Transportation

About: <p>Sustainable transport has a low impact on the environment. It is &lsquo;green.&rsquo; <a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/category/transportation">Sustainable transport</a> is finding the balance between current- and future transportation needs. Replacing fossil fuel transportation by the battery, hybrid, hydrogen, wind, or solar for cars, trucks, boats, planes,s and other transportation means is not enough. We also need to reduce traffic by sharing sustainable transportation like carpooling, cycling, and walking.</p> <h2>Sustainable Transport By Car, Boat, Bike And Plane</h2> <p>Transport has a significant influence on the environment. It uses about 20% of our energy sources and produces about 25% CO2 emissions.</p> <p>If there was an urge to develop sustainable transport solutions and share these topics globally, it&rsquo;s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers, and influencers to write about sustainable transport, your experiences, and expectations for the future at home and globally. <br /><br />Boost Global Sustainability Now, that&rsquo;s what you can do together with WhatsOrb.&nbsp;<a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/newsletter/your-shared-sustainable-ideas-make-our-earth-a-better-place">What's in for me?</a></p>
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EV Cars: The Difference Between US And EU EV Cars
Have you ever gone to a dealership to see that car model you saw on an EV car advertisement? The chances are you saw a European model. But did you know that EV cars are not treated, nor designed, the same across continents? This EV trend is not passing by. Some Differences Between US And EU EV Cars European EV's and American EV’s have many differences that go beyond the aesthetic features. What do you have to think of? Differences in costs, national bias, the general public image, and the government policies. EV Cars: How Preferences Of EV’s Compare Tesla is pretty big in the US. Tesla is so popular that it looks like there are no other electric vehicles that could outrank this one. The EU, on the other hand, has a different taste. Popular EVs in the EU Nissan Leaf BMW i3 Renault Zoe Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV For example, the plug-in EV, which performed well in the EU and America, is the Nissan Leaf, but way more popular in Europe. The Nissan Leaf is affordable, practical, drives smoothly, and is highly accessible to consumers. The car has been on the market for more than ten years. Next is the famous, futuristic-looking German BMW i3. His popularity hits Europe because of its limited appeal. It does not sell well in North American cities. Recommended:  BMW 2020: iHydrogen NEXT Eco Ready In 2022? The Renault Zoe is more common in Europe than in the United States. This is mainly due to its small size in comparison to other EV's. The Renault Zoe is perfect for navigating in small streets, which are very common in European cities. The Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV is inexpensive and very suitable for both on- and off-road trips. This hybrid car loads fast, up to 80% in only 25 minutes. If it runs only on batteries, people residing in the EU can travel up to 22 miles, perfect for smaller commutes between Europe's cities. Popular EVs in the US Chevy Volt Chevy Volt (PHEV) Tesla Model X and S Toyota Prius Prime The only electric car which is not manufactured by Tesla is the Chevy Volt. He is a bit cheaper than the Tesla models and guarantees an approximate EPA coverage of 259 miles with a loaded battery. The Chevy Volt sells better in the US. Tesla Models X and S are known as long-distance vehicles. Tesla cars are also equipped with the most modern autonomous driver assistance, such as self-parking, automatic lane changer, lane centering, and traffic-conscious cruise control. They can also navigate a highway with limited access, perfect for longer commuting distances in the United States. Recommended:  Insane Tesla Data: Are Robotaxis Coming Soon? Next, we discuss the Chevy Plug-in hybrid (PHEV). This car has a much better power range and a more passenger-friendly interior design. For the American, the Chevy hybrid car has gained a significant customer base in the U.S. because of its price and comfortable seats. The last one is the Toyota Prius Prime. The hybrid engine's ability to attract and fulfill the daily needs of long-distance commuters makes the car massively appealing to more customers in the U.S. than in Europe. EV Sales in the United States en Europe In 2010, the US was mainly the leader in electric cars. But if you travel to Europe, you will see more electric vehicles (EV) on the road than in the US. Europe has caught up and exceeded America. The market for electric cars in the US even seems to be at a standstill because the US did not give consumers incentives to change to electric vehicles. Some countries, like France and the UK, provided generous financial and non-financial incentive deals. Charging Station Differences For EV's In the US, the charging stations supply charging cables, while in the EU, the drivers have their own cables with them. However, most charging stations in the US are privately owned. In Europe, a lot of towns and cities provide public charging stations for drivers. Another unsurprising factor about the American charging stations is that they prefer the larger ones. Drivers of electric cars in the EU prefer small stations to save room. Conclusion Difference Between US And EU EV Cars There are certainly some differences between American and European EVs, but one thing is clear: the tendency mentioned above does not just pass by; this is one thing that's for sure. Before you go! Recommended:  Tesla Electric Cybertruck: Explorer’s Best Friend Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about electric cars? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Have you ever gone to a dealership to see that car model you saw on an EV car advertisement? The chances are you saw a European model. But did you know that EV cars are not treated, nor designed, the same across continents? This EV trend is not passing by. Some Differences Between US And EU EV Cars European EV's and American EV’s have many differences that go beyond the aesthetic features. What do you have to think of? Differences in costs, national bias, the general public image, and the government policies. EV Cars: How Preferences Of EV’s Compare Tesla is pretty big in the US. Tesla is so popular that it looks like there are no other electric vehicles that could outrank this one. The EU, on the other hand, has a different taste. Popular EVs in the EU Nissan Leaf BMW i3 Renault Zoe Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV For example, the plug-in EV, which performed well in the EU and America, is the Nissan Leaf, but way more popular in Europe. The Nissan Leaf is affordable, practical, drives smoothly, and is highly accessible to consumers. The car has been on the market for more than ten years. Next is the famous, futuristic-looking German BMW i3. His popularity hits Europe because of its limited appeal. It does not sell well in North American cities. Recommended:  BMW 2020: iHydrogen NEXT Eco Ready In 2022? The Renault Zoe is more common in Europe than in the United States. This is mainly due to its small size in comparison to other EV's. The Renault Zoe is perfect for navigating in small streets, which are very common in European cities. The Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV is inexpensive and very suitable for both on- and off-road trips. This hybrid car loads fast, up to 80% in only 25 minutes. If it runs only on batteries, people residing in the EU can travel up to 22 miles, perfect for smaller commutes between Europe's cities. Popular EVs in the US Chevy Volt Chevy Volt (PHEV) Tesla Model X and S Toyota Prius Prime The only electric car which is not manufactured by Tesla is the Chevy Volt. He is a bit cheaper than the Tesla models and guarantees an approximate EPA coverage of 259 miles with a loaded battery. The Chevy Volt sells better in the US. Tesla Models X and S are known as long-distance vehicles. Tesla cars are also equipped with the most modern autonomous driver assistance, such as self-parking, automatic lane changer, lane centering, and traffic-conscious cruise control. They can also navigate a highway with limited access, perfect for longer commuting distances in the United States. Recommended:  Insane Tesla Data: Are Robotaxis Coming Soon? Next, we discuss the Chevy Plug-in hybrid (PHEV). This car has a much better power range and a more passenger-friendly interior design. For the American, the Chevy hybrid car has gained a significant customer base in the U.S. because of its price and comfortable seats. The last one is the Toyota Prius Prime. The hybrid engine's ability to attract and fulfill the daily needs of long-distance commuters makes the car massively appealing to more customers in the U.S. than in Europe. EV Sales in the United States en Europe In 2010, the US was mainly the leader in electric cars. But if you travel to Europe, you will see more electric vehicles (EV) on the road than in the US. Europe has caught up and exceeded America. The market for electric cars in the US even seems to be at a standstill because the US did not give consumers incentives to change to electric vehicles. Some countries, like France and the UK, provided generous financial and non-financial incentive deals. Charging Station Differences For EV's In the US, the charging stations supply charging cables, while in the EU, the drivers have their own cables with them. However, most charging stations in the US are privately owned. In Europe, a lot of towns and cities provide public charging stations for drivers. Another unsurprising factor about the American charging stations is that they prefer the larger ones. Drivers of electric cars in the EU prefer small stations to save room. Conclusion Difference Between US And EU EV Cars There are certainly some differences between American and European EVs, but one thing is clear: the tendency mentioned above does not just pass by; this is one thing that's for sure. Before you go! Recommended:  Tesla Electric Cybertruck: Explorer’s Best Friend Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about electric cars? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
EV Cars: The Difference Between US And EU EV Cars
Electric Scooters You Can’t Resist
