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Go with the wind: patent pending for small spherical wind turbine
Recently, I came across an article that discussed a new patent that is pending for the so-called O-Wind concept. This is explained by its developers as being a omnidirectional wind turbine. Say what? Yes, that is right - a wind turbine that can catch winds coming in from all directions and will no longer depend on the good graces of Mother Nature or expensive and time-consuming ways of letting the turbine face the right direction.   The O-Wind turbine was developed as part of the challenge set by the organisation behind the James Dyson Award. This annual award, bringing along a monetary prize of € 35,000, seeks to encourage young inventors and developers to come up with solutions that might make the world a better place.   The futuristic O-Wind turbine captures wind from all directions This year, British entrepreneurs Nicolas Orellana and Yaseen Noorani saw themselves victorious on the award night with their concept for a spherical, small  wind turbine that is able to capture wind, no matter what direction it is coming from. It is futuristic, slick, unconventional and only measures a incredible 25 cm in diameter. Through geometric ports, it takes in wind; that it subsequently converts to energy that can directly be used in the surrounding area. Photo by:  James Dyson Award The applications for this invention seem endless and very promising: it is small and functional enough to serve crowded, urban areas, while it makes optimal use of the often unpredictable wind in those large cities. When attached to someone’s balcony, it might just serve to deliver at least a significant portion of that household’s needs - or feed the energy needs of the larger community. As explained by inventor Orellana: “We hope that O-Wind Turbine will improve the usability and affordability of turbines for people across the world. Cities are windy places but we are currently not harnessing this resource. Our belief is that making it easier to generate green energy, people will be encouraged to play a bigger own role in conserving our planet.” Combining science and great engineering The basic idea of the O-Wind is pretty nifty. For its mechanical motion, it effectively employs Bernoulli’s principle, where the sphere-shaped turbine relies on differences in air pressure to generate its momentum. It has a large number of vents that the wind could run through, using three dimensions. These vents are placed all across the sphere, allowing it to function no matter what direction the wind is coming from.   And once the wind reaches the turbine, it will enter through larger entrances and use smaller exits. When it is windy, the pressure difference between those two terminals will lead to movement in the form of rotation. The movement, in turn, will be used to feed a generator. This produces electricity that can be used locally or fed back to the regional or national grid, to be used at a time of shortage. For this, the owners of the turbines will receive a financial reward - another incentive for installing such a nifty turbine, while increasing the share of sustainable energy. Its functionality makes it particularly suitable for, for instance, apartment buildings in urban areas, where winds can be erratic due to tall architectural buildings throwing it in chaos. The small size, probably best compared to a balloon or Chinese lantern, requires very little maintenance, while very little space is required for its installation. Another plus for urban use. It could quite literally be perched on top of anyone’s roof or the side of a building. Next steps in  wind energy Innovations such as the O-Wind can bring urban energy harvesting to the next level. While Orellana and Noorani are currently developing and prototyping their spherical turbine and lining up investors, there are multiple other start-ups working hard to bring new, feasible alternatives to the market as well. A fascinating initiative would be that of Maya Power, a fellow British company, that uses the wind in the tunnels of the London Underground to generate energy, using a flexible fabric. Or the smart wind turbine of Italian-based start-up Enessere, that learns from the wind patterns to optimise the power generated. Wind energy is something that most people will find themselves drawn to, yet not many will applaud the idea of having a huge turbine in their backyard. This is why these smaller initiatives should be encouraged and cheered on: they are looking into ways of making wind energy accessible for all, whether it is from the use of tiny wind turbines, the O-Wind’s spherical turbines or other creative ways of harnessing the power of the wind. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy
Recently, I came across an article that discussed a new patent that is pending for the so-called O-Wind concept. This is explained by its developers as being a omnidirectional wind turbine. Say what? Yes, that is right - a wind turbine that can catch winds coming in from all directions and will no longer depend on the good graces of Mother Nature or expensive and time-consuming ways of letting the turbine face the right direction.   The O-Wind turbine was developed as part of the challenge set by the organisation behind the James Dyson Award. This annual award, bringing along a monetary prize of € 35,000, seeks to encourage young inventors and developers to come up with solutions that might make the world a better place.   