Waste

About: <h1>Waste, refuse, recycle: towards a circulair economy</h1> <p>Waste is something unwanted or are materials we cannot use anymore. Waste is any material or product which is worthless, defect or of any use. In the near past it had hardly any economic value anymore but nowadays there are plenty people and organisations which are recycling waste and make from the regained parts again valuable material for reuse. The Circular Economy at work.</p> <p>Even better is a zero waste environment. That means no waste send to landfills. A zero waste lifestyle means: using less resources, eating healthier, saving money and less negative impact on the environment. Go for the 5 R&rsquo;s: refuse, reduce, reuse, recycle and rot.</p> <p>By reducing waste we can make a big difference. If there was an urge to come up with waste reduction ideas and sustainable recycle solutions and share these topics globally it&rsquo;s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about waste reduction your experiences and expectations for the future at home and globally.&nbsp;</p> <p>Global Sustainability X-change, that&rsquo;s what you can do together with WhatsOrb.&nbsp;<a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/blog/your-shared-sustainable-ideas-make-our-earth-a-better-place">What's in for me?</a></p>
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Hunger, Not Global Warming Will Impact Our Future
We need not pause and ponder global warming. Hungry 'migrants' will flood communities long before the high tides. It will be caused by the loss of the 3Ps, plankton, pollinators, and plants all half gone in my lifetime. Hunger: Our Oceans Are Dying Our oceans are dying, PCB laced microplastic is displacing phytoplankton as the begining of the oceans food chain. Most of it washes off the millions of miles of American roadways into rivers and streams then into the oceans where it becomes homoginized and is impossiable to remove. Phytoplankton sequesters most of the CO2 we worry about and gives us most of the oxygen we breathe while feeding the oceans fish. The oceans are directly responsible for feeding 1 billion people but they also feed cows, pigs and chickens so many more will go hungry. {youtube}                                            Why are Plankton the Most Vital Organisms on Earth? | BBC Earth                                                      Hunger, Not Global Warming Will Impact Our Future Recommended:  Climate Change A Major Threat To Bumble Bees: Worldwide Add the loss of pollinators also from toxins also and its quite obvious billions of hungry migrants will cause war, chaos and mayham like the world has never seen. Add in the burning of the rain forests for Big Macs and a sprinkling of global warming and for sure hunger, mankinds greatest motivator will effect us all, its imminent and likely irreversable.  Before you go! Recommended:  Consumerism In ‘The West’: A Society Built On Exploitation Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
We need not pause and ponder global warming. Hungry 'migrants' will flood communities long before the high tides. It will be caused by the loss of the 3Ps, plankton, pollinators, and plants all half gone in my lifetime. Hunger: Our Oceans Are Dying Our oceans are dying, PCB laced microplastic is displacing phytoplankton as the begining of the oceans food chain. Most of it washes off the millions of miles of American roadways into rivers and streams then into the oceans where it becomes homoginized and is impossiable to remove. Phytoplankton sequesters most of the CO2 we worry about and gives us most of the oxygen we breathe while feeding the oceans fish. The oceans are directly responsible for feeding 1 billion people but they also feed cows, pigs and chickens so many more will go hungry. {youtube}                                            Why are Plankton the Most Vital Organisms on Earth? | BBC Earth                                                      Hunger, Not Global Warming Will Impact Our Future Recommended:  Climate Change A Major Threat To Bumble Bees: Worldwide Add the loss of pollinators also from toxins also and its quite obvious billions of hungry migrants will cause war, chaos and mayham like the world has never seen. Add in the burning of the rain forests for Big Macs and a sprinkling of global warming and for sure hunger, mankinds greatest motivator will effect us all, its imminent and likely irreversable.  Before you go! Recommended:  Consumerism In ‘The West’: A Society Built On Exploitation Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Hunger, Not Global Warming Will Impact Our Future
Waste: The Netherlands Creates New Material From Sewage
