Close Login
Register here
Forgot password
Forgot password
or
or

Close
Close Inspiration on environmental sustainability, every month.

Currently 5,988 people are getting new inspiration every month from our global sustainability exchange. Do you want to stay informed? Fill in your e-mail address below:

Close Receive monthly UPDATES ON ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY IN YOUR MAILBOX EVERY MONTH.

Want to be kept in the loop? We will provide monthly overview of what is happening in our community along with new exciting ways on how you can contribute.

Close Reset password
your profile is 33% complete:
33%
Update profile Close

Travel categorybanner Activities

MenuMenu
Travel sustainable! 10 Easy tips to go green on holiday
Sustainable travel. Easy tips to make the world a little better Since my visit to Sumatra I really realize what an impact we as people have on nature and the world around us, especially when traveling. In this section I discuss an aspect of sustainable travel every month and I highlight green and inspiring initiatives in the field of tourism. This time: 10 easy tips to go green on a trip. The first steps to a sustainable travel style A green lifestyle is often seen as difficult and expensive. Organic products cost more money than regular foods, and waste-free life requires a certain dedication. But does that also apply to green travel? Yes, it costs money to compensate your air travel and it is always a search for a hotel run by locals. Yet it does not have to be difficult to adopt a sustainable travel style, and you can even make the world a little better with a small budget. With the summer season approaching, I have put 10 easy tips for a greener travel style at a glance. They cost little money and little effort, but are a good step towards a green travel style and a better world. Pull all plugs out of their sockets at home when leaving Thinking green can be so simple ... Your house is full of electrical appliances that use power and energy during your absence. That is not only bad for the environment, but also for your wallet. Check this just before departure and pull out as many plugs as possible. In any case, of all devices that have a light on or the digital time is displayed, such as your television, alarm clock and the oven. Use a digital boarding pass By making optimal use of modern techniques you can save a lot of paper. For example, use a digital boarding pass or download the app from your airline company. You can also easily manage hotel reservations via your phone, for example with the Wallet for iPhone app. No more hassle with printers and packs of paper, but everything at hand via your smartphone. Check the conditions of your airline. There are of course also comparable apps for Android phones. Eat vegetarian in the airplane Meat is bad for the planet, and ideally we are all vegetarian. I do not see that happening that fast, but decreasing is already a step in the right direction. Choose, for example, to only eat really tasty meat, for example in a good restaurant or from an organic butcher. One of the places where you can certainly leave your meat is on the plane. These meals are not exactly gourmet delights, so a good reason to choose a meatless meal here. Please indicate your preference for a meal during the booking process. An additional advantage: you get your food first. Use as  less plastic as possible Limit the use of plastic. Particularly in the poorer countries plastic often ends up in nature or is burned along the roadside. It is certainly not good for nature at all, so try to contribute as little as possible as a tourist. Below I have put a few useful tips on a list. - Take a shopping bag with you - Use a LifestrawGo or other water bottle - Use your own earplugs on the plane - Take a blanket for yourself on the plane Leave soap, pens and note blocks where they are; in your ‘hotel room’ If you sleep in a luxury hotel, you can collect quite a few goodies. Care products, but also slippers, pens and note blocks: leave it as much as possible in the packaging and in the hotel, because it costs a lot of raw materials to make and transport everything. Have you used anything from the care products? Take the bottles home at the end of your stay, because half-empty bottles are often thrown away. Don’t take every day a clean towel Try to do a little longer with your towel in the hotel, because you can quickly fill a washing machine with the towels from one hotel room. In some hotels the reuse of a towel is happily encouraged and you even get a nice counterpart. For example, at the Qbic Hotel in London, I received a £ 5 voucher every day if my room was not cleaned that day. Another tip for the hotel: go in the shower instead of in the bath. And do not use the laundry at a large hotel, because often every garment is washed separately. It is also often cheaper to hand over your laundry at a local launderette. Photo by: Hans van der Broek , GreenAppeHoiAn, Bicycle Tours Rent a bicycle  instead of a scooter A scooter gives you the ultimate freedom on vacation, because you can drive to remote villages and beaches on your own. But a scooter is also pretty polluting and the noise can deter and drive away wild animals. Therefore, change the scooter for a bike and explore the area on your own. Is your holiday destination hilly and do you have to cover long distances? Then consider an e-bike or an electric scooter. Photo by Etienne Bossot: An Bang Beach, Hoi An, Vietnam. 