Scooters. Quite the eyesore for many - particularly when they are loud, parked on the pavement, or simply obnoxiously ignoring all traffic and common decency rules. In some areas, older scooters are already forbidden, as the threat, they pose to the environment is painfully obvious. Electric scooters you can’t resist show beautiful models that are clean, quiet, and sustainable. Electric Scooters: Clean, Quiet, Sustainable Now that we got that out of the way, there is a new wave of scooters that you will not be able to resist. It is fully electric - so clean, quiet, and sustainable. And it is your golden ticket to beat the morning rush hour and traffic headaches in the city center. Electric scooters are not just a fun toy for the rich kids in town; they could help us a great deal if we want our transportation to become more sustainable. Even better, there is plenty for you to choose from. Let’s take a look at the most obvious contenders. Recommended:  Electric Scooter Start-Ups Hype: The Netherlands Electric Scooter:  Carota Design If you wonder why it has such a striking resemblance to BMW’s Concept Link from 2017, wonder no longer. It was designed that way. The matte-finish metal panels will instantly give you that BMW-feel. The boot-storage is somewhat limited, as the cantilever seat somewhat imposes on its space, but you have a dedicated space for your helmet to the side. Fun extra: the seat also dubs as your taillight, in the form of a thin arc along the back and side, while your headlights are edge-lit details on the front. Vespa 98 Conceptual Scooter Time to get wow-ed by the creation of Mightyseed, the Vespa 98. This conceptual scooter has a traditional retro look and feels and a lot of modern gadgets and gizmos. This is clearly visible in the handles, LED-lights, and all kinds of sensors to alert the rider to nearby traffic - which will, or so the design team claims, replace the traditional rearview mirrors. Vespa scooter concept Recommended:  Sexy Electric Vehicle: Vespa Meets Tesla And Apple Stator, The Self-Balancing Scooter Worried about falling over? Worry no longer, thanks to the self-balancing scooter that gives you a huge burst of power. The 1000W battery hidden in the rear wheel can get you moving at up to 40 km/h. A cool bike that does what it says and says what it does: its design is simple, nothing unnecessary, or flashy here. Especially the handlebars stand out in simplicity - made out of a single tube, housing an intuitive control module.   Stator, the scooter which balances you and itself. Pocket Rocket State Of The Art Scooter Not exactly a name one would associate with a state-of-the-art scooter, but hear me out for a second. The triangle shape makes it instantly eye-catching, while there is an impressive amount of technology and design hidden away in its pretty bare structure. If you want something unique, this might be your ride.   Pocket Rocket scooter Vespa By Artem: Scooter Of The Future Prefer the old-school Vespa, but not convinced by the Vespa 98? Then Vespa by Artem might be for you, which is basically Artem Smirnov’s interpretation of the Vespa of the future. Spoiler alert, it does not have many of the Vespa bike's distinctive characteristics, although that is not something to be alarmed by. It does look more like an e-bike than a scooter. That may alarm you.   The futuristic Vespa Scooter design. Artem Smirnov’s interpretation. Recommended:  Futuristic e-Bike, Boat, Camper Makes Headlines Carota Classic E-Bike Speaking of e-bikes-turned-e-scooters, Carota has you covered. This design is funky and unique, very Harley Davidson-esque, while still being lean enough to classify as an e-bike. It is virtually silent, powered by the V-twin engine right beneath your seat. Paddle no more, hello Harley Davidson charm.   Carota e-bike with a Harley look. Recommended:  Electric Bike Rayvolt X One: A Different eBike Upholding Simple Scooter The vision of Ekaterina Tiholova was clear: let’s keep it simple. She came up with a plain and simple scooter, consisting of a simple black base, with two bulbous wheels underneath. Some color accents are used to spice it up a bit, and ta-dah, we proudly present - the Upholding. Electric scooter 'flat-pack'! Dyson Moovo Dyson might be most well-known as the producer of vacuum cleaners. This is not all they do, though. The Moovo is modeled after Dyson’s best-known designs, featuring clean lines. This makes the whole thing rather sophisticated and aesthetically pleasing while incorporating some cool tech. What about the handlebar that functions as a controller for the screen displaying information about your trip or features of the scooter? Easy to love, it really is. The Dyson 'mini' scooter Ather 450 Electric Scooter The Indian company Ather is working hard at creating a market for its electric scooter. They already set up 30 charging points for its scooter throughout the city of Bengaluru. They are aiming high, and for a good reason - their product will be Indian’s first electric scooter. Potentially a revolution in a country dominated by scooters. Its top speed is 80 km/h, with a range of 75 km on a full battery. Plus, it is quite handsome to look at: its design is edgy, almost Stormtrooper-like. It also has a smart touchscreen connected to the bespoke app. Ather 450 Electric Scooter from India Z-Scooter Last but not least, Z-Scooter is something fun and surprising. It is the lovechild of a scooter and a Segway, meant for recreational trips: it looks striking and can reach 20 km/h for some 35 km per charge. You accelerate by leaning forward and decelerate by leaning backward, and you can go left and right by turning the handles. What other options do you need?   The Z-Scooter, Amazing! Electric Scooters: Get Into It The options available in the market are diverse and continue to improve, becoming smaller, leaner, and smarter. They are the best alternative for our urban transportation needs - not only will you be able to avoid traffic, but parking is also easy, and pollution is non-existent. What do you say? It is about time to get excited about electric scooters. Before you go! Recommended:  Harley Davidson LiveWire Electric Bike Drives Like A Tesla Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about electric scooters you can’t resist? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Scooters. Quite the eyesore for many - particularly when they are loud, parked on the pavement, or simply obnoxiously ignoring all traffic and common decency rules. In some areas, older scooters are already forbidden, as the threat, they pose to the environment is painfully obvious. Electric scooters you can’t resist show beautiful models that are clean, quiet, and sustainable. Electric Scooters: Clean, Quiet, Sustainable Now that we got that out of the way, there is a new wave of scooters that you will not be able to resist. It is fully electric - so clean, quiet, and sustainable. And it is your golden ticket to beat the morning rush hour and traffic headaches in the city center. Electric scooters are not just a fun toy for the rich kids in town; they could help us a great deal if we want our transportation to become more sustainable. Even better, there is plenty for you to choose from. Let’s take a look at the most obvious contenders. Recommended:  Electric Scooter Start-Ups Hype: The Netherlands Electric Scooter:  Carota Design If you wonder why it has such a striking resemblance to BMW’s Concept Link from 2017, wonder no longer. It was designed that way. The matte-finish metal panels will instantly give you that BMW-feel. The boot-storage is somewhat limited, as the cantilever seat somewhat imposes on its space, but you have a dedicated space for your helmet to the side. Fun extra: the seat also dubs as your taillight, in the form of a thin arc along the back and side, while your headlights are edge-lit details on the front. Vespa 98 Conceptual Scooter Time to get wow-ed by the creation of Mightyseed, the Vespa 98. This conceptual scooter has a traditional retro look and feels and a lot of modern gadgets and gizmos. This is clearly visible in the handles, LED-lights, and all kinds of sensors to alert the rider to nearby traffic - which will, or so the design team claims, replace the traditional rearview mirrors. Vespa scooter concept Recommended:  Sexy Electric Vehicle: Vespa Meets Tesla And Apple Stator, The Self-Balancing Scooter Worried about falling over? Worry no longer, thanks to the self-balancing scooter that gives you a huge burst of power. The 1000W battery hidden in the rear wheel can get you moving at up to 40 km/h. A cool bike that does what it says and says what it does: its design is simple, nothing unnecessary, or flashy here. Especially the handlebars stand out in simplicity - made out of a single tube, housing an intuitive control module.   Stator, the scooter which balances you and itself. Pocket Rocket State Of The Art Scooter Not exactly a name one would associate with a state-of-the-art scooter, but hear me out for a second. The triangle shape makes it instantly eye-catching, while there is an impressive amount of technology and design hidden away in its pretty bare structure. If you want something unique, this might be your ride.   Pocket Rocket scooter Vespa By Artem: Scooter Of The Future Prefer the old-school Vespa, but not convinced by the Vespa 98? Then Vespa by Artem might be for you, which is basically Artem Smirnov’s interpretation of the Vespa of the future. Spoiler alert, it does not have many of the Vespa bike's distinctive characteristics, although that is not something to be alarmed by. It does look more like an e-bike than a scooter. That may alarm you.   The futuristic Vespa Scooter design. Artem Smirnov’s interpretation. Recommended:  Futuristic e-Bike, Boat, Camper Makes Headlines Carota Classic E-Bike Speaking of e-bikes-turned-e-scooters, Carota has you covered. This design is funky and unique, very Harley Davidson-esque, while still being lean enough to classify as an e-bike. It is virtually silent, powered by the V-twin engine right beneath your seat. Paddle no more, hello Harley Davidson charm.   