There is a new sustainable raw material available, taken from the excess granular sludge released during the treatment of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Epe, the Netherlands. This new sustainable raw material is made possible by the Dutch Water Authority Vallei en Veluwe. Construction Of The Installation The board of Vallei en Veluwe has given the green light for the development of an installation who can carry out this process. In the spring of 2020, it has to be finished and working. Material From Sewage Has Unique Features {youtube}                                                            This video is only available in the Dutch language                                                    Waste: The Netherlands Creates New Material From Sewage                                                     Kaumera Nereda Gum - samenwerkende partners in beeld   The sustainable and biological raw material, Kaumera Nereda Gum, has a few exceptional qualities. It can retain water, but also repel it. This offers various possibilities for its use in the agriculture and horticulture, the paper industry and the construction sector.  For example, if you add Kaumera to the soil, fertilisers can be retained much longer. But you can add Kaumera as well to concrete floors, for a better coating. It last longer and its hardening better. Recommended:  Bioplastic From Fish Scale And Skin Composts Quickly: UK Circular Economy What is a circular economy? A circular economy (often referred to simply as ‘circularity’) is an economic system aimed at eliminating waste and the continual use of resources. Circular systems employ reuse, sharing, repair, remanufacturing and recycling to create a close-loop system, minimising the use of resource inputs and the creation of waste, pollution and carbon emissions The goal of the national government is to have a completely circular economy by 2050 in the country. To achieve that goal, Kaumera could play an important role as raw material. Tanja Klip-Martin, chair of the Water Authority, says: "together with our partners, we are fully committed to the research, production and application of Kaumera to achieve this goal". Sewage Purification Technology What are the different types of wastewater? Types of wastewater: Wastewater comes in three main types namely Blackwater, Graywater and Yellow water. This is wastewater that originates from toilet fixtures, dishwashers, and food preparation sinks. It is made up of all the things that you can imagine going down the toilets, bath and sink drains. The raw material is obtained from the sewage sludge generated by Nereda's sewage technology. In 2012, the Vallei en Veluwe Water Board was the world' s first to start utilising this technology in Epe. There is way less energy needed to purify the sewage water. This innovative and organic method of wastewater treatment is now used in more and more installations all over the world. Recommended:  Agriculture, Using Wastewater As Natural Fertilizer: Mexico Creating New Material From Sewage In Two factories Within a year, the Vallei en Veluwe Water Authority and the Rijn en IJssel Water Authority work together to build two factories. A factory will open in Zutphen in the autumn of 2019. This factory will take Kaumera from wastewater from the dairy industry. Next to the factory in Zutphen, there will be an operational factory in Epe in the spring of 2020. They also extract Kaumera, but then from municipal sewage water. A lot of people are happy with this innovation; the extraction of Kaumera from wastewater is widely supported in this sector. Next to Rijn en IJssel, Vallei en Veluwe, the water authorities of Noorderzijlvest, Vechtstromen, Waterbedrijf Limburg and Hoogheemraadschap de Stichtse Rijnlanden are also involved. Working Together A lot of companies worked together to make it possible to extract Kaumera. They all have their knowledge and expertise to recover, process and market this new raw material. At this way, they are all working together to create a sustainable, circular economy. This all can be created and developed, thanks to the financial contributions of the Province of Gelderland, the European Union (LIFE), and the Ministry of Economic Affairs (DEI). Collaboration and innovation are essential to make things happen. Before you go! Recommended:  Climate Change Efforts On Reducing CO2 Why Not Recycle It? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
There is a new sustainable raw material available, taken from the excess granular sludge released during the treatment of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Epe, the Netherlands. This new sustainable raw material is made possible by the Dutch Water Authority Vallei en Veluwe. Construction Of The Installation The board of Vallei en Veluwe has given the green light for the development of an installation who can carry out this process. In the spring of 2020, it has to be finished and working. Material From Sewage Has Unique Features {youtube}                                                            This video is only available in the Dutch language                                                    Waste: The Netherlands Creates New Material From Sewage                                                     Kaumera Nereda Gum - samenwerkende partners in beeld   The sustainable and biological raw material, Kaumera Nereda Gum, has a few exceptional qualities. It can retain water, but also repel it. This offers various possibilities for its use in the agriculture and horticulture, the paper industry and the construction sector.  