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Israeli 3D printed fashion as sustainable works of art
Israeli fashion design have been drawing international attention in recent years. More specifically is the 3D printed fashion that has the wow-factor, not least since Israeli designer Danit Peleg created the world’s first entirely 3D printed fashion collection. Creators in Israel and all over the globe are looking with interest at the limitless possibilities of 3D printed fashion and its multisensorial effects, testing their own imaginative boundaries in a notoriously fickle industry. Also, 3D printing in fashion can be a more sustainable option for designers to safeguard their art while supporting an environmentally conscious ecosystem. Reshaping fashion through 3D printing One of these designers is Ganit Goldstein, whose creations have embraced 3D printing to create remarkable and sustainable, works of art. As a graduate of the prestigious Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem, Goldstein has embarked on a path that seeks to reshape fashion through a unique blend of art and technology. The designer recently launched a collection entitled ‘Between the Layers’, which was created as a graduation project. The collection is made using 3D printing and consists of seven outfits and six pairs of shoes that are made with thermoplastic polyurethane and polylactic acid. The unique pieces in Ganit Goldstein’s fashion collection feature a visual interaction between traditional artistic methods and the dynamic and evolving technologies of artistic expression. Goldstein chose to express this by “fusing additive manufacturing and computer engineering with traditional crafting techniques, such as weaving”, according to her statement. “The technique of 3D layer printing allows me to re-examine which layers can be added and what new connections I can create.” Beautiful ánd waste -averse During her time in an university exchange program in Japan, Goldstein began experimenting with up-cycling and reconstruction techniques, shredding a range of second-hand fabrics and industrial textile leftovers and using a traditional Japanese textile technique called IKAT weaving to create captivating designs. Upon her return to Israel, Goldstein started developing a weaving process using an Orginal Prusa i3 Mk3 3D printer and finished off her designs adding hand-woven layers. Alongside her art-meets-technology mix, Goldstein has been devoting attention to the creation of garments, shoes and jewelry pieces that are not only beautiful but also sustainable and waste-averse. The technique of 3D printing in fashion is a great sustainable tool. “With this technique, we are able to choose exactly which materials to print and how much we need, as well as the precise pattern we want to obtain, without incurring unneeded waste, a notion that is both empowering and impactful,” Goldstein says. The future of 3D printing: personalized and one-of-a-kind Looking ahead, Goldstein says she would like to further explore the use of recycled plastics. “Creating designs from recycled plastic is an ever-growing interest of mine and I would like to create a growing number of designs that utilize this material,” she says. Goldstein has recently been touring the world with her collection of 3D printed clothing and shoes. She predicts that 3D printed fashion “will change the way people design and wear clothes. ‘Personalized’, ‘one-of-a-kind’ pieces that are specifically created for one single person are the future of 3D printed fashion.” Other Israeli 3 D printed fashion pioneers to watch Israel’s forward-looking innovation in the field of 3D printed fashion is inspirational and some creative ideas by a number of Israeli talents have already garnered international attention. Designer Danit Peleg created the world’s first entirely 3D printed fashion collection, which included five full outfits that took over 2,000 hours to print. Noa Raviv, whose work has been displayed in the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art, created a 3D print collection by manipulating digital images using computer modelling software. Israeli textile designer Eden Saadon used a 3D printing pen for a lacy lingerie collection. Also, Nitzan Kish attracted media attention. She has been using 3D tech to create uniquely shaped clothing and jewellery with a special purpose in mind – self-defence, specifically in urban environments. 3D printing can and will be the future in fashion, especially according to the innovative fashion designers in Israel. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/fashion
Israeli fashion design have been drawing international attention in recent years. More specifically is the 3D printed fashion that has the wow-factor, not least since Israeli designer Danit Peleg created the world’s first entirely 3D printed fashion collection. Creators in Israel and all over the globe are looking with interest at the limitless possibilities of 3D printed fashion and its multisensorial effects, testing their own imaginative boundaries in a notoriously fickle industry. Also, 3D printing in fashion can be a more sustainable option for designers to safeguard their art while supporting an environmentally conscious ecosystem. Reshaping fashion through 3D printing One of these designers is Ganit Goldstein, whose creations have embraced 3D printing to create remarkable and sustainable, works of art. As a graduate of the prestigious Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem, Goldstein has embarked on a path that seeks to reshape fashion through a unique blend of art and technology. The designer recently launched a collection entitled ‘Between the Layers’, which was created as a graduation project. The collection is made using 3D printing and consists of seven outfits and six pairs of shoes that are made with thermoplastic polyurethane and polylactic acid. The unique pieces in Ganit Goldstein’s fashion collection feature a visual interaction between traditional artistic methods and the dynamic and evolving technologies of artistic expression. Goldstein chose to express this by “fusing additive manufacturing and computer engineering with traditional crafting techniques, such as weaving”, according to her statement. “The technique of 3D layer printing allows me to re-examine which layers can be added and what new connections I can create.” Beautiful ánd waste -averse During her time in an university exchange program in Japan, Goldstein began experimenting with up-cycling and reconstruction techniques, shredding a range of second-hand fabrics and industrial textile leftovers and using a traditional Japanese textile technique called IKAT weaving to create captivating designs. Upon her return to Israel, Goldstein started developing a weaving process using an Orginal Prusa i3 Mk3 3D printer and finished off her designs adding hand-woven layers. Alongside her art-meets-technology mix, Goldstein has been devoting attention to the creation of garments, shoes and jewelry pieces that are not only beautiful but also sustainable and waste-averse. The technique of 3D