Carota e-bike with a Harley look. Recommended:  Electric Bike Rayvolt X One: A Different eBike Upholding Simple Scooter The vision of Ekaterina Tiholova was clear: let’s keep it simple. She came up with a plain and simple scooter, consisting of a simple black base, with two bulbous wheels underneath. Some color accents are used to spice it up a bit, and ta-dah, we proudly present - the Upholding. Electric scooter 'flat-pack'! Dyson Moovo Dyson might be most well-known as the producer of vacuum cleaners. This is not all they do, though. The Moovo is modeled after Dyson’s best-known designs, featuring clean lines. This makes the whole thing rather sophisticated and aesthetically pleasing while incorporating some cool tech. What about the handlebar that functions as a controller for the screen displaying information about your trip or features of the scooter? Easy to love, it really is. The Dyson 'mini' scooter Ather 450 Electric Scooter The Indian company Ather is working hard at creating a market for its electric scooter. They already set up 30 charging points for its scooter throughout the city of Bengaluru. They are aiming high, and for a good reason - their product will be Indian’s first electric scooter. Potentially a revolution in a country dominated by scooters. Its top speed is 80 km/h, with a range of 75 km on a full battery. Plus, it is quite handsome to look at: its design is edgy, almost Stormtrooper-like. It also has a smart touchscreen connected to the bespoke app. Ather 450 Electric Scooter from India Z-Scooter Last but not least, Z-Scooter is something fun and surprising. It is the lovechild of a scooter and a Segway, meant for recreational trips: it looks striking and can reach 20 km/h for some 35 km per charge. You accelerate by leaning forward and decelerate by leaning backward, and you can go left and right by turning the handles. What other options do you need?   The Z-Scooter, Amazing! Electric Scooters: Get Into It The options available in the market are diverse and continue to improve, becoming smaller, leaner, and smarter. They are the best alternative for our urban transportation needs - not only will you be able to avoid traffic, but parking is also easy, and pollution is non-existent. What do you say? It is about time to get excited about electric scooters. Before you go! Recommended:  Harley Davidson LiveWire Electric Bike Drives Like A Tesla Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about electric scooters you can’t resist? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Electric Scooters You Can’t Resist
Electric Car Road Trips: The Ultimate Guide
Electric car road trips. Which electric car should you choose? You have to find an electric car suitable for your needs. Not all-electric cars are a perfect fit for road tripping. Take a few steps into consideration before purchasing an electric of a plug-in hybrid instead. This article is full of battery degradation information and tips & tricks on coping best with your EV-battery! A Road-Trip Capable Electric Car: The Criteria Buy a car that can meet up your needs with an appropriate range for road tripping. Do not purchase a model with an 80-mile range if you plan to take only 500+ mile road trips. If you do not mind stopping a few times to charge, the BMW i3 is an option. Do you want to avoid frequently charging? Think of a Tesla or Chevrolet Bolt. They are great for long-distance. Photo by 'Share Me.' BMW i3 Consider A Plug-In Hybrid Or Range-Extended Vehicle You may consider an electric car which is not entirely electric. You have two options: the range-extended electric vehicles and the plug-in hybrids. The latter have large batteries which can be charged externally. Generally, they have an electric action range of 15 to 50 miles and a full-size gas tank. But they do not have the whole electric driving experience. Then you have the range-extended electric cars, which are entirely electric with a small gas motor. The motor charges the car's battery to provide additional range while driving long distances. The range-extended vehicles give you the full-electric driving experience. Also, they have a fast charger and other EV-specific technology features. For a long time, the Toyota Yaris was the only supermini to come with a hybrid option, making it one of the cheapest ways to get a ‘hybrid’ badge. A Fiesta will excite keen drivers much more than the Yaris, but the hybrid is easy to drive and feels perfectly comfortable on a long motorway trip. Around 50mpg is promised, starting to look a little low, seeing as the Fiesta’s turbo petrol engines can manage this figure. The Yaris has an excellent reputation for reliability and a host of safety features, such as autonomous emergency braking, fitted as standard. DC Fast Charging Is Key For A Sane Road Trip Only buy a car, including DC fast charging, if you plan to take a road trip. For example, the BMW i3 can charge up to 80 percent in 45 minutes. They charge 50kw per hour. A vehicle without this option, but they only charge around 11kW per hour. So, this will take a lot of time when on-the-go. If you have to wait an hour to drive again, your trip will be extended. Luckily, most new electric cars are equipped with fast charging. Ensure you will get all the information to know if you're dealing with a new or older model. What is DC fast charging? “DC” refers to “direct current,” the type of power that batteries use. EVs have “onboard chargers” inside the car that convert AC power to DC for the battery. DC fast chargers convert AC power to DC within the charging station and deliver DC power directly to the battery, which is why they charge faster.   {youtube}                                              5 New Battery Technologies That Could CHANGE EVERYTHING   Recommended:  Tesla Battery Day: It Blows My Mind Check Battery Degradation When Buying A Used Car What can 6,000 electric vehicles tell us about EV battery health? Compare the average battery degradation for different vehicle makes and model years. How long does an electric car battery last? Use the free  EV Battery Degradation Tool  to compare the average battery degradation over time for different vehicle makes and model years. The importance of EV batteries If you’re thinking about buying an electric vehicle (EV), there are some important factors to consider. These three questions are probably at the top of your list: How much will the EV cost? What is its range? How long will the battery last? From a life-cycle perspective, battery performance and health really are the key to it all. As the battery is an EV’s most expensive component, the degree of degradation will affect the vehicle’s residual value (which helps answer the cost question from above), and will also have a direct impact on the maximum usable range over time. How long will an EV battery last? You might have noticed that it is tough to get a straight answer to questions about an EV’s battery lifespan. What you may find instead are assurances that the warranty covers batteries should something go wrong. Typically, battery coverage is 8 years or 100,000 miles, but this will vary by manufacturer and country. Warranties are reassuring, and so too is the fact that battery costs are decreasing significantly year over year. Since 2010, the price of an average Lithium-ion battery pack has dropped by over 80%. An automaker’s guarantee of their battery technology and the promise of decreasing costs should inspire some confidence. However, most of us would find more comfort knowing how quickly our batteries are expected to degrade and how to minimize this loss. What is EV battery degradation? Battery degradation is a natural process that permanently reduces the amount of energy a battery can store or the amount of power it can deliver. The batteries in EVs can generally deliver more power than the powertrain components can handle. As a result, power degradation is rarely observable in EVs, and only the loss of the battery’s ability to store energy matters. A battery’s condition is called its state of health (SOH) . Batteries start their life with 100% SOH, and over time they deteriorate. For example, a 60 kWh battery with 90% SOH would effectively act like a 54 kWh battery. Keep in mind; this is not the same as vehicle range (the distance the vehicle can travel on those kWhs), which will fluctuate on a daily or trip-by-trip basis, depending on several factors including charge level, topography, temperature, auxiliary use, driving habits, and passenger or cargo load. Common factors impacting Lithium-ion battery health: Time High temperatures Operating at a high and low state of charge High electric current Usage (energy cycles) While there has been plenty of research done on battery health, there has been very little data following EVs' real-world performance over time, let alone comparisons across different makes and models. Until now. Introducing the EV Battery Degradation Tool Geotab created the EV Battery Degradation Tool to assess how batteries have been holding up and consider the relative importance of EV battery life's above factors under real-world conditions. We analyzed the battery health of 6,300 fleet and consumer EVs, representing 1.8 million days of data. From the telematics data processed, we have gained insight into how real-world conditions influence electric vehicles' battery health, providing aggregated average degradation data for 21 distinct vehicle models, representing 64 makes, models, and years. Notes about the tool: The degradation curves displayed below are the average trend line from the data analyzed. These graphs can offer insight into average battery health over time, but should not be interpreted as a precise prediction for any specific vehicle. A subset of vehicle makes, models, and years are not available in the visualization tool – we have excluded vehicles with insufficient data, so don’t be alarmed if your car of choice is missing. Get started with the tool. For more information and to use the tool, see the  Electric Vehicle Battery Degradation Tool  page.  