For example, if you add Kaumera to the soil, fertilisers can be retained much longer. But you can add Kaumera as well to concrete floors, for a better coating. It last longer and its hardening better. Recommended:  Bioplastic From Fish Scale And Skin Composts Quickly: UK Circular Economy What is a circular economy? A circular economy (often referred to simply as ‘circularity’) is an economic system aimed at eliminating waste and the continual use of resources. Circular systems employ reuse, sharing, repair, remanufacturing and recycling to create a close-loop system, minimising the use of resource inputs and the creation of waste, pollution and carbon emissions The goal of the national government is to have a completely circular economy by 2050 in the country. To achieve that goal, Kaumera could play an important role as raw material. Tanja Klip-Martin, chair of the Water Authority, says: "together with our partners, we are fully committed to the research, production and application of Kaumera to achieve this goal". Sewage Purification Technology What are the different types of wastewater? Types of wastewater: Wastewater comes in three main types namely Blackwater, Graywater and Yellow water. This is wastewater that originates from toilet fixtures, dishwashers, and food preparation sinks. It is made up of all the things that you can imagine going down the toilets, bath and sink drains. The raw material is obtained from the sewage sludge generated by Nereda's sewage technology. In 2012, the Vallei en Veluwe Water Board was the world' s first to start utilising this technology in Epe. There is way less energy needed to purify the sewage water. This innovative and organic method of wastewater treatment is now used in more and more installations all over the world. Recommended:  Agriculture, Using Wastewater As Natural Fertilizer: Mexico Creating New Material From Sewage In Two factories Within a year, the Vallei en Veluwe Water Authority and the Rijn en IJssel Water Authority work together to build two factories. A factory will open in Zutphen in the autumn of 2019. This factory will take Kaumera from wastewater from the dairy industry. Next to the factory in Zutphen, there will be an operational factory in Epe in the spring of 2020. They also extract Kaumera, but then from municipal sewage water. A lot of people are happy with this innovation; the extraction of Kaumera from wastewater is widely supported in this sector. Next to Rijn en IJssel, Vallei en Veluwe, the water authorities of Noorderzijlvest, Vechtstromen, Waterbedrijf Limburg and Hoogheemraadschap de Stichtse Rijnlanden are also involved. Working Together A lot of companies worked together to make it possible to extract Kaumera. They all have their knowledge and expertise to recover, process and market this new raw material. At this way, they are all working together to create a sustainable, circular economy. This all can be created and developed, thanks to the financial contributions of the Province of Gelderland, the European Union (LIFE), and the Ministry of Economic Affairs (DEI). Collaboration and innovation are essential to make things happen. Before you go! Recommended:  Climate Change Efforts On Reducing CO2 Why Not Recycle It? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Waste: The Netherlands Creates New Material From Sewage
Waste: The Netherlands Creates New Material From Sewage
Bioplastic From Fish Scale And Skin Composts Quickly: UK
Did you know we do not have to use single-use plastic for our bread or fruit? Lucy Hughes is a graduate from the University of Sussex and made a MarinaTex out of fish waste to create a compostable alternative. She won the UK James Dyson Award this year for her design. MarinaTex From Fish Scale And Skin  Lucy used for her MarinaTex design fish skin and scales and waste products, which were usually buried or burned in a dump. The material is translucent and flexible, so the ideal candidate for disposable packagings, such as sandwich packs and bags. But, more importantly, it will be decomposed within four to six weeks in home composts or food waste bins. Recommended:  Microplastics Can Be Moved From The Ocean: Is It Harming Us? Lucy created the MarinaTex as her final-year project, and she thought it would be useful to have an environmental benefit as well. She wanted to challenge herself to use other materials, and so it all started with a waste dream. "For me, a good design is something that bridges the gap between behaviours, business and our planet." {youtube}                                              Bioplastic From Fish Scale And Skin Composts Quickly: UK                                       Fish scale bioplastic wins UK James Dyson Award for student design Unlike some of the current biodegradable plastics, Hughes' biomaterial would not need separate waste collection infrastructure for its disposal. Another advantage of the product is that it is energy efficient to produce, and because it is based on waste, it does not burden the earth's natural resources. According to the UK Sea Fish Industry Authority, the UK produces almost 500,000 tonnes of waste every year by fish processing. Lucy says that the waste from only one Atlantic cod is capable of producing 1,400 MarinaTex bags.   