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Vegetarian pancakes with oyster mushrooms and chives
Vegetarian delicious dish? Try these chive pancakes More and more people eat less meat or do not even eat meat at all. Why would you too; meat can be easily replaced by other, healthy (honorary) products with the same nutritional value. In addition, substitute products are often much cheaper than meat ... and tell who does not like such a delicious chive pancake now? This recipe is for about ten pieces. You can of course serve the pancakes as a main course, but they are also very tasty as lunch. Chives What do you need vegetarian dish ? For the pancakes: 2 tablespoons chopped (fresh) chives 1 teaspoon of soft butter 1 egg 1 teaspoon of salt Fresh pepper 2 dl of milk 100 grams of wheat flour Oil for baking For the filling 250 grams oyster mushrooms 1 small onion 5 tablespoons of butter 1 dl white wine 1 tablespoon of flour 4 tablespoons of cream Salt and pepper to taste Oyster mushrooms How do you make the chive pancakes? Take a large mixing bowl and put all the ingredients for the pancakes in it. Make a nice batter and leave it for half an hour until it is thick (but still liquid). Clean the oyster mushrooms and cut off the stalks. Cut the rest into strips. Cut the onion into small pieces. Heat the butter in a pan and then fry the onion and the oyster mushrooms light brown. Add the white wine and let the mixture boil for five minutes. Sprinkle the flour over it and add the cream while continuing to stir well. Bring the sauce to the boil and add salt and (freshly ground) pepper to taste. Make sure the sauce stays warm (for example on a hot plate). Baking pancakes: Bake the pancake batter about 10 nice, thin pancakes with a diameter of about 8 cm. Fill the pancakes with the oyster mushroom sauce, roll them up and serve them warm. You can also make a 'package'. Tie a chive twig around it for decoration. Enjoy your meal https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/food/vegan
Vegetarian delicious dish? Try these chive pancakes More and more people eat less meat or do not even eat meat at all. Why would you too; meat can be easily replaced by other, healthy (honorary) products with the same nutritional value. In addition, substitute products are often much cheaper than meat ... and tell who does not like such a delicious chive pancake now? This recipe is for about ten pieces. You can of course serve the pancakes as a main course, but they are also very tasty as lunch. Chives What do you need vegetarian dish ? For the pancakes: 2 tablespoons chopped (fresh) chives 1 teaspoon of soft butter 1 egg 1 teaspoon of salt Fresh pepper 2 dl of milk 100 grams of wheat flour Oil for baking For the filling 250 grams oyster mushrooms 1 small onion 5 tablespoons of butter 1 dl white wine 1 tablespoon of flour 4 tablespoons of cream Salt and pepper to taste Oyster mushrooms How do you make the chive pancakes? Take a large mixing bowl and put all the ingredients for the pancakes in it. Make a nice batter and leave it for half an hour until it is thick (but still liquid). Clean the oyster mushrooms and cut off the stalks. Cut the rest into strips. Cut the onion into small pieces. Heat the butter in a pan and then fry the onion and the oyster mushrooms light brown. Add the white wine and let the mixture boil for five minutes. Sprinkle the flour over it and add the cream while continuing to stir well. Bring the sauce to the boil and add salt and (freshly ground) pepper to taste. Make sure the sauce stays warm (for example on a hot plate). Baking pancakes: Bake the pancake batter about 10 nice, thin pancakes with a diameter of about 8 cm. Fill the pancakes with the oyster mushroom sauce, roll them up and serve them warm. You can also make a 'package'. Tie a chive twig around it for decoration. Enjoy your meal https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/food/vegan
Vegetarian pancakes with oyster mushrooms and chives
Vegetarian pancakes with oyster mushrooms and chives
Plant-Based Energy Boosters for the cold winterdays
Wintertime is approaching so it’s time to tackle these cold days with some plant-based energy boosters. You could even make these hearty snacks for your holiday feast. Here you find easy to make plant-based so that you stay energized a full all day long. 1. Pumpkin Superfood Bars  It’s a handful of ingredients, some brown rice syrup, and takes minimal time and effort. As long as you get the process down you can create countless bar concepts for years to come! What’s also good about these Pumpkin Superfood Bars? They are packed with healthy omega 3’s that contribute to good cholesterol! 2. Butternut Energy Bites These pumpkin veggie balls are like any other energy bite, but they’re jam-packed with good fats and with a little less dates. These Butternut Energy Bites are full of nutrients and seasonal flavor for a delicious, bite-sized snack on the go! 3. Sweet Potato and Sage Corn Muffins These Sweet Potato and Sage Corn Muffins are an Autumn-inspired take on cornbread. Make them for your Thanksgiving feast but set a few aside for you to take with you on your Black Friday shopping adventures! They have sweet potato puree in them to add a little natural sweetness and some sage to make them fragrant and earthy. 4. Nut-Free Strawberry Vanilla Crumble Bars If you make these Strawberry Vanilla Crumble Bars, bring enough to share with everyone! Seriously, they’re so addictive. There’s no better way to throw together a simple, sweet treat to enjoy on the move. Sweet in all the best ways, these strawberry bars will be your new addiction. 5. Salted Tahini Caramel  These Salted Tahini Caramel Bites are a humble snack and plus they’re loaded with healthy fats to keep you energized and satisfied. Throw everything in a food processor and you’re 99% of the way done. The rest is just waiting for the caramel to set in the freezer. These have the best texture and richest flavors. Perfect to cut into bite-size pieces for when you’re craving something sweet in the middle of a long shopping trip! 6. Curried Cashew and Veggie Trail Mix Savoury, salty, crunchy, and healthy — what more could you ask for? This Curried Cashew and Veggie Trail Mix is savoury with a touch of sweet, and perfectly balanced out with the veggies so you don’t get a huge kick of curry. Perfect to eat in-between stores! 7. Everything Bagel Kale Chips Okay, okay: kale chips have been around and around the web/blogging/food recipe sites forever. But these Everything Bagel Kale Chips are the best. For real. And let’s face it, you can eat the entire thing while you’re out-and-about and have ZERO guilt in your game. So there! Plus 3 grams of protein per cup and loaded with potassium (move over bananas) for another vitamin punch. Your shopping trip just got an upgrade. 8. Chocolate Covered Banana Peanut Butter Balls Your Black Friday shopping snacks are covered with these healthy Chocolate Banana Peanut Butter Balls. They’re rich, creamy, and decadent, yet free of refined sugars, gluten, and oil! 9. Chocolate Pumpkin Energy Bars This recipe is super easy to make, takes only 10 minutes to prepare, and then is popped in the freezer for a couple of hours. Coating them in chocolate is optional but, of course, makes everything better! Using pumpkin seeds is a good alternative to using nuts. These Chocolate Pumpkin Energy Bars are packed full of magnesium, iron, and natural sugars, so they will give you loads of healthy energy. 