Key takeaways High levels of sustained battery health observed First and foremost, based on data from over 6,000 electric vehicles, spanning all the major makes and models, batteries are exhibiting high levels of sustained health. If the observed degradation rates are maintained, the vast majority of batteries will outlast the vehicle's usable life. Like us, health declines with age. As you might expect, the older a vehicle is, the more likely its battery has deteriorated. However, when looking at the average decline across all vehicles, the loss is arguably minor, at 2.3% per year. This means that if you purchase an EV today with a 150-mile range, losing about 17 miles of accessible range after five years is unlikely to impact your day-to-day needs. Is EV battery degradation linear? While this tool shows more or less linear degradation, as a general rule, EV batteries are expected to decline non-linearly: an initial drop, which then continues to decline but at a far more moderate pace. Towards the end of its life, a battery will see a final significant drop, as seen below. Tesla battery degradation data-points chart Why do some vehicle models seem to, on average, degrade faster than others? Two potential contributors are: battery chemistry thermal management of the battery pack. While EVs use Lithium-ion batteries, there are many different variations of Lithium-ion chemistries (the most prominent difference being the materials used for the electrodes). A battery’s chemical make-up will influence how it responds to stress. In addition to cell chemistry, temperature control techniques differ across vehicle models. A major distinction is if the battery pack is cooled and/or heated by air or by liquid. Let’s compare a vehicle with a liquid cooling system to one with a passive air cooling system: the 2015 Tesla Model S and the 2015 Nissan Leaf, respectively. The Leaf has an average degradation rate of 4.2%, while the Model S is 2.3%. Good thermal management means better protection against degradation. State of Charge (SOC) and the buffer effect Another anticipated reason for the differences in battery health between manufacturers is how SOC is controlled. Operating a battery at near full or empty has implications on battery health. Many manufacturers add a buffer to limit this effect, effectively preventing access to the SOC's extreme ends. In addition to the protection buffers at the top end and bottom end of the battery range, many vehicles provide the EV owner the option to stop normal daily charging at a level below 100%. Did you know? Removing extremes is not only done for battery health but also for safe vehicle operation. The battery wouldn’t accept or deliver full power at the extreme ends, and the driving experience would be impacted. In essence, a battery at 100% isn’t completely charged from a pure battery chemistry standpoint. Similarly, 0% isn’t empty. Since the vehicle owner cannot access these parts of the battery range for safety and battery life reasons, many are likely unaware of it. Thanks to over-the-air software upgrades, it’s possible that the size of the buffer can change over time, as discovered by some Tesla owners in 2019, when they noticed a decrease in their top range. Tesla confirmed the upgrade was “to protect the battery and improve longevity.” Besides, some automakers have adjustable-charge ceilings, where the user can pre-set at what point the battery stops charging (e.g., they can tell the vehicle to stop charging at 75% instead of 100%). This owner-discretionary region (B in the graphic above) works in combination with the non-discretionary buffer (A) to limit battery operation in areas of higher degradation. In later updates to the degradation tool, we intend to include the impact of the owner’s operation within this discretionary (B) region and the resulting impact on degradation rates. Let’s consider an example: The Chevrolet Volt, especially the early model years, has comparatively large top and bottom protection buffers (regions A and D) that dynamically change as the battery ages. While the larger buffers mean less energy for driving, it should result in a longer-lasting battery pack. Given the larger SOC buffers, liquid thermal management, and dynamic (decreasing) buffer size, slower than average degradation rates should be expected on the Volt. What additional factors appear to influence battery health? Based on the telematics data available, we evaluated battery degradation by different factors the vehicles were exposed to and see any correlation with health decline. These factors included: Use Extreme climates Charging type High vehicle use does not equal higher battery degradation. One exciting piece of information we were able to glean from the data was that vehicles with high use did not show significantly higher battery degradation. This should come as welcome news since you don’t get the benefit of an EV if it’s just sitting in the fleet yard. The takeaway? Don’t be afraid to put your EVs in high-use duty cycles. As long as they are within their daily driving range, their battery life won’t be negatively impacted. One caveat: if high use requires routine DC fast charging, be sure to read the section on the impact of charging type. Vehicles driven in hot temperatures show a faster decline in battery SOH. A battery exposed to scorching temperatures will be prone to more damage, but by how much? Will an EV in Arizona have a different battery life than the same car driven in Norway? To find out, we grouped the vehicles based on the following climate conditions: Temperate:  Fewer than 5 days per year over 80 F (27 C) or under 23 F (-5 C). Hot: More than 5 days per year over 80 F (27 C). Heat and cold weather also impacts your day-to-day range. To understand how to take a look at our  Temperature Tool for EV Range . Taking a look at charge type We were able to look at the predominant charging level used for the EVs in our system. North American EV charging stations are categorized into three common types: Level 1: 120 volt – a regular home outlet in North America. Level 2: 240 volt – typical for home or fleet charging. Direct current fast charger: DCFC – for faster top-ups. Charging in most of Europe is referred to as AC charging (which is generally equivalent to Level 2 in North America) and DC charging (DCFC, as described above). While Level 2 is often cited as the optimal way to charge an EV, the difference in battery health between cars that routinely charged on Level 2 as compared to those who used Level 1 appeared to be observable but was not beyond the level of statistical significance. The use of DCFCs, however, does appear to impact the speed that batteries degrade. Rapidly charging a battery means high currents resulting in high temperatures, both known to strain batteries. In fact, many automakers suggest limiting the use of DCFC to prolong their vehicles’ battery life. Here we look at all battery electric vehicles in the same climate group (we chose to look at the most susceptible group – those operating in extreme climate conditions), and categorized them based on how frequently they used a DCFC: Never, occasionally (1–3 times per month) and frequently (more than 3 times per month). The difference between those vehicles that never used DCFC and those that occasionally used seasonal or hot climates was notable. While there may be other factors at play (we want to stress that this wasn’t a controlled experiment), charging via lower power Level 2 charging should be prioritized. Tips to prolong your EV battery’s life While battery degradation varies by model and external conditions – such as climate and charging type – most vehicles on the road, have not experienced a significant decline. In fact, overall degradation has been very modest, with an average capacity loss of just 2.3% per year. Under the ideal climate and charging conditions, the loss is 1.6%. While some things are out of an operator’s control, there are ways you can extend the life of your EV’s battery. Some tips for operating your EVs: Avoid keeping your car sitting with a full or empty charge. Ideally, keep your SOC between 20–80% particularly when leaving it for longer periods, and only charge it fully for long-distance trips. Minimize fast charging (DCFC). Some high-use duty cycles will need a faster charge, but if your vehicle sits overnight, level 2 should be sufficient for the majority of your charging needs. Climate is out of an operator’s control, but do what you can to avoid scorching temperatures, such as choosing shade when parked on hot days. High-use is not a concern, so fleets shouldn’t hesitate to put them to work. An EV isn’t useful sitting idle in the fleet yard, and putting on more miles per vehicle is overall a better fleet management practice. Final thought Don’t sweat the small stuff. As vehicles come out with larger battery packs, losing some capacity may not impact your day-to-day driving needs, and shouldn’t overshadow the many benefits EVs have to offer. How To Plan A Road Trip With An Electric Car Road tripping with an electric vehicle is different than with a gas car. You have to plan more. If you know how to do it, it's okay. Plan Your Route Around Fast Chargers First, you have to know where you can charge your car. Plan your road trip around available public chargers, near expressways, highways, and other roads. The thing is, you will spend more battery once you accelerate or going up hills. So, take into consideration that you will need a 10 percent buffer. Try to stick to fast chargers once you're on the road, you have to wait 30 - 40 minutes, and you're back on the road again, without any problems. Plan your trips manually or use an app like PlugShare. The app is a crowdsources directory with all available chargers near your location. It will save you a lot of time. Look For Hotels With Charge Points Save time during your trip is possible to stay at hotels which offer to charge your electric car. Nowadays, it is used more often. Generally, they are Level 2 chargers, so make sure to load your vehicle during your sleep. If the hotel does not have charging, ask the hotel staff if they have an outdoor plug to charge your car. Most electric vehicles have a Level 1 wall charger, which you can use with any standard wall socket. Which Apps To Use To Find Public Chargers What is the best way to find public chargers? In the United States, you have different charging networks, like ChargePoint and Electrify America. In Europe, we know Chargemap. You can buy a Chargemap pass, which allows you to charge your electric car on most European charging networks. You will find thousands of compatible charging stations near your location. PlugShare For Most Public Chargers PlugShare is a powered electric charger app in the community. Use this app to see which chargers are networked, non-networked, and home chargers open to the public. You can filter the chargers by connector type, speed, and if you have to pay for using them. The app can help you plan your trip and find chargers along the way. Type in your origin and destination and the app will show you all the chargers nearby. The app ChargePoint is also an advantage for the Tesla owners because it will show you all Tesla Destination Chargers, Superchargers, and all compatible chargers. Click on PlugShare