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Sustainable fabric by IKEA and NIKE textile without pollution
Recently, the Netherlands-based textile company DyeCoo announced that they have agreed on long-term collaborations with industry giants Nike and IKEA. This is quite a big step for a company that has a ‘mere’ 15 years of experience in their core business: integrating CO2 technologies in the creation of textiles. Does that sound confusingly brilliant? Well, we are pretty sure that it is. Through their lean and clean production methods, DyeCoo has made it its mission to lead the textile industry to a sustainable future.   Whereas most ‘traditional’ fabric producers rely on heavy chemicals, extensive use of scarce resources like water, and extremely cheap labour in sweatshops; this company from the town of Weesp has developed a 100% water-free and process chemical-free textile processing solution - that has attracted the attention of the before mentioned multinationals. Water-free textile production The CO2 technology has been proudly patented, having proven itself in a industrial setting. It replaces the water needed in the production process with reclaimed CO2. This is used as the dyeing agent in a closed loop process. After it gets pressurised, CO2 turns supercritical (SC-CO2). When this happens, its solvency power increases - which will let the dye dissolve very easily. This high permeability will transport the dyes easily and deeply in fibres, resulting in strikingly vibrant colours.   This entire process is 'dry', without any need to evaporate water. Combined with efficient colour absorption and short batch cycles, this has made the entire technology very energy efficient as well: another factor contributing to the significantly reduced operating costs.   On top of the significantly reduced water and energy needs, the dyeing process that uses CO2 does not require the addition of processed chemicals in order to dissolve the dye. Instead, the technology uses 100% pure dyes, that benefit from a 98% uptake - minimising waste. Actually, the entire production processed is focused on this minimisation of waste - including ( waste ) water and chemicals. This removes the need for water treatment.   Reclaimed materials at the basis Most of the materials used during the dying process, including the CO2, are reclaimed from the existing industrial processes. A brilliant 95% is recycled in the closed loop system. DyeCoo has remained steadfast in its proposal, employing a team of specialised engineers and textile experts to keep the process running smoothly. This includes a variety of personnel, including chemical and mechanical engineers, CO2 specialists, physicists and material experts.   All of this has allowed the company to scale up activities, yet remaining true to its core. The entire chain is optimised for accountability and sustainability, so not just the mechanics of the production process alone, but also the procurement of fabrics and dyes; as well as the handling of the finished product. This has led to an increased focus on implementing best practices throughout the textile chain. Scaling-up as the challenge After proving its technology, DyeCoo has now stepped up and is looking for ways of scaling up. The main selling point, besides the sustainable production process, is the vibrancy of the colours - that really stands out. The use of 100% pure dyestuff allows for those beautiful colours to be added evenly, adding to the high quality standards. Additionally, the company has claimed that it is able to “dye fabric in the middle of the Sahara”: the geographic freedom is unlimited now that the need for water has been eliminated.   Production can be kickstarted literally anywhere on the globe, opening up some great new opportunities - for instance, allowing the production to be performed closer to relevant markets, shortening the lead times, and being more 'lean' altogether. The immense potential has been realised by Nike and IKEA, amongst others. They have actively invested in the technology, which even led to demand for CO2-dyed fabric outgrowing the current supply. Now that the 'big players' have acknowledged that the product generated in a more energy-efficient and generally more sustainable manner does not have to constitute a compromise on quality, revenue or functionality; we will soon start to see the results. Nike already introduced a product line that features the DyeCoo technology, with a bunch of additional products being added in the near future.   It is a great example of how, once suppliers get their heads in the game, small technological improvements can make a world of difference: without having to compromise on product quality or appeal, the greener process makes for a much more sustainable one. And that is great news for all of us. {youtube} https://www.whatsorb.com/category/fashion