10. No-Bake Trail Mix Popcorn Clusters These easy-to-throw-together treats are totally adaptable and adorable! The No-Bake Clustersare a combination of all your trail mix favorites and fluffy popcorn. The popcorn clusters only take about 20 minutes to set in the freezer, making them a great party treat to make in a pinch. 11. Turmeric Coconut Bites  These anti-inflammatory Coconut Turmeric Bites are packed with superfood power. Plus, they’re grain-free, gluten-free, dairy-free, and paleo! Simple, wholesome ingredients that offer a whole lot of nutrition as well as yum. The bites themselves take on an almost fudge-like consistency, loaded with healthy fats and so satisfying on-the-go. 12.  Cranberry and Pistachio Energy Bars These sweet and incredibly satiating Cranberry and Pistachio Energy Bars are quick-to-make compared to traditional energy bars. Create your own combination by swapping out ingredients depending on what you have in your pantry. 13. Apple Ginger Spiced Snack Bites  Spicy, sweet, and healthy! These Apple Ginger Spiced Snack Bites are a nutritious and satisfying way to stay full and energized on your shopping trip!  Make these ahead of time to eat at your Thanksgiving dinner and keep a few aside to take on your late-night Black Friday run! 14. 3-Ingredient, Easy Peanut Butter Oat Bars  Oats are like magic – they are not only a healthy superfood but they can be used a million different ways! These Peanut Butter Oat Bars are beyond easy – you could probably make them in your sleep (don’t). It’s mostly melting, stirring, and waiting by the fridge. Oh yeah, it’s actually that simple. Skip the prepackaged bars from the store and make these yourself. They’re delicious, easy, rich, and healthy. No excuses! 15. High Energy Matcha Bliss Balls  If you haven’t hopped on the matcha train yet, get on it with these High Energy Matcha Bliss Balls! Seriously, matcha is more powerful than coffee (as well as other types of green tea) and packs in antioxidants like no other. The natural caffeine content in matcha gives you a clear, calm energy that is released over the course of a few hours, so you experience none of the jitters or sudden crash that you would from energy drinks or espresso. Harnessing the power of matcha in an energy bite with oats and vegan protein powder is the perfect way to keep yourself going through the whole shopping trip! For more snacks that will give you energy, check out 10 Homemade Energy Bars: The Easy and Inexpensive Way to Refuel, Top Energy-Boosting Vegan Bites to Power You Through the Week!, and 25 Energy-Packed Snack Balls That Will Jump-Start Your Day. Find these energy-boosting recipes and more by downloading the Food Monster App on your Android and iPhone. You can also find us on Instagram and Facebook. Source: Food Monster Bytes,  Green Planet Food Monster App  
Wintertime is approaching so it’s time to tackle these cold days with some plant-based energy boosters. You could even make these hearty snacks for your holiday feast. Here you find easy to make plant-based so that you stay energized a full all day long. 1. Pumpkin Superfood Bars  It’s a handful of ingredients, some brown rice syrup, and takes minimal time and effort. As long as you get the process down you can create countless bar concepts for years to come! What’s also good about these Pumpkin Superfood Bars? They are packed with healthy omega 3’s that contribute to good cholesterol! 2. Butternut Energy Bites These pumpkin veggie balls are like any other energy bite, but they’re jam-packed with good fats and with a little less dates. These Butternut Energy Bites are full of nutrients and seasonal flavor for a delicious, bite-sized snack on the go! 3. Sweet Potato and Sage Corn Muffins These Sweet Potato and Sage Corn Muffins are an Autumn-inspired take on cornbread. Make them for your Thanksgiving feast but set a few aside for you to take with you on your Black Friday shopping adventures! They have sweet potato puree in them to add a little natural sweetness and some sage to make them fragrant and earthy. 4. Nut-Free Strawberry Vanilla Crumble Bars If you make these Strawberry Vanilla Crumble Bars, bring enough to share with everyone! Seriously, they’re so addictive. There’s no better way to throw together a simple, sweet treat to enjoy on the move. Sweet in all the best ways, these strawberry bars will be your new addiction. 5. Salted Tahini Caramel  These Salted Tahini Caramel Bites are a humble snack and plus they’re loaded with healthy fats to keep you energized and satisfied. Throw everything in a food processor and you’re 99% of the way done. The rest is just waiting for the caramel to set in the freezer. These have the best texture and richest flavors. Perfect to cut into bite-size pieces for when you’re craving something sweet in the middle of a long shopping trip! 6. Curried Cashew and Veggie Trail Mix Savoury, salty, crunchy, and healthy — what more could you ask for? This Curried Cashew and Veggie Trail Mix is savoury with a touch of sweet, and perfectly balanced out with the veggies so you don’t get a huge kick of curry. Perfect to eat in-between stores! 7. Everything Bagel Kale Chips Okay, okay: kale chips have been around and around the web/blogging/food recipe sites forever. But these Everything Bagel Kale Chips are the best. For real. And let’s face it, you can eat the entire thing while you’re out-and-about and have ZERO guilt in your game. So there! Plus 3 grams of protein per cup and loaded with potassium (move over bananas) for another vitamin punch. Your shopping trip just got an upgrade. 8. Chocolate Covered Banana Peanut Butter Balls Your Black Friday shopping snacks are covered with these healthy Chocolate Banana Peanut Butter Balls. They’re rich, creamy, and decadent, yet free of refined sugars, gluten, and oil! 9. Chocolate Pumpkin Energy Bars This recipe is super easy to make, takes only 10 minutes to prepare, and then is popped in the freezer for a couple of hours. Coating them in chocolate is optional but, of course, makes everything better! Using pumpkin seeds is a good alternative to using nuts. These Chocolate Pumpkin Energy Bars are packed full of magnesium, iron, and natural sugars, so they will give you loads of healthy energy. 10. No-Bake Trail Mix Popcorn Clusters These easy-to-throw-together treats are totally adaptable and adorable! The No-Bake Clustersare a combination of all your trail mix favorites and fluffy popcorn. The popcorn clusters only take about 20 minutes to set in the freezer, making them a great party treat to make in a pinch. 11. Turmeric Coconut Bites  These anti-inflammatory Coconut Turmeric Bites are packed with superfood power. Plus, they’re grain-free, gluten-free, dairy-free, and paleo! Simple, wholesome ingredients that offer a whole lot of nutrition as well as yum. The bites themselves take on an almost fudge-like consistency, loaded with healthy fats and so satisfying on-the-go. 12.  