printing in fashion is a great sustainable tool. “With this technique, we are able to choose exactly which materials to print and how much we need, as well as the precise pattern we want to obtain, without incurring unneeded waste, a notion that is both empowering and impactful,” Goldstein says. The future of 3D printing: personalized and one-of-a-kind Looking ahead, Goldstein says she would like to further explore the use of recycled plastics. “Creating designs from recycled plastic is an ever-growing interest of mine and I would like to create a growing number of designs that utilize this material,” she says. Goldstein has recently been touring the world with her collection of 3D printed clothing and shoes. She predicts that 3D printed fashion “will change the way people design and wear clothes. ‘Personalized’, ‘one-of-a-kind’ pieces that are specifically created for one single person are the future of 3D printed fashion.” Other Israeli 3 D printed fashion pioneers to watch Israel’s forward-looking innovation in the field of 3D printed fashion is inspirational and some creative ideas by a number of Israeli talents have already garnered international attention. Designer Danit Peleg created the world’s first entirely 3D printed fashion collection, which included five full outfits that took over 2,000 hours to print. Noa Raviv, whose work has been displayed in the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art, created a 3D print collection by manipulating digital images using computer modelling software. Israeli textile designer Eden Saadon used a 3D printing pen for a lacy lingerie collection. Also, Nitzan Kish attracted media attention. She has been using 3D tech to create uniquely shaped clothing and jewellery with a special purpose in mind – self-defence, specifically in urban environments. 3D printing can and will be the future in fashion, especially according to the innovative fashion designers in Israel. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/fashion
Israeli 3D printed fashion as sustainable works of art
Israeli 3D printed fashion as sustainable works of art
State of Fashion: Searching for the New Luxury
Last month we have already discussed circular fashion, a way of manufacturing and utilising clothes and accessories in a way that will what we wear more environmentally friendly. Today, we would like to introduce you to State of Fashion 2018: Searching for the New Luxury – an exhibition that explores new techniques and technologies that aim to make fashion more sustainable. This exhibition is currently taking place in Arnhem, the Netherlands, a country that, as we discovered in our previous article, is at the forefront of making fashion more sustainable.  It features works by established designers and fashion houses, such as G-Star Raw, Hermes and Vivienne Westwood, as well as upcoming studios like Threeasfour and Algaefabrics. This event aims to rethink what fashion is on a fundamental level and help consumers make better choices in a market that is focused on launching new things as quickly as possible. Why New Luxury? The exhibition explores a new definition of what luxury is – less waste and pollution, more equality, welfare and inclusiveness. According to José Teunissen, the curator of this exhibition, "The new luxury is about imagination and coming up with new ideas, and a new universe that matches better with our daily lives and values. It's about agency and taking control." The future of  sustainable fashion State of Fashion acts as a host to multitude of projects that are focusing on various areas and aspects of fashion and we would like to introduce you to some of the most innovative and interesting ones. First on our list is Funghi Fashion, also known as MycoTex, a project from NEFFA and one of the 5 winners of 2018 Global Change Awards. Like many of us, they were very becoming very aware of the waste that fast fashion creates and they have decided to tackle the problem at its root – quite literally. Funghi Fashion use mycelium – mushroom roots – in combination with their Body-Based modelling process to create perfectly fitting custom garments.  Unlike traditional clothing, these garments do not need to be cut and sewn and their shorter supply chain reduces water usage and eliminates need for chemical and pesticides. But best of all is the fact that after you have worn the garment, you can simply burry it in the ground and it will naturally decompose. This innovative scheme tackles many major concerns that exist in apparel production and we would love to see more designs from Funghi Fashion! Another project that is looking to introduce new materials into the world of fashion is AlgaeFabrics. As the name suggests, they are working on developing a new type of raw textile material from algae. Algae are found in abundance in oceans and lakes and have many amazing properties – they act as a crucial food source for many species, they convert large volumes of  CO2 to oxygen and help clean up the oceans by absorbing waste. However, when they grow excessively, algae can become a nuisance and have a negative impact on water quality and thus local communities. They often get removed from the lakes and burnt, but Tjeerd Veenhoven, the founder of AlgaeFabrics, sees it as a waste. Algae are rich in cellulose, which means that they have a great potential. While this project is still in development, we are sure that it has a great potential and who knows, perhaps this could become the most fashionable material in floating communities of the future? Japanese designer Yuima Nakazato takes a different approach to sustainable fashion. Instead of inventing new materials, he is focusing on developing a new garment construction system called Unit Constructed Textile. His designs are made with panels of fabric called Units that are all connected in a way that allows them to be easily replaced. This unique system lets consumers repair their clothing with ease and make changes to the design, potentially allowing the garments to be handed down over generations. The last company on our list, Fashion 4 Freedom calls themselves “the first socially responsible, ethical and transparent supply chain in Vietnam”. In the recent years there was a lot of controversy surrounding working conditions on many clothing factories and more companies have pledged to conduct more thorough checks of their suppliers. Unfortunately, most companies outsource their production and rely on agents to oversee that process, which makes it hard for them to have full control over day-to-day operations. Fashion 4 Freedom connects companies directly with local artisans, craft and textile villages and partnered companies without the need for middlemen. Their system allows for production of higher quality garments, preservation of many crafts, higher transparency and economic empowerment for the artisans. As the companies have more control and awareness of where and how their garments are manufactured, they will be more willing to share this with the consumers. This is a truly inspiring initiative that benefits many and it would be great to see more companies adopt this approach! What do you think the new luxury should be? Are there any new companies in the fashion industry that you think can make a real change? Share your thoughts with us in the comments! https://www.whatsorb.com/category/fashion