for charging points in your country -ChargePoint+ Has Chargers Around The World ChargePoint is one of the largest charging networks in the World, which offers chargers Level 2 and 3. You will find them in the big cities and on a few major highways. You can use the app to pay for charging. Note: not all chargers shown in the app are public. Click on -ChargePoint+ for charging points in your country. Electrify America For DC Fast Chargers On Highways Electrify America chargers has a significant network of fast chargers near large highways (near Walmart, Targets, and other shopping centers). Prices are reasonable, and you will get a discount by signing up for a membership ($4 per month). Using the chargers is super easy, and the costs are billed to your credit card. A disadvantage is that a few stations are unreliable. Some chargers can be out of service. Click on Electrify America  to download the app. Carwow UK Electric Car Charging Point Finder. An interactive Electric Car charging point finder tool to help EV and hybrid car owners find the nearest electric vehicle charging stations. Click on:  nearest electric vehicle charging station Coming Soon: EV Passport For Unlimited Charging Soon to come: EV Passport for electric car owners. With the passport, you charge up your vehicle unlimited for only $39 per month. You can check your battery status directly from your phone. Earn Bonus Miles On Electric Car Charging Once you're on the road, you usually have to pay for charging your car. So why not earn some miles while charging it? Most chargers do not have a code 'travel,' so you need to have a credit card to earn these miles. There a few of these cards on the market: The Blue Business®️ Plus Credit Card from American Express (On the first $50,000 in purchase per year, you will get 2x Membership Rewards points; then 1x, giving you a 4% return based on TPG's valuation) Chase Freedom Unlimited (1.5% cash back/1.5x Ultimate Rewards points for a 3% return based on TPG's valuation) Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card (On all purchases, you will get 2x miles, that will give you a 2.8% return based on TPG's valuations) If you fill in a credit card request, you can use it to pay for charging your electric car. Bottom Line Road tripping with an electric vehicle is way different from a gas car, but you still have a lot of fun. You will save money, so you can see more during your trip or stay in fancier hotels. Also, consider the range and think of a 10 percent buffer with your battery. Plan your charge points on your trip so that you can enjoy your trip stress-free! Cover photo by Jannes Glas Before you go! Recommended:  Tesla Electric Cybertruck: Explorer’s Best Friend Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about electric cars? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Electric car road trips. Which electric car should you choose? You have to find an electric car suitable for your needs. Not all-electric cars are a perfect fit for road tripping. Take a few steps into consideration before purchasing an electric of a plug-in hybrid instead. This article is full of battery degradation information and tips & tricks on coping best with your EV-battery! A Road-Trip Capable Electric Car: The Criteria Buy a car that can meet up your needs with an appropriate range for road tripping. Do not purchase a model with an 80-mile range if you plan to take only 500+ mile road trips. If you do not mind stopping a few times to charge, the BMW i3 is an option. Do you want to avoid frequently charging? Think of a Tesla or Chevrolet Bolt. They are great for long-distance. Photo by 'Share Me.' BMW i3 Consider A Plug-In Hybrid Or Range-Extended Vehicle You may consider an electric car which is not entirely electric. You have two options: the range-extended electric vehicles and the plug-in hybrids. The latter have large batteries which can be charged externally. Generally, they have an electric action range of 15 to 50 miles and a full-size gas tank. But they do not have the whole electric driving experience. Then you have the range-extended electric cars, which are entirely electric with a small gas motor. The motor charges the car's battery to provide additional range while driving long distances. The range-extended vehicles give you the full-electric driving experience. Also, they have a fast charger and other EV-specific technology features. For a long time, the Toyota Yaris was the only supermini to come with a hybrid option, making it one of the cheapest ways to get a ‘hybrid’ badge. A Fiesta will excite keen drivers much more than the Yaris, but the hybrid is easy to drive and feels perfectly comfortable on a long motorway trip. Around 50mpg is promised, starting to look a little low, seeing as the Fiesta’s turbo petrol engines can manage this figure. The Yaris has an excellent reputation for reliability and a host of safety features, such as autonomous emergency braking, fitted as standard. DC Fast Charging Is Key For A Sane Road Trip Only buy a car, including DC fast charging, if you plan to take a road trip. For example, the BMW i3 can charge up to 80 percent in 45 minutes. They charge 50kw per hour. A vehicle without this option, but they only charge around 11kW per hour. So, this will take a lot of time when on-the-go. If you have to wait an hour to drive again, your trip will be extended. Luckily, most new electric cars are equipped with fast charging. Ensure you will get all the information to know if you're dealing with a new or older model. What is DC fast charging? “DC” refers to “direct current,” the type of power that batteries use. EVs have “onboard chargers” inside the car that convert AC power to DC for the battery. DC fast chargers convert AC power to DC within the charging station and deliver DC power directly to the battery, which is why they charge faster.   {youtube}                                              5 New Battery Technologies That Could CHANGE EVERYTHING   Recommended:  Tesla Battery Day: It Blows My Mind Check Battery Degradation When Buying A Used Car What can 6,000 electric vehicles tell us about EV battery health? Compare the average battery degradation for different vehicle makes and model years. How long does an electric car battery last? Use the free  EV Battery Degradation Tool  to compare the average battery degradation over time for different vehicle makes and model years. The importance of EV batteries If you’re thinking about buying an electric vehicle (EV), there are some important factors to consider. These three questions are probably at the top of your list: How much will the EV cost? What is its range? How long will the battery last? From a life-cycle perspective, battery performance and health really are the key to it all. As the battery is an EV’s most expensive component, the degree of degradation will affect the vehicle’s residual value (which helps answer the cost question from above), and will also have a direct impact on the maximum usable range over time. How long will an EV battery last? You might have noticed that it is tough to get a straight answer to questions about an EV’s battery lifespan. What you may find instead are assurances that the warranty covers batteries should something go wrong. Typically, battery coverage is 8 years or 100,000 miles, but this will vary by manufacturer and country. Warranties are reassuring, and so too is the fact that battery costs are decreasing significantly year over year. Since 2010, the price of an average Lithium-ion battery pack has dropped by over 80%. An automaker’s guarantee of their battery technology and the promise of decreasing costs should inspire some confidence. However, most of us would find more comfort knowing how quickly our batteries are expected to degrade and how to minimize this loss. What is EV battery degradation? Battery degradation is a natural process that permanently reduces the amount of energy a battery can store or the amount of power it can deliver. The batteries in EVs can generally deliver more power than the powertrain components can handle. As a result, power degradation is rarely observable in EVs, and only the loss of the battery’s ability to store energy matters. A battery’s condition is called its state of health (SOH) . Batteries start their life with 100% SOH, and over time they deteriorate. For example, a 60 kWh battery with 90% SOH would effectively act like a 54 kWh battery. Keep in mind; this is not the same as vehicle range (the distance the vehicle can travel on those kWhs), which will fluctuate on a daily or trip-by-trip basis, depending on several factors including charge level, topography, temperature, auxiliary use, driving habits, and passenger or cargo load. Common factors impacting Lithium-ion battery health: Time High temperatures Operating at a high and low state of charge High electric current Usage (energy cycles) While there has been plenty of research done on battery health, there has been very little data following EVs' real-world performance over time, let alone comparisons across different makes and models. Until now. Introducing the EV Battery Degradation Tool Geotab created the EV Battery Degradation Tool to assess how batteries have been holding up and consider the relative importance of EV battery life's above factors under real-world conditions. We analyzed the battery health of 6,300 fleet and consumer EVs, representing 1.8 million days of data. From the telematics data processed, we have gained insight into how real-world conditions influence electric vehicles' battery health, providing aggregated average degradation data for 21 distinct vehicle models, representing 64 makes, models, and years. Notes about the tool: The degradation curves displayed below are the average trend line from the data analyzed. These graphs can offer insight into average battery health over time, but should not be interpreted as a precise prediction for any specific vehicle. A subset of vehicle makes, models, and years are not available in the visualization tool – we have excluded vehicles with insufficient data, so don’t be alarmed if your car of choice is missing. Get started with the tool. For more information and to use the tool, see the  Electric Vehicle Battery Degradation Tool  page.  