Waste

About: <p><strong>Waste is something unwanted or is material we cannot use anymore. Waste is any material or product that is worthless, defective, or of any use. In the near past, it had hardly any economic value anymore. Still, nowadays, there are plenty of people and organizations recycling waste and making from the regained parts again valuable material for reuse&mdash;the Circular Economy at work.</strong></p> <h2>Waste, Refuse, Recycle: Towards A Circular Economy</h2> <p>Even better is a zero waste environment. That means no waste is sent to landfills. A zero-waste lifestyle means: using fewer resources, eating healthier, saving money, and less negative impact on the environment. Go for the 5 R&rsquo;s: refuse, reduce, reuse, recycle, and rot.</p> <p>By reducing waste, we can make a big difference. If there was an urge to develop waste reduction ideas and sustainable recycling solutions and share these topics globally, it&rsquo;s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers, and influencers to write about waste reduction, your experiences, and expectations for the future at home and globally.&nbsp;</p> <p>Boost Global Sustainability Now, that&rsquo;s what you can do together with WhatsOrb.&nbsp;<a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/newsletter/your-shared-sustainable-ideas-make-our-earth-a-better-place">What's in for me?</a></p>
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Plastic In Oceans: Cheers To The Enzyme Cocktail
Remember those scientists who discovered this marvelous little plastic-eating enzyme, better known as PETase? Are those crazy bits capable of literally eating the much dreaded PET-based materials? No? Well, some scientists found and reproduced an enzyme that is capable of eating plastic. There, you are up to speed. PETase As PET’s Worst Nightmare Now those guys are back - and they have gone next level. They discovered another enzyme that they threw together with their original enzyme is an enzyme cocktail that can digest plastic up to six times faster. This new enzyme was found in the same group of bacteria that enjoys hanging around groups of debris in our oceans and landfills. When combined with PETase, it has proven to be even faster in breaking down plastic. A quick refresher. PETase is capable of breaking down polyethylene terephthalate, better known as PET, into its core parts. What this means could be groundbreaking - as it allows us to create a closed recycling loop for plastics, effectively reducing plastic pollution and pushing back greenhouse gases associated with PET production. PET is used in pretty much everything around us. It can be found in our drinks bottles, clothes, or carpets, to name a few. And as we discard it, it continues to exist all around us. Plastic does not really break down, or well, does so rather slowly. It takes hundreds of years in a usual setting. This is why PETase is so revolutionary. It can do this job in a matter of days and is extremely low-energy, while it can be produced in a lab setting. So, a triple win. Recommended:  Microplastics In Oceans: Is It Harming Us? Meet MHETase: The Partner In Crime Make that a quadruple win, now that a counterpart has been discovered. The PETase’s partner in crime has been given the equally catchy name MHETase, and when the two are combined, they provide even bigger benefits. By putting them together, the PET breakdown speed is doubled. Pretty good already, but if you go that extra mile and engineer a connection between the two, a so-called ‘super-enzyme’ is created that increases this speed threefold.   One of the lead scientists is Professor John McGeehan from the Centre for Enzyme Innovation at the University of Portsmouth, who worked together with his colleague Dr. Gregg Beckham from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. As McGeehan explains, “ Gregg and I were chatting about how PETase attacks the surface of the plastics and MHETase chops things up further, so it seemed natural to see if we could use them together, mimicking what happens in nature." “Our first experiments showed that they did indeed work better together, so we decided to try to physically link them as two Pac-men joined by a piece of string. It took a great deal of work on both sides of the Atlantic. Still, it was worth the effort -- we were delighted to see that our new chimeric enzyme is up to three times faster than the naturally evolved separate enzymes, opening new avenues for further improvements." Cheers To The Enzyme Cocktail   The enzyme cocktail basically digests PET plastic and excrements its ‘building blocks,’ so to speak. These building blocks break down much faster and give rise to a cycle where plastic can be made and re-used in a never-ending loop. This could not just solve the plastic problem; it could also be a major cut in the use of gas and oil. That certainly sounds like something worth their effort. PETase enzymes break down PET molecules into monomeric building blocks. After the researchers’ original work with PETase was published, many heralded it as the next big thing in global plastic pollution while noting that it would not suffice in and of itself. PETase was not fast enough to offer commercial viability to the process. Now that the second enzyme has been added to speed things up, it seems like a major step toward becoming a real solution. Before you go! Recommended:  Solar Panel Recycling: Photovoltaics Rebirth Like to write your article about plastic waste? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Remember those scientists who discovered this marvelous little plastic-eating enzyme, better known as PETase? Are those crazy bits capable of literally eating the much dreaded PET-based materials? No? Well, some scientists found and reproduced an enzyme that is capable of eating plastic. There, you are up to speed. PETase As PET’s Worst Nightmare Now those guys are back - and they have gone next level. They discovered another enzyme that they threw together with their original enzyme is an enzyme cocktail that can digest plastic up to six times faster. This new enzyme was found in the same group of bacteria that enjoys hanging around groups of debris in our oceans and landfills. When combined with PETase, it has proven to be even faster in breaking down plastic. A quick refresher. PETase is capable of breaking down polyethylene terephthalate, better known as PET, into its core parts. What this means could be groundbreaking - as it allows us to create a closed recycling loop for plastics, effectively reducing plastic pollution and pushing back greenhouse gases associated with PET production. PET is used in pretty much everything around us. It can be found in our drinks bottles, clothes, or carpets, to name a few. And as we discard it, it continues to exist all around us. Plastic does not really break down, or well, does so rather slowly. It takes hundreds of years in a usual setting. This is why PETase is so revolutionary. It can do this job in a matter of days and is extremely low-energy, while it can be produced in a lab setting. So, a triple win. Recommended:  Microplastics In Oceans: Is It Harming Us? Meet MHETase: The Partner In Crime Make that a quadruple win, now that a counterpart has been discovered. The PETase’s partner in crime has been given the equally catchy name MHETase, and when the two are combined, they provide even bigger benefits. By putting them together, the PET breakdown speed is doubled. Pretty good already, but if you go that extra mile and engineer a connection between the two, a so-called ‘super-enzyme’ is created that increases this speed threefold.   One of the lead scientists is Professor John McGeehan from the Centre for Enzyme Innovation at the University of Portsmouth, who worked together with his colleague Dr. Gregg Beckham from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. As McGeehan explains, “ Gregg and I were chatting about how PETase attacks the surface of the plastics and MHETase chops things up further, so it seemed natural to see if we could use them together, mimicking what happens in nature." “Our first experiments showed that they did indeed work better together, so we decided to try to physically link them as two Pac-men joined by a piece of string. It took a great deal of work on both sides of the Atlantic. Still, it was worth the effort -- we were delighted to see that our new chimeric enzyme is up to three times faster than the naturally evolved separate enzymes, opening new avenues for further improvements." Cheers To The Enzyme Cocktail   The enzyme cocktail basically digests PET plastic and excrements its ‘building blocks,’ so to speak. These building blocks break down much faster and give rise to a cycle where plastic can be made and re-used in a never-ending loop. This could not just solve the plastic problem; it could also be a major cut in the use of gas and oil. That certainly sounds like something worth their effort. PETase enzymes break down PET molecules into monomeric building blocks. After the researchers’ original work with PETase was published, many heralded it as the next big thing in global plastic pollution while noting that it would not suffice in and of itself. PETase was not fast enough to offer commercial viability to the process. Now that the second enzyme has been added to speed things up, it seems like a major step toward becoming a real solution. Before you go! Recommended:  Solar Panel Recycling: Photovoltaics Rebirth Like to write your article about plastic waste? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Plastic In Oceans: Cheers To The Enzyme Cocktail
Plastic In Oceans: Cheers To The Enzyme Cocktail
Plastic Particle Pollution: Caught In Action