Recently, the Netherlands-based textile company DyeCoo announced that they have agreed on long-term collaborations with industry giants Nike and IKEA. This is quite a big step for a company that has a ‘mere’ 15 years of experience in their core business: integrating CO2 technologies in the creation of textiles. Does that sound confusingly brilliant? Well, we are pretty sure that it is. Through their lean and clean production methods, DyeCoo has made it its mission to lead the textile industry to a sustainable future.   Whereas most ‘traditional’ fabric producers rely on heavy chemicals, extensive use of scarce resources like water, and extremely cheap labour in sweatshops; this company from the town of Weesp has developed a 100% water-free and process chemical-free textile processing solution - that has attracted the attention of the before mentioned multinationals. Water-free textile production The CO2 technology has been proudly patented, having proven itself in a industrial setting. It replaces the water needed in the production process with reclaimed CO2. This is used as the dyeing agent in a closed loop process. After it gets pressurised, CO2 turns supercritical (SC-CO2). When this happens, its solvency power increases - which will let the dye dissolve very easily. This high permeability will transport the dyes easily and deeply in fibres, resulting in strikingly vibrant colours.   This entire process is 'dry', without any need to evaporate water. Combined with efficient colour absorption and short batch cycles, this has made the entire technology very energy efficient as well: another factor contributing to the significantly reduced operating costs.   On top of the significantly reduced water and energy needs, the dyeing process that uses CO2 does not require the addition of processed chemicals in order to dissolve the dye. Instead, the technology uses 100% pure dyes, that benefit from a 98% uptake - minimising waste. Actually, the entire production processed is focused on this minimisation of waste - including ( waste ) water and chemicals. This removes the need for water treatment.   Reclaimed materials at the basis Most of the materials used during the dying process, including the CO2, are reclaimed from the existing industrial processes. A brilliant 95% is recycled in the closed loop system. DyeCoo has remained steadfast in its proposal, employing a team of specialised engineers and textile experts to keep the process running smoothly. This includes a variety of personnel, including chemical and mechanical engineers, CO2 specialists, physicists and material experts.   All of this has allowed the company to scale up activities, yet remaining true to its core. The entire chain is optimised for accountability and sustainability, so not just the mechanics of the production process alone, but also the procurement of fabrics and dyes; as well as the handling of the finished product. This has led to an increased focus on implementing best practices throughout the textile chain. Scaling-up as the challenge After proving its technology, DyeCoo has now stepped up and is looking for ways of scaling up. The main selling point, besides the sustainable production process, is the vibrancy of the colours - that really stands out. The use of 100% pure dyestuff allows for those beautiful colours to be added evenly, adding to the high quality standards. Additionally, the company has claimed that it is able to “dye fabric in the middle of the Sahara”: the geographic freedom is unlimited now that the need for water has been eliminated.   Production can be kickstarted literally anywhere on the globe, opening up some great new opportunities - for instance, allowing the production to be performed closer to relevant markets, shortening the lead times, and being more 'lean' altogether. The immense potential has been realised by Nike and IKEA, amongst others. They have actively invested in the technology, which even led to demand for CO2-dyed fabric outgrowing the current supply. Now that the 'big players' have acknowledged that the product generated in a more energy-efficient and generally more sustainable manner does not have to constitute a compromise on quality, revenue or functionality; we will soon start to see the results. Nike already introduced a product line that features the DyeCoo technology, with a bunch of additional products being added in the near future.   It is a great example of how, once suppliers get their heads in the game, small technological improvements can make a world of difference: without having to compromise on product quality or appeal, the greener process makes for a much more sustainable one. And that is great news for all of us. {youtube} https://www.whatsorb.com/category/fashion
Sustainable fabric by IKEA and NIKE textile without pollution
Sustainable fabric by IKEA and NIKE textile without pollution
Sustainable fashion (in sport): the necessary step