Key takeaways High levels of sustained battery health observed First and foremost, based on data from over 6,000 electric vehicles, spanning all the major makes and models, batteries are exhibiting high levels of sustained health. If the observed degradation rates are maintained, the vast majority of batteries will outlast the vehicle's usable life. Like us, health declines with age. As you might expect, the older a vehicle is, the more likely its battery has deteriorated. However, when looking at the average decline across all vehicles, the loss is arguably minor, at 2.3% per year. This means that if you purchase an EV today with a 150-mile range, losing about 17 miles of accessible range after five years is unlikely to impact your day-to-day needs. Is EV battery degradation linear? While this tool shows more or less linear degradation, as a general rule, EV batteries are expected to decline non-linearly: an initial drop, which then continues to decline but at a far more moderate pace. Towards the end of its life, a battery will see a final significant drop, as seen below. Tesla battery degradation data-points chart Why do some vehicle models seem to, on average, degrade faster than others? Two potential contributors are: battery chemistry thermal management of the battery pack. While EVs use Lithium-ion batteries, there are many different variations of Lithium-ion chemistries (the most prominent difference being the materials used for the electrodes). A battery’s chemical make-up will influence how it responds to stress. In addition to cell chemistry, temperature control techniques differ across vehicle models. A major distinction is if the battery pack is cooled and/or heated by air or by liquid. Let’s compare a vehicle with a liquid cooling system to one with a passive air cooling system: the 2015 Tesla Model S and the 2015 Nissan Leaf, respectively. The Leaf has an average degradation rate of 4.2%, while the Model S is 2.3%. Good thermal management means better protection against degradation. State of Charge (SOC) and the buffer effect Another anticipated reason for the differences in battery health between manufacturers is how SOC is controlled. Operating a battery at near full or empty has implications on battery health. Many manufacturers add a buffer to limit this effect, effectively preventing access to the SOC's extreme ends. In addition to the protection buffers at the top end and bottom end of the battery range, many vehicles provide the EV owner the option to stop normal daily charging at a level below 100%. Did you know? Removing extremes is not only done for battery health but also for safe vehicle operation. The battery wouldn’t accept or deliver full power at the extreme ends, and the driving experience would be impacted. In essence, a battery at 100% isn’t completely charged from a pure battery chemistry standpoint. Similarly, 0% isn’t empty. Since the vehicle owner cannot access these parts of the battery range for safety and battery life reasons, many are likely unaware of it. Thanks to over-the-air software upgrades, it’s possible that the size of the buffer can change over time, as discovered by some Tesla owners in 2019, when they noticed a decrease in their top range. Tesla confirmed the upgrade was “to protect the battery and improve longevity.” Besides, some automakers have adjustable-charge ceilings, where the user can pre-set at what point the battery stops charging (e.g., they can tell the vehicle to stop charging at 75% instead of 100%). This owner-discretionary region (B in the graphic above) works in combination with the non-discretionary buffer (A) to limit battery operation in areas of higher degradation. In later updates to the degradation tool, we intend to include the impact of the owner’s operation within this discretionary (B) region and the resulting impact on degradation rates. Let’s consider an example: The Chevrolet Volt, especially the early model years, has comparatively large top and bottom protection buffers (regions A and D) that dynamically change as the battery ages. While the larger buffers mean less energy for driving, it should result in a longer-lasting battery pack. Given the larger SOC buffers, liquid thermal management, and dynamic (decreasing) buffer size, slower than average degradation rates should be expected on the Volt. What additional factors appear to influence battery health? Based on the telematics data available, we evaluated battery degradation by different factors the vehicles were exposed to and see any correlation with health decline. These factors included: Use Extreme climates Charging type High vehicle use does not equal higher battery degradation. One exciting piece of information we were able to glean from the data was that vehicles with high use did not show significantly higher battery degradation. This should come as welcome news since you don’t get the benefit of an EV if it’s just sitting in the fleet yard. The takeaway? Don’t be afraid to put your EVs in high-use duty cycles. As long as they are within their daily driving range, their battery life won’t be negatively impacted. One caveat: if high use requires routine DC fast charging, be sure to read the section on the impact of charging type. Vehicles driven in hot temperatures show a faster decline in battery SOH. A battery exposed to scorching temperatures will be prone to more damage, but by how much? Will an EV in Arizona have a different battery life than the same car driven in Norway? To find out, we grouped the vehicles based on the following climate conditions: Temperate:  Fewer than 5 days per year over 80 F (27 C) or under 23 F (-5 C). Hot: More than 5 days per year over 80 F (27 C). Heat and cold weather also impacts your day-to-day range. To understand how to take a look at our  Temperature Tool for EV Range . Taking a look at charge type We were able to look at the predominant charging level used for the EVs in our system. North American EV charging stations are categorized into three common types: Level 1: 120 volt – a regular home outlet in North America. Level 2: 240 volt – typical for home or fleet charging. Direct current fast charger: DCFC – for faster top-ups. Charging in most of Europe is referred to as AC charging (which is generally equivalent to Level 2 in North America) and DC charging (DCFC, as described above). While Level 2 is often cited as the optimal way to charge an EV, the difference in battery health between cars that routinely charged on Level 2 as compared to those who used Level 1 appeared to be observable but was not beyond the level of statistical significance. The use of DCFCs, however, does appear to impact the speed that batteries degrade. Rapidly charging a battery means high currents resulting in high temperatures, both known to strain batteries. In fact, many automakers suggest limiting the use of DCFC to prolong their vehicles’ battery life. Here we look at all battery electric vehicles in the same climate group (we chose to look at the most susceptible group – those operating in extreme climate conditions), and categorized them based on how frequently they used a DCFC: Never, occasionally (1–3 times per month) and frequently (more than 3 times per month). The difference between those vehicles that never used DCFC and those that occasionally used seasonal or hot climates was notable. While there may be other factors at play (we want to stress that this wasn’t a controlled experiment), charging via lower power Level 2 charging should be prioritized. Tips to prolong your EV battery’s life While battery degradation varies by model and external conditions – such as climate and charging type – most vehicles on the road, have not experienced a significant decline. In fact, overall degradation has been very modest, with an average capacity loss of just 2.3% per year. Under the ideal climate and charging conditions, the loss is 1.6%. While some things are out of an operator’s control, there are ways you can extend the life of your EV’s battery. Some tips for operating your EVs: Avoid keeping your car sitting with a full or empty charge. Ideally, keep your SOC between 20–80% particularly when leaving it for longer periods, and only charge it fully for long-distance trips. Minimize fast charging (DCFC). Some high-use duty cycles will need a faster charge, but if your vehicle sits overnight, level 2 should be sufficient for the majority of your charging needs. Climate is out of an operator’s control, but do what you can to avoid scorching temperatures, such as choosing shade when parked on hot days. High-use is not a concern, so fleets shouldn’t hesitate to put them to work. An EV isn’t useful sitting idle in the fleet yard, and putting on more miles per vehicle is overall a better fleet management practice. Final thought Don’t sweat the small stuff. As vehicles come out with larger battery packs, losing some capacity may not impact your day-to-day driving needs, and shouldn’t overshadow the many benefits EVs have to offer. How To Plan A Road Trip With An Electric Car Road tripping with an electric vehicle is different than with a gas car. You have to plan more. If you know how to do it, it's okay. Plan Your Route Around Fast Chargers First, you have to know where you can charge your car. Plan your road trip around available public chargers, near expressways, highways, and other roads. The thing is, you will spend more battery once you accelerate or going up hills. So, take into consideration that you will need a 10 percent buffer. Try to stick to fast chargers once you're on the road, you have to wait 30 - 40 minutes, and you're back on the road again, without any problems. Plan your trips manually or use an app like PlugShare. The app is a crowdsources directory with all available chargers near your location. It will save you a lot of time. Look For Hotels With Charge Points Save time during your trip is possible to stay at hotels which offer to charge your electric car. Nowadays, it is used more often. Generally, they are Level 2 chargers, so make sure to load your vehicle during your sleep. If the hotel does not have charging, ask the hotel staff if they have an outdoor plug to charge your car. Most electric vehicles have a Level 1 wall charger, which you can use with any standard wall socket. Which Apps To Use To Find Public Chargers What is the best way to find public chargers? In the United States, you have different charging networks, like ChargePoint and Electrify America. In Europe, we know Chargemap. You can buy a Chargemap pass, which allows you to charge your electric car on most European charging networks. You will find thousands of compatible charging stations near your location. PlugShare For Most Public