Four master's students call themselves the Tyre Collective, from Imperial College London and the Royal College of Art designed a tire attachment to reduce transport pollution. Plastic particle pollution: caught in action. Plastic Particle Pollution: Tires The tire attachment is a device that captures microplastic particles from tires once they are emitted. The tire attachment, which won the UK James Dyson award, could decrease the harmful pollution by road transport. Tires wear out, but why? Every time a vehicle accelerates, brakes, or turns a corner, the tires wear due to friction with the road. Thousands of small particles end up in the air. In Europe alone, this results in 500,000 tonnes of plastic tire particles. Worldwide, it is estimated that tire wear is responsible for almost half of the particulate emissions from road transport. After pollution in the ocean, this is the worst microplastic pollutant. The winning tool is placed on the wheel and uses electrostatics to gather the emitted particles using air currents around a rotating wheel. The prototype collected 60 percent of all tire particles floating in the air in a controlled environment on a trial installation. Recommended:  Unique In The World: Roads Turn Into Electricity A Passion For The Environment The four master's students (Siobhan Anderson, Hanson Cheng, M Deepak Mallya, and Hugo Richardson) said they have a passion for the environment. They use design to have a significant impact on society. "As a team, our strength lies in our diversity," said Hugo Richardson. We all come from different places globally and have a great deal of knowledge in architecture, biomechanics, product design, and mechanical engineering. Caught In Action "Normally, tires wear down, but nobody thinks about where it goes." The students were shocked to find out that tire pollution is the worst kind after ocean pollution. At the Tyre Collective, they look at capture tire wear at the source. They recycle the particles and reuse them for new tires or other materials. For example, they printed business cards using ink made of the captured tire dust. They want to create a closed-loop system. {youtube}                                         The Tyre Collective - capturing micro-plastic pollution from tire wear A recent study by the Norwegian Institute for Air Research has shown that more than 200,000 tonnes of small plastic particles are pumped from the roads into the oceans every year. The problem may get more severe if the UK increases the use of electric cars. They are heavier than comparable diesel or petrol models. So, more electric vehicles mean more wear on tires. Before you go! Recommended:  Solar Panel Recycling: Photovoltaics Rebirth Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about recycling? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Four master's students call themselves the Tyre Collective, from Imperial College London and the Royal College of Art designed a tire attachment to reduce transport pollution. Plastic particle pollution: caught in action. Plastic Particle Pollution: Tires The tire attachment is a device that captures microplastic particles from tires once they are emitted. The tire attachment, which won the UK James Dyson award, could decrease the harmful pollution by road transport. Tires wear out, but why? Every time a vehicle accelerates, brakes, or turns a corner, the tires wear due to friction with the road. Thousands of small particles end up in the air. In Europe alone, this results in 500,000 tonnes of plastic tire particles. Worldwide, it is estimated that tire wear is responsible for almost half of the particulate emissions from road transport. After pollution in the ocean, this is the worst microplastic pollutant. The winning tool is placed on the wheel and uses electrostatics to gather the emitted particles using air currents around a rotating wheel. The prototype collected 60 percent of all tire particles floating in the air in a controlled environment on a trial installation. Recommended:  Unique In The World: Roads Turn Into Electricity A Passion For The Environment The four master's students (Siobhan Anderson, Hanson Cheng, M Deepak Mallya, and Hugo Richardson) said they have a passion for the environment. They use design to have a significant impact on society. "As a team, our strength lies in our diversity," said Hugo Richardson. We all come from different places globally and have a great deal of knowledge in architecture, biomechanics, product design, and mechanical engineering. Caught In Action "Normally, tires wear down, but nobody thinks about where it goes." The students were shocked to find out that tire pollution is the worst kind after ocean pollution. At the Tyre Collective, they look at capture tire wear at the source. They recycle the particles and reuse them for new tires or other materials. For example, they printed business cards using ink made of the captured tire dust. They want to create a closed-loop system. {youtube}                                         The Tyre Collective - capturing micro-plastic pollution from tire wear A recent study by the Norwegian Institute for Air Research has shown that more than 200,000 tonnes of small plastic particles are pumped from the roads into the oceans every year. The problem may get more severe if the UK increases the use of electric cars. They are heavier than comparable diesel or petrol models. So, more electric vehicles mean more wear on tires. Before you go! Recommended:  Solar Panel Recycling: Photovoltaics Rebirth Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about recycling? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Plastic Particle Pollution: Caught In Action
Plastic Particle Pollution: Caught In Action
The Fourth Of July. What About The Fireworks?
