuse, recycle and rot.

By reducing waste we can make a big difference. If there was an urge to come up with waste reduction ideas and sustainable recycle solutions and share these topics globally it’s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about waste reduction your experiences and expectations for the future at home and globally. 

Global Sustainability X-change, that’s what you can do together with WhatsOrb. What's in for me?

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