Chargers PlugShare is a powered electric charger app in the community. Use this app to see which chargers are networked, non-networked, and home chargers open to the public. You can filter the chargers by connector type, speed, and if you have to pay for using them. The app can help you plan your trip and find chargers along the way. Type in your origin and destination and the app will show you all the chargers nearby. The app ChargePoint is also an advantage for the Tesla owners because it will show you all Tesla Destination Chargers, Superchargers, and all compatible chargers. Click on PlugShare for charging points in your country -ChargePoint+ Has Chargers Around The World ChargePoint is one of the largest charging networks in the World, which offers chargers Level 2 and 3. You will find them in the big cities and on a few major highways. You can use the app to pay for charging. Note: not all chargers shown in the app are public. Click on -ChargePoint+ for charging points in your country. Electrify America For DC Fast Chargers On Highways Electrify America chargers has a significant network of fast chargers near large highways (near Walmart, Targets, and other shopping centers). Prices are reasonable, and you will get a discount by signing up for a membership ($4 per month). Using the chargers is super easy, and the costs are billed to your credit card. A disadvantage is that a few stations are unreliable. Some chargers can be out of service. Click on Electrify America  to download the app. Carwow UK Electric Car Charging Point Finder. An interactive Electric Car charging point finder tool to help EV and hybrid car owners find the nearest electric vehicle charging stations. Click on:  nearest electric vehicle charging station Coming Soon: EV Passport For Unlimited Charging Soon to come: EV Passport for electric car owners. With the passport, you charge up your vehicle unlimited for only $39 per month. You can check your battery status directly from your phone. Earn Bonus Miles On Electric Car Charging Once you're on the road, you usually have to pay for charging your car. So why not earn some miles while charging it? Most chargers do not have a code 'travel,' so you need to have a credit card to earn these miles. There a few of these cards on the market: The Blue Business®️ Plus Credit Card from American Express (On the first $50,000 in purchase per year, you will get 2x Membership Rewards points; then 1x, giving you a 4% return based on TPG's valuation) Chase Freedom Unlimited (1.5% cash back/1.5x Ultimate Rewards points for a 3% return based on TPG's valuation) Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card (On all purchases, you will get 2x miles, that will give you a 2.8% return based on TPG's valuations) If you fill in a credit card request, you can use it to pay for charging your electric car. Bottom Line Road tripping with an electric vehicle is way different from a gas car, but you still have a lot of fun. You will save money, so you can see more during your trip or stay in fancier hotels. Also, consider the range and think of a 10 percent buffer with your battery. Plan your charge points on your trip so that you can enjoy your trip stress-free! Cover photo by Jannes Glas Before you go! Recommended:  Tesla Electric Cybertruck: Explorer’s Best Friend Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about electric cars? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Electric Car Road Trips: The Ultimate Guide
Electric Car From Waste. Plastic Meets Horsehair
Its name is Luca: Eindhoven students make an electric car entirely out of waste. Luca is a lightweight two-seater with two electric motors. Together they deliver a power of 20 hp (15 kW). It is supplied with modular batteries. Electric Car From Waste. Plastic Meets Horsehair. Electric Car From Waste. Plastic From The Ocean BusinessSocietyTech & Bart van Overbeeke Students at the Eindhoven University of Technology have produced a car made entirely out of waste products, including plastic recovered from the ocean. Other waste materials include horsehair, coconut fibers, and flax. As the car has been dubbed, the Luca has two electric motors, a range of 220 kilometers, and a top speed of 90 kph. It took 22 students 18 months to build the car, which, they said, is a demonstration to the car industry of how to use waste as a resource. Photo by Bart van Overbeeke. Luca is a lightweight two-seater with two electric motors made from waste. Recommended:  Waste Your Electronic Waste At A Repair Cafe The students were surprised some of the plastic which had been in the ocean for years could still be used. ‘That was a real kick,’ one of the students told broadcaster Nos. The use of plastic bottles in the chairs is also a way of making the recycled material last longer, student Sietze Gelderloos said. ‘The plastic of a disposable bottle can be recycled perhaps 10 times. Use it in 10 cars, and it’ll last 100 years.’ {youtube}                                                           Design Presentation Luca: Embrace Waste! Waste & Recycling Car recycling organization ARN said the Luca electric car project could be ‘an inspiration for car manufacturers.’ Dozens of different sorts of plastics are used to make new cars in Europe, spokesman Martijn Boelhouwer said, translating to a million tonnes a year. And while cars are almost completely recycled, not all the material is used to build new cars, he said. Recommended:  Plastic Becomes Building Blocks: Circular Economy Recommended:  Solar Car From Plastic Waste. Clean To Antarctica Electric Car Luca: Testing The Luca electric car will not be seen on Dutch roads soon, although the students plan to have the electric car tested for road-worthiness. ‘There are several things that will have to be tested, such as fire safety and performance in different weather conditions. But we dare to dream, and that is why we have taken the first step,’ Gelderloos said. Get in contact with TU/Ecomotive Before you go! Recommended:  Sustainable Bicycle From Recycled Plastic. Great! Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about electric cars made from waste? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Its name is Luca: Eindhoven students make an electric car entirely out of waste. Luca is a lightweight two-seater with two electric motors. Together they deliver a power of 20 hp (15 kW). It is supplied with modular batteries. Electric Car From Waste. Plastic Meets Horsehair. Electric Car From Waste. Plastic From The Ocean BusinessSocietyTech & Bart van Overbeeke Students at the Eindhoven University of Technology have produced a car made entirely out of waste products, including plastic recovered from the ocean. Other waste materials include horsehair, coconut fibers, and flax. As the car has been dubbed, the Luca has two electric motors, a range of 220 kilometers, and a top speed of 90 kph. It took 22 students 18 months to build the car, which, they said, is a demonstration to the car industry of how to use waste as a resource. Photo by Bart van Overbeeke. Luca is a lightweight two-seater with two electric motors made from waste. Recommended:  Waste Your Electronic Waste At A Repair Cafe The students were surprised some of the plastic which had been in the ocean for years could still be used. ‘That was a real kick,’ one of the students told broadcaster Nos. The use of plastic bottles in the chairs is also a way of making the recycled material last longer, student Sietze Gelderloos said. ‘The plastic of a disposable bottle can be recycled perhaps 10 times. Use it in 10 cars, and it’ll last 100 years.’ {youtube}                                                           Design Presentation Luca: Embrace Waste! Waste & Recycling Car recycling organization ARN said the Luca electric car project could be ‘an inspiration for car manufacturers.’ Dozens of different sorts of plastics are used to make new cars in Europe, spokesman Martijn Boelhouwer said, translating to a million tonnes a year. And while cars are almost completely recycled, not all the material is used to build new cars, he said. Recommended:  Plastic Becomes Building Blocks: Circular Economy Recommended:  Solar Car From Plastic Waste. Clean To Antarctica Electric Car Luca: Testing The Luca electric car will not be seen on Dutch roads soon, although the students plan to have the electric car tested for road-worthiness. ‘There are several things that will have to be tested, such as fire safety and performance in different weather conditions. But we dare to dream, and that is why we have taken the first step,’ Gelderloos said. Get in contact with TU/Ecomotive Before you go! Recommended:  Sustainable Bicycle From Recycled Plastic. Great! Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about electric cars made from waste? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Electric Car From Waste. Plastic Meets Horsehair
Electric Car From Waste. Plastic Meets Horsehair
EV Europe: Convert Fossil History To An EV Future