Cranberry and Pistachio Energy Bars These sweet and incredibly satiating Cranberry and Pistachio Energy Bars are quick-to-make compared to traditional energy bars. Create your own combination by swapping out ingredients depending on what you have in your pantry. 13. Apple Ginger Spiced Snack Bites  Spicy, sweet, and healthy! These Apple Ginger Spiced Snack Bites are a nutritious and satisfying way to stay full and energized on your shopping trip!  Make these ahead of time to eat at your Thanksgiving dinner and keep a few aside to take on your late-night Black Friday run! 14. 3-Ingredient, Easy Peanut Butter Oat Bars  Oats are like magic – they are not only a healthy superfood but they can be used a million different ways! These Peanut Butter Oat Bars are beyond easy – you could probably make them in your sleep (don’t). It’s mostly melting, stirring, and waiting by the fridge. Oh yeah, it’s actually that simple. Skip the prepackaged bars from the store and make these yourself. They’re delicious, easy, rich, and healthy. No excuses! 15. High Energy Matcha Bliss Balls  If you haven’t hopped on the matcha train yet, get on it with these High Energy Matcha Bliss Balls! Seriously, matcha is more powerful than coffee (as well as other types of green tea) and packs in antioxidants like no other. The natural caffeine content in matcha gives you a clear, calm energy that is released over the course of a few hours, so you experience none of the jitters or sudden crash that you would from energy drinks or espresso. Harnessing the power of matcha in an energy bite with oats and vegan protein powder is the perfect way to keep yourself going through the whole shopping trip! For more snacks that will give you energy, check out 10 Homemade Energy Bars: The Easy and Inexpensive Way to Refuel, Top Energy-Boosting Vegan Bites to Power You Through the Week!, and 25 Energy-Packed Snack Balls That Will Jump-Start Your Day. Find these energy-boosting recipes and more by downloading the Food Monster App on your Android and iPhone. You can also find us on Instagram and Facebook. Source: Food Monster Bytes,  Green Planet Food Monster App  
Plant-Based Energy Boosters for the cold winterdays
Plant-Based Energy Boosters for the cold winterdays
Vegan and Thanksgiving are not two words that mix well
Elspeth Feldman, a blogger from Crownsville known as The Speedy Vegan, has been pardoning the turkey at her Thanksgivings for the last six years. Born on a dairy farm in Zimbabwe, Feldman grew up loving and eating animals. When her teenage son became a vegetarian, Feldman said she became concerned about his health and began researching plant-based diets. “I never made the connection between the animals I loved and the food I ate,” Feldman said. “Once my family went vegan and I had to host Thanksgiving for our friends, I thought, ‘Who’s going to come if we don’t serve turkey?’ ”As it turns out, Feldman’s cooking made up for a turkey-less turkey day. She recently published an e-book, “Pardon My Turkey,” for those looking to do the same. Each recipe is free of sugar, oil and salt (minus the pumpkin gingersnap trifle). Feldman uses dates for sweetening and salt substitute. Her pumpkin pie recipe is also gluten-free. While dates, salt substitute and some of the other ingredients Feldman uses may be foreign to budding vegan chefs, that shouldn’t discourage them. There are simple substitutes for the ingredients that make up Thanksgiving classics. Almond milk and vegan butter (or oil) can replace old fashioned milk and butter. “With a little creativity you can veganize anything,” Feldman said. Foreign ingredients also don’t make the recipes particularly difficult. If a relative shows up to your house suddenly announcing their veganism, you can still save the day. “My cranberry relish takes 30 seconds in a food processor. It’s just raw cranberries, pineapple and dates. And people think that you’ve done something incredible because it’s so refreshing and tangy and sweet. It’s like a cheat,” Feldman said. “Same with the gravy. As I heard my husband coming in the house last night, I thought, ‘Oh shoot, I need to make the gravy.’ I did it in five minutes and my daughter asked, ‘Mom, how did you do that so quick?’ ” Feldman also emphasized that almost all the recipes can be made well in advance (though if you’re reading this now, you’re probably past that point). Shepherd’s Pie with Creamy Dreamy Cauliflower Mashed Potatoes Ingredients (serves 6): For the filling: 1 cup onion, diced 1 cup carrots, diced 1 cup celery, diced 2 cups vegetable stock 3 cups cooked lentils ½ pound mushrooms, rough chopped 1 teaspoon poultry spice 1 teaspoon thyme ½ teaspoon fresh ground black pepper Salt substitute, to taste 2 big handfuls of baby spinach or Swiss chard For the potatoes: 3 pounds of organic Yukon gold potatoes (unpeeled) 3 whole cloves of garlic For the sauce: ¾ pound cauliflower florets ½ medium onion, roughly chopped ½ cup raw cashew nuts 1 teaspoons almond butter ½ cup boiling water, or as needed 1 clove garlic, chopped ½ cup nutritional yeast 1 tablespoons coconut aminos 1 teaspoon lemon juice Salt substitute, to taste Instructions: Heat oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Scrub the potatoes and cut in quarters and add to a large pot along with the garlic. Cover the potatoes with water and bring to a boil. When they are tender (approximately 20 minutes), drain and mash with a potato masher. While the potatoes are cooking, saute the onion, carrots and celery in a little vegetable stock until caramelized. Add the chopped mushrooms and lentils along with the herbs and seasoning and cook for 10 minutes more. Remove from the heat and add in the spinach or Swiss chard and let it wilt into the mixture. While the potatoes are boiling and the filling is cooking, you can cook the cauliflower and onions either by steaming or just boiling until fork tender. While the cauliflower is cooking, put the cashews in a high-speed blender and add half a cup of boiling water. When the cauliflower has softened, add it to the blender along with the rest of the ingredients. Blend it all together into a creamy sauce. Once the potatoes are mashed, add a generous cup and a half of the cauliflower cheese sauce to the potatoes and mash it all together. Season to taste. Divide the filling into a 9-by-13-inch baking dish or divide between six 8-ounce ramekins and top with the creamy potatoes. Bake for about 20-30 minutes until heated through and slightly browned on top. Serve with your favorite green vegetables and mango chutney if desired. NOTE: This can be made in advance and stored in the refrigerator and heated right before serving. Mushroom Gravy Ingredients (makes 4 cups): 1 pound mushrooms chopped 2 cloves garlic, chopped 2 carrots, chopped 2 celery, chopped ½ large onion, chopped 2 teaspoons salt substitute 2 tablespoons coconut aminos 2 tablespoons brown rice flour 20 ounces vegetable broth, or as needed 1 teaspoon fresh sage, chopped 1 teaspoon thyme, chopped ½ teaspoon rosemary, chopped 2 tablespoons cooking sherry (optional) Instructions: Saute the mushrooms, garlic, carrots, celery and onions until softened, about 5 minutes. In a small bowl, make a slurry with the rice flour and