Nowadays lots of people are getting a more sustainable mindset: they eat organic food, drive electric cars and buy second hand clothing. There is still a very long way to go, but let’s face it: the topic is hot. Many brands wants to get in the sustainable hype. It does not take a genius to see that a lot of companies acting green are actually just green washing. This seems like a bad thing, but it still does some part of the trick: creating the right mindset. Which of course is needed for the right actions. Sustainable fashion Like many other industries, fashion is making great steps in getting more sustainable. Also in fashion we see a lot of greenwashing (not calling names here). Usually the smaller brands are the ones that are really fair and sustainable. And also the ones who are very inovatif in ways to become sustainable. Like ( this article ) which shows perfect examples of looking further than the standard ways to go. Sportswear Were some parts of fashion are leading on the topic of fair fashion, baby clothing is one of them, some parts are tragically behind. An example of this is the sportswear industry. Thinking about this makes it a little ironic. Most people who are passionate about sports are very committed to mother nature. Running, climbing, swimming, ice skating, and so forth. Why is their apparel not sustainable? There are plenty of beautiful options for creating sustainable sportswear (like discussed here ). Recycled polyester When looking at sportswear the first thing to notice is that lots of it is from polyester. The image of polyester is getting worse by the day. And for good reason! Everybody knows the terrible images of plastic soups and animals getting killed by it. But besides that, polyester is a beautiful material for sportswear. When used sustainable it is still an option fabric option. Polyester is available in hundreds of different chemical compositions. The most common one is known as RPET. This is the one of which sports fabric is made. And here is the good part: it lends itself perfectly for recycling. The fiber from raw material (from oil) is exactly the same as a recycled fiber. So, why not use all this  plastic waste in our advantage, and create something beautiful from it? Bamboo Another great option for sustainable sportswear is bamboo. It has advantages on two levels: the growing of it and the attributes of it for sports applications. Bamboo is one of the fastest growing plants out there. Some types grow by a meter a day! Also, it needs very little water and can grow where nothing else will, so no forest is needed to clear (like needed for cotton for example). If that is not enough, know that bamboo is resistant of a lot of bugs and diseases, so very little to no pesticides are needed. Of course, this is all very helpful for our already plagued environment. For sportswear, bamboo is excellent in comparing it to other materials. The fabric has great isolation, which makes it warmer when it’s cold, but fresher when its warm. Also, the fabric has great ventilation because of the micro holes in the fiber. When you do sweat, it absorbs moisture very good and also drains it fast. If this is not enough for you, then use it because it is soft as silk and strong as leather! Besides the material There are several other points you need to take into account when talking about sustainable fashion. Of course, these doesn’t just apply for sportswear, but for every item of clothing you produce (and want to do it fair and sustainable). The fashion industry has made a name for itself in treating workers poorly. We all know the sad stories about sweatshops and dangerous working conditions. It goes to far for this article to dig into this matter, but please be aware that just because a t-shirt is made from bamboo, it is not necessarily sustainable. There is plenty to go on for your own research, just start reading and figuring out what’s important for you! https://www.whatsorb.com/category/fashion
Nowadays lots of people are getting a more sustainable mindset: they eat organic food, drive electric cars and buy second hand clothing. There is still a very long way to go, but let’s face it: the topic is hot. Many brands wants to get in the sustainable hype. It does not take a genius to see that a lot of companies acting green are actually just green washing. This seems like a bad thing, but it still does some part of the trick: creating the right mindset. Which of course is needed for the right actions. Sustainable fashion Like many other industries, fashion is making great steps in getting more sustainable. Also in fashion we see a lot of greenwashing (not calling names here). Usually the smaller brands are the ones that are really fair and sustainable. And also the ones who are very inovatif in ways to become sustainable. Like ( this article ) which shows perfect examples of looking further than the standard ways to go. Sportswear Were some parts of fashion are leading on the topic of fair fashion, baby clothing is one of them, some parts are tragically behind. An example of this is the sportswear industry. Thinking about this makes it a little ironic. Most people who are passionate about sports are very committed to mother nature. Running, climbing, swimming, ice skating, and so forth. Why is their apparel not sustainable? There are plenty of beautiful options for creating sustainable sportswear (like discussed here ). Recycled polyester When looking at sportswear the first thing to notice is that lots of it is from polyester. The image of polyester is getting worse by the day. And for good reason! Everybody knows the terrible images of plastic soups and animals getting killed by it. But besides that, polyester is a beautiful material for sportswear. When used sustainable it is still an option fabric option. Polyester is available in hundreds of