There are too many car lovers out there to stop climate change. Wait. What? If that logic does not appear sound, you might want to think again while I repeat it - too many car lovers mean that there is no way of ever calling a halt to climate change. Electric Cars Are Not Appealing Enough The thing is, even if most of us give in to the societal pressure and the very beneficial tax cuts and government subsidies to get ourselves an electric vehicle in our driveway, there are still too many gas-guzzling four-wheelers out there. Case in point: people who only just recently bought a car will not be purchasing another one for at least the next five years.   Or, another case in point that is even more prominent: people who enjoy old cars and who provide shelter to some of the worst polluters - in their garages. They will not be looking at giving up their oldtimer Jaguar or BMW, that they regularly drive around town on warm summer days. These cars are more than just a hobby. They have almost become a part of their identity, one that they are indeed not willing to give up. Recommended:  Electric Cars: Green Or A New Kind Of Liability? EV Europe: Conversion As A Hot New Field For all of those people - so basically for anyone who is still driving a non-electric vehicle - there’s good news. What if we were to tell you that you can keep your trusty old’ car while going electric? That you can convert your gas-powered vehicle to an electricity-powered one? All thanks to EV Europe, amongst others. EV Europe is committed to working towards a fully EV future. As two leading companies in the EV movement merged, Heijnsdijk Electric Cars and EV Custom, they started to work towards making this dream a reality. Each company provided its unique benefits and advantages. Heijnsdijk Electric Cars, for instance, knew how to deliver, develop and certify EV components and lithium battery systems. EV Custom, on the other hand, had a background in full-service overhaul concepts. After the respective owners, Vincent Heijnsdijk and Peter-Jan Schouten got together, they decided to join forces and merge, creating EV Europe. This company is now a market leader in the field of electric mobility and lithium battery systems, all in a one-stop-shop concept. EV Europe: Conversion Examples Over the past years, EV Europe has successfully converted hundreds of cars to fully electric vehicles. In addition to this premium service, they also launched a separate EV hypE kit that aims to make the conversion process even simpler while requiring limited materials and man-hours. These standard conversion kits are available for many car brands and types. With one of the most extensive supplies of both new and used EV parts in Europe, EV Europe also runs a successful webshop that allows for a quick and straightforward purchase of materials that can be put towards making your car an electric one. All of these have been extensively tested by EV Europe so that they can deliver adequate support.   The EV Future Of A Porsche 912 One example of such a conversion is of the Porsche 912, a classic car from 1969. The basis was a specially developed conversion kit that allows for the creation of a fully electric oldtimer using minimal materials and labor. This re-built car has a 90 kW engine and offers a super smooth drive, even better than the original.   Recommended:  Electric Car Conversion Kits: Electrified Class Convert Fossil History To An EV Future: VW Transporter A Dutch municipally came to EV Europe for the conversion of their fleet of VW Transporters, type T5, and T6. Once again, they developed an own standardized conversion kit that allowed for the replacement of the combustion engine for a 250 Nm AC e-motor. All of the CAN communication is powered by the e-car-box, which enables the dashboard to function as it always used to. The city is happy with its renewed VWs, using them regularly - also for hauling heavy loads. Recommended:  Electric Car Technology In The Retro Luka EV An EV Future: The VW T1 Staying in the VW family, EV Europe also worked on creating a 100% electric version of their prized VW T1 bus. The end result is a valid symbol of sustainability and circularity that is being used throughout the Netherlands for (public) transportation purposes. Dubbed the kombiSOL, it is not just powered by an electric battery, and it also boasts extra isolation using hemp - which is carbon negative - and has five flexible solar panels on its roof, meant to power the optional kitchenette and mobile office. A project that shows the true potential of electric conversion. Recommended:  Volkswagen Type 20 EV Microbus: A Hippie Classic Why Electric Vehicles Matter Electric vehicles are not just an excellent conversation starter or a fun gadget. Instead, they can play a vital role in reducing our carbon footprint in the world. And while you may think that you drive a car with a combustion engine will not have a real impact - it does. If all of us could transition to electric driving, there would be one less thing to worry about. Especially now that EV Europe is showing us how this can be achieved without purchasing a brand new car, there is no excuse for why you should not. Recommended:  Electric Cars Take Us To A Low Carbon Culture Before you go! Recommended:  Electric Solar Car 2020 Never Needs Charging Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about converting fossil fuel cars into electric cars? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
There are too many car lovers out there to stop climate change. Wait. What? If that logic does not appear sound, you might want to think again while I repeat it - too many car lovers mean that there is no way of ever calling a halt to climate change. Electric Cars Are Not Appealing Enough The thing is, even if most of us give in to the societal pressure and the very beneficial tax cuts and government subsidies to get ourselves an electric vehicle in our driveway, there are still too many gas-guzzling four-wheelers out there. Case in point: people who only just recently bought a car will not be purchasing another one for at least the next five years.   Or, another case in point that is even more prominent: people who enjoy old cars and who provide shelter to some of the worst polluters - in their garages. They will not be looking at giving up their oldtimer Jaguar or BMW, that they regularly drive around town on warm summer days. These cars are more than just a hobby. They have almost become a part of their identity, one that they are indeed not willing to give up. Recommended:  Electric Cars: Green Or A New Kind Of Liability? EV Europe: Conversion As A Hot New Field For all of those people - so basically for anyone who is still driving a non-electric vehicle - there’s good news. What if we were to tell you that you can keep your trusty old’ car while going electric? That you can convert your gas-powered vehicle to an electricity-powered one? All thanks to EV Europe, amongst others. EV Europe is committed to working towards a fully EV future. As two leading companies in the EV movement merged, Heijnsdijk Electric Cars and EV Custom, they started to work towards making this dream a reality. Each company provided its unique benefits and advantages. Heijnsdijk Electric Cars, for instance, knew how to deliver, develop and certify EV components and lithium battery systems. EV Custom, on the other hand, had a background in full-service overhaul concepts. After the respective owners, Vincent Heijnsdijk and Peter-Jan Schouten got together, they decided to join forces and merge, creating EV Europe. This company is now a market leader in the field of electric mobility and lithium battery systems, all in a one-stop-shop concept. EV Europe: Conversion Examples Over the past years, EV Europe has successfully converted hundreds of cars to fully electric vehicles. In addition to this premium service, they also launched a separate EV hypE kit that aims to make the conversion process even simpler while requiring limited materials and man-hours. These standard conversion kits are available for many car brands and types. With one of the most extensive supplies of both new and used EV parts in Europe, EV Europe also runs a successful webshop that allows for a quick and straightforward purchase of materials that can be put towards making your car an electric one. All of these have been extensively tested by EV Europe so that they can deliver adequate support.   The EV Future Of A Porsche 912 One example of such a conversion is of the Porsche 912, a classic car from 1969. The basis was a specially developed conversion kit that allows for the creation of a fully electric oldtimer using minimal materials and labor. This re-built car has a 90 kW engine and offers a super smooth drive, even better than the original.   Recommended:  Electric Car Conversion Kits: Electrified Class Convert Fossil History To An EV Future: VW Transporter A Dutch municipally came to EV Europe for the conversion of their fleet of VW Transporters, type T5, and T6. Once again, they developed an own standardized conversion kit that allowed for the replacement of the combustion engine for a 250 Nm AC e-motor. All of the CAN communication is powered by the e-car-box, which enables the dashboard to function as it always used to. The city is happy with its renewed VWs, using them regularly - also for hauling heavy loads. Recommended:  Electric Car Technology In The Retro Luka EV An EV Future: The VW T1 Staying in the VW family, EV Europe also worked on creating a 100% electric version of their prized VW T1 bus. The end result is a valid symbol of sustainability and circularity that is being used throughout the Netherlands for (public) transportation purposes. Dubbed the kombiSOL, it is not just powered by an electric battery, and it also boasts extra isolation using hemp - which is carbon negative - and has five flexible solar panels on its roof, meant to power the optional kitchenette and mobile office. A project that shows the true potential of electric conversion. Recommended:  Volkswagen Type 20 EV Microbus: A Hippie Classic Why Electric Vehicles Matter Electric vehicles are not just an excellent conversation starter or a fun gadget. Instead, they can play a vital role in reducing our carbon footprint in the world. And while you may think that you drive a car with a combustion engine will not have a real impact - it does. If all of us could transition to electric driving, there would be one less thing to worry about. Especially now that EV Europe is showing us how this can be achieved without purchasing a brand new car, there is no excuse for why you should not. Recommended:  Electric Cars Take Us To A Low Carbon Culture Before you go! Recommended:  Electric Solar Car 2020 Never Needs Charging Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about converting fossil fuel cars into electric cars? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
EV Europe: Convert Fossil History To An EV Future
EV Europe: Convert Fossil History To An EV Future
Transportation

Sustainable transport has a low impact on the environment. It is ‘green.’ Sustainable transport is finding the balance between current- and future transportation needs. Replacing fossil fuel transportation by the battery, hybrid, hydrogen, wind, or solar for cars, trucks, boats, planes,s and other transportation means is not enough. We also need to reduce traffic by sharing sustainable transportation like carpooling, cycling, and walking.

Sustainable Transport By Car, Boat, Bike And Plane

Transport has a significant influence on the environment. It uses about 20% of our energy sources and produces about 25% CO2 emissions.

If there was an urge to develop sustainable transport solutions and share these topics globally, it’s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers, and influencers to write about sustainable transport, your experiences, and expectations for the future at home and globally.

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