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World Car Free Day –  re-thinking our daily commute
Every year we see sustainability-related events like  Sustainable House Day and  Zero Emissions Day  Also we have World Car Free Day. Taking place in September, this event “promotes improvement of mass transit, cycling and walking, and the development of communities where jobs are closer to home and where shopping is within walking distance”. It was established as a global event in 2000, but various projects of similar nature had taken place from time to time since 1956. Similar to Zero Emissions Day, World Car Free Day has set out a challenge: To spend one carefully prepared day without cars. To study and observe closely what exactly goes on during that day. Then, to reflect publicly and collectively on the lessons of this experience and on what might be prudently and creatively done next to build on these. We are going to focus on the last part of this challenge and look at the latest developments in eco-friendly transportation. Making public transport greener Copenhagen is a city with a green mission – the municipality has set a target of switching all of the city’s buses to electric power by 2030. And local operating company Movia is quickly moving towards reaching that goal – they have just announced that 41 new electric buses will join their fleet at once this year 2019. The Netherlands has an even more ambitious goal. Back in 2016, Environment Minister Dijksma has signed an agreement with all transport operators in the country that by 2025 all buses used in public transport should be electric or hydrogen-powered. By then, two of the country’s provinces (Noord-Brabant and Limburg) have already switched completely to electric vehicles and became the drivers behind that agreement. All electricity that powers the buses will be generated completely sustainably by solar panels or wind turbines in the region, lowering the CO2 emissions further. Buses aren’t the only type of public transport that the Dutch are making more sustainable – the trains are quickly becoming greener every year. Holland’s national train company, Nederlandse Spoorwegen, became the world’s first railway company to get 100% of the energy needed to power its trains from wind. The company’s new goal is to re-use 75% of their waste by 2020. Trams have long been considered the cleanest form of public transport and the city of Melbourne, Australia is aiming to take it one step further. Back in January 2017, Victorian government has announced the construction of two new solar farms that will power the trams. With transport being the second largest and fastest growing contributor to Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions, changes like these can make a huge difference and highlight more opportunities for improvement. A small solution to a big problem While making public transport greener is important, it is also crucial to remember that the main challenge is getting the public to wave goodbye to their cars. One of the problems to solve is accessibility – most of the time smaller towns and villages simply do not have good access to public transport and thus living there makes owning a car a necessity rather than a luxury. The City of Candiac in Québec, Canada is currently hosting a long-term demonstration project for an autonomous electric shuttle that is aiming to promote use of public transport in such underserved areas. These shuttles have a capacity of 15 passengers and will run throughout the fall of 2018. Once winter season starts, the project will enter an experimentation phase without passengers to test the shuttle’s performance in winter conditions. This approach sounds very promising and hopefully we will see more similar projects taking place around the world. Other sustainable alternatives to cars Of course mass transit isn’t the only way to reduce the amount of cars on our roads. Malta’s Public Transport has teamed up with Ioscoot to introduce a more eco-friendly alternative to renting a car on the island – electric motorbikes. This initiative is set to become a solution to both carbon footprint and traffic problems. The service allows users to pick up and drop off scooters at designated spots and all they need is to download the app and have a valid moped licence. All of the  scooters have space for 2 passengers and have 2 helmets in different sizes in their storage compartments. Ioscoot is already offering this service in Madrid and Barcelona, where it is already quite successful. It is impossible to write about sustainable car alternatives without mentioning bicycles. More cities are adjusting their roads to include bike paths and are closing off inner cities for cars. Cycling offers many benefits, such as low cost, the ability to avoid traffic and of course it provides the exercise many of us have to time for otherwise. One of the biggest drawbacks of cycling is the question of storage – in some areas bike racks are hard to come by and hallway space is too valuable. And what about those situations where you happen to need your bicycle when you are at work or out with your friends, while it’s locked in front of your house? These reasons are exactly why bike-sharing is becoming incredibly popular. In 2008 there were only 128 bike-sharing services worldwide – today there are more than 1’600! Companies that are traditionally associated with cars – such as Uber and Lyft – are entering that market as well. There are a lot of efforts to make our commutes easier and “greener”, and while some of them are focused on the longer term many solutions are available to us today. So if you haven’t biked since you were in school – World Car Free Day is the perfect opportunity to brush up that skill! Are there any eco-friendly transport initiatives taking place in your area? Tell us all about them in the comments! https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/transportation/general