different chemical compositions. The most common one is known as RPET. This is the one of which sports fabric is made. And here is the good part: it lends itself perfectly for recycling. The fiber from raw material (from oil) is exactly the same as a recycled fiber. So, why not use all this  plastic waste in our advantage, and create something beautiful from it? Bamboo Another great option for sustainable sportswear is bamboo. It has advantages on two levels: the growing of it and the attributes of it for sports applications. Bamboo is one of the fastest growing plants out there. Some types grow by a meter a day! Also, it needs very little water and can grow where nothing else will, so no forest is needed to clear (like needed for cotton for example). If that is not enough, know that bamboo is resistant of a lot of bugs and diseases, so very little to no pesticides are needed. Of course, this is all very helpful for our already plagued environment. For sportswear, bamboo is excellent in comparing it to other materials. The fabric has great isolation, which makes it warmer when it’s cold, but fresher when its warm. Also, the fabric has great ventilation because of the micro holes in the fiber. When you do sweat, it absorbs moisture very good and also drains it fast. If this is not enough for you, then use it because it is soft as silk and strong as leather! Besides the material There are several other points you need to take into account when talking about sustainable fashion. Of course, these doesn’t just apply for sportswear, but for every item of clothing you produce (and want to do it fair and sustainable). The fashion industry has made a name for itself in treating workers poorly. We all know the sad stories about sweatshops and dangerous working conditions. It goes to far for this article to dig into this matter, but please be aware that just because a t-shirt is made from bamboo, it is not necessarily sustainable. There is plenty to go on for your own research, just start reading and figuring out what’s important for you! https://www.whatsorb.com/category/fashion
Sustainable fashion (in sport): the necessary step
Sustainable fashion (in sport): the necessary step
State of Fashion: Searching for the New Luxury
Last month we have already discussed circular fashion, a way of manufacturing and utilising clothes and accessories in a way that will what we wear more environmentally friendly. Today, we would like to introduce you to State of Fashion 2018: Searching for the New Luxury – an exhibition that explores new techniques and technologies that aim to make fashion more sustainable. This exhibition is currently taking place in Arnhem, the Netherlands, a country that, as we discovered in our previous article, is at the forefront of making fashion more sustainable.  It features works by established designers and fashion houses, such as G-Star Raw, Hermes and Vivienne Westwood, as well as upcoming studios like Threeasfour and Algaefabrics. This event aims to rethink what fashion is on a fundamental level and help consumers make better choices in a market that is focused on launching new things as quickly as possible. Why New Luxury? The exhibition explores a new definition of what luxury is – less waste and pollution, more equality, welfare and inclusiveness. According to José Teunissen, the curator of this exhibition, "The new luxury is about imagination and coming up with new ideas, and a new universe that matches better with our daily lives and values. It's about agency and taking control." The future of  sustainable fashion State of Fashion acts as a host to multitude of projects that are focusing on various areas and aspects of fashion and we would like to introduce you to some of the most innovative and interesting ones. First on our list is Funghi Fashion, also known as MycoTex, a project from NEFFA and one of the 5 winners of 2018 Global Change Awards. Like many of us, they were very becoming very aware of the waste that fast fashion creates and they have decided to tackle the problem at its root – quite literally. Funghi Fashion use mycelium – mushroom roots – in combination with their Body-Based modelling process to create perfectly fitting custom garments.  Unlike traditional clothing, these garments do not need to be cut and sewn and their shorter supply chain reduces water usage and eliminates need for chemical and pesticides. But best of all is the fact that after you have worn the garment, you can simply burry it in the ground and it will naturally decompose. This innovative scheme tackles many major concerns that exist in apparel production and we would love to see more designs from Funghi Fashion! Another project that is looking to introduce new materials into the world of fashion is AlgaeFabrics. As the name suggests, they are working on developing a new type of raw textile material from algae. Algae are found in abundance in oceans and lakes and have many amazing properties – they act as a crucial food source for many species, they convert large volumes of  CO2 to oxygen and help clean up the oceans by absorbing waste. However, when they grow excessively, algae can become a nuisance and have a negative impact on water quality and