The Fourth of July—also known as Independence Day or July 4th—has been a federal holiday in the United States since 1941. Festivities ranging from fireworks, parades and concerts to more casual family gatherings and barbecues. The Fourth Of July. History The tradition of Independence Day celebrations goes back to the 18th century and the American Revolution. On July 2nd, 1776, the Continental Congress voted in favor of independence, and two days later delegates from the 13 colonies adopted the Declaration of Independence, a historic document drafted by Thomas Jefferson. From 1776 to the present day, July 4th has been celebrated as the birth of American independence. Fireworks: Is It Still Ok? Fireworks are mesmerizing, dreamy, and very romantic. But at the same time, they are not exactly great for the environment. Whether you opt for looking out from behind the relative safety of your window, gawking at the professional show amidst thousands of others in a crowded square.  Recommended:  India’s CO2, Pollution, Artificial Rain: How To Survive? Fireworks, Made in China And while it will not be a thing most of us are wanting to hear about fireworks, because 'it is tradition and a symbolic way of celebrating the fourth of July' Well, just hear me out if you want to optimize the number of future celebrations will get to enjoy it as well. Where did fireworks originally come from? Some think that fireworks first originated in China around 2,000 years ago. The most popular legend has it that fireworks were discovered by accident when a Chinese cook working in a field kitchen happened to mix charcoal, sulphur and saltpeter (which were all common kitchen items at the time). The fireworks colorful, artistic lights flickering in the sky, accompanied by rhythmic booms reverberating in our hearts, will fill us with joy. With happy and perhaps not so happy memories. It will fill us with love and with good intentions.  And with harmful particulates and elements. {youtube}                                                       Fourth of July Fireworks NYC 2019 from Brooklyn Bridge Park                                                            U nfortunately, all the things that make fireworks so pretty and attractive are exactly those things that make them so bad for us. Gunpowder will help it lift off and reach the sky. Metallic compounds give it its gorgeous colors. All of these elements are made up of carcinogenic and hormone-disrupting substances, that can make its way into our soil, air, and water. Recommended:  Climate Change Efforts On Reducing CO2 Why Not Recycle It? Fireworks and it's 'dirty' chemistry How are fireworks produced? When a firework explodes mid-air thanks to the bursting charge and the black powder, the gas and the heat that are produced ignite the stars. The atoms of the metal powders in the stars absorb that heat energy and their electrons rearrange from their lower-energy ground state to a higher-energy 'excited' state Some of those really bad guys that are present in commonly used fireworks include perchlorates. These are responsible for the explosion, as they feed oxygen in the charcoal-sulfur fuel that powers up the explosive, serving as the so-called oxidizers. The pyrotechnics industry is particularly looking at two types of perchlorates for this: potassium perchlorate and ammonium perchlorate.   Fancy names for something so inherently bad, as they can cause all kind of health problems, most significantly hypothyroidism: an illness that limits the thyroid’s ability to ingest iodine, which will lead to a lack of hormones in the human body - hindering all kind of bodily functions and potentially giving rise to all kind of disorders, especially in children.   Recommended:  Fossil Fuel Will Dominate Energy Use Through 2050: Globally Fireworks have bad effects on children's health Then there are particulates in fireworks. These can be found in the smoke resulting from the burned charcoal and sulfur and will make their way to our lungs. This could pose an instant danger for those suffering from asthma-related diseases. Merely looking at an air-quality monitor spiking out in the hours after a fireworks show should get you concerned about the air that you are breathing.   Do fireworks make it rain? Nonetheless, fireworks are not found to be an actual cause for rain. The concentration of chemicals during even the busiest of firework nights alone are not enough to open the floodgates of the sky. The problem with the argument is that fireworks won't go high enough to introduce the particles into the clouds Fireworks which have been exploded There are even more rather ominous-sounding elements that can be found in your firecrackers, flares, and Roman candles. Strontium, aluminum, copper, barium, rubidium, cadmium: terms that you might remember from your chem class as being rather delicate and dangerous substances, yet that are freely used to color our fireworks. All of them carry nasty side-effects when ingested in high doses, including impairment of bone growth, mental disorders, Alzheimer’s, cancer, skin diseases, paralysis, heart problems, and - in the worst case - death.   Is the smoke from fireworks toxic? Depending on the effect sought, fireworks produce smoke and dust that contain various heavy metals, sulfur-coal compounds, and other noxious chemicals. Barium, for instance, is used to produce brilliant green colors in fireworks displays, despite Fireworks: You Will Be Breathing Highly Toxic Particles Some will object at this point, claiming that it cannot be that bad. Fireworks are, after all, not an everyday event (that is unless you work in Disney World). And are those one or two days per year that we shoot all kinds of garbage up in the atmosphere really something worth worrying over? Especially as the industrial sector keeps on regurgitating substances that are seemingly identical on a daily basis?   Admittedly, the chances of attracting any of the diseases given above for the volumes going up in the air on the fourth of July are so small that they could be considered insignificant. Yet we should not just think about ourselves but consider the impact on our environment as well. Some cities will experience more smog and air pollution on the fourth of July alone than in the previous year as a whole. That is a fact.   