What does bioplastic mean? Bioplastics are plastic materials produced from renewable biomass sources, such as vegetable fats and oils, corn starch, straw, woodchips, sawdust, recycled food waste, etc. Bioplastic can be made from agricultural by-products and also from used plastic bottles and other containers using microorganisms.   Hughes had to do more than 100 experiments to came up with this final design of refined bioplastic mixture. It all happened on the kitchen stove in her student dorm. MarinaTex is strong, with high tensile strength. It is sustainable and is not at the expense of quality. Are you convinced as well? Before you go! Recommended:  Sustainable Bicycle Is Made From Recycled Plastic In Brazil Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Did you know we do not have to use single-use plastic for our bread or fruit? Lucy Hughes is a graduate from the University of Sussex and made a MarinaTex out of fish waste to create a compostable alternative. She won the UK James Dyson Award this year for her design. MarinaTex From Fish Scale And Skin  Lucy used for her MarinaTex design fish skin and scales and waste products, which were usually buried or burned in a dump. The material is translucent and flexible, so the ideal candidate for disposable packagings, such as sandwich packs and bags. But, more importantly, it will be decomposed within four to six weeks in home composts or food waste bins. Recommended:  Microplastics Can Be Moved From The Ocean: Is It Harming Us? Lucy created the MarinaTex as her final-year project, and she thought it would be useful to have an environmental benefit as well. She wanted to challenge herself to use other materials, and so it all started with a waste dream. "For me, a good design is something that bridges the gap between behaviours, business and our planet." {youtube}                                              Bioplastic From Fish Scale And Skin Composts Quickly: UK                                       Fish scale bioplastic wins UK James Dyson Award for student design Unlike some of the current biodegradable plastics, Hughes' biomaterial would not need separate waste collection infrastructure for its disposal. Another advantage of the product is that it is energy efficient to produce, and because it is based on waste, it does not burden the earth's natural resources. According to the UK Sea Fish Industry Authority, the UK produces almost 500,000 tonnes of waste every year by fish processing. Lucy says that the waste from only one Atlantic cod is capable of producing 1,400 MarinaTex bags.   What does bioplastic mean? Bioplastics are plastic materials produced from renewable biomass sources, such as vegetable fats and oils, corn starch, straw, woodchips, sawdust, recycled food waste, etc. Bioplastic can be made from agricultural by-products and also from used plastic bottles and other containers using microorganisms.   Hughes had to do more than 100 experiments to came up with this final design of refined bioplastic mixture. It all happened on the kitchen stove in her student dorm. MarinaTex is strong, with high tensile strength. It is sustainable and is not at the expense of quality. Are you convinced as well? Before you go! Recommended:  Sustainable Bicycle Is Made From Recycled Plastic In Brazil Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Bioplastic From Fish Scale And Skin Composts Quickly: UK
Bioplastic From Fish Scale And Skin Composts Quickly: UK
Nuclear Floating Power Plants: A Floating Chernobyl: Russia
The only nuclear floating power plant in the world has gone up the sea for the first time. The Russian Akademik Lomonosov left St. Petersburg, where it was built. It is towed through the Baltic Sea, around the northern tip of Norway to Murmansk, where the reactors are filled with nuclear fuel. The Akademik Lomonosov was built in nine years and will be operational this year 2019 off the coast of Chukotka in the far east of Russia. There, the power plant must provide energy to remote factories, port cities and oil platforms. It will replace two nuclear reactors which, according to the Russian nuclear power company Rosatom, are technologically outdated. Russian nuclear floating power plant makes its maiden voyage Shocking The project is heavily criticized by environmentalists. Greenpeace calls it a floating Chernobyl. "Nuclear reactors that float in the Arctic Ocean are a shockingly obvious threat to a fragile environment that is already under enormous pressure from climate change," says Jan Haverkamp, ​​nuclear expert at the environmental club. Nuclear floating power plant is not safe at all The atomic lobby deliberately omits the enormous risks of nuclear power plants, says Els de Groen, writer, journalist and former MEP for the Greens / European Free Alliance. Now that coal, oil and gas consumption is warming