'GreenappleHoian' Take some litter with you Are you going for a walk in a nature reserve? Kayaking? Snorkeling? Take the litter that is in nature and throw it away in the right way. Collect plastic bottles that people have carelessly thrown into the sea or a piece of the beach. You do not have to pick up the whole afternoon, but to pick up some is a small effort. Be critical on the souvenirs you buy Do not buy souvenirs made of tropical hardwood, coral, shells or animals. For example, in Vietnam you can buy bottles of whiskey with a scorpion, snake or other animal in the bottle. So look critically at the souvenirs you want to take home. Return leaflets, maps and brochures back When traveling, you regularly get a map or brochure printed in your hands. Imagine how many boxes of paper every day have to be towed to provide all tourists with information that is also just on the internet. Therefore, say as much as possible no to all the paperwork you receive, or return it at the end of your visit. Even better: download the museum's app or make sure you have the website open on your phone. Setting yourself a sustainable lifestyle is done in small steps and all the bits help. By: expeditieaardbol.nl https://www.whatsorb.com/category/travel
Sustainable travel. Easy tips to make the world a little better Since my visit to Sumatra I really realize what an impact we as people have on nature and the world around us, especially when traveling. In this section I discuss an aspect of sustainable travel every month and I highlight green and inspiring initiatives in the field of tourism. This time: 10 easy tips to go green on a trip. The first steps to a sustainable travel style A green lifestyle is often seen as difficult and expensive. Organic products cost more money than regular foods, and waste-free life requires a certain dedication. But does that also apply to green travel? Yes, it costs money to compensate your air travel and it is always a search for a hotel run by locals. Yet it does not have to be difficult to adopt a sustainable travel style, and you can even make the world a little better with a small budget. With the summer season approaching, I have put 10 easy tips for a greener travel style at a glance. They cost little money and little effort, but are a good step towards a green travel style and a better world. Pull all plugs out of their sockets at home when leaving Thinking green can be so simple ... Your house is full of electrical appliances that use power and energy during your absence. That is not only bad for the environment, but also for your wallet. Check this just before departure and pull out as many plugs as possible. In any case, of all devices that have a light on or the digital time is displayed, such as your television, alarm clock and the oven. Use a digital boarding pass By making optimal use of modern techniques you can save a lot of paper. For example, use a digital boarding pass or download the app from your airline company. You can also easily manage hotel reservations via your phone, for example with the Wallet for iPhone app. No more hassle with printers and packs of paper, but everything at hand via your smartphone. Check the conditions of your airline. There are of course also comparable apps for Android phones. Eat vegetarian in the airplane Meat is bad for the planet, and ideally we are all vegetarian. I do not see that happening that fast, but decreasing is already a step in the right direction. Choose, for example, to only eat really tasty meat, for example in a good restaurant or from an organic butcher. One of the places where you can certainly leave your meat is on the plane. These meals are not exactly gourmet delights, so a good reason to choose a meatless meal here. Please indicate your preference for a meal during the booking process. An additional advantage: you get your food first. Use as  less plastic as possible Limit the use of plastic. Particularly in the poorer countries plastic often ends up in nature or is burned along the roadside. It is certainly not good for nature at all, so try to contribute as little as possible as a tourist. Below I have put a few useful tips on a list. - Take a shopping bag with you - Use a LifestrawGo or other water bottle - Use your own earplugs on the plane - Take a blanket for yourself on the plane Leave soap, pens and note blocks where they are; in your ‘hotel room’ If you sleep in a luxury hotel, you can collect quite a few goodies. Care products, but also slippers, pens and note blocks: leave it as much as possible in the packaging and in the hotel, because it costs a lot of raw materials to make and transport everything. Have you used anything from the care products? Take the bottles home at the end of your stay, because half-empty bottles are often thrown away. Don’t take every day a clean towel Try to do a little longer with your towel in the hotel, because you can quickly fill a washing machine with the towels from one hotel room. In some hotels the reuse of a towel is happily encouraged and you even get a nice counterpart. For example, at the Qbic Hotel in London, I received a £ 5 voucher every day if my room was not cleaned that day. Another tip for the hotel: go in the shower instead of in the bath. And do not use the laundry at a large hotel, because often every garment is washed separately. It is also often cheaper to hand over your laundry at a local launderette. Photo by: Hans van der Broek , GreenAppeHoiAn, Bicycle Tours Rent a bicycle  instead of a scooter A scooter gives you the ultimate freedom on vacation, because you can drive to remote villages and beaches on your own. But a scooter is also pretty polluting and the noise can deter and drive away wild animals. Therefore, change the scooter for a bike and explore the area on your own. Is your holiday destination hilly and do you have to cover long distances? Then consider an e-bike or an electric scooter. Photo by Etienne Bossot: An Bang Beach, Hoi An, Vietnam. 