Every year we see sustainability-related events like  Sustainable House Day and  Zero Emissions Day  Also we have World Car Free Day. Taking place in September, this event “promotes improvement of mass transit, cycling and walking, and the development of communities where jobs are closer to home and where shopping is within walking distance”. It was established as a global event in 2000, but various projects of similar nature had taken place from time to time since 1956. Similar to Zero Emissions Day, World Car Free Day has set out a challenge: To spend one carefully prepared day without cars. To study and observe closely what exactly goes on during that day. Then, to reflect publicly and collectively on the lessons of this experience and on what might be prudently and creatively done next to build on these. We are going to focus on the last part of this challenge and look at the latest developments in eco-friendly transportation. Making public transport greener Copenhagen is a city with a green mission – the municipality has set a target of switching all of the city’s buses to electric power by 2030. And local operating company Movia is quickly moving towards reaching that goal – they have just announced that 41 new electric buses will join their fleet at once this year 2019. The Netherlands has an even more ambitious goal. Back in 2016, Environment Minister Dijksma has signed an agreement with all transport operators in the country that by 2025 all buses used in public transport should be electric or hydrogen-powered. By then, two of the country’s provinces (Noord-Brabant and Limburg) have already switched completely to electric vehicles and became the drivers behind that agreement. All electricity that powers the buses will be generated completely sustainably by solar panels or wind turbines in the region, lowering the CO2 emissions further. Buses aren’t the only type of public transport that the Dutch are making more sustainable – the trains are quickly becoming greener every year. Holland’s national train company, Nederlandse Spoorwegen, became the world’s first railway company to get 100% of the energy needed to power its trains from wind. The company’s new goal is to re-use 75% of their waste by 2020. Trams have long been considered the cleanest form of public transport and the city of Melbourne, Australia is aiming to take it one step further. Back in January 2017, Victorian government has announced the construction of two new solar farms that will power the trams. With transport being the second largest and fastest growing contributor to Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions, changes like these can make a huge difference and highlight more opportunities for improvement. A small solution to a big problem While making public transport greener is important, it is also crucial to remember that the main challenge is getting the public to wave goodbye to their cars. One of the problems to solve is accessibility – most of the time smaller towns and villages simply do not have good access to public transport and thus living there makes owning a car a necessity rather than a luxury. The City of Candiac in Québec, Canada is currently hosting a long-term demonstration project for an autonomous electric shuttle that is aiming to promote use of public transport in such underserved areas. These shuttles have a capacity of 15 passengers and will run throughout the fall of 2018. Once winter season starts, the project will enter an experimentation phase without passengers to test the shuttle’s performance in winter conditions. This approach sounds very promising and hopefully we will see more similar projects taking place around the world. Other sustainable alternatives to cars Of course mass transit isn’t the only way to reduce the amount of cars on our roads. Malta’s Public Transport has teamed up with Ioscoot to introduce a more eco-friendly alternative to renting a car on the island – electric motorbikes. This initiative is set to become a solution to both carbon footprint and traffic problems. The service allows users to pick up and drop off scooters at designated spots and all they need is to download the app and have a valid moped licence. All of the  scooters have space for 2 passengers and have 2 helmets in different sizes in their storage compartments. Ioscoot is already offering this service in Madrid and Barcelona, where it is already quite successful. It is impossible to write about sustainable car alternatives without mentioning bicycles. More cities are adjusting their roads to include bike paths and are closing off inner cities for cars. Cycling offers many benefits, such as low cost, the ability to avoid traffic and of course it provides the exercise many of us have to time for otherwise. One of the biggest drawbacks of cycling is the question of storage – in some areas bike racks are hard to come by and hallway space is too valuable. And what about those situations where you happen to need your bicycle when you are at work or out with your friends, while it’s locked in front of your house? These reasons are exactly why bike-sharing is becoming incredibly popular. In 2008 there were only 128 bike-sharing services worldwide – today there are more than 1’600! Companies that are traditionally associated with cars – such as Uber and Lyft – are entering that market as well. There are a lot of efforts to make our commutes easier and “greener”, and while some of them are focused on the longer term many solutions are available to us today. So if you haven’t biked since you were in school – World Car Free Day is the perfect opportunity to brush up that skill! Are there any eco-friendly transport initiatives taking place in your area? Tell us all about them in the comments! https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/transportation/general