a cup of vegetable broth. Whisk it together with a fork for two minutes so it does not form lumps. Add the slurry to the sauteed vegetables and slowly stir in the rest of the vegetable stock five ounces at a time. Stir in the seasoning and fresh herbs and let it simmer for 5 minutes, stirring every minute or two. Turn off the stove and let the gravy cool. Pour some or all of the gravy into a high-speed blender and blend until smooth. Pour mixture back into the pot and add the sherry (if using). Heat for a few minutes before serving. Chocolate Bourbon Pecan Tart Ingredients (serves 8): For the crust: 10 ounces deglet noor dates, pitted 2 cups pecans 1 teaspoon cinnamon filling For the filling: 1½ avocados 6-ounces dates (soaked in hot water and drained) 3 tablespoons raw cacao powder 2 tablespoons bourbon For the topping: 1 cup pecan halves Instructions for the crust: Put the dates, pecans and cinnamon in a food processor and pulse until it starts sticking together in a ball. Press the dough into a nonstick fluted tart pan and place it in the freezer while you prepare the filling. For the filling: Place all the ingredients into a high-speed blender and blend until thick and creamy. Spread the mixture on the raw crust and decorate with the pecan halves. Store in the refrigerator until ready to serve. If you are making in advance, you can wrap it with plastic wrap and store in the freezer for several weeks. When ready to serve, remove from the freezer half an hour before you serve.
Elspeth Feldman, a blogger from Crownsville known as The Speedy Vegan, has been pardoning the turkey at her Thanksgivings for the last six years. Born on a dairy farm in Zimbabwe, Feldman grew up loving and eating animals. When her teenage son became a vegetarian, Feldman said she became concerned about his health and began researching plant-based diets. “I never made the connection between the animals I loved and the food I ate,” Feldman said. “Once my family went vegan and I had to host Thanksgiving for our friends, I thought, ‘Who’s going to come if we don’t serve turkey?’ ”As it turns out, Feldman’s cooking made up for a turkey-less turkey day. She recently published an e-book, “Pardon My Turkey,” for those looking to do the same. Each recipe is free of sugar, oil and salt (minus the pumpkin gingersnap trifle). Feldman uses dates for sweetening and salt substitute. Her pumpkin pie recipe is also gluten-free. While dates, salt substitute and some of the other ingredients Feldman uses may be foreign to budding vegan chefs, that shouldn’t discourage them. There are simple substitutes for the ingredients that make up Thanksgiving classics. Almond milk and vegan butter (or oil) can replace old fashioned milk and butter. “With a little creativity you can veganize anything,” Feldman said. Foreign ingredients also don’t make the recipes particularly difficult. If a relative shows up to your house suddenly announcing their veganism, you can still save the day. “My cranberry relish takes 30 seconds in a food processor. It’s just raw cranberries, pineapple and dates. And people think that you’ve done something incredible because it’s so refreshing and tangy and sweet. It’s like a cheat,” Feldman said. “Same with the gravy. As I heard my husband coming in the house last night, I thought, ‘Oh shoot, I need to make the gravy.’ I did it in five minutes and my daughter asked, ‘Mom, how did you do that so quick?’ ” Feldman also emphasized that almost all the recipes can be made well in advance (though if you’re reading this now, you’re probably past that point). Shepherd’s Pie with Creamy Dreamy Cauliflower Mashed Potatoes Ingredients (serves 6): For the filling: 1 cup onion, diced 1 cup carrots, diced 1 cup celery, diced 2 cups vegetable stock 3 cups cooked lentils ½ pound mushrooms, rough chopped 1 teaspoon poultry spice 1 teaspoon thyme ½ teaspoon fresh ground black pepper Salt substitute, to taste 2 big handfuls of baby spinach or Swiss chard For the potatoes: 3 pounds of organic Yukon gold potatoes (unpeeled) 3 whole cloves of garlic For the sauce: ¾ pound cauliflower florets ½ medium onion, roughly chopped ½ cup raw cashew nuts 1 teaspoons almond butter ½ cup boiling water, or as needed 1 clove garlic, chopped ½ cup nutritional yeast 1 tablespoons coconut aminos 1 teaspoon lemon juice Salt substitute, to taste Instructions: Heat oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Scrub the potatoes and cut in quarters and add to a large pot along with the garlic. Cover the potatoes with water and bring to a boil. When they are tender (approximately 20 minutes), drain and mash with a potato masher. While the potatoes are cooking, saute the onion, carrots and celery in a little vegetable stock until caramelized. Add the chopped mushrooms and lentils along with the herbs and seasoning and cook for 10 minutes more. Remove from the heat and add in the spinach or Swiss chard and let it wilt into the mixture. While the potatoes are boiling and the filling is cooking, you can cook the cauliflower and onions either by steaming or just boiling until fork tender. While the cauliflower is cooking, put the cashews in a high-speed blender and add half a cup of boiling water. When the cauliflower has softened, add it to the blender along with the rest of the ingredients. Blend it all together into a creamy sauce. Once the potatoes are mashed, add a generous cup and a half of the cauliflower cheese sauce to the potatoes and mash it all together. Season to taste. Divide the filling into a 9-by-13-inch baking dish or divide between six 8-ounce ramekins and top with the creamy potatoes. Bake for about 20-30 minutes until heated through and slightly browned on top. Serve with your favorite green vegetables and mango chutney if desired. NOTE: This can be made in advance and stored in the refrigerator and heated right before serving. Mushroom Gravy Ingredients (makes 4 cups): 1 pound mushrooms chopped 2 cloves garlic, chopped 2 carrots, chopped 2 celery, chopped ½ large onion, chopped 2 teaspoons salt substitute 2 tablespoons coconut aminos 2 tablespoons brown rice flour 20 ounces vegetable broth, or as needed 1 teaspoon fresh sage, chopped 1 teaspoon thyme, chopped ½ teaspoon rosemary, chopped 2 tablespoons cooking sherry (optional) Instructions: Saute the mushrooms, garlic, carrots, celery and onions until softened, about 5 minutes. In a small bowl, make a slurry with the rice flour and a cup of vegetable broth. Whisk it together with a fork for two minutes so it does not form lumps. Add the slurry to the sauteed vegetables and slowly stir in the rest of the vegetable stock five ounces at a time. Stir in the seasoning and fresh herbs and let it simmer for 5 minutes, stirring every minute or two. Turn off the stove and let the gravy cool. Pour some or all of the gravy into a high-speed blender and blend until smooth. Pour mixture back into the pot and add the sherry (if using). Heat for a few minutes before serving. Chocolate Bourbon Pecan Tart Ingredients (serves 8): For the crust: 10 ounces deglet noor dates, pitted 2 cups pecans 1 teaspoon cinnamon filling For the filling: 1½ avocados 6-ounces dates (soaked in hot water and drained) 3 tablespoons raw cacao powder 2 tablespoons bourbon For the topping: 1 cup pecan halves Instructions for the crust: Put the dates, pecans and cinnamon in a food processor and pulse until it starts sticking together in a ball. Press the dough into a nonstick fluted tart pan and place it in the freezer while you prepare the filling. For the filling: Place all the ingredients into a high-speed blender and blend until thick and creamy. Spread the mixture on the raw crust and decorate with the pecan halves. Store in the refrigerator until ready to serve. If you are making in advance, you can wrap it with plastic wrap and store in the freezer for several weeks. When ready to serve, remove from the freezer half an hour before you serve.