'GreenappleHoian' Take some litter with you Are you going for a walk in a nature reserve? Kayaking? Snorkeling? Take the litter that is in nature and throw it away in the right way. Collect plastic bottles that people have carelessly thrown into the sea or a piece of the beach. You do not have to pick up the whole afternoon, but to pick up some is a small effort. Be critical on the souvenirs you buy Do not buy souvenirs made of tropical hardwood, coral, shells or animals. For example, in Vietnam you can buy bottles of whiskey with a scorpion, snake or other animal in the bottle. So look critically at the souvenirs you want to take home. Return leaflets, maps and brochures back When traveling, you regularly get a map or brochure printed in your hands. Imagine how many boxes of paper every day have to be towed to provide all tourists with information that is also just on the internet. Therefore, say as much as possible no to all the paperwork you receive, or return it at the end of your visit. Even better: download the museum's app or make sure you have the website open on your phone. Setting yourself a sustainable lifestyle is done in small steps and all the bits help. By: expeditieaardbol.nl https://www.whatsorb.com/category/travel
Travel sustainable! 10 Easy tips to go green on holiday
Travel sustainable! 10 Easy tips to go green on holiday
The time for sustainability in travel has arrived
Brett Tollman is the global CEO of The Travel Corp. and founder of the TreadRight Foundation, a not-for-profit established to encourage sustainable tourism. He also served as vice-chairman of the World Travel and Tourism Council (WTTC). In the year the United Nations has designated as the International Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development, we need to ensure World Tourism Day, being marked on Wednesday, is given the attention it requires at such a critical juncture for the international travel sector. I firmly believe that we – the world's travel industry and travellers alike – must follow the example set by the Paris climate accord, which brings together myriad competing entities in the shared goal of sustainability.   A conference earlier this month hosted by Canada's Environment Minister Catherine McKenna brought together 34 countries in a bid to maintain momentum to implement the Paris accord as the United States acknowledged it will not attempt to renegotiate it. In much the same way, we must use the collective momentum provided by the International Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development to use our sector's distinct influence and capabilities to help shape a more sustainable future for our planet. Otherwise, we will have to watch everything we value and cherish erode and disappear.   At the 70th Session of the UN General Assembly in 2015, 154 heads of state or governments adopted the bold and ambitious 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which included 17 Sustainable Development Goals that aim to end poverty, protect the planet, and ensure prosperity for all. Based on this universal, integrated, and transformative vision, the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) is working with governments, public and private partners, development banks, international and regional finance institutions, UN agencies and international organizations to help achieve these goals. However, if the goals of the 2030 agenda are to be reached, the travel industry and travellers alike must make a deliberate effort to ensure their realization. Canada has stepped into a leading role regarding the Paris accord, and Canadian-based companies and those operating within Canada have an opportunity to play a major role in this charge. When one considers that the Canadian travel sector contributes as much as 8 per cent to Canada's GDP – more than transportation, manufacturing, agriculture, forest products and mining, according to the most recent statistics available – it becomes even more apparent that Canadian travel and tourism businesses can influence this charge. The travel sector's international influence is much the same. As one of the world's largest sectors, supporting 284 million jobs and generating 9.8 per cent of global GDP, we can help to increase public appreciation of the environment and awareness of the value of connecting with the natural world and other cultures and communities in a sustainable way. Tourism can also contribute to environmental protection, conservation and restoration of biological diversity and sustainable use of natural resources. The beauty of the natural world is a vitally important asset for our sector; maintaining the vibrancy of natural sites is crucial to tourism organizations' ability to continuously benefit from their existence.   There are no causes easier for organizations and individuals to get behind than those that make emotional and moral sense, as well as practical sense. We in the travel industry believe that ensuring the health of the planet and its population is not only the right thing to do from a moral standpoint, it's also something we have to do if we want to be able to continue offering travel experiences to the world. There may very well be no industry with more opportunity to affect the positive transformation of the planet than the travel and tourism industry. Travel can help people see the fragile beauty of our planet and help influence decision makers. If the travel sector can move the world the way we move people around the world, then our influence can be incredible. But we have to act now and we have to act together.   By BRETT TOLLMAN CONTRIBUTED TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