Recommended:  Sustainable Polluting Eating Tree Is Cleaning Cities Air Fireworks, distribution case These toxins will get in the atmosphere, in the soil, in the water. Aquatic life will suffer, cows eating polluted grass will pass it on to us through our hamburgers. With every piece of firework launched, toxic rain will fall down on our lands that will impact all living beings. And the worst part? The majority of these chemicals are persistent, which means that they will not break down in nature, but stay in our ecosystems indefinitely.   Are fireworks bad for animals? Research studies show that the loud sounds of fireworks do have an adverse effect on wild animals as well as domestic animals. ... This fear often causes them to flee into roadways which results in more vehicle damage (from large animals such as deer) and an increase in dead animals. And no, there has not been enough research performed yet to be able to state with certainty that fireworks do actually pose an instant, immediate danger to us and the world around us. But the evidence as given above will, if anything, make it perfectly clear that it cannot possibly be any good.   Only clinging onto it for the sake of tradition, would be silly - and hugely negligent. Recommended:  How An Artificial Leaf Sucks CO2 And Makes Fuel. Amazing! Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about 'fireworks'? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
The Fourth of July—also known as Independence Day or July 4th—has been a federal holiday in the United States since 1941. Festivities ranging from fireworks, parades and concerts to more casual family gatherings and barbecues. The Fourth Of July. History The tradition of Independence Day celebrations goes back to the 18th century and the American Revolution. On July 2nd, 1776, the Continental Congress voted in favor of independence, and two days later delegates from the 13 colonies adopted the Declaration of Independence, a historic document drafted by Thomas Jefferson. From 1776 to the present day, July 4th has been celebrated as the birth of American independence. Fireworks: Is It Still Ok? Fireworks are mesmerizing, dreamy, and very romantic. But at the same time, they are not exactly great for the environment. Whether you opt for looking out from behind the relative safety of your window, gawking at the professional show amidst thousands of others in a crowded square.  Recommended:  India’s CO2, Pollution, Artificial Rain: How To Survive? Fireworks, Made in China And while it will not be a thing most of us are wanting to hear about fireworks, because 'it is tradition and a symbolic way of celebrating the fourth of July' Well, just hear me out if you want to optimize the number of future celebrations will get to enjoy it as well. Where did fireworks originally come from? Some think that fireworks first originated in China around 2,000 years ago. The most popular legend has it that fireworks were discovered by accident when a Chinese cook working in a field kitchen happened to mix charcoal, sulphur and saltpeter (which were all common kitchen items at the time). The fireworks colorful, artistic lights flickering in the sky, accompanied by rhythmic booms reverberating in our hearts, will fill us with joy. With happy and perhaps not so happy memories. It will fill us with love and with good intentions.  And with harmful particulates and elements. {youtube}                                                       Fourth of July Fireworks NYC 2019 from Brooklyn Bridge Park                                                            U nfortunately, all the things that make fireworks so pretty and attractive are exactly those things that make them so bad for us. Gunpowder will help it lift off and reach the sky. Metallic compounds give it its gorgeous colors. All of these elements are made up of carcinogenic and hormone-disrupting substances, that can make its way into our soil, air, and water. Recommended:  Climate Change Efforts On Reducing CO2 Why Not Recycle It? Fireworks and it's 'dirty' chemistry How are fireworks produced? When a firework explodes mid-air thanks to the bursting charge and the black powder, the gas and the heat that are produced ignite the stars. The atoms of the metal powders in the stars absorb that heat energy and their electrons rearrange from their lower-energy ground state to a higher-energy 'excited' state Some of those really bad guys that are present in commonly used fireworks include perchlorates. These are responsible for the explosion, as they feed oxygen in the charcoal-sulfur fuel that powers up the explosive, serving as the so-called oxidizers. The pyrotechnics industry is particularly looking at two types of perchlorates for this: potassium perchlorate and ammonium perchlorate.   Fancy names for something so inherently bad, as they can cause all kind of health problems, most significantly hypothyroidism: an illness that limits the thyroid’s ability to ingest iodine, which will lead to a lack of hormones in the human body - hindering all kind of bodily functions and potentially giving rise to all kind of disorders, especially in children.   Recommended:  Fossil Fuel Will Dominate Energy Use Through 2050: Globally Fireworks have bad effects on children's health Then there are particulates in fireworks. These can be found in the smoke resulting from the burned charcoal and sulfur and will make their way to our lungs. This could pose an instant danger for those suffering from asthma-related diseases. Merely looking at an air-quality monitor spiking out in the hours after a fireworks show should get you concerned about the air that you are breathing.   Do fireworks make it rain? Nonetheless, fireworks are not found to be an actual cause for rain. The concentration of chemicals during even the busiest of firework nights alone are not enough to open the floodgates of the sky. The problem with the argument is that fireworks won't go high enough to introduce the particles into the clouds Fireworks which have been exploded There are even more rather ominous-sounding elements that can be found in your firecrackers, flares, and Roman candles. Strontium, aluminum, copper, barium, rubidium, cadmium: terms that you might remember from your chem class as being rather delicate and dangerous substances, yet that are freely used to color our fireworks. All of them carry nasty side-effects when ingested in high doses, including impairment of bone growth, mental disorders, Alzheimer’s, cancer, skin diseases, paralysis, heart problems, and - in the worst case - death.   