up or shaking the earth, the call for nuclear energy is getting louder. Complete with the old mantra: major accidents, small opportunities. Hydropower, particulate matter and natural gas production are all much more dangerous than nuclear energy ... Chernobyl was the fault of the Russians and Fukushima was hit by a tsunami, and the numbers of victims are based on speculation. It is time to put an end to the demagoguery of nuclear lobbyists as emeritus professor Jan Goudriaan. The expertise they carry out does not sink in anything that they conceal. Never do they mention the waste problem and the long-term consequences. During uranium extraction, during reprocessing and decommissioning, large quantities of waste occur that remain highly radioactive for hundreds of years (cesium) to tens of thousands of years (plutonium) and even billions of years (uranium). On that scale we are one-day flies, although it is with a footprint that no dinosaur can match. ( Recommended:  Nuclear Power: Will It Destroy Or Save The World? ) Experts never tell us that the calculation of 'safe' doses is always based on an average person. The four to ten times greater radiation sensitivity of women, children and unborn babies is not taken into account. For the Netherlands this means that three-fifths of the population may be exposed to unacceptable radiation levels. The annual dose of 1 millisievert experiences a fetus as 10 millisievert or half the annual dose of a radiological worker! Moreover, the sensitivity of tissues and organs, expressed as a percentage, is cast into a system that does not allow any correction. If we discover tomorrow that our lungs are more sensitive than has always been assumed, then we must lower the sensitivity of another organ, because the sensitivity of all organs must remain 100%. However, this inadequate system is used to calculate the permissible burden on, for example, the bladder and then to decide whether or not to send workers an infected space or to evacuate members of the population or not. Last year, all Dutch people received a iodine tablet in a radius of 100 km. If saturated in time, the thyroid gland, causing the radioactive iodine-131 is no longer absorbed. What experts do not tell you is that there is more to it: strontium, for example, that accumulates in our bones, or plutonium that seeks out the red bone marrow. There are no pills against that. The sensitivity of the thyroid is only a fraction of the total sensitivity. Nuclear energy stations are in 30 years gone. In Doel, Tihange and Borssele there are power stations of forty years old. There are thousands of cracks in various reactor vessels, so-called hydrogen flakes. This leads to a dilemma: the fuel rods have to be cooled permanently, but the cracks force us to drastically increase the temperature of the emergency cooling water. Nevertheless, the power stations remain open. There is no budget for demolition, no premium was paid for accident insurance or the costs of evacuations. There is not one insurance company that dares to run the risks. If a nuclear power plant had four wheels, it would be taken directly from the road. ( Recommended:  Nuclear Waste Storage An Example For The World: Finland ) Why does not that happen? I would like to quote Einstein: "The unchained atomic force has changed everything, except our way of thinking ... The solution of that problem lies in the heart of the people. Had I known that, then I would have become a watchmaker. Not everything we discover is good, but apparently it takes courage to admit mistakes". By: Els de Groen. Cover photo Фото: greenpeace.org/russia All about Energy
The only nuclear floating power plant in the world has gone up the sea for the first time. The Russian Akademik Lomonosov left St. Petersburg, where it was built. It is towed through the Baltic Sea, around the northern tip of Norway to Murmansk, where the reactors are filled with nuclear fuel. The Akademik Lomonosov was built in nine years and will be operational this year 2019 off the coast of Chukotka in the far east of Russia. There, the power plant must provide energy to remote factories, port cities and oil platforms. It will replace two nuclear reactors which, according to the Russian nuclear power company Rosatom, are technologically outdated. Russian nuclear floating power plant makes its maiden voyage Shocking The project is heavily criticized by environmentalists. Greenpeace calls it a floating Chernobyl. "Nuclear reactors that float in the Arctic Ocean are a shockingly obvious threat to a fragile environment that is already under enormous pressure from climate change," says Jan Haverkamp, ​​nuclear expert at the environmental club. Nuclear floating power plant is not safe at all The atomic lobby deliberately omits the enormous risks of nuclear power plants, says Els de Groen, writer, journalist and former MEP for the Greens / European Free Alliance. Now that coal, oil and gas consumption is warming up or shaking the earth, the call for nuclear energy is getting louder. Complete with the old mantra: major accidents, small