Brett Tollman is the global CEO of The Travel Corp. and founder of the TreadRight Foundation, a not-for-profit established to encourage sustainable tourism. He also served as vice-chairman of the World Travel and Tourism Council (WTTC). In the year the United Nations has designated as the International Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development, we need to ensure World Tourism Day, being marked on Wednesday, is given the attention it requires at such a critical juncture for the international travel sector. I firmly believe that we – the world's travel industry and travellers alike – must follow the example set by the Paris climate accord, which brings together myriad competing entities in the shared goal of sustainability.   A conference earlier this month hosted by Canada's Environment Minister Catherine McKenna brought together 34 countries in a bid to maintain momentum to implement the Paris accord as the United States acknowledged it will not attempt to renegotiate it. In much the same way, we must use the collective momentum provided by the International Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development to use our sector's distinct influence and capabilities to help shape a more sustainable future for our planet. Otherwise, we will have to watch everything we value and cherish erode and disappear.   At the 70th Session of the UN General Assembly in 2015, 154 heads of state or governments adopted the bold and ambitious 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which included 17 Sustainable Development Goals that aim to end poverty, protect the planet, and ensure prosperity for all. Based on this universal, integrated, and transformative vision, the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) is working with governments, public and private partners, development banks, international and regional finance institutions, UN agencies and international organizations to help achieve these goals. However, if the goals of the 2030 agenda are to be reached, the travel industry and travellers alike must make a deliberate effort to ensure their realization. Canada has stepped into a leading role regarding the Paris accord, and Canadian-based companies and those operating within Canada have an opportunity to play a major role in this charge. When one considers that the Canadian travel sector contributes as much as 8 per cent to Canada's GDP – more than transportation, manufacturing, agriculture, forest products and mining, according to the most recent statistics available – it becomes even more apparent that Canadian travel and tourism businesses can influence this charge. The travel sector's international influence is much the same. As one of the world's largest sectors, supporting 284 million jobs and generating 9.8 per cent of global GDP, we can help to increase public appreciation of the environment and awareness of the value of connecting with the natural world and other cultures and communities in a sustainable way. Tourism can also contribute to environmental protection, conservation and restoration of biological diversity and sustainable use of natural resources. The beauty of the natural world is a vitally important asset for our sector; maintaining the vibrancy of natural sites is crucial to tourism organizations' ability to continuously benefit from their existence.   There are no causes easier for organizations and individuals to get behind than those that make emotional and moral sense, as well as practical sense. We in the travel industry believe that ensuring the health of the planet and its population is not only the right thing to do from a moral standpoint, it's also something we have to do if we want to be able to continue offering travel experiences to the world. There may very well be no industry with more opportunity to affect the positive transformation of the planet than the travel and tourism industry. Travel can help people see the fragile beauty of our planet and help influence decision makers. If the travel sector can move the world the way we move people around the world, then our influence can be incredible. But we have to act now and we have to act together.   By BRETT TOLLMAN CONTRIBUTED TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
The time for sustainability in travel has arrived
The time for sustainability in travel has arrived
Fellow Travellers: We
If travellers use their purchasing power to influence travel suppliers to operate in a sustainable manner, there's no limit to what can be accomplished. Travellers, by their very nature, have an awareness about the world. Most Canadians are conscious of the damaging footprint travel can have on the environment and communities. They're witnessing the potential for destruction as they explore. They've observed attractions such as Angkor Wat, Cambodia's famous temple complex, deteriorate under the crush of vandalism, theft and blatant disregard as scores of tourists descended on the site every year.   They've seen elephants forced to suffer through appalling conditions to lug tourists around on their backs. They've absorbed the reports on Canada's Arctic melting as a result of climate change and they've seen cultural traditions swept aside in exchange for cheap tourism dollars. Whether it's damage to the landscape, litter, pollution, exhaustion of resources or cultural erosion, an inundation of thoughtless tourists can overwhelm and desecrate a destination. Today as we mark World Tourism Day, conscientious travellers must demand more from their travel suppliers.    