Last month we have already discussed circular fashion, a way of manufacturing and utilising clothes and accessories in a way that will what we wear more environmentally friendly. Today, we would like to introduce you to State of Fashion 2018: Searching for the New Luxury – an exhibition that explores new techniques and technologies that aim to make fashion more sustainable. This exhibition is currently taking place in Arnhem, the Netherlands, a country that, as we discovered in our previous article, is at the forefront of making fashion more sustainable.  It features works by established designers and fashion houses, such as G-Star Raw, Hermes and Vivienne Westwood, as well as upcoming studios like Threeasfour and Algaefabrics. This event aims to rethink what fashion is on a fundamental level and help consumers make better choices in a market that is focused on launching new things as quickly as possible. Why New Luxury? The exhibition explores a new definition of what luxury is – less waste and pollution, more equality, welfare and inclusiveness. According to José Teunissen, the curator of this exhibition, "The new luxury is about imagination and coming up with new ideas, and a new universe that matches better with our daily lives and values. It's about agency and taking control." The future of  sustainable fashion State of Fashion acts as a host to multitude of projects that are focusing on various areas and aspects of fashion and we would like to introduce you to some of the most innovative and interesting ones. First on our list is Funghi Fashion, also known as MycoTex, a project from NEFFA and one of the 5 winners of 2018 Global Change Awards. Like many of us, they were very becoming very aware of the waste that fast fashion creates and they have decided to tackle the problem at its root – quite literally. Funghi Fashion use mycelium – mushroom roots – in combination with their Body-Based modelling process to create perfectly fitting custom garments.  Unlike traditional clothing, these garments do not need to be cut and sewn and their shorter supply chain reduces water usage and eliminates need for chemical and pesticides. But best of all is the fact that after you have worn the garment, you can simply burry it in the ground and it will naturally decompose. This innovative scheme tackles many major concerns that exist in apparel production and we would love to see more designs from Funghi Fashion! Another project that is looking to introduce new materials into the world of fashion is AlgaeFabrics. As the name suggests, they are working on developing a new type of raw textile material from algae. Algae are found in abundance in oceans and lakes and have many amazing properties – they act as a crucial food source for many species, they convert large volumes of  CO2 to oxygen and help clean up the oceans by absorbing waste. However, when they grow excessively, algae can become a nuisance and have a negative impact on water quality and thus local communities. They often get removed from the lakes and burnt, but Tjeerd Veenhoven, the founder of AlgaeFabrics, sees it as a waste. Algae are rich in cellulose, which means that they have a great potential. While this project is still in development, we are sure that it has a great potential and who knows, perhaps this could become the most fashionable material in floating communities of the future? Japanese designer Yuima Nakazato takes a different approach to sustainable fashion. Instead of inventing new materials, he is focusing on developing a new garment construction system called Unit Constructed Textile. His designs are made with panels of fabric called Units that are all connected in a way that allows them to be easily replaced. This unique system lets consumers repair their clothing with ease and make changes to the design, potentially allowing the garments to be handed down over generations. The last company on our list, Fashion 4 Freedom calls themselves “the first socially responsible, ethical and transparent supply chain in Vietnam”. In the recent years there was a lot of controversy surrounding working conditions on many clothing factories and more companies have pledged to conduct more thorough checks of their suppliers. Unfortunately, most companies outsource their production and rely on agents to oversee that process, which makes it hard for them to have full control over day-to-day operations. Fashion 4 Freedom connects companies directly with local artisans, craft and textile villages and partnered companies without the need for middlemen. Their system allows for production of higher quality garments, preservation of many crafts, higher transparency and economic empowerment for the artisans. As the companies have more control and awareness of where and how their garments are manufactured, they will be more willing to share this with the consumers. This is a truly inspiring initiative that benefits many and it would be great to see more companies adopt this approach! What do you think the new luxury should be? Are there any new companies in the fashion industry that you think can make a real change? Share your thoughts with us in the comments! https://www.whatsorb.com/category/fashion
State of Fashion: Searching for the New Luxury
State of Fashion: Searching for the New Luxury
Circular fashion - sustainability is set to become the biggest trend of the century
For centuries, humans have used clothing as a way to express themselves and underline their status in society. Aristocracy was constantly chasing new rare materials, continuing world exploration made exotic fabrics very sought after and when new emerald green arsenic fabric dye was developed in 1814 in Europe for some it became (quite literally) to die for.  These days fashion became much more attainable. Thanks to the fast fashion trend and clothing giants like Primark, H&M and Zara anyone can look like they stepped right off the runway without spending a fortune. But with clothing prices being so low and fashion changing so often, it can sometimes feel like it is easier to buy a brand new garment rather than fix one that has slight signs of wear. This current “Take-Make-Dispose” system puts pressure on economies around the world, requires consumption of a very significant amount of already-limited resources and increases pollution.  According to Ellen McArthur Foundation, if nothing changes in the way that the current clothing supply chain system operates then by 2050 our non-renewable resource consumption will increase threefold and our oceans will have a whopping 22 million tons of microfiber added to them over the span of the next 32 years. This is something that neither nature nor economy can sustain and luckily many apparel, shoe and accessories manufacturers are already looking to better the industry. So what is circular fashion? Circular fashion is a term that was coined in 2014 and it combines the concepts of circular economy and sustainable fashion. The key principles of circular fashion define a system where wearable items are designed, sourced, produced, used and recycled in such a way that the materials can be reused over and over for production of new items with minimal environmental impact and high degree of social responsibility.  