thus local communities. They often get removed from the lakes and burnt, but Tjeerd Veenhoven, the founder of AlgaeFabrics, sees it as a waste. Algae are rich in cellulose, which means that they have a great potential. While this project is still in development, we are sure that it has a great potential and who knows, perhaps this could become the most fashionable material in floating communities of the future? Japanese designer Yuima Nakazato takes a different approach to sustainable fashion. Instead of inventing new materials, he is focusing on developing a new garment construction system called Unit Constructed Textile. His designs are made with panels of fabric called Units that are all connected in a way that allows them to be easily replaced. This unique system lets consumers repair their clothing with ease and make changes to the design, potentially allowing the garments to be handed down over generations. The last company on our list, Fashion 4 Freedom calls themselves “the first socially responsible, ethical and transparent supply chain in Vietnam”. In the recent years there was a lot of controversy surrounding working conditions on many clothing factories and more companies have pledged to conduct more thorough checks of their suppliers. Unfortunately, most companies outsource their production and rely on agents to oversee that process, which makes it hard for them to have full control over day-to-day operations. Fashion 4 Freedom connects companies directly with local artisans, craft and textile villages and partnered companies without the need for middlemen. Their system allows for production of higher quality garments, preservation of many crafts, higher transparency and economic empowerment for the artisans. As the companies have more control and awareness of where and how their garments are manufactured, they will be more willing to share this with the consumers. This is a truly inspiring initiative that benefits many and it would be great to see more companies adopt this approach! What do you think the new luxury should be? Are there any new companies in the fashion industry that you think can make a real change? Share your thoughts with us in the comments! https://www.whatsorb.com/category/fashion
Last month we have already discussed circular fashion, a way of manufacturing and utilising clothes and accessories in a way that will what we wear more environmentally friendly. Today, we would like to introduce you to State of Fashion 2018: Searching for the New Luxury – an exhibition that explores new techniques and technologies that aim to make fashion more sustainable. This exhibition is currently taking place in Arnhem, the Netherlands, a country that, as we discovered in our previous article, is at the forefront of making fashion more sustainable.  It features works by established designers and fashion houses, such as G-Star Raw, Hermes and Vivienne Westwood, as well as upcoming studios like Threeasfour and Algaefabrics. This event aims to rethink what fashion is on a fundamental level and help consumers make better choices in a market that is focused on launching new things as quickly as possible. Why New Luxury? The exhibition explores a new definition of what luxury is – less waste and pollution, more equality, welfare and inclusiveness. According to José Teunissen, the curator of this exhibition, "The new luxury is about imagination and coming up with new ideas, and a new universe that matches better with our daily lives and values. It's about agency and taking control." The future of  sustainable fashion State of Fashion acts as a host to multitude of projects that are focusing on various areas and aspects of fashion and we would like to introduce you to some of the most innovative and interesting ones. First on our list is Funghi Fashion, also known as MycoTex, a project from NEFFA and one of the 5 winners of 2018 Global Change Awards. Like many of us, they were very becoming very aware of the waste that fast fashion creates and they have decided to tackle the problem at its root – quite literally. Funghi Fashion use mycelium – mushroom roots – in combination with their Body-Based modelling process to create perfectly fitting custom garments.  Unlike traditional clothing, these garments do not need to be cut and sewn and their shorter supply chain reduces water usage and eliminates need for chemical and pesticides. But best of all is the fact that after you have worn the garment, you can simply burry it in the ground and it will naturally decompose. This innovative scheme tackles many major concerns that exist in apparel production and we would love to see more designs from Funghi Fashion! Another project that is looking to introduce new materials into the world of fashion is AlgaeFabrics. As the name suggests, they are working on developing a new type of raw textile material from algae. Algae are found in abundance in oceans and lakes and have many amazing properties – they act as a crucial food source for many species, they convert large volumes of  CO2 to oxygen and help clean up the oceans by absorbing waste. However, when they grow excessively, algae can become a nuisance and have a negative impact on water quality and