World Car Free Day –  re-thinking our daily commute
World Car Free Day – re-thinking our daily commute
Bamboo traffic signs will help us make our cities safer and more sustainable
  As consumers, we are often aware of how sustainable are the items we use every day – our food, clothing, skincare and other items have special labels to let us know that they are environmentally friendly and fair trade. But what about common objects that surround us outside of our homes? HR Groep in collaboration with MOSO International have introduced a new product line –traffic signs made out of bamboo – that is aiming to make our streets a bit more green. Why bamboo? Bamboo is one of the fastest growing sustainable resources in the world. A single bamboo plant consists of multiple stems. Every year, new shoots sprout from them. On average, 20-25% of the stems can be harvested in a sustainable plantation or commercial forest every year. Due to the rapid growth rate, this can happen without the number of stems per hectare decreasing! Deforestation is averted as a result of selective logging, keeping the plants alive and healthy. In fact, this means of harvesting the mature stems actually improves overall yield and quality of the commercial forest. Another great thing about bamboo is that it absorbs large quantities of CO2 as it grows. This, combined with ease of recycling, makes it more sustainable than aluminium and carbon neutral throughout its entire life cycle. And, naturally, high CO2 absorption rates help combat global warming! Lastly, bamboo’s properties are comparable to – or even superior to – hardwood. It is a very strong material that can be used in a multitude of ways – it can be fully recycled into things such as chipboard, or used in biomass power plants to generate green energy. This, combined with bamboo’s growth rates, makes it a more attractive crop for many farmers that can provide them with a steady annual income. What makes the bamboo sign unique? For the usage of bamboo as an information carrier, multiple layers of bamboo are glued together. The result is a remarkably resilient, scratchproof product that will neither rip nor deform. HR Groep uses their Ultimate Signing™ technology to make these signs even more sustainable. Ultimate Signing™ is a special UV printing method that is more long lasting than traditional foils. It provides a better viewing angle that improves visibility and thus helps make our roads safer! https://www.whatsorb.com/category/transportation https://www.hrgroep.nl/ https://www.moso.eu/nl/producten/bamboo-unlimited/bamboo-ultimate-verkeersbord
  As consumers, we are often aware of how sustainable are the items we use every day – our food, clothing, skincare and other items have special labels to let us know that they are environmentally friendly and fair trade. But what about common objects that surround us outside of our homes? HR Groep in collaboration with MOSO International have introduced a new product line –traffic signs made out of bamboo – that is aiming to make our streets a bit more green. Why bamboo? Bamboo is one of the fastest growing sustainable resources in the world. A single bamboo plant consists of multiple stems. Every year, new shoots sprout from them. On average, 20-25% of the stems can be harvested in a sustainable plantation or commercial forest every year. Due to the rapid growth rate, this can happen without the number of stems per hectare decreasing! Deforestation is averted as a result of selective logging, keeping the plants alive and healthy. In fact, this means of harvesting the mature stems actually improves overall yield and quality of the commercial forest. Another great thing about bamboo is that it absorbs large quantities of CO2 as it grows. This, combined with ease of recycling, makes it more sustainable than aluminium and carbon neutral throughout its entire life cycle. And, naturally, high CO2 absorption rates help combat global warming! Lastly, bamboo’s properties are comparable to – or even superior to – hardwood. It is a very strong material that can be used in a multitude of ways – it can be fully recycled into things such as chipboard, or used in biomass power plants to generate green energy. This, combined with bamboo’s growth rates, makes it a more attractive crop for many farmers that can provide them with a steady annual income. What makes the bamboo sign unique? For the usage of bamboo as an information carrier, multiple layers of bamboo are glued together. The result is a remarkably resilient, scratchproof product that will neither rip nor deform. HR Groep uses their Ultimate Signing™ technology to make these signs even more sustainable. Ultimate Signing™ is a special UV printing method that is more long lasting than traditional foils. It provides a better viewing angle that improves visibility and thus helps make our roads safer! https://www.whatsorb.com/category/transportation https://www.hrgroep.nl/ https://www.moso.eu/nl/producten/bamboo-unlimited/bamboo-ultimate-verkeersbord
Bamboo traffic signs will help us make our cities safer and more sustainable