This also means eliminating many toxic materials from our clothing, making sure it will last for a long time and encouraging sharing among multiple users. Over the past 4 years a lot has been done to being the switch to this more sustainable approach. Many big brands have pledged to increase use of recycled textiles and use more sustainable practices and materials. Slowing down fast  fashion H&M is a company that is normally seen as one of the biggest names in fast fashion, however they are actually the ones who have been trying to popularize circular fashion – in fact, they might have been the first ones to use the term! They have committed to following sustainable and ethical practices in every step of the apparel creation process and they offer customers incentives such as discounts for bringing in their old clothing to be reused and recycled. G-Star Raw have also shown their dedication to increasing sustainability and social responsibility throughout their supply chain. They have not only been focusing on their own products, but are collaborating with other companies to help push the industry towards using more environmentally friendly materials and practices. They continue to innovate and one of their most prominent innovations was Bionic Yarn, a comfortable and durable material that is made out of ocean plastic. Not only does this material help find a great use for the plastic that is collected from the ocean, but it also minimizes the release of plastic microfibers back into the oceans. Another company who is trying to make a change is MudJeans. This is a European company that has pioneered a “Lease a Jeans” business model. It is simple: you pick a pair of jeans, pay a monthly fee for a year and then you can either chose to keep the jeans, send them back to MudJeans or lease another pair. The jeans that are returned to the company get recycled and turned into new pieces of clothing. According to MudJeans, their innovative business model and manufacturing technologies help them cut water usage by 78% per pair compared to average jeans manufacturers. New professionals to raise the sustainability bar With such acceleration in adoption of circular fashion, there is a need for more intra- and entrepreneurs who have the skills necessary to build and run businesses with sustainable goals at their core. The Amsterdam Fashion Institute is the first one to offer a Circular Fashion Master’s. According to Leslie Holden, Head of design and of the Master of Fashion Enterprise, this programme is essential to safeguarding the long-term future of the fashion industry. And in the UK the online retail giant Asos has just announced that it will be partnering with London College of Fashion’s Centre for  Sustainable Fashion to run a pilot training programme on circular fashion! The Netherlands is one of the countries that are really set to push the circular fashion movement forward – throughout February and March the first edition of The Circular Fashion Games took place in Eindhoven and Amsterdam. Sponsored by C&A Foundation, this event saw 40 students, scientists, designers and entrepreneurs from different countries present their innovations for the fashion industry, which ranged from new ways to spread awareness of sustainability in fashion to introducing new technologies that would allow use of other materials in textiles. This event helped bring industry leaders together with the new players and from what we’ve heard, one of the winners might be working with G-Star Raw in the future. We are looking forward to the second edition of the Games and are hoping to see it go global! Do you know of other companies in the fashion industry that are introducing interesting sustainable innovations? What changes would you like to see when it comes to how our clothes are made? Share your thoughts and ideas with us in the comments! https://www.whatsorb.com/category/fashion
For centuries, humans have used clothing as a way to express themselves and underline their status in society. Aristocracy was constantly chasing new rare materials, continuing world exploration made exotic fabrics very sought after and when new emerald green arsenic fabric dye was developed in 1814 in Europe for some it became (quite literally) to die for.  These days fashion became much more attainable. Thanks to the fast fashion trend and clothing giants like Primark, H&M and Zara anyone can look like they stepped right off the runway without spending a fortune. But with clothing prices being so low and fashion changing so often, it can sometimes feel like it is easier to buy a brand new garment rather than fix one that has slight signs of wear. This current “Take-Make-Dispose” system puts pressure on economies around the world, requires consumption of a very significant amount of already-limited resources and increases pollution.  According to Ellen McArthur Foundation, if nothing changes in the way that the current clothing supply chain system operates then by 2050 our non-renewable resource consumption will increase threefold and our oceans will have a whopping 22 million tons of microfiber added to them over the span of the next 32 years. This is something that neither nature nor economy can sustain and luckily many apparel, shoe and accessories manufacturers are already looking to better the industry. So what is circular fashion? Circular fashion is a term that was coined in 2014 and it combines the concepts of circular economy and sustainable fashion. The key principles of circular fashion define a system where wearable items are designed, sourced, produced, used and recycled in such a way that the materials can be reused over and over for production of new items with minimal environmental impact and high degree of social responsibility.  