opportunities. Hydropower, particulate matter and natural gas production are all much more dangerous than nuclear energy ... Chernobyl was the fault of the Russians and Fukushima was hit by a tsunami, and the numbers of victims are based on speculation. It is time to put an end to the demagoguery of nuclear lobbyists as emeritus professor Jan Goudriaan. The expertise they carry out does not sink in anything that they conceal. Never do they mention the waste problem and the long-term consequences. During uranium extraction, during reprocessing and decommissioning, large quantities of waste occur that remain highly radioactive for hundreds of years (cesium) to tens of thousands of years (plutonium) and even billions of years (uranium). On that scale we are one-day flies, although it is with a footprint that no dinosaur can match. ( Recommended:  Nuclear Power: Will It Destroy Or Save The World? ) Experts never tell us that the calculation of 'safe' doses is always based on an average person. The four to ten times greater radiation sensitivity of women, children and unborn babies is not taken into account. For the Netherlands this means that three-fifths of the population may be exposed to unacceptable radiation levels. The annual dose of 1 millisievert experiences a fetus as 10 millisievert or half the annual dose of a radiological worker! Moreover, the sensitivity of tissues and organs, expressed as a percentage, is cast into a system that does not allow any correction. If we discover tomorrow that our lungs are more sensitive than has always been assumed, then we must lower the sensitivity of another organ, because the sensitivity of all organs must remain 100%. However, this inadequate system is used to calculate the permissible burden on, for example, the bladder and then to decide whether or not to send workers an infected space or to evacuate members of the population or not. Last year, all Dutch people received a iodine tablet in a radius of 100 km. If saturated in time, the thyroid gland, causing the radioactive iodine-131 is no longer absorbed. What experts do not tell you is that there is more to it: strontium, for example, that accumulates in our bones, or plutonium that seeks out the red bone marrow. There are no pills against that. The sensitivity of the thyroid is only a fraction of the total sensitivity. Nuclear energy stations are in 30 years gone. In Doel, Tihange and Borssele there are power stations of forty years old. There are thousands of cracks in various reactor vessels, so-called hydrogen flakes. This leads to a dilemma: the fuel rods have to be cooled permanently, but the cracks force us to drastically increase the temperature of the emergency cooling water. Nevertheless, the power stations remain open. There is no budget for demolition, no premium was paid for accident insurance or the costs of evacuations. There is not one insurance company that dares to run the risks. If a nuclear power plant had four wheels, it would be taken directly from the road. ( Recommended:  Nuclear Waste Storage An Example For The World: Finland ) Why does not that happen? I would like to quote Einstein: "The unchained atomic force has changed everything, except our way of thinking ... The solution of that problem lies in the heart of the people. Had I known that, then I would have become a watchmaker. Not everything we discover is good, but apparently it takes courage to admit mistakes". By: Els de Groen. Cover photo Фото: greenpeace.org/russia All about Energy
Nuclear Floating Power Plants: A Floating Chernobyl: Russia
Nuclear Floating Power Plants: A Floating Chernobyl: Russia
Fireworks: Undermines Your New Year
New Year’s Eve. While most of us will have plenty of activities on the night itself, sipping champagne, watching the traditional tv-shows and playing games with family, there are quite a number of people who enjoy another recurring tradition: watching the fireworks. Whether you opt for looking out from behind the relative safety of your window, gawking at the professional show amidst thousands of others in a crowded square, or going out to light up the sky yourself. Fireworks are mesmerizing, dreamy, and very romantic. But at the same time, they are not exactly great for the environment. Photo by: Gregie Bertaud Watching the fireworks And while it will not be a thing most of us are wanting to hear, because ‘it is tradition and a symbolic way of welcoming the new year…’ Well, just hear me out if you want to optimize the number of new years that future generations will get to enjoy as well. The colorful, artistic lights flickering in the sky, accompanied by rhythmic booms reverberating in our hearts, will fill us with joy. With happy and perhaps not so happy memories of the year that we just said goodbye to. With hope and anticipation for the year to come. It will fill us with love and with good intentions.  