Bamboo traffic signs will help us make our cities safer and more sustainable
# Sustainable
The Boring Company on its way to a slow variant of the Hyperloop. The tunnel drill hobby company of Elon Musk will give priority to pedestrians and others who want to travel without a car in the underground transport network. With this, the Boring Company meets one of the criticisms on the futuristic transport system. The Electric Car and Space Pioneer announced the change of course last weekend via twitter. He placed a film in which a cabin full of travelers sank down the sidewalk and inserted into the underground transport system, which listens to the name ‘Loop’. It is a slow variant of the well-known Hyperloop, in which capsules with speeds of 1000 kilometers per hour shoot through vacuum tubes. At ‘Loop’, the speeds will not exceed 200 kilometers per hour. Those speeds are achieved by platforms on a special kind of 'skates'. In the first plans of the Boring Company were mainly cars to see, Tesla's of course, who parked on such a platform and through ‘Loop’ bypassed the traffic jams at ground level. Traffic jam suffering was also the origin of this umpteenth company of the Tesla and SpaceX boss. When Musk got stuck for one and a half hour at the end of 2016 with his car in the traffic of Los Angelos, he launched the idea for the underground transport system. But the starting point, especially cars on a platform through underground tubes, came to him from the beginning on the necessary scorn. It was not seen as an adequate response to traffic congestion that cities worldwide struggle with. In cars, especially during peak hours, often no more than one person is involved, and that does lead to a very inefficient and costly transport system. With the change of course to give pedestrians a first advantage within Loop, it will get more the character of a public transport system. 'Bertha' becomes smaller and faster Musk gains speed by starting to halve the diameter of the TBM. This is possible since The 'Loop' works with automatic guided vehicles. And with the halving, the costs shrink and the drilling speed also jumps up. The Boring Company also strives for a continuous tunnel boring process where the drill does not have to be stagnated half the time for placing the concrete prefab elements of the tunnel wall. As the world is accustomed to him, Musk did not grow grass over his idea of ​​traffic jam. Within half a year, the Boring Company had managed to lay its hands on a disused tunnel boring machine, which drilled a section of about 80 meters on the SpaceX site in California. It is said that this is mainly used to test the electric skates over which the platforms have to slide. There are advanced plans to drill another one kilometer further. For that Musk had to apply for a permit, because that is no longer possible on the company's own premises alone.
The Boring Company on its way to a slow variant of the Hyperloop. The tunnel drill hobby company of Elon Musk will give priority to pedestrians and others who want to travel without a car in the underground transport network. With this, the Boring Company meets one of the criticisms on the futuristic transport system. The Electric Car and Space Pioneer announced the change of course last weekend via twitter. He placed a film in which a cabin full of travelers sank down the sidewalk and inserted into the underground transport system, which listens to the name ‘Loop’. It is a slow variant of the well-known Hyperloop, in which capsules with speeds of 1000 kilometers per hour shoot through vacuum tubes. At ‘Loop’, the speeds will not exceed 200 kilometers per hour. Those speeds are achieved by platforms on a special kind of 'skates'. In the first plans of the Boring Company were mainly cars to see, Tesla's of course, who parked on such a platform and through ‘Loop’ bypassed the traffic jams at ground level. Traffic jam suffering was also the origin of this umpteenth company of the Tesla and SpaceX boss. When Musk got stuck for one and a half hour at the end of 2016 with his car in the traffic of Los Angelos, he launched the idea for the underground transport system. But the starting point, especially cars on a platform through underground tubes, came to him from the beginning on the necessary scorn. It was not seen as an adequate response to traffic congestion that cities worldwide struggle with. In cars, especially during peak hours, often no more than one person is involved, and that does lead to a very inefficient and costly transport system. With the change of course to give pedestrians a first advantage within Loop, it will get more the character of a public transport system. 'Bertha' becomes smaller and faster Musk gains speed by starting to halve the diameter of the TBM. This is possible since The 'Loop' works with automatic guided vehicles. And with the halving, the costs shrink and the drilling speed also jumps up. The Boring Company also strives for a continuous tunnel boring process where the drill does not have to be stagnated half the time for placing the concrete prefab elements of the tunnel wall. As the world is accustomed to him, Musk did not grow grass over his idea of ​​traffic jam. Within half a year, the Boring Company had managed to lay its hands on a disused tunnel boring machine, which drilled a section of about 80 meters on the SpaceX site in California. It is said that this is mainly used to test the electric skates over which the platforms have to slide. There are advanced plans to drill another one kilometer further. For that Musk had to apply for a permit, because that is no longer possible on the company's own premises alone.