thus local communities. They often get removed from the lakes and burnt, but Tjeerd Veenhoven, the founder of AlgaeFabrics, sees it as a waste. Algae are rich in cellulose, which means that they have a great potential. While this project is still in development, we are sure that it has a great potential and who knows, perhaps this could become the most fashionable material in floating communities of the future? Japanese designer Yuima Nakazato takes a different approach to sustainable fashion. Instead of inventing new materials, he is focusing on developing a new garment construction system called Unit Constructed Textile. His designs are made with panels of fabric called Units that are all connected in a way that allows them to be easily replaced. This unique system lets consumers repair their clothing with ease and make changes to the design, potentially allowing the garments to be handed down over generations. The last company on our list, Fashion 4 Freedom calls themselves “the first socially responsible, ethical and transparent supply chain in Vietnam”. In the recent years there was a lot of controversy surrounding working conditions on many clothing factories and more companies have pledged to conduct more thorough checks of their suppliers. Unfortunately, most companies outsource their production and rely on agents to oversee that process, which makes it hard for them to have full control over day-to-day operations. Fashion 4 Freedom connects companies directly with local artisans, craft and textile villages and partnered companies without the need for middlemen. Their system allows for production of higher quality garments, preservation of many crafts, higher transparency and economic empowerment for the artisans. As the companies have more control and awareness of where and how their garments are manufactured, they will be more willing to share this with the consumers. This is a truly inspiring initiative that benefits many and it would be great to see more companies adopt this approach! What do you think the new luxury should be? Are there any new companies in the fashion industry that you think can make a real change? Share your thoughts with us in the comments! https://www.whatsorb.com/category/fashion
State of Fashion: Searching for the New Luxury
State of Fashion: Searching for the New Luxury
Clothing from recycled material by JUNGL
There are about 23 plastic bottles in the jackets and they can be worn on two sides. We spoke with initiator Natascha (23) about her sustainable business. 1 jacket, 2 sides From her childhood she focused on people, animals and the environment. It was quickly clear that she wanted to set up her own company and wanted to work with sustainable products. 'I have gone into the fashion industry, because here in my opinion a lot goes wrong. It is polluting, working conditions are often not good and animals are being treated badly. ' She decided to focus on plastic as part of the problem and solution. In Waste2Wear she found a reliable and transparent producer, specialized in the processing of plastic waste to clothing. Fashion brand JUNGL was born and Natascha designed a jacket that is wearable on two sides. 'That means that only one jacket needs to be produced and the consumer can wear two.' 23 plastic bottles In the jackets are on average 23 plastic bottles of 0.5 liters processed. These are used plastic bottles that would otherwise end up in nature or the incinerator. By using collected plastic bottles, no new raw materials are used. 'In comparison with polyester, water consumption is 86% lower, energy consumption 70% lower and CO2 emissions 75% lower. The jackets are produced under good conditions in Shanghai and transported to the Netherlands by freighter, which in this case is the most sustainable option. ' JUNGL also takes the environment into account as far as possible for other matters. The shipping boxes, flyers and business cards are made from recycled paper and plastic is not used for the shipment of the products. The little suffering that is called microplastics Like polyester clothing from new raw materials, the jackets give microplastics during washing. 'Waste2Wear, however, ensures that the quality of the yarn is as good as possible, so that they wear less quickly. As a result, fewer microplastics release during washing. ' In order to minimize the pollution of microplastics, Natascha advises its customers to wash the jacket as little as possible. And if you wash it as cold as possible and without using the dryer. 'This does not help to reduce micro-plastics, but it is a lot more sustainable.' Ultimately, the young entrepreneur hopes that a solution will be found for the small harmful particles. That solution may already be on the way, because these Berlin entrepreneurs have developed a laundry bag that captures microplastics. Do not be tempted Natascha's tip for other starting entrepreneurs is very clear. 'Stick to your sustainable position and do not be' tempted 'by the polluting market, which in many cases is easier to enter. Keep going and keep in mind that every little bit helps. " Her own plans for the future are already clear. 'I would like to expand the collection. With what kind of product I do not know yet, but in any case made of sustainable or recycled material. ' Her mission has just begun: making people aware of the need to reduce plastic waste. 'I want to offer consumers an alternative to polluting clothing. And eventually I open my own fair trade factory, specializing in the recycling of materials. ' The jackets cost € 119, - and are for sale in the JUNGL webshop. https://www.junglamsterdam.com/