And with harmful particulates and elements. U nfortunately all the things that make fireworks so pretty and attractive are exactly those things that make them so bad for us. Gunpowder will help it lift off and reach the sky. Metallic compounds give it its gorgeous colors. All of these elements are made up of carcinogenic and hormone-disrupting substances, that can make its way into our soil, air, and water . Some of those really bad guys that are present in commonly used fireworks include perchlorates. These are responsible for the explosion, as they feed oxygen in the charcoal-sulfur fuel that powers up the explosive, serving as the so-called oxidizers. The pyrotechnics industry is particularly looking at two types of perchlorates for this: potassium perchlorate and ammonium perchlorate.   Fancy names for something so inherently bad, as they can cause all kind of health problems, most significantly hypothyroidism: an illness that limits the thyroid’s ability to ingest iodine, which will lead to a lack of hormones in the human body - hindering all kind of bodily functions and potentially giving rise to all kind of disorders, especially in children.   Then there are particulates. These can be found in the smoke resulting from the burned charcoal and sulfur and will make their way to our lungs. This could pose an instant danger for those suffering from asthma-related diseases. Merely looking at an air-quality monitor spiking out in the hours after a fireworks show should get you concerned about the air that you are breathing.   There are even more rather ominous sounding elements that can be found in your firecrackers, flares and Roman candles. Strontium, aluminum, copper, barium, rubidium, cadmium: terms that you might remember from your chem class as being rather delicate and dangerous substances, yet that are freely used to color our fireworks. All of them carry nasty side-effects when ingested in high doses, including impairment of bone growth, mental disorders, Alzheimer’s, cancer, skin diseases, paralysis, heart problems and - in the worst case - death.   Translation? For the next few days or weeks, you will be eating, drinking, and breathing all kind of highly toxic and destructive particles. You’re welcome. Some will object at this point, claiming that it cannot be that bad. Fireworks are, after all, not an everyday event (that is, unless you work in Disney World). And are those one or two days per year that we shoot all kinds of garbage up in the atmosphere really something worth worrying over? Especially as the industrial sector keeps on regurgitating substances that are seemingly identical on a daily basis?   Admittedly, the chances of attracting any of the diseases given above for the volumes going up in the air on New Years are so small that they could be considered insignificant. Yet we should not just think about ourselves (which might coincidentally just be another of your New Year’s resolutions), but consider the impact on our environment as well. Some cities will experience more smog and air pollution on New Year’s Day alone than in the previous year as a whole. That is a fact.   These toxins will get in the atmosphere, in the soil, in the water. Aquatic life will suffer , cows eating polluted grass will pass it on to us through our hamburgers. With every piece of firework launched, a toxic rain will fall down on our lands that will impact all living beings. And the worst part? The majority of these chemicals are persistent, which means that they will not break down in nature, but stay in our ecosystems indefinitely.   And no, there has not been enough research performed yet to be able to state with certainty that fireworks do actually pose an instant, immediate danger to us and the world around us. But the evidence as given above will, if anything, make perfectly clear that it cannot possibly be any good.   Only clinging onto it for the sake of tradition, would be silly - and hugely negligent. Cover photo by: Mervyn Chan https://www.whatsorb.com/category/waste
New Year’s Eve. While most of us will have plenty of activities on the night itself, sipping champagne, watching the traditional tv-shows and playing games with family, there are quite a number of people who enjoy another recurring tradition: watching the fireworks. Whether you opt for looking out from behind the relative safety of your window, gawking at the professional show amidst thousands of others in a crowded square, or going out to light up the sky yourself. Fireworks are mesmerizing, dreamy, and very romantic. But at the same time, they are not exactly great for the environment. Photo by: Gregie Bertaud Watching the fireworks And while it will not be a thing most of us are wanting to hear, because ‘it is tradition and a symbolic way of welcoming the new year…’ Well, just hear me out if you want to optimize the number of new years that future generations will get to enjoy as well. The colorful, artistic lights flickering in the sky, accompanied by rhythmic booms reverberating in our hearts, will fill us with joy. With happy and perhaps not so happy memories of the year that we just said goodbye to. With hope and anticipation for the year to come. It will fill us with love and with good intentions.  