Vegan and Thanksgiving are not two words that mix well
The best vegan foods to eat if you
You can make major gains without eating meat. When you think of toning up, a tofu scramble might not come to mind as the buff breakfast of choice. Well, it’s time to reconsider the power of plants. They’re an excellent source of hunger-curbing protein that’s the perfect fuel to sculpt those quads and biceps. “Vegan athletes don't actually have very different protein needs than athletes who include meat in their diets,” explains Ginger Hultin, R.D.N., a nutritionist from Seattle. “There are a lot of protein sources equivalent to meat that have the added benefits of different vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.” Those nutritional extras might partially explain why vegans are believed to live longer and experience lower rates of chronic diseases. Although the USDA recommends that a 75 kg woman consume 54 grams of protein daily (you can calculate your needs on their website), some experts believe we’re too obsessed with protein and that we will get more than enough nutrients by eating a varied vegan diet. (That’s a position supported by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.) “If you’re eating healthy whole foods in a plant-based diet, it’s impossible not to get enough protein,” says Julieanna Hever, R.D., a vegan dietitian from Los Angeles and author of The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Plant-Based Nutrition. Her argument: The world’s largest muscled animals, such as elephants, gorillas and hippos, eat mostly plants. She also points out that if you’re working out hard, you’ll likely eat more calories overall, which will end up boosting your protein consumption anyway. Just like meat-eating exercisers, what and when you eat your vegan vittles can help you maximize your body’s performance. Aim for small, frequent meals throughout the day to keep your blood sugar levels steady and eat a variety of protein sources, says Vandana Sheth, R.D.N., a Los Angeles-based dietician who specializes in vegetarian nutrition. “You want a combination of protein, healthy fats, and carbs to give you the right amount of energy to push through a workout,” says Sheth, who’s also a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Her pre-gym favorites include a peanut butter and banana sandwich or oatmeal with soy milk and fruit. After your last squat, she recommends a meal containing 15 to 20 grams of protein within an hour to help your muscles recover. Good options include a bean burrito or lentil soup. You can always stash a few vegan protein bars in your bag. Here are the experts’ top food choices to help you stay pumped: Protein powder Smoothies made with protein powders are easy to drink and carry on the go. Plus, protein powders are remarkably versatile because they can be mixed with everything from nut butters, soy yogurt, or even that quarter-bag of leftover frozen strawberries at the back of your freezer. “Vegan protein powders include hemp, pea, rice, or soy,” says Hultin. “This can be a convenient way to get a concentrated source of protein, and some have 20 or more grams per serving.” Skip powders made from whey and casein, both of which are derived from cow's milk. Tofu Soy is an excellent source of vegan nutrition because it’s higher in protein and fat while lower in carbs than other legumes, says Hultin. Soybeans (the base of tofu) are also bursting with antioxidants called isoflavones that research shows are linked to reduced heart disease, osteoporosis, and certain forms of cancer. “That combo could also boost your athletic performance,” she says. Try stir-frying your tofu with veggies and wrapping it inside a whole-grain tortilla, says Sheth. A half-cup of tofu has 10 grams of protein. Beans Beans just might be the perfect food. Not only are they filling and tasty, they’re bursting with fiber and important phytonutrients, which tame disease-causing inflammation and oxidation, says Hever. Studies also show that beans reduce bad cholesterol and the risk of heart disease and diabetes. Plus, at 15 grams of protein per cup, beans are good workout fuel. “When athletes eat beans and lentils, they get complex carbohydrates in addition to protein for a sustainable, slow-burning energy boost,” adds Hultin. Make a Sunday pot of black bean soup or sprinkle some chickpeas on your salad. Nuts and seeds Nuts are highly portable and a great choice to eat after a workout, says Hever, who recommends noshing on one to two ounces daily. “They also have essential fatty acids, which help with inflammation, support muscle recovery, and are good for weight management,” she says. Those amazing omega-3s can also power your athletic performance, adds Hultin. She suggests walnuts, chia, hemp, and flax seeds to get the most omega-3 fats. As for protein, almonds and cashews have about six grams per serving, and peanut butter has eight grams. Spread some nut butter on your toast or sprinkle some peanut butter powder on your berries. Extra! 5 Vegan dinners with as much protein as a chicken breast Do you whip up vegan smoothies for breakfast and hummus six ways for lunch, only to lose your love of plants when dinnertime rolls around? Understandably, it can be harder to get excited about another pasta or rice bowl. Not only does the idea of eating all those carbs after 3 p.m. fly against well-worn diet advice, you might worry that you’re not getting enough protein to fuel your body, especially after a long evening run. Fear not! That’s the advice of Joel Kahn, M.D., a Detroit cardiologist who’s been vegan for the last 40 years. He tells his patients that they can get plenty of protein from plants. “If you eat the colours of the rainbow, there’s no need to monitor protein grams,” says Kahn, who’s also the clinical professor of medicine at Wayne State University School of Medicine. “But I’m talking about whole plant-based foods, not Skittles or Pringles.” For the record, the USDA’s recommended dietary allowance for protein intake is your weight multiplied by 0.36, which comes out to 54 grams for a 75 kg person. (You can calculate your own on their website.)While a cooked boneless skinless chicken breast has about 24 grams of protein, many vegan staples will help you meet your daily totals pretty quickly. “Just eating nuts, seeds, beans, and greens provide more than enough protein for you to flourish,” says Kahn. “And you don’t need to add protein powders to your diet, unless you’re an endurance athlete burning 6,000 