When I first joined the travel industry at the beginning of the decade, sustainability was not exactly the order of the day. That's not to say travel and sustainability coming together was unheard of — the travel sector first witnessed discussions and debates about the "new promising field" of sustainable tourism in the 1970s — but, in my experience working for a magazine that covered the Canadian travel industry at large on a daily basis, I think it's fair to say the ideas of "sustainability" and "responsible travel" were rarely front-page news just a few years ago. The last decade, as climate change compelled thinking on sustainability forward in general, a constantly growing number of responsible travellers are no longer willing to be part of the problem. Increasing power is being given to travellers to use their purchasing power to shape a more sustainable future for travel. If travellers use their purchasing power to influence travel suppliers to operate in a sustainable manner, there's no limit to what can be accomplished as it to relates a more sustainable future. It's not complicated. Canadians simply need to know what to look for as they make their travel-related purchases. One thing that's valuable to keep in mind is that the best travel companies are great at executing unforgettable trips, but that doesn't mean they have the necessary expertise to deliver practical and impactful sustainability projects. That's why progressive travel companies are increasingly partnering with leading sustainability organizations to help save wildlife and elevate communities in the places they visit. In doing so, they are giving agency to those leaders and organizers who are already knowledgeable and capable of delivering effective sustainable travel solutions and helping to ensure that what starts as good intentions actually has a positive effect on the world. Travel companies are proud to talk about these critical relationships. They recognize that operating responsibly is valuable to their bottom line, and that's a good thing for everyone. By simply doing a little research online before booking your next trip, you can quickly discover which companies are supporting sustainable organizations in their efforts to ensure the negative impacts of the experiences they provide are minimal and managed. It's also important to recognize that sustainability is a journey, not a destination. No travel company is going to flip a switch and become completely sustainable overnight, but those that are leading the charge towards a sustainable travel future are continually adopting new best practices and policies to reflect this ever-improving field. Canadians have to ask about these policies. Let travel companies know that these things matter to you. For example, next time you're preparing to book a trip, inquire as to whether the operator has an animal welfare policy. Agreements or policies established with leading animal welfare organizations ensure that the animal-related experiences travel companies offer meet globally recognized animal welfare criteria.   BARCROFT MEDIA VIA GETTY IMAGESTourists click pictures of a Rhino crossing a road during a Jeep Safari in Kaziranga National Park on World Wildlife Day on March 3, 2015 in Assam, India.   You can also ask about their approach to in-destination purchases. Forward-looking travel companies work to help ensure the money you spend while travelling remains in the communities you visit, rather than simply taking as much as they can for themselves. Do their itineraries include stops in local shops and restaurants? The sale of locally made artisan handicrafts and products are vital to local economies. Culture and heritage-based work helps to create jobs, champion economic development, and build connections to the global marketplace. Companies that work to create itineraries that patronize local shops as often as possible put themselves in the best position to empower locals. You, the consumer, have the power. We must now use it effectively, obliging the travel industry to ensure that our beautiful planet can continue to provide us with the unforgettable opportunities to explore, experience, and exchange. It's now up to us all to apply the tenacious dedication and resolve we've demonstrated in exploring our planet to saving it. As travellers, as explorers, we've always demonstrated our deeply rooted capacity to push beyond, to venture into the unknown, and to overcome the impossible. We do all this to satisfy our desire to push beyond preconceived limitations. We overcome oceans, deserts, mountains, political borders, language gaps and cultural differences because we believe in the beauty of our planet and we have a need to seek out and appreciate everything it has in store for us. It's now up to us all to apply the tenacious dedication and resolve we've demonstrated in exploring our planet to saving it. For everything it's given us, we absolutely owe it that much. Zach Vanasse for HuffPost