Is the smoke from fireworks toxic? Depending on the effect sought, fireworks produce smoke and dust that contain various heavy metals, sulfur-coal compounds, and other noxious chemicals. Barium, for instance, is used to produce brilliant green colors in fireworks displays, despite Fireworks: You Will Be Breathing Highly Toxic Particles Some will object at this point, claiming that it cannot be that bad. Fireworks are, after all, not an everyday event (that is unless you work in Disney World). And are those one or two days per year that we shoot all kinds of garbage up in the atmosphere really something worth worrying over? Especially as the industrial sector keeps on regurgitating substances that are seemingly identical on a daily basis?   Admittedly, the chances of attracting any of the diseases given above for the volumes going up in the air on the fourth of July are so small that they could be considered insignificant. Yet we should not just think about ourselves but consider the impact on our environment as well. Some cities will experience more smog and air pollution on the fourth of July alone than in the previous year as a whole. That is a fact.   Recommended:  Sustainable Polluting Eating Tree Is Cleaning Cities Air Fireworks, distribution case These toxins will get in the atmosphere, in the soil, in the water. Aquatic life will suffer, cows eating polluted grass will pass it on to us through our hamburgers. With every piece of firework launched, toxic rain will fall down on our lands that will impact all living beings. And the worst part? The majority of these chemicals are persistent, which means that they will not break down in nature, but stay in our ecosystems indefinitely.   Are fireworks bad for animals? Research studies show that the loud sounds of fireworks do have an adverse effect on wild animals as well as domestic animals. ... This fear often causes them to flee into roadways which results in more vehicle damage (from large animals such as deer) and an increase in dead animals. And no, there has not been enough research performed yet to be able to state with certainty that fireworks do actually pose an instant, immediate danger to us and the world around us. But the evidence as given above will, if anything, make it perfectly clear that it cannot possibly be any good.   Only clinging onto it for the sake of tradition, would be silly - and hugely negligent. Recommended:  How An Artificial Leaf Sucks CO2 And Makes Fuel. Amazing! Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about 'fireworks'? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
The Fourth Of July. What About The Fireworks?
Biggest Fear Greater Than Climate Change: Hunger
We need not pause and ponder global warming. Hungry 'migrants' will flood communities long before the high tides. It will be caused by the loss of the 3Ps, plankton, pollinators, and plants all half gone in my lifetime. Hunger: Our Oceans Are Dying Recommended:  Climate Change Stop, Store CO2, Add Phytoplankton By Whales? Our oceans are dying, PCB laced microplastic is displacing phytoplankton as the beginning of the ocean's food chain. Most of it washes off the millions of miles of American roadways into rivers and streams then into the oceans where it becomes homogenized and is impossible to remove. Phytoplankton sequesters most of the CO2 we worry about and gives us most of the oxygen we breathe while feeding the oceans fish. The oceans are directly responsible for feeding 1 billion people, but they also feed cows, pigs, and chickens so many more will go hungry. {youtube}                                            Why are Plankton the Most Vital Organisms on Earth? | BBC Earth                                                      Hunger, Not Global Warming Will Impact Our Future Recommended:  Breaking: Did You Know, All You Read About CO2 Rise Is Half The Truth Add the loss of pollinators also from toxins also and its quite apparent billions of hungry migrants will cause war, chaos, and mayhem like the world has never seen. Add in the burning of the rain forests for Big Macs and a sprinkling of global warming, and sure hunger, humankind's greatest motivator will affect us all; it's imminent and likely irreversible.  Before you go! Recommended:  Consumerism In ‘The West’: A Society Built On Exploitation Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about Food Insecurity? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
We need not pause and ponder global warming. Hungry 'migrants' will flood communities long before the high tides. It will be caused by the loss of the 3Ps, plankton, pollinators, and plants all half gone in my lifetime. Hunger: Our Oceans Are Dying Recommended:  Climate Change Stop, Store CO2, Add Phytoplankton By Whales? Our oceans are dying, PCB laced microplastic is displacing phytoplankton as the beginning of the ocean's food chain. Most of it washes off the millions of miles of American roadways into rivers and streams then into the oceans where it becomes homogenized and is impossible to remove. Phytoplankton sequesters most of the CO2 we worry about and gives us most of the oxygen we breathe while feeding the oceans fish. The oceans are directly responsible for feeding 1 billion people, but they also feed cows, pigs, and chickens so many more will go hungry. {youtube}                                            Why are Plankton the Most Vital Organisms on Earth? | BBC Earth                                                      Hunger, Not Global Warming Will Impact Our Future Recommended:  Breaking: Did You Know, All You Read About CO2 Rise Is Half The Truth Add the loss of pollinators also from toxins also and its quite apparent billions of hungry migrants will cause war, chaos, and mayhem like the world has never seen. Add in the burning of the rain forests for Big Macs and a sprinkling of global warming, and sure hunger, humankind's greatest motivator will affect us all; it's imminent and likely irreversible.  Before you go! Recommended:  Consumerism In ‘The West’: A Society Built On Exploitation Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about Food Insecurity? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Biggest Fear Greater Than Climate Change: Hunger
Waste: Can We Create New Material From Sewage?