There are about 23 plastic bottles in the jackets and they can be worn on two sides. We spoke with initiator Natascha (23) about her sustainable business. 1 jacket, 2 sides From her childhood she focused on people, animals and the environment. It was quickly clear that she wanted to set up her own company and wanted to work with sustainable products. 'I have gone into the fashion industry, because here in my opinion a lot goes wrong. It is polluting, working conditions are often not good and animals are being treated badly. ' She decided to focus on plastic as part of the problem and solution. In Waste2Wear she found a reliable and transparent producer, specialized in the processing of plastic waste to clothing. Fashion brand JUNGL was born and Natascha designed a jacket that is wearable on two sides. 'That means that only one jacket needs to be produced and the consumer can wear two.' 23 plastic bottles In the jackets are on average 23 plastic bottles of 0.5 liters processed. These are used plastic bottles that would otherwise end up in nature or the incinerator. By using collected plastic bottles, no new raw materials are used. 'In comparison with polyester, water consumption is 86% lower, energy consumption 70% lower and CO2 emissions 75% lower. The jackets are produced under good conditions in Shanghai and transported to the Netherlands by freighter, which in this case is the most sustainable option. ' JUNGL also takes the environment into account as far as possible for other matters. The shipping boxes, flyers and business cards are made from recycled paper and plastic is not used for the shipment of the products. The little suffering that is called microplastics Like polyester clothing from new raw materials, the jackets give microplastics during washing. 'Waste2Wear, however, ensures that the quality of the yarn is as good as possible, so that they wear less quickly. As a result, fewer microplastics release during washing. ' In order to minimize the pollution of microplastics, Natascha advises its customers to wash the jacket as little as possible. And if you wash it as cold as possible and without using the dryer. 'This does not help to reduce micro-plastics, but it is a lot more sustainable.' Ultimately, the young entrepreneur hopes that a solution will be found for the small harmful particles. That solution may already be on the way, because these Berlin entrepreneurs have developed a laundry bag that captures microplastics. Do not be tempted Natascha's tip for other starting entrepreneurs is very clear. 'Stick to your sustainable position and do not be' tempted 'by the polluting market, which in many cases is easier to enter. Keep going and keep in mind that every little bit helps. " Her own plans for the future are already clear. 'I would like to expand the collection. With what kind of product I do not know yet, but in any case made of sustainable or recycled material. ' Her mission has just begun: making people aware of the need to reduce plastic waste. 'I want to offer consumers an alternative to polluting clothing. And eventually I open my own fair trade factory, specializing in the recycling of materials. ' The jackets cost € 119, - and are for sale in the JUNGL webshop. https://www.junglamsterdam.com/
Clothing from recycled material by JUNGL
Stella McCartney lays waste to disposable fashion in Paris
The designer continues to break down barriers by showing how ethical clothing can hold its own on high-end catwalks Glamour for its own sake is not something I have ever been particularly interested in,” Stella McCartney said backstage after her catwalk show. Which could sound like a facetious statement from a fashion designer who was, at that moment, standing among the marble-slabbed floors, elaborately frescoed ceilings and giant chandeliers of the Palais Garnier opera house, where the show was staged. But McCartney has broken down barriers between high fashion and ethical fashion by straddling two worlds. Her mission statement is that clothes made from sustainable viscose and cruelty-free alternatives to leather should not be targeted at a niche market, but shown to hold their own on the Paris fashion week catwalk. The invitations to this show were rolls of logoed eco-friendly, recycled and recyclable bin bags made from low-density polyethylene, stamped with the label’s logo. The designer’s most recent advertising campaign was shot in a Scottish landfill site, featuring the models Birgit Kos in a camel jumpsuit on top of the decaying wreck of a car, and Iana Godnia in a green lace party dress prone on a bed of cardboard and flattened milk cartons. The bin bags, and the campaign, were intended to encourage debate about wastefulness in the fashion industry, in which McCartney is engaging by using yarn made from plastic