If travellers use their purchasing power to influence travel suppliers to operate in a sustainable manner, there's no limit to what can be accomplished. Travellers, by their very nature, have an awareness about the world. Most Canadians are conscious of the damaging footprint travel can have on the environment and communities. They're witnessing the potential for destruction as they explore. They've observed attractions such as Angkor Wat, Cambodia's famous temple complex, deteriorate under the crush of vandalism, theft and blatant disregard as scores of tourists descended on the site every year.   They've seen elephants forced to suffer through appalling conditions to lug tourists around on their backs. They've absorbed the reports on Canada's Arctic melting as a result of climate change and they've seen cultural traditions swept aside in exchange for cheap tourism dollars. Whether it's damage to the landscape, litter, pollution, exhaustion of resources or cultural erosion, an inundation of thoughtless tourists can overwhelm and desecrate a destination. Today as we mark World Tourism Day, conscientious travellers must demand more from their travel suppliers.    When I first joined the travel industry at the beginning of the decade, sustainability was not exactly the order of the day. That's not to say travel and sustainability coming together was unheard of — the travel sector first witnessed discussions and debates about the "new promising field" of sustainable tourism in the 1970s — but, in my experience working for a magazine that covered the Canadian travel industry at large on a daily basis, I think it's fair to say the ideas of "sustainability" and "responsible travel" were rarely front-page news just a few years ago. The last decade, as climate change compelled thinking on sustainability forward in general, a constantly growing number of responsible travellers are no longer willing to be part of the problem. Increasing power is being given to travellers to use their purchasing power to shape a more sustainable future for travel. If travellers use their purchasing power to influence travel suppliers to operate in a sustainable manner, there's no limit to what can be accomplished as it to relates a more sustainable future. It's not complicated. Canadians simply need to know what to look for as they make their travel-related purchases. One thing that's valuable to keep in mind is that the best travel companies are great at executing unforgettable trips, but that doesn't mean they have the necessary expertise to deliver practical and impactful sustainability projects. That's why progressive travel companies are increasingly partnering with leading sustainability organizations to help save wildlife and elevate communities in the places they visit. In doing so, they are giving agency to those leaders and organizers who are already knowledgeable and capable of delivering effective sustainable travel solutions and helping to ensure that what starts as good intentions actually has a positive effect on the world. Travel companies are proud to talk about these critical relationships. They recognize that operating responsibly is valuable to their bottom line, and that's a good thing for everyone. By simply doing a little research online before booking your next trip, you can quickly discover which companies are supporting sustainable organizations in their efforts to ensure the negative impacts of the experiences they provide are minimal and managed. It's also important to recognize that sustainability is a journey, not a destination. No travel company is going to flip a switch and become completely sustainable overnight, but those that are leading the charge towards a sustainable travel future are continually adopting new best practices and policies to reflect this ever-improving field. Canadians have to ask about these policies. Let travel companies know that these things matter to you. For example, next time you're preparing to book a trip, inquire as to whether the operator has an animal welfare policy. Agreements or policies established with leading animal welfare organizations ensure that the animal-related experiences travel companies offer meet globally recognized animal welfare criteria.   BARCROFT MEDIA VIA GETTY IMAGESTourists click pictures of a Rhino crossing a road during a Jeep Safari in Kaziranga National Park on World Wildlife Day on March 3, 2015 in Assam, India.   You can also ask about their approach to in-destination purchases. Forward-looking travel companies work to help ensure the money you spend while travelling remains in the communities you visit, rather than simply taking as much as they can for themselves. Do their itineraries include stops in local shops and restaurants? The sale of locally made artisan handicrafts and products are vital to local economies. Culture and heritage-based work helps to create jobs, champion economic development, and build connections to the global marketplace. Companies that work to create itineraries that patronize local shops as often as possible put themselves in the best position to empower locals. You, the consumer, have the power. We must now use it effectively, obliging the travel industry to ensure that our beautiful planet can continue to provide us with the unforgettable opportunities to explore, experience, and exchange. It's now up to us all to apply the tenacious dedication and resolve we've demonstrated in exploring our planet to saving it. As travellers, as explorers, we've always demonstrated our deeply rooted capacity to push beyond, to venture into the unknown, and to overcome the impossible. We do all this to satisfy our desire to push beyond preconceived limitations. We overcome oceans, deserts, mountains, political borders, language gaps and cultural differences because we believe in the beauty of our planet and we have a need to seek out and appreciate everything it has in store for us. It's now up to us all to apply the tenacious dedication and resolve we've demonstrated in exploring our planet to saving it. For everything it's given us, we absolutely owe it that much. Zach Vanasse for HuffPost
Fellow Travellers: We
Fellow Travellers: We've Seen The World. Now Let's Save It
Tourism ‘has crucial role’ propelling global sustainability debate