calories a day.” Some examples: A cup of cannellini beans has 15 grams of protein. A serving of tempeh (fermented soy) adds 19 grams. Even a sprinkling of some chopped almonds and roasted hemp seeds on your salads or quinoa can add 10 more grams. Don’t forget soy milk and vegan yogurt. Check out these nutritionists’ go-to ideas for dinners bursting with flavour and protein: Veggie burgers All veggie burgers don't come frozen in a box. In fact, dietician Jessica Spiro's favourite recipe includes cooked lentils mixed with mashed butternut squash and onions and spices. "This is where you can get creative," says Spiro. "One of my favourite things is to form patties and pan-fry them in avocado or olive oil." Instead of using traditional raw eggs to bind the mixture, try her vegan chia seed trick. Soaking a tablespoon of chia (or ground flax) seeds in three tablespoons of water for five minutes creates a gel-like substance that keeps your burgers from falling apart on the grill. A cup of lentils packs on 22 grams of protein. A tablespoon of chia seeds add three more. Protein count: 25 grams. Grilled tofu and veggies Just because you're grilling tofu instead of tri-tip doesn't mean you have to lose your grilling cred. "If you eat tofu out of the block, it's not tasty. No one boils a chicken breast and then complains that it doesn't taste good," says Las Vegas-based dietician Andy Bellatti. "Tofu is a sponge. It soaks up other flavors. You have to know how to boost the flavor." Dazzle your guests with tasty marinades or sauces, such as peanut lime sauce for a Thai kick. A half-cup tofu has 10 grams of protein. Add broccoli, Portobello mushrooms, and a tablespoon of peanut butter in your sauce to bring up your total. Protein count: 23 grams. Vegan vegetables lasagnes or enchiladas The vegetable spiralizer has become a vegan chef's essential tool. However, there are many ways to slice and dice a zucchini to add variety to your dinners. Spiro recommends slicing zukes or yellow squash in thin layers and topping them with tomatoes and onions—and protein-packed vegan cheese, beans, or tofu—in lasagne or enchiladas. A serving of Trader Joe's soy cheese has six grams of protein. Add a half-cup of black beans for eight more and a cup of brown rice for five more. Protein count: 21 grams. Vegan tacos with ‘mock meat' Those vegan chicken nuggets look like chicken and taste like chicken, and they're a great substitute for times when you're craving chicken. "These days, if you go to most grocery stores, you can find a vegan version of everything from crab cakes to fajita steak strips," says Bellatti. So-called "mock meats" can be a godsend when you want to make your favourite tacos with vegan ground beef. Although they add a protein punch of soy, consider them a treat. They're still processed and tend to be high in sodium. A serving of soy crumbles like Gardein's has 18 grams of protein. Add some soy cheese for another six grams, and black beans for eight more grams, and you've got some seriously protein-powered vegan tacos. Protein count: 26 grams. Chickpea and grain bowls There are other ways to eat beans other than your beloved chickpea hummus. You can mix and match these protein powerhouses in three-bean chili or a more innovative version of those three-bean salads from your college salad bar with a sprinkle of olive tapenade, for example. Mix up your texture by tossing roasted chickpeas into salads. Bellatti suggests draining the water from the canned beans, tossing them with olive oil, lemon juice, soy sauce and your favourite spices. Roast them at 450 degrees for 30 minutes. "Now you have a delicious high-fiber snack ready to go." he says. A half-can of chickpeas has nine grams of protein. Sautee your roasted batch with spinach and add to your quinoa to pack on 10 grams. Drizzle a tablespoon of tahini for three more. Protein count: 22 grams.  By Sarah Elizabeth Richards Getty Images https://www.whatsorb.com/category/food
You can make major gains without eating meat. When you think of toning up, a tofu scramble might not come to mind as the buff breakfast of choice. Well, it’s time to reconsider the power of plants. They’re an excellent source of hunger-curbing protein that’s the perfect fuel to sculpt those quads and biceps. “Vegan athletes don't actually have very different protein needs than athletes who include meat in their diets,” explains Ginger Hultin, R.D.N., a nutritionist from Seattle. “There are a lot of protein sources equivalent to meat that have the added benefits of different vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.” Those nutritional extras might partially explain why vegans are believed to live longer and experience lower rates of chronic diseases. Although the USDA recommends that a 75 kg woman consume 54 grams of protein daily (you can calculate your needs on their website), some experts believe we’re too obsessed with protein and that we will get more than enough nutrients by eating a varied vegan diet. (That’s a position supported by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.) “If you’re eating healthy whole foods in a plant-based diet, it’s impossible not to get enough protein,” says Julieanna Hever, R.D., a vegan dietitian from Los Angeles and author of The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Plant-Based Nutrition. Her argument: The world’s largest muscled animals, such as elephants, gorillas and hippos, eat mostly plants. She also points out that if you’re working out hard, you’ll likely eat more calories overall, which will end up boosting your protein consumption anyway. Just like meat-eating exercisers, what and when you eat your vegan vittles can help you maximize your body’s performance. Aim for small, frequent meals throughout the day to keep your blood sugar levels steady and eat a variety of protein sources, says Vandana Sheth, R.D.N., a Los Angeles-based dietician who specializes in vegetarian nutrition. “You want a combination of protein, healthy fats, and carbs to give you the right amount of energy to push through a workout,” says Sheth, who’s also a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Her pre-gym favorites include a peanut butter and banana sandwich or oatmeal with soy milk and fruit. After your last squat, she recommends a meal containing 15 to 20 grams of protein within an hour to help your muscles recover. Good options include a bean burrito or lentil soup. You can always stash a few vegan protein bars in your bag. Here are the experts’ top food choices to help you stay pumped: Protein powder Smoothies made with protein powders are easy to drink and carry on the go. Plus, protein powders are remarkably versatile because they can be mixed with everything from nut butters, soy yogurt, or even that quarter-bag of leftover frozen strawberries at the back of your freezer. “Vegan protein powders include hemp, pea, rice, or soy,” says Hultin. “This can be a convenient way to get a concentrated source of protein, and some have 20 or more grams per serving.” Skip powders made from whey and casein, both of which are derived from cow's milk. Tofu Soy is an excellent source of vegan nutrition because it’s higher in protein and fat while lower in carbs