And with harmful particulates and elements. U nfortunately all the things that make fireworks so pretty and attractive are exactly those things that make them so bad for us. Gunpowder will help it lift off and reach the sky. Metallic compounds give it its gorgeous colors. All of these elements are made up of carcinogenic and hormone-disrupting substances, that can make its way into our soil, air, and water . Some of those really bad guys that are present in commonly used fireworks include perchlorates. These are responsible for the explosion, as they feed oxygen in the charcoal-sulfur fuel that powers up the explosive, serving as the so-called oxidizers. The pyrotechnics industry is particularly looking at two types of perchlorates for this: potassium perchlorate and ammonium perchlorate.   Fancy names for something so inherently bad, as they can cause all kind of health problems, most significantly hypothyroidism: an illness that limits the thyroid’s ability to ingest iodine, which will lead to a lack of hormones in the human body - hindering all kind of bodily functions and potentially giving rise to all kind of disorders, especially in children.   Then there are particulates. These can be found in the smoke resulting from the burned charcoal and sulfur and will make their way to our lungs. This could pose an instant danger for those suffering from asthma-related diseases. Merely looking at an air-quality monitor spiking out in the hours after a fireworks show should get you concerned about the air that you are breathing.   There are even more rather ominous sounding elements that can be found in your firecrackers, flares and Roman candles. Strontium, aluminum, copper, barium, rubidium, cadmium: terms that you might remember from your chem class as being rather delicate and dangerous substances, yet that are freely used to color our fireworks. All of them carry nasty side-effects when ingested in high doses, including impairment of bone growth, mental disorders, Alzheimer’s, cancer, skin diseases, paralysis, heart problems and - in the worst case - death.   Translation? For the next few days or weeks, you will be eating, drinking, and breathing all kind of highly toxic and destructive particles. You’re welcome. Some will object at this point, claiming that it cannot be that bad. Fireworks are, after all, not an everyday event (that is, unless you work in Disney World). And are those one or two days per year that we shoot all kinds of garbage up in the atmosphere really something worth worrying over? Especially as the industrial sector keeps on regurgitating substances that are seemingly identical on a daily basis?   Admittedly, the chances of attracting any of the diseases given above for the volumes going up in the air on New Years are so small that they could be considered insignificant. Yet we should not just think about ourselves (which might coincidentally just be another of your New Year’s resolutions), but consider the impact on our environment as well. Some cities will experience more smog and air pollution on New Year’s Day alone than in the previous year as a whole. That is a fact.   These toxins will get in the atmosphere, in the soil, in the water. Aquatic life will suffer , cows eating polluted grass will pass it on to us through our hamburgers. With every piece of firework launched, a toxic rain will fall down on our lands that will impact all living beings. And the worst part? The majority of these chemicals are persistent, which means that they will not break down in nature, but stay in our ecosystems indefinitely.   And no, there has not been enough research performed yet to be able to state with certainty that fireworks do actually pose an instant, immediate danger to us and the world around us. But the evidence as given above will, if anything, make perfectly clear that it cannot possibly be any good.   Only clinging onto it for the sake of tradition, would be silly - and hugely negligent. Cover photo by: Mervyn Chan https://www.whatsorb.com/category/waste
Fireworks: Undermines Your New Year's Good Intentions
Waste

Waste, refuse, recycle: towards a circulair economy

Waste is something unwanted or are materials we cannot use anymore. Waste is any material or product which is worthless, defect or of any use. In the near past it had hardly any economic value anymore but nowadays there are plenty people and organisations which are recycling waste and make from the regained parts again valuable material for reuse. The Circular Economy at work.

Even better is a zero waste environment. That means no waste send to landfills. A zero waste lifestyle means: using less resources, eating healthier, saving money and less negative impact on the environment. Go for the 5 R’s: refuse, reduce, reuse, recycle and rot.

By reducing waste we can make a big difference. If there was an urge to come up with waste reduction ideas and sustainable recycle solutions and share these topics globally it’s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about waste reduction your experiences and expectations for the future at home and globally. 

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