# Sustainable
# Sustainable 'walking' underground the Elon Musk way. Meet the 'Loop'.
#Hyperloop. Soon we will travel in 45 minutes from London to Edinburgh
Virgin Hyperloop One has unveiled the first design of its hyperloop cab Virgin Hyperloop One has unveiled the first design of its hyperloop cab, also known as a pod. The pod was unveiled during the UAE Innovation Month in Dubai. In this metropolis, the first hyperloop route must arise, between Dubai and Abu Dhabi. The first design offers a look at future passenger transport via a hyperloop. Hyperloop. What is a #Hyperloop A hyperloop is a stretch of vacuum drawn tubes, through which capsules can be shot. Because these capsules experience almost no air resistance, they can achieve speeds of up to 1,200 kilometers per hour on paper. In addition, the concept reduces CO2 emissions and fuel consumption. Hyperloop One recently joined Virgin, the Richard Branson company. In an interview with CNBC, the billionaire stated that the Hyperloop can be operational within two to four years, provided that governments respond quickly to it. The billionaire also stated that a Hyperloop system can be cheaper and faster than a traditional rail network. "As owner of a rail network, this is something that I want to be involved with", says Branson. "Consumers would love to travel from London to Edinburgh within 45 minutes. This is possible with a Hyperloop. " Dubai and Abu Dhabi Together the parties want to realize a first hyperloop route, between Dubai and Abu Dhabi. This route should make it possible to travel from city to city within 12 minutes. By way of comparison: you take over 2 hours by car. According to Hyperloop One, the route must ultimately be capable of carrying 10,000 passengers per hour, or 5,000 passengers in each direction. By: Hidde Middelweerd
Virgin Hyperloop One has unveiled the first design of its hyperloop cab Virgin Hyperloop One has unveiled the first design of its hyperloop cab, also known as a pod. The pod was unveiled during the UAE Innovation Month in Dubai. In this metropolis, the first hyperloop route must arise, between Dubai and Abu Dhabi. The first design offers a look at future passenger transport via a hyperloop. Hyperloop. What is a #Hyperloop A hyperloop is a stretch of vacuum drawn tubes, through which capsules can be shot. Because these capsules experience almost no air resistance, they can achieve speeds of up to 1,200 kilometers per hour on paper. In addition, the concept reduces CO2 emissions and fuel consumption. Hyperloop One recently joined Virgin, the Richard Branson company. In an interview with CNBC, the billionaire stated that the Hyperloop can be operational within two to four years, provided that governments respond quickly to it. The billionaire also stated that a Hyperloop system can be cheaper and faster than a traditional rail network. "As owner of a rail network, this is something that I want to be involved with", says Branson. "Consumers would love to travel from London to Edinburgh within 45 minutes. This is possible with a Hyperloop. " Dubai and Abu Dhabi Together the parties want to realize a first hyperloop route, between Dubai and Abu Dhabi. This route should make it possible to travel from city to city within 12 minutes. By way of comparison: you take over 2 hours by car. According to Hyperloop One, the route must ultimately be capable of carrying 10,000 passengers per hour, or 5,000 passengers in each direction. By: Hidde Middelweerd
#Hyperloop. Soon we will travel in 45 minutes from London to Edinburgh
#Hyperloop. Soon we will travel in 45 minutes from London to Edinburgh
Anti-smog bikes: could pedal power clean China
The bikes designed by Dutch artist Daan Roosegaarde would suck in polluted air, using positive ionisation to purify it, before releasing it back into the atmosphere. Airpocalypse now … Daan Roosegaarde’s smog-free bicycles.  Dutch designer Daan Roosegaarde has announced the next phase of his Smog Free Project: a bike that sucks in polluted air and releases purified air in a cloud around the cyclist. According to Roosegaarde, whose design firm Studio Roosegaarde has offices in both Rotterdam (Netherlands) and Beijing (China), the idea for his Smog Free Project came just over three years ago, as he gazed out of his Beijing apartment’s window. On a Saturday, the city skyline is visible; on weekdays, it’s shrouded in smog. Roosegaarde first proposed a “smog vacuum cleaner” to remove pollutants from the skies. This evolved into an air-purifying tower which, following a successful Kickstarter campaign, has just been unveiled in a public park in Tianjin. The Smog Free Tower uses positive ionisation to remove particulate matter from the surrounding air, expelling purified air through vents in the side. The same technology is now being applied – in theory, anyway – to bicycles. “Bikes have always