This also means eliminating many toxic materials from our clothing, making sure it will last for a long time and encouraging sharing among multiple users. Over the past 4 years a lot has been done to being the switch to this more sustainable approach. Many big brands have pledged to increase use of recycled textiles and use more sustainable practices and materials. Slowing down fast  fashion H&M is a company that is normally seen as one of the biggest names in fast fashion, however they are actually the ones who have been trying to popularize circular fashion – in fact, they might have been the first ones to use the term! They have committed to following sustainable and ethical practices in every step of the apparel creation process and they offer customers incentives such as discounts for bringing in their old clothing to be reused and recycled. G-Star Raw have also shown their dedication to increasing sustainability and social responsibility throughout their supply chain. They have not only been focusing on their own products, but are collaborating with other companies to help push the industry towards using more environmentally friendly materials and practices. They continue to innovate and one of their most prominent innovations was Bionic Yarn, a comfortable and durable material that is made out of ocean plastic. Not only does this material help find a great use for the plastic that is collected from the ocean, but it also minimizes the release of plastic microfibers back into the oceans. Another company who is trying to make a change is MudJeans. This is a European company that has pioneered a “Lease a Jeans” business model. It is simple: you pick a pair of jeans, pay a monthly fee for a year and then you can either chose to keep the jeans, send them back to MudJeans or lease another pair. The jeans that are returned to the company get recycled and turned into new pieces of clothing. According to MudJeans, their innovative business model and manufacturing technologies help them cut water usage by 78% per pair compared to average jeans manufacturers. New professionals to raise the sustainability bar With such acceleration in adoption of circular fashion, there is a need for more intra- and entrepreneurs who have the skills necessary to build and run businesses with sustainable goals at their core. The Amsterdam Fashion Institute is the first one to offer a Circular Fashion Master’s. According to Leslie Holden, Head of design and of the Master of Fashion Enterprise, this programme is essential to safeguarding the long-term future of the fashion industry. And in the UK the online retail giant Asos has just announced that it will be partnering with London College of Fashion’s Centre for  Sustainable Fashion to run a pilot training programme on circular fashion! The Netherlands is one of the countries that are really set to push the circular fashion movement forward – throughout February and March the first edition of The Circular Fashion Games took place in Eindhoven and Amsterdam. Sponsored by C&A Foundation, this event saw 40 students, scientists, designers and entrepreneurs from different countries present their innovations for the fashion industry, which ranged from new ways to spread awareness of sustainability in fashion to introducing new technologies that would allow use of other materials in textiles. This event helped bring industry leaders together with the new players and from what we’ve heard, one of the winners might be working with G-Star Raw in the future. We are looking forward to the second edition of the Games and are hoping to see it go global! Do you know of other companies in the fashion industry that are introducing interesting sustainable innovations? What changes would you like to see when it comes to how our clothes are made? Share your thoughts and ideas with us in the comments! https://www.whatsorb.com/category/fashion
Circular fashion - sustainability is set to become the biggest trend of the century
Circular fashion - sustainability is set to become the biggest trend of the century
How sustainable are your clothes in your wardrobe?
Sustainable fashion, we had it all so well organized in the past Clothes are something humanity need as long as we are around. Probably it started with plant-based materials and animal skins to protect us against the elements. Later it evolved in textiles which was not only used for protection but also to show the social status, gender and occupational status. In the very past clothes were made from grass, bark, fur and leather which were wrapped or tied around the body. Knowledge about the cloth keeps referential because the material deteriorated quickly compared to stone, bone, shell and metal artifacts. Sewing needles of bone and ivory date from about 30.000 years BC. What body lice can tell us Scientists are still debating about when people started to wear clothes. Some anthropologists have conducted a genetic analysis of human body lice that suggests clothing originated quite recently, around 170,000 years ago. Body lice is an indicator of clothes-wearing, since most humans have sparse body hair, and lice thus require human clothing to survive.  Research suggests the invention of clothing may have coincided with the northward migration of modern Homo Sapiens. Away from the warm climate of Africa, which is thought to have begun between 50,000 and 100,000 years ago. However, a second group of researchers using similar genetic methods estimate that clothing originated around 540,000 years ago. So fashion has made a long journey. Today it is the world’s second largest industrial polluter after oil. A lice on human skin told the story of human clothing The trillion dollar industry The $2.5 trillion fashion industry supports over 60 million workers throughout the global value chain. The number of urban consumers will double to 2 billion people by 2025, according to estimates by McKinsey management firm. Related pressures on the environment and the need to achieve the anti-poverty Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030 makes a transformation within the  fashion industry critical. So where did it all go so horrible go wrong? I still can remember. Almost 60 years ago when I got new clothes, it was for a special occasion. The clothes I normally wore were really worn out. Often, I got clothes from older brothers which were repaired so many times untill it was not possible anymore. Socks were adjusted, if holes started to appear. The part of a sweater around the elbow, was sometimes provided with extra strong patches from leather. The same with the knee parts from a trouser. Hans van der Broek in the early sixties in the 'Sunday room', Wildervank, the Netherlands. Photo by: M. van der Broek This all got done by my mother in the evening after dinner when sitting at the kitchen table. My father would read the newspaper or was preparing some office work for the next day. One light would be on above the kitchen table and maybe a reading light for my father. I was probably playing with some wooden building blocks and the few Dinky Toys I had on the floor. A coal stove provided some heat and the old cracking radio spitted some music out and the last news about the ‘Cuban Crisis’. On Sunday I wore my Sunday cloth which I did not like at all. I wanted to play outside, make fun with my friends and not sit tied in the ‘visitors’ room which only was used on this ‘special’ day. The girls at school got lessons in knitting, repairing, patching clothes and ironing. Later on, they worked on their trousseau, a small or larger supply of linen and clothes, with which they could use for a while in the beginning of their marriage. Clothes and linen were valuable items which needed to be repaired and taking care of. Learning how to knit and iron was part of the education system in the 'early days' Fashion and supply starts to change In the sixties and seventies things started to change. Clothes made in other countries started to appear in the shops. Till then a lot of fashion – clothes and shoes – were made in the country I lived in. It