than other legumes, says Hultin. Soybeans (the base of tofu) are also bursting with antioxidants called isoflavones that research shows are linked to reduced heart disease, osteoporosis, and certain forms of cancer. “That combo could also boost your athletic performance,” she says. Try stir-frying your tofu with veggies and wrapping it inside a whole-grain tortilla, says Sheth. A half-cup of tofu has 10 grams of protein. Beans Beans just might be the perfect food. Not only are they filling and tasty, they’re bursting with fiber and important phytonutrients, which tame disease-causing inflammation and oxidation, says Hever. Studies also show that beans reduce bad cholesterol and the risk of heart disease and diabetes. Plus, at 15 grams of protein per cup, beans are good workout fuel. “When athletes eat beans and lentils, they get complex carbohydrates in addition to protein for a sustainable, slow-burning energy boost,” adds Hultin. Make a Sunday pot of black bean soup or sprinkle some chickpeas on your salad. Nuts and seeds Nuts are highly portable and a great choice to eat after a workout, says Hever, who recommends noshing on one to two ounces daily. “They also have essential fatty acids, which help with inflammation, support muscle recovery, and are good for weight management,” she says. Those amazing omega-3s can also power your athletic performance, adds Hultin. She suggests walnuts, chia, hemp, and flax seeds to get the most omega-3 fats. As for protein, almonds and cashews have about six grams per serving, and peanut butter has eight grams. Spread some nut butter on your toast or sprinkle some peanut butter powder on your berries. Extra! 5 Vegan dinners with as much protein as a chicken breast Do you whip up vegan smoothies for breakfast and hummus six ways for lunch, only to lose your love of plants when dinnertime rolls around? Understandably, it can be harder to get excited about another pasta or rice bowl. Not only does the idea of eating all those carbs after 3 p.m. fly against well-worn diet advice, you might worry that you’re not getting enough protein to fuel your body, especially after a long evening run. Fear not! That’s the advice of Joel Kahn, M.D., a Detroit cardiologist who’s been vegan for the last 40 years. He tells his patients that they can get plenty of protein from plants. “If you eat the colours of the rainbow, there’s no need to monitor protein grams,” says Kahn, who’s also the clinical professor of medicine at Wayne State University School of Medicine. “But I’m talking about whole plant-based foods, not Skittles or Pringles.” For the record, the USDA’s recommended dietary allowance for protein intake is your weight multiplied by 0.36, which comes out to 54 grams for a 75 kg person. (You can calculate your own on their website.)While a cooked boneless skinless chicken breast has about 24 grams of protein, many vegan staples will help you meet your daily totals pretty quickly. “Just eating nuts, seeds, beans, and greens provide more than enough protein for you to flourish,” says Kahn. “And you don’t need to add protein powders to your diet, unless you’re an endurance athlete burning 6,000 calories a day.” Some examples: A cup of cannellini beans has 15 grams of protein. A serving of tempeh (fermented soy) adds 19 grams. Even a sprinkling of some chopped almonds and roasted hemp seeds on your salads or quinoa can add 10 more grams. Don’t forget soy milk and vegan yogurt. Check out these nutritionists’ go-to ideas for dinners bursting with flavour and protein: Veggie burgers All veggie burgers don't come frozen in a box. In fact, dietician Jessica Spiro's favourite recipe includes cooked lentils mixed with mashed butternut squash and onions and spices. "This is where you can get creative," says Spiro. "One of my favourite things is to form patties and pan-fry them in avocado or olive oil." Instead of using traditional raw eggs to bind the mixture, try her vegan chia seed trick. Soaking a tablespoon of chia (or ground flax) seeds in three tablespoons of water for five minutes creates a gel-like substance that keeps your burgers from falling apart on the grill. A cup of lentils packs on 22 grams of protein. A tablespoon of chia seeds add three more. Protein count: 25 grams. Grilled tofu and veggies Just because you're grilling tofu instead of tri-tip doesn't mean you have to lose your grilling cred. "If you eat tofu out of the block, it's not tasty. No one boils a chicken breast and then complains that it doesn't taste good," says Las Vegas-based dietician Andy Bellatti. "Tofu is a sponge. It soaks up other flavors. You have to know how to boost the flavor." Dazzle your guests with tasty marinades or sauces, such as peanut lime sauce for a Thai kick. A half-cup tofu has 10 grams of protein. Add broccoli, Portobello mushrooms, and a tablespoon of peanut butter in your sauce to bring up your total. Protein count: 23 grams. Vegan vegetables lasagnes or enchiladas The vegetable spiralizer has become a vegan chef's essential tool. However, there are many ways to slice and dice a zucchini to add variety to your dinners. Spiro recommends slicing zukes or yellow squash in thin layers and topping them with tomatoes and onions—and protein-packed vegan cheese, beans, or tofu—in lasagne or enchiladas. A serving of Trader Joe's soy cheese has six grams of protein. Add a half-cup of black beans for eight more and a cup of brown rice for five more. Protein count: 21 grams. Vegan tacos with ‘mock meat' Those vegan chicken nuggets look like chicken and taste like chicken, and they're a great substitute for times when you're craving chicken. "These days, if you go to most grocery stores, you can find a vegan version of everything from crab cakes to fajita steak strips," says Bellatti. So-called "mock meats" can be a godsend when you want to make your favourite tacos with vegan ground beef. Although they add a protein punch of soy, consider them a treat. They're still processed and tend to be high in sodium. A serving of soy crumbles like Gardein's has 18 grams of protein. Add some soy cheese for another six grams, and black beans for eight more grams, and you've got some seriously protein-powered vegan tacos. Protein count: 26 grams. Chickpea and grain bowls There are other ways to eat beans other than your beloved chickpea hummus. You can mix and match these protein powerhouses in three-bean chili or a more innovative version of those three-bean salads from your college salad bar with a sprinkle of olive tapenade, for example. Mix up your texture by tossing roasted chickpeas into salads. Bellatti suggests draining the water from the canned beans, tossing them with olive oil, lemon juice, soy sauce and your favourite spices. Roast them at 450 degrees for 30 minutes. "Now you have a delicious high-fiber snack ready to go." he says. A half-can of chickpeas has nine grams of protein. Sautee your roasted batch with spinach and add to your quinoa to pack on 10 grams. Drizzle a tablespoon of tahini for three more. Protein count: 22 grams.  By Sarah Elizabeth Richards Getty Images https://www.whatsorb.com/category/food
The best vegan foods to eat if you
The best vegan foods to eat if you're trying to tone up and more!