been a symbol of energy-friendly and congestion-reducing living, but this bike serves a double function by cleaning the air as you cycle,” says Roosegaarde. “For me, design has never been about creating yet another chair or another table. We should use creativity to improve the way we live.” Beijing and Tianjin are just two of 300 cities in China that badly failed air-quality tests in 2015, according to Greenpeace. More than 1.6 million people die every year in China from breathing toxic air, and in December a much-publicised “airpocalypse” hit 460 million people, who were exposed to smog levels six times higher than the WHO’s daily guidelines. Flights were grounded and schools closed, as 24 cities across China were put on “red alert” for extreme smog. “Healthier cities and urban innovation will always be connected with large-scale governmental investment,” says Roosegaarde. “But I’m too impatient to wait for change to trickle down. The government does top-down, and designers, universities and NGOs do bottom-up, and hopefully we meet in the middle.” Roosegaarde hopes that smog-free bikes will be adopted by China’s increasingly popular bike-sharing programmes – there are 29 in total across the country – such as Mobike, Bluegogo and Ofo. “Of course one tower and a few bikes won’t solve China’s air pollution problem, but smog-free bikes are an exciting idea that will hopefully activate communities towards creating greener cities,” says Roosegaarde. “Our aspirations are being redefined; in the future, the biggest luxury won’t be a Louis Vuitton bag. It will be clean air.” By: Anna Hart
The bikes designed by Dutch artist Daan Roosegaarde would suck in polluted air, using positive ionisation to purify it, before releasing it back into the atmosphere. Airpocalypse now … Daan Roosegaarde’s smog-free bicycles.  Dutch designer Daan Roosegaarde has announced the next phase of his Smog Free Project: a bike that sucks in polluted air and releases purified air in a cloud around the cyclist. According to Roosegaarde, whose design firm Studio Roosegaarde has offices in both Rotterdam (Netherlands) and Beijing (China), the idea for his Smog Free Project came just over three years ago, as he gazed out of his Beijing apartment’s window. On a Saturday, the city skyline is visible; on weekdays, it’s shrouded in smog. Roosegaarde first proposed a “smog vacuum cleaner” to remove pollutants from the skies. This evolved into an air-purifying tower which, following a successful Kickstarter campaign, has just been unveiled in a public park in Tianjin. The Smog Free Tower uses positive ionisation to remove particulate matter from the surrounding air, expelling purified air through vents in the side. The same technology is now being applied – in theory, anyway – to bicycles. “Bikes have always been a symbol of energy-friendly and congestion-reducing living, but this bike serves a double function by cleaning the air as you cycle,” says Roosegaarde. “For me, design has never been about creating yet another chair or another table. We should use creativity to improve the way we live.” Beijing and Tianjin are just two of 300 cities in China that badly failed air-quality tests in 2015, according to Greenpeace. More than 1.6 million people die every year in China from breathing toxic air, and in December a much-publicised “airpocalypse” hit 460 million people, who were exposed to smog levels six times higher than the WHO’s daily guidelines. Flights were grounded and schools closed, as 24 cities across China were put on “red alert” for extreme smog. “Healthier cities and urban innovation will always be connected with large-scale governmental investment,” says Roosegaarde. “But I’m too impatient to wait for change to trickle down. The government does top-down, and designers, universities and NGOs do bottom-up, and hopefully we meet in the middle.” Roosegaarde hopes that smog-free bikes will be adopted by China’s increasingly popular bike-sharing programmes – there are 29 in total across the country – such as Mobike, Bluegogo and Ofo. “Of course one tower and a few bikes won’t solve China’s air pollution problem, but smog-free bikes are an exciting idea that will hopefully activate communities towards creating greener cities,” says Roosegaarde. “Our aspirations are being redefined; in the future, the biggest luxury won’t be a Louis Vuitton bag. It will be clean air.” By: Anna Hart
Anti-smog bikes: could pedal power clean China
Anti-smog bikes: could pedal power clean China's polluted air?
Transportation

Easy transportation of goods is one of the backbones of our modern society. Unfortunately a lot of energy is involved in getter your goods from A to B. In these articles we try to tell you all about carbon neutral fuel and other sustainable efforts to move goods around the world.

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