There is a new sustainable raw material available, taken from the excess granular sludge released during the treatment of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Epe, the Netherlands. This new sustainable raw material is made possible by the Dutch Water Authority Vallei en Veluwe. Construction Of The Installation The board of Vallei en Veluwe has given the green light for the development of an installation that can carry out this process. In the spring of 2020, it has to be finished and working. Material From Sewage Has Unique Features {youtube}                                                            This video is only available in the Dutch language                                                    Waste: The Netherlands Creates New Material From Sewage                                                     Kaumera Nereda Gum - samenwerkende partners in beeld   The sustainable and biological raw material, Kaumera Nereda Gum, has a few exceptional qualities. It can retain water, but also repel it. This offers various possibilities for its use in agriculture and horticulture, the paper industry, and the construction sector.  For example, if you add Kaumera to the soil, fertilizers can be retained much longer. But you can add Kaumera as well to concrete floors, for a better coating. It lasts longer, and its hardening better. Recommended:  Bioplastic From Fish Scale And Skin Composts Quickly: UK Circular Economy What is a circular economy? A circular economy (often referred to simply as ‘circularity’) is an economic system aimed at eliminating waste and the continual use of resources. Circular systems employ reuse, sharing, repair, remanufacturing and recycling to create a close-loop system, minimising the use of resource inputs and the creation of waste, pollution and carbon emissions The goal of the national government is to have a completely circular economy by 2050 in the country. To achieve that goal, Kaumera could play an important role as raw material. Tanja Klip-Martin, chair of the Water Authority, says: "together with our partners, we are fully committed to the research, production, and application of Kaumera to achieve this goal." Sewage Purification Technology What are the different types of wastewater? Types of wastewater: Wastewater comes in three main types namely Blackwater, Graywater and Yellow water. This is wastewater that originates from toilet fixtures, dishwashers, and food preparation sinks. It is made up of all the things that you can imagine going down the toilets, bath and sink drains. The raw material is obtained from the sewage sludge generated by Nereda's sewage technology. In 2012, the Vallei en Veluwe Water Board was the world' s first to start utilizing this technology in Epe. There is way less energy needed to purify the sewage water. This innovative and organic method of wastewater treatment is now used in more and more installations all over the world. Recommended:  Agriculture, Using Wastewater As Natural Fertilizer: Mexico Creating New Material From Sewage In Two factories Within a year, the Vallei en Veluwe Water Authority and the Rijn en IJssel Water Authority work together to build two factories. A factory will open in Zutphen in the autumn of 2019. This factory will take Kaumera from wastewater from the dairy industry. Next to the factory in Zutphen, there will be an operational factory in Epe in the spring of 2020. They also extract Kaumera, but then from municipal sewage water. A lot of people are happy with this innovation; the extraction of Kaumera from wastewater is widely supported in this sector. Next to Rijn en IJssel, Vallei en Veluwe, the water authorities of Noorderzijlvest, Vechtstromen, Waterbedrijf Limburg, and Hoogheemraadschap de Stichtse Rijnlanden are also involved. Working Together A lot of companies worked together to make it possible to extract Kaumera. They all have their knowledge and expertise to recover, process, and market this new raw material. In this way, they are all working together to create a sustainable, circular economy. This all can be created and developed, thanks to the financial contributions of the Province of Gelderland, the European Union (LIFE), and the Ministry of Economic Affairs (DEI). Collaboration and innovation are essential to make things happen. Before you go! Recommended:  Climate Change Efforts On Reducing CO2 Why Not Recycle It? Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