New foods, and new attitudes, for a new year.
Each year I am struck by the many feelings I have about the meaning of Rosh Hashanah. First and foremost, it is a time of hope. The first words of our Torah reading tell us that G-d remembered Sarah and blessed her with a child; the birth of a child is a clear indication that the world will continue. It is also a time of renewal and repurpose. We request forgiveness for our shortcomings and then move forward with renewed purpose and commitment to be better, to do better. We go forward with this clean slate, so to speak, and, I was taught, there is never a time when a person is not forgiven or not allowed redemption. We are also reminded that it is never too late to change. In college, for a philosophy seminar, I read Rambam’s “The Guide for the Perplexed.” I remember one concept which echoed advice my dad had always given me: think long and hard before you leap. Rambam explained that people don’t do well with sudden change; they do better if they approach things slowly and methodically. So how does all this tie in to the food we eat?  We are always “on a diet.” We are always changing what we eat and, for the most part, that is a good thing. We now know that one culprit in our battle with weight may be the high fructose corn syrup that is hidden in so many foods — it may be the Diet Coke we consumed by the gallon, thinking we were being “good” by skipping the sugar. We follow the food of the week trends, from kale (surprise! no one really likes kale, we just eat it to feel virtuous) to beans to micro greens, green tea, green smoothies and more. We’d all much rather have a brownie, but that is on the food list that has a big, huge “X” on it. We often dive headfirst into a “cleanse,” or a new diet, only to feel the sting of failure when we succumb to that donut. Remember, however, as Rosh Hashanah teaches us, there is always a chance to start again. We can — and should — approach dietary changes slowly and methodically. Think about the healthful foods we like and use more of them each meal, each day, each week. Then think about the less healthful foods we eat, and try to lessen the frequency with which we eat those. Simple and methodical. All the knowledge we need to help us eat a balanced, healthy diet is in the Torah and the words of our teachers. Take things slowly, make small changes, absorb them and, even after a slip, forgive yourself and go forward.  Our New Year has much to teach us about not only how we live our lives, but also about the food we eat. Slow and methodical. Reasoned and forgiving. Shanah Tovah!  Note: There are many new kosher cookbooks published this time of year. I hope these adapted recipes encourage you to support our kosher cooks and try their delicious recipes. Remember, cookbooks make wonderful Rosh Hashanah hostess gifts.
Each year I am struck by the many feelings I have about the meaning of Rosh Hashanah. First and foremost, it is a time of hope. The first words of our Torah reading tell us that G-d remembered Sarah and blessed her with a child; the birth of a child is a clear indication that the world will continue. It is also a time of renewal and repurpose. We request forgiveness for our shortcomings and then move forward with renewed purpose and commitment to be better, to do better. We go forward with this clean slate, so to speak, and, I was taught, there is never a time when a person is not forgiven or not allowed redemption. We are also reminded that it is never too late to change. In college, for a philosophy seminar, I read Rambam’s “The Guide for the Perplexed.” I remember one concept which echoed advice my dad had always given me: think long and hard before you leap. Rambam explained that people don’t do well with sudden change; they do better if they approach things slowly and methodically. So how does all this tie in to the food we eat?  We are always “on a diet.” We are always changing what we eat and, for the most part, that is a good thing. We now know that one culprit in our battle with weight may be the high fructose corn syrup that is hidden in so many foods — it may be the Diet Coke we consumed by the gallon, thinking we were being “good” by skipping the sugar. We follow the food of the week trends, from kale (surprise! no one really likes kale, we just eat it to feel virtuous) to beans to micro greens, green tea, green smoothies and more. We’d all much rather have a brownie, but that is on the food list that has a big, huge “X” on it. We often dive headfirst into a “cleanse,” or a new diet, only to feel the sting of failure when we succumb to that donut. Remember, however, as Rosh Hashanah teaches us, there is always a chance to start again. We can — and should — approach dietary changes slowly and methodically. Think about the healthful foods we like and use more of them each meal, each day, each week. Then think about the less healthful foods we eat, and try to lessen the frequency with which we eat those. Simple and methodical. All the knowledge we need to help us eat a balanced, healthy diet is in the Torah and the words of our teachers. Take things slowly, make small changes, absorb them and, even after a slip, forgive yourself and go forward.  Our New Year has much to teach us about not only how we live our lives, but also about the food we eat. Slow and methodical. Reasoned and forgiving. Shanah Tovah!  Note: There are many new kosher cookbooks published this time of year. I hope these adapted recipes encourage you to support our kosher cooks and try their delicious recipes. Remember, cookbooks make wonderful Rosh Hashanah hostess gifts.
New foods, and new attitudes, for a new year.
New foods, and new attitudes, for a new year.
Food

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