were sturdy not always comfortable products. Shoes had to be worn for a while before you could say; “yes, they fit”. Trousers and shirts often felt stiff the first few times I wore them. Only after washing them a few times they started to feel like a second skin around my body. The clothes and shoes which started to take over our market were more colorful, better and made from different material. They were often made in ‘far away countries’ which I hardly knew they existed and I can’t remember any moment that I thought about how these cloths could be so different, cheap and how they were made. T-shirts and jeans were introduced. The new jeans you could wear without washing them a few times before you get your legs in it. Afghan coats and accessories like the ‘Pukkel’ - a military style bag - became popular. Couple wearing an Afghan coat. Following trends A time of abundance in choice started and got celebrated with monthly shopping. ‘Following trends’ started to be ‘normal’ for the common man and at the end of seasons, ‘sales’ invited us to buy clothes and shoes at an even lower price. Just recently I started to be aware how our ‘cheap clothes and shoes’ are produced and in which countries they come from. Articles about sweatshops - where people have to work under horrible circumstances, child labor and working days of 12 hours – start to emerge. Although many countries recognize treaties like the International Labor Organization, which attempt to set standards for worker safety and rights, many countries have made exceptions to certain parts of the treaties or failed to thoroughly enforce them. India for example has not ratified sections 87 and 92 of the treaty. Sweatshop in Bangladesh Who doesn’t remember the fire in the Tazreen Fashions factory in 2012 in Bangladesh which killed 112 workers. A year later the Rana plaza building collapsed, an eighth story garment factory where more than 1000 people got killed. Despite the strong reactions that ‘sweatshops’ evoked among critics of globalization, the production of textiles has functioned as a consistent industry for developing nations providing work and wages, whether construed as exploitative or not, to many thousands of people. Also, the pressure on water resources especially in the cotton industry and dying practices start people around the world to be more aware that our Western ‘consumption drive’ comes at a cost for others and the environment . Manufacturing textiles is extremely water intensive. After the water is used in the manufacturing process, this often-polluted water is then sent back to our rivers, lakes and oceans. The World Bank estimates almost 20% of global industrial water pollution is caused by textile production and dyeing. Environmental friendly materials So slowly our awareness changes in a different approach towards the fashion industry. On a very small-scale things start to change. Some companies start to recycle clothes and approach the circular economy principle. Other want that in the production and consumption process a part is included which slowly ‘gives back’ something to people and nature. Some people in the garment industry embrace the idea to make cloth stronger so they last longer. Some ‘new’ companies start to use more environmental friendly materials like coconut, alpaca and bamboo. There are companies who start to make shoes from collected plastic bottles in canals and the seas. I know one company who start to make dresses from mushrooms. Mushroom textile What about me? So ‘I’ slowly start to change my buying habits if it is about clothes. I always wore and still wear clothes a long time. I hardly buy things if I don’t need them. My shelves in my wardrobe are pretty empty, almost minimalistic. A few month ago, I bought my first garments from alternative material. I bought towels made from bamboo and environmental friendly produced cotton. Stuff I can’t use anymore I gave to organizations which recycle clothes and shoes. Some items end up as dust towel or I cut shirts in pieces so I can use them to clean my bicycle. I even started to repair trousers myself that were damaged while cycling. One of the trouser legs had ended up between the chain and front gear which caused a hole in it. I’m pretty satisfied about the result. In the area where I live people have set up a X-Change group where people can deposit and collect children’s clothes. So small steps are made and consciousness is growing. Still we are at the beginning of an era which has to change our Western consumption behavior, my behavior and has to result in good wages and circumstances for the people who make your and my clothes. We have to be more precious about our environment, our people, our planet. We only have one place to live. The internet is a great tool to inform and get information how certain companies - where you and I buy our clothes - cope with working standards for the people who provide us with our garments. I as an individual can make small steps. Hopefully the industry starts making the big ones. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/fashion By: Hans van der Broek
Sustainable fashion, we had it all so well organized in the past Clothes are something humanity need as long as we are around. Probably it started with plant-based materials and animal skins to protect us against the elements. Later it evolved in textiles which was not only used for protection but also to show the social status, gender and occupational status. In the very past clothes were made from grass, bark, fur and leather which were wrapped or tied around the body. Knowledge about the cloth keeps referential because the material deteriorated quickly compared to stone, bone, shell and metal artifacts. Sewing needles of bone and ivory date from about 30.000 years BC. What body lice can tell us Scientists are still debating about when people started to wear clothes. Some anthropologists have conducted a genetic analysis of human body lice that suggests clothing originated quite recently, around 170,000 years ago. Body lice is an indicator of clothes-wearing, since most humans have sparse body hair, and lice thus require human clothing to survive.  