bottles retrieved from the seas by the Parley for the Oceans initiative to make a Parley Ultra Boost trainer and the Ocean Legend Falabella handbag. In partnership with the fashion resale site The RealReal, McCartney is also embracing the “circular economy” by encouraging resale as one strategy for reducing the 75% of clothes worldwide that end up in landfill. This collection was strong on the day-to-night staples the Stella McCartney customer wants. (The designer herself was wearing tailored caramel-coloured trousers with a toning crew neck knit, because “it’s work, and I have too much to do to get dressed up”.) The double-breasted blazer which is on every front row this season came with an elbow-length sleeve for spring, while jumpsuits, a signature of the label, came slinky and tailored or in a blowsier boiler suit silhouette. French taffeta evening separates – a puffball skirt, and a ruffled blouse – were pressed flat to drag them up to date. “I’ve always done that with party dresses – take the lining out to flatten them, or chop into them,” said McCartney.  Next year, Stella McCartney’s London flagship store will move from Bruton Street to a landmark Old Bond Street location. The move is the most prominent symbol of the label’s strong financial results. In 2016, turnover rose 31% to £41.7m, while profits increased 42.5% to £7m. The label also releases environmental profit and loss results, measuring the business’s environmental impact. In 2016, this impact rose 2%, an increase significantly smaller than the growth of the business. The company said its rising production and sales were largely offset by reductions in the impact of raw material use, for instance by replacing virgin cashmere fibres with regenerated cashmere that had previously been considered a waste material.  
The designer continues to break down barriers by showing how ethical clothing can hold its own on high-end catwalks Glamour for its own sake is not something I have ever been particularly interested in,” Stella McCartney said backstage after her catwalk show. Which could sound like a facetious statement from a fashion designer who was, at that moment, standing among the marble-slabbed floors, elaborately frescoed ceilings and giant chandeliers of the Palais Garnier opera house, where the show was staged. But McCartney has broken down barriers between high fashion and ethical fashion by straddling two worlds. Her mission statement is that clothes made from sustainable viscose and cruelty-free alternatives to leather should not be targeted at a niche market, but shown to hold their own on the Paris fashion week catwalk. The invitations to this show were rolls of logoed eco-friendly, recycled and recyclable bin bags made from low-density polyethylene, stamped with the label’s logo. The designer’s most recent advertising campaign was shot in a Scottish landfill site, featuring the models Birgit Kos in a camel jumpsuit on top of the decaying wreck of a car, and Iana Godnia in a green lace party dress prone on a bed of cardboard and flattened milk cartons. The bin bags, and the campaign, were intended to encourage debate about wastefulness in the fashion industry, in which McCartney is engaging by using yarn made from plastic bottles retrieved from the seas by the Parley for the Oceans initiative to make a Parley Ultra Boost trainer and the Ocean Legend Falabella handbag. In partnership with the fashion resale site The RealReal, McCartney is also embracing the “circular economy” by encouraging resale as one strategy for reducing the 75% of clothes worldwide that end up in landfill. This collection was strong on the day-to-night staples the Stella McCartney customer wants. (The designer herself was wearing tailored caramel-coloured trousers with a toning crew neck knit, because “it’s work, and I have too much to do to get dressed up”.) The double-breasted blazer which is on every front row this season came with an elbow-length sleeve for spring, while jumpsuits, a signature of the label, came slinky and tailored or in a blowsier boiler suit silhouette. French taffeta evening separates – a puffball skirt, and a ruffled blouse – were pressed flat to drag them up to date. “I’ve always done that with party dresses – take the lining out to flatten them, or chop into them,” said McCartney.  Next year, Stella McCartney’s London flagship store will move from Bruton Street to a landmark Old Bond Street location. The move is the most prominent symbol of the label’s strong financial results. In 2016, turnover rose 31% to £41.7m, while profits increased 42.5% to £7m. The label also releases environmental profit and loss results, measuring the business’s environmental impact. In 2016, this impact rose 2%, an increase significantly smaller than the growth of the business. The company said its rising production and sales were largely offset by reductions in the impact of raw material use, for instance by replacing virgin cashmere fibres with regenerated cashmere that had previously been considered a waste material.  
Stella McCartney lays waste to disposable fashion in Paris
Stella McCartney lays waste to disposable fashion in Paris
Fashion

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