There is a new sustainable raw material available, taken from the excess granular sludge released during the treatment of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Epe, the Netherlands. This new sustainable raw material is made possible by the Dutch Water Authority Vallei en Veluwe. Construction Of The Installation The board of Vallei en Veluwe has given the green light for the development of an installation that can carry out this process. In the spring of 2020, it has to be finished and working. Material From Sewage Has Unique Features {youtube}                                                            This video is only available in the Dutch language                                                    Waste: The Netherlands Creates New Material From Sewage                                                     Kaumera Nereda Gum - samenwerkende partners in beeld   The sustainable and biological raw material, Kaumera Nereda Gum, has a few exceptional qualities. It can retain water, but also repel it. This offers various possibilities for its use in agriculture and horticulture, the paper industry, and the construction sector.  For example, if you add Kaumera to the soil, fertilizers can be retained much longer. But you can add Kaumera as well to concrete floors, for a better coating. It lasts longer, and its hardening better. Recommended:  Bioplastic From Fish Scale And Skin Composts Quickly: UK Circular Economy What is a circular economy? A circular economy (often referred to simply as ‘circularity’) is an economic system aimed at eliminating waste and the continual use of resources. Circular systems employ reuse, sharing, repair, remanufacturing and recycling to create a close-loop system, minimising the use of resource inputs and the creation of waste, pollution and carbon emissions The goal of the national government is to have a completely circular economy by 2050 in the country. To achieve that goal, Kaumera could play an important role as raw material. Tanja Klip-Martin, chair of the Water Authority, says: "together with our partners, we are fully committed to the research, production, and application of Kaumera to achieve this goal." Sewage Purification Technology What are the different types of wastewater? Types of wastewater: Wastewater comes in three main types namely Blackwater, Graywater and Yellow water. This is wastewater that originates from toilet fixtures, dishwashers, and food preparation sinks. It is made up of all the things that you can imagine going down the toilets, bath and sink drains. The raw material is obtained from the sewage sludge generated by Nereda's sewage technology. In 2012, the Vallei en Veluwe Water Board was the world' s first to start utilizing this technology in Epe. There is way less energy needed to purify the sewage water. This innovative and organic method of wastewater treatment is now used in more and more installations all over the world. Recommended:  Agriculture, Using Wastewater As Natural Fertilizer: Mexico Creating New Material From Sewage In Two factories Within a year, the Vallei en Veluwe Water Authority and the Rijn en IJssel Water Authority work together to build two factories. A factory will open in Zutphen in the autumn of 2019. This factory will take Kaumera from wastewater from the dairy industry. Next to the factory in Zutphen, there will be an operational factory in Epe in the spring of 2020. They also extract Kaumera, but then from municipal sewage water. A lot of people are happy with this innovation; the extraction of Kaumera from wastewater is widely supported in this sector. Next to Rijn en IJssel, Vallei en Veluwe, the water authorities of Noorderzijlvest, Vechtstromen, Waterbedrijf Limburg, and Hoogheemraadschap de Stichtse Rijnlanden are also involved. Working Together A lot of companies worked together to make it possible to extract Kaumera. They all have their knowledge and expertise to recover, process, and market this new raw material. In this way, they are all working together to create a sustainable, circular economy. This all can be created and developed, thanks to the financial contributions of the Province of Gelderland, the European Union (LIFE), and the Ministry of Economic Affairs (DEI). Collaboration and innovation are essential to make things happen. Before you go! Recommended:  Climate Change Efforts On Reducing CO2 Why Not Recycle It? Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Waste: Can We Create New Material From Sewage?
Waste: Can We Create New Material From Sewage?
Waste

Waste is something unwanted or is material we cannot use anymore. Waste is any material or product that is worthless, defective, or of any use. In the near past, it had hardly any economic value anymore. Still, nowadays, there are plenty of people and organizations recycling waste and making from the regained parts again valuable material for reuse—the Circular Economy at work.

Waste, Refuse, Recycle: Towards A Circular Economy

Even better is a zero waste environment. That means no waste is sent to landfills. A zero-waste lifestyle means: using fewer resources, eating healthier, saving money, and less negative impact on the environment. Go for the 5 R’s: refuse, reduce, reuse, recycle, and rot.

By reducing waste, we can make a big difference. If there was an urge to develop waste reduction ideas and sustainable recycling solutions and share these topics globally, it’s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers, and influencers to write about waste reduction, your experiences, and expectations for the future at home and globally. 

Boost Global Sustainability Now, that’s what you can do together with WhatsOrb. What's in for me?

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