Research suggests the invention of clothing may have coincided with the northward migration of modern Homo Sapiens. Away from the warm climate of Africa, which is thought to have begun between 50,000 and 100,000 years ago. However, a second group of researchers using similar genetic methods estimate that clothing originated around 540,000 years ago. So fashion has made a long journey. Today it is the world’s second largest industrial polluter after oil. A lice on human skin told the story of human clothing The trillion dollar industry The $2.5 trillion fashion industry supports over 60 million workers throughout the global value chain. The number of urban consumers will double to 2 billion people by 2025, according to estimates by McKinsey management firm. Related pressures on the environment and the need to achieve the anti-poverty Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030 makes a transformation within the  fashion industry critical. So where did it all go so horrible go wrong? I still can remember. Almost 60 years ago when I got new clothes, it was for a special occasion. The clothes I normally wore were really worn out. Often, I got clothes from older brothers which were repaired so many times untill it was not possible anymore. Socks were adjusted, if holes started to appear. The part of a sweater around the elbow, was sometimes provided with extra strong patches from leather. The same with the knee parts from a trouser. Hans van der Broek in the early sixties in the 'Sunday room', Wildervank, the Netherlands. Photo by: M. van der Broek This all got done by my mother in the evening after dinner when sitting at the kitchen table. My father would read the newspaper or was preparing some office work for the next day. One light would be on above the kitchen table and maybe a reading light for my father. I was probably playing with some wooden building blocks and the few Dinky Toys I had on the floor. A coal stove provided some heat and the old cracking radio spitted some music out and the last news about the ‘Cuban Crisis’. On Sunday I wore my Sunday cloth which I did not like at all. I wanted to play outside, make fun with my friends and not sit tied in the ‘visitors’ room which only was used on this ‘special’ day. The girls at school got lessons in knitting, repairing, patching clothes and ironing. Later on, they worked on their trousseau, a small or larger supply of linen and clothes, with which they could use for a while in the beginning of their marriage. Clothes and linen were valuable items which needed to be repaired and taking care of. Learning how to knit and iron was part of the education system in the 'early days' Fashion and supply starts to change In the sixties and seventies things started to change. Clothes made in other countries started to appear in the shops. Till then a lot of fashion – clothes and shoes – were made in the country I lived in. It were sturdy not always comfortable products. Shoes had to be worn for a while before you could say; “yes, they fit”. Trousers and shirts often felt stiff the first few times I wore them. Only after washing them a few times they started to feel like a second skin around my body. The clothes and shoes which started to take over our market were more colorful, better and made from different material. They were often made in ‘far away countries’ which I hardly knew they existed and I can’t remember any moment that I thought about how these cloths could be so different, cheap and how they were made. T-shirts and jeans were introduced. The new jeans you could wear without washing them a few times before you get your legs in it. Afghan coats and accessories like the ‘Pukkel’ - a military style bag - became popular. Couple wearing an Afghan coat. Following trends A time of abundance in choice started and got celebrated with monthly shopping. ‘Following trends’ started to be ‘normal’ for the common man and at the end of seasons, ‘sales’ invited us to buy clothes and shoes at an even lower price. Just recently I started to be aware how our ‘cheap clothes and shoes’ are produced and in which countries they come from. Articles about sweatshops - where people have to work under horrible circumstances, child labor and working days of 12 hours – start to emerge. Although many countries recognize treaties like the International Labor Organization, which attempt to set standards for worker safety and rights, many countries have made exceptions to certain parts of the treaties or failed to thoroughly enforce them. India for example has not ratified sections 87 and 92 of the treaty. Sweatshop in Bangladesh Who doesn’t remember the fire in the Tazreen Fashions factory in 2012 in Bangladesh which killed 112 workers. A year later the Rana plaza building collapsed, an eighth story garment factory where more than 1000 people got killed. Despite the strong reactions that ‘sweatshops’ evoked among critics of globalization, the production of textiles has functioned as a consistent industry for developing nations providing work and wages, whether construed as exploitative or not, to many thousands of people. Also, the pressure on water resources especially in the cotton industry and dying practices start people around the world to be more aware that our Western ‘consumption drive’ comes at a cost for others and the environment . Manufacturing textiles is extremely water intensive. After the water is used in the manufacturing process, this often-polluted water is then sent back to our rivers, lakes and oceans. The World Bank estimates almost 20% of global industrial water pollution is caused by textile production and dyeing. Environmental friendly materials So slowly our awareness changes in a different approach towards the fashion industry. On a very small-scale things start to change. Some companies start to recycle clothes and approach the circular economy principle. Other want that in the production and consumption process a part is included which slowly ‘gives back’ something to people and nature. Some people in the garment industry embrace the idea to make cloth stronger so they last longer. Some ‘new’ companies start to use more environmental friendly materials like coconut, alpaca and bamboo. There are companies who start to make shoes from collected plastic bottles in canals and the seas. I know one company who start to make dresses from mushrooms. Mushroom textile What about me? So ‘I’ slowly start to change my buying habits if it is about clothes. I always wore and still wear clothes a long time. I hardly buy things if I don’t need them. My shelves in my wardrobe are pretty empty, almost minimalistic. A few month ago, I bought my first garments from alternative material. I bought towels made from bamboo and environmental friendly produced cotton. Stuff I can’t use anymore I gave to organizations which recycle clothes and shoes. Some items end up as dust towel or I cut shirts in pieces so I can use them to clean my bicycle. I even started to repair trousers myself that were damaged while cycling. One of the trouser legs had ended up between the chain and front gear which caused a hole in it. I’m pretty satisfied about the result. In the area where I live people have set up a X-Change group where people can deposit and collect children’s clothes. So small steps are made and consciousness is growing. Still we are at the beginning of an era which has to change our Western consumption behavior, my behavior and has to result in good wages and circumstances for the people who make your and my clothes. We have to be more precious about our environment, our people, our planet. We only have one place to live. The internet is a great tool to inform and get information how certain companies - where you and I buy our clothes - cope with working standards for the people who provide us with our garments. I as an individual can make small steps. Hopefully the industry starts making the big ones. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/fashion By: Hans van der Broek
How sustainable are your clothes in your wardrobe?