Tourism has a crucial role to play in propelling the global debate around sustainability but is too often “absent” from the debate, a nature-based tourism initiative  says. The Long Run – which helps its members protect more than 12 million acres of “ecologically important areas” – released its annual report this month. Its chairman Jochen Zeitz says that tourism does not often take the lead in global debates around issues like climate change and “environmental degradation”. But he thinks it can have a big impact on the way businesses across the world deal with those issues. Traveling transforms lives from people “Tourism has a unique opportunity to lead the way,” said Zeitz, a former chief executive at sportswear firm Puma. “The sector represents 9.8% of the world’s GDP, one in 11 jobs, and will concern 1.8 billion travellers by 2030. “Travelling transforms lives; by exposing people to new experiences and cultures, it increases understanding and opens minds. If done right, it can drive sustainable development and significantly contribute to the delivery of the world’s Sustainable Development Goals by helping to protect nature, improve livelihoods and preserve cultural identities. Despite all this, the tourism sector is noticeably absent from global sustainability debates. The United Nations The United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals are a list of 17 goals – with 169 targets between them – that it hopes countries around the globe can introduce by 2030 in international agreement. It includes subjects ranging from hunger, health and education to climate, equality and innovation. The Long Run was founded in 2009 to support eco-sensitive tourism ventures as they sought to develop businesses in tune with the protection of the landscapes in which they operate. It now has more than 40 members which look after a combined 12 million acres – an area larger than the size of Switzerland. Its members have invested over US$10 million in conservation and local communities and employed more than 3,700 people. Its sites include Cottar’s, a 1920’s Safari Camp in Kenya’s Maasai Mara, Brazil’s Sinal do Vale biosphere reserve, and hiking destination Comrie Croft in Perthshire, Scotland. The Long Run's vision “The Long Run’s vision is that of a world in which business, nature and people are harmoniously working together for a sustainable future,” Zeitz added. “It demonstrates what the private sector can achieve and the positive impact it can have on conservation and communities around the world. Society, and business especially, must embrace its responsibility towards the future of this planet.” https://www.whatsorb.com/category/travel
Tourism has a crucial role to play in propelling the global debate around sustainability but is too often “absent” from the debate, a nature-based tourism initiative  says. The Long Run – which helps its members protect more than 12 million acres of “ecologically important areas” – released its annual report this month. Its chairman Jochen Zeitz says that tourism does not often take the lead in global debates around issues like climate change and “environmental degradation”. But he thinks it can have a big impact on the way businesses across the world deal with those issues. Traveling transforms lives from people “Tourism has a unique opportunity to lead the way,” said Zeitz, a former chief executive at sportswear firm Puma. “The sector represents 9.8% of the world’s GDP, one in 11 jobs, and will concern 1.8 billion travellers by 2030. “Travelling transforms lives; by exposing people to new experiences and cultures, it increases understanding and opens minds. If done right, it can drive sustainable development and significantly contribute to the delivery of the world’s Sustainable Development Goals by helping to protect nature, improve livelihoods and preserve cultural identities. Despite all this, the tourism sector is noticeably absent from global sustainability debates. The United Nations The United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals are a list of 17 goals – with 169 targets between them – that it hopes countries around the globe can introduce by 2030 in international agreement. It includes subjects ranging from hunger, health and education to climate, equality and innovation. The Long Run was founded in 2009 to support eco-sensitive tourism ventures as they sought to develop businesses in tune with the protection of the landscapes in which they operate. It now has more than 40 members which look after a combined 12 million acres – an area larger than the size of Switzerland. Its members have invested over US$10 million in conservation and local communities and employed more than 3,700 people. Its sites include Cottar’s, a 1920’s Safari Camp in Kenya’s Maasai Mara, Brazil’s Sinal do Vale biosphere reserve, and hiking destination Comrie Croft in Perthshire, Scotland. The Long Run's vision “The Long Run’s vision is that of a world in which business, nature and people are harmoniously working together for a sustainable future,” Zeitz added. “It demonstrates what the private sector can achieve and the positive impact it can have on conservation and communities around the world. Society, and business especially, must embrace its responsibility towards the future of this planet.” https://www.whatsorb.com/category/travel
Tourism ‘has crucial role’ propelling global sustainability debate
Tourism ‘has crucial role’ propelling global sustainability debate
Travel

Whether it is for business or pleasure, we travel more then we have ever done before. Thanks to modern transportation, the world is now smaller than ever. But at what cost? Read all about sustainable tourism and other solutions to reduce our carbon footprint and other effects of our traveling habit.onnect with others to find sustainable solutions faster.

Get updates on environmental sustainability in your mailbox every month.