How sustainable are your clothes in your wardrobe?
Stink no more! Sound to good to be true?
Organic-Cotton Undies Fight Odor, Bacteria With Silver Technology the funk in your trunk, one pair of undies at a time. The Danish apparel company has developed a line of organic-cotton boxer briefs that keeps your nether regions fresh by “fighting bacteria, regulating temperatures, and reducing sweat,” according to a campaign. Photo by: Organic Basics Sound too good to be true? The secret lies with the garments’ infused silver fibers, which are 99.9 percent pure and are permanently bonded to the fabric, meaning they won’t slough off in the wash or get absorbed by sweaty skin. “We have actively chosen not to work with silver nanoparticles that will wash out after just a few washes,” Organic Basics said. Stink no more The company notes that silver has long been prized for its germ-killing properties. In recent years, silver ions have helped neutralize microbes in hospital gowns, athletic wear, even bandages. But scrubbing odor-causing bacteria isn’t all silver can do, Organic Basics said. The metal is also an efficient thermal conductor, which can be helpful for athletes looking to regulate their body temperatures. “By working with natural elements such as pure silver and organic cotton, we’ve created a fabric that enhances the capabilities of your skin; keeping you warm when it’s cold and cooling you down when it’s warm,” it said. “At the same time, helping your body control micro-bacterial growth and kill the unwanted bacteria.” The need for infrequent laundering also helps with water conservation Organic Basics claims it uses only Global Organic Textile Standard– and Oeko-Tex 100–certified organic cotton, certified pure silver, and Worldwide Responsible Accredited Production–certified labor. Plus, the firm says that product longevity was key to the underwear’s design. “With SilverTech we have been working with pure silver and long-fiber organic cotton creating a high-quality fabric made to last 10-plus years and with active silver-controlling microbial growth potentially bringing down machine washes by 50 percent,” Organic Basics said. “ Goodbye to ‘fast fashion’ and goodbye to planned obsolescence. By Lori Zimmer, Inhabitat
Organic-Cotton Undies Fight Odor, Bacteria With Silver Technology the funk in your trunk, one pair of undies at a time. The Danish apparel company has developed a line of organic-cotton boxer briefs that keeps your nether regions fresh by “fighting bacteria, regulating temperatures, and reducing sweat,” according to a campaign. Photo by: Organic Basics Sound too good to be true? The secret lies with the garments’ infused silver fibers, which are 99.9 percent pure and are permanently bonded to the fabric, meaning they won’t slough off in the wash or get absorbed by sweaty skin. “We have actively chosen not to work with silver nanoparticles that will wash out after just a few washes,” Organic Basics said. Stink no more The company notes that silver has long been prized for its germ-killing properties. In recent years, silver ions have helped neutralize microbes in hospital gowns, athletic wear, even bandages. But scrubbing odor-causing bacteria isn’t all silver can do, Organic Basics said. The metal is also an efficient thermal conductor, which can be helpful for athletes looking to regulate their body temperatures. “By working with natural elements such as pure silver and organic cotton, we’ve created a fabric that enhances the capabilities of your skin; keeping you warm when it’s cold and cooling you down when it’s warm,” it said. “At the same time, helping your body control micro-bacterial growth and kill the unwanted bacteria.” The need for infrequent laundering also helps with water conservation Organic Basics claims it uses only Global Organic Textile Standard– and Oeko-Tex 100–certified organic cotton, certified pure silver, and Worldwide Responsible Accredited Production–certified labor. Plus, the firm says that product longevity was key to the underwear’s design. “With SilverTech we have been working with pure silver and long-fiber organic cotton creating a high-quality fabric made to last 10-plus years and with active silver-controlling microbial growth potentially bringing down machine washes by 50 percent,” Organic Basics said. “ Goodbye to ‘fast fashion’ and goodbye to planned obsolescence. By Lori Zimmer, Inhabitat
Stink no more! Sound to good to be true?
Fashion

Many individuals and brands are now producing clothing and accessories that promote a sustainable lifestyle or otherwise contribute to improve the environment. Read all about the latest efforts to make wearable contributions to the environment.

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