The futuristic O-Wind turbine captures wind from all directions This year, British entrepreneurs Nicolas Orellana and Yaseen Noorani saw themselves victorious on the award night with their concept for a spherical, small  wind turbine that is able to capture wind, no matter what direction it is coming from. It is futuristic, slick, unconventional and only measures a incredible 25 cm in diameter. Through geometric ports, it takes in wind; that it subsequently converts to energy that can directly be used in the surrounding area. Photo by:  James Dyson Award The applications for this invention seem endless and very promising: it is small and functional enough to serve crowded, urban areas, while it makes optimal use of the often unpredictable wind in those large cities. When attached to someone’s balcony, it might just serve to deliver at least a significant portion of that household’s needs - or feed the energy needs of the larger community. As explained by inventor Orellana: “We hope that O-Wind Turbine will improve the usability and affordability of turbines for people across the world. Cities are windy places but we are currently not harnessing this resource. Our belief is that making it easier to generate green energy, people will be encouraged to play a bigger own role in conserving our planet.” Combining science and great engineering The basic idea of the O-Wind is pretty nifty. For its mechanical motion, it effectively employs Bernoulli’s principle, where the sphere-shaped turbine relies on differences in air pressure to generate its momentum. It has a large number of vents that the wind could run through, using three dimensions. These vents are placed all across the sphere, allowing it to function no matter what direction the wind is coming from.   And once the wind reaches the turbine, it will enter through larger entrances and use smaller exits. When it is windy, the pressure difference between those two terminals will lead to movement in the form of rotation. The movement, in turn, will be used to feed a generator. This produces electricity that can be used locally or fed back to the regional or national grid, to be used at a time of shortage. For this, the owners of the turbines will receive a financial reward - another incentive for installing such a nifty turbine, while increasing the share of sustainable energy. Its functionality makes it particularly suitable for, for instance, apartment buildings in urban areas, where winds can be erratic due to tall architectural buildings throwing it in chaos. The small size, probably best compared to a balloon or Chinese lantern, requires very little maintenance, while very little space is required for its installation. Another plus for urban use. It could quite literally be perched on top of anyone’s roof or the side of a building. Next steps in  wind energy Innovations such as the O-Wind can bring urban energy harvesting to the next level. While Orellana and Noorani are currently developing and prototyping their spherical turbine and lining up investors, there are multiple other start-ups working hard to bring new, feasible alternatives to the market as well. A fascinating initiative would be that of Maya Power, a fellow British company, that uses the wind in the tunnels of the London Underground to generate energy, using a flexible fabric. Or the smart wind turbine of Italian-based start-up Enessere, that learns from the wind patterns to optimise the power generated. Wind energy is something that most people will find themselves drawn to, yet not many will applaud the idea of having a huge turbine in their backyard. This is why these smaller initiatives should be encouraged and cheered on: they are looking into ways of making wind energy accessible for all, whether it is from the use of tiny wind turbines, the O-Wind’s spherical turbines or other creative ways of harnessing the power of the wind. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy
Go with the wind: patent pending for small spherical wind turbine
Go with the wind: patent pending for small spherical wind turbine
WOODEN WIND TURBINES: BROUGHT TO YOU BY EAZ-WIND
A ‘wooden mill’ will undoubtedly bring up associations of the age-old, traditional mills of the Dutch type. Fierce, imposing wooden structures towering over the surrounding landscapes. Quite often, the wind turbines that are so common today pale in comparison. They stand out, with their unnatural materials and shapes. That is, until EAZ developed their unique wooden wind turbines. This Netherlands-based company, originating from the rural area of Groningen, wanted to develop a wind turbine that could easily be set up in densely populated areas. Normally, some of these areas cannot afford an actual wind turbine. Not only are they too expensive, due to the expensive materials and the complicated process of installing and servicing it, they are also facing heavy resistance from the community.   Effectively, this makes it hard to make wind energy solutions available in areas that do not have the required funds or social support. The only options left are solar panels or water power, which are usually not sufficient for providing in the electricity needs of the immediate area either.   EAZ WIND TURBINES As the need for renewable energy grows, so does the need for solutions that actually fit in to the area. And while ‘traditional’ wind turbines often do not fit in, the unique versions created by EAZ manage to blend in seamlessly. The design for their wind turbines have been made simpler, and much more cost-effective. Production is all performed in-house, using local labour and materials. As such, it will not nearly be as expensive to get the wind turbines produced. These materials, sourced locally, include a number of sustainable components from natural sources - including the blades, which are made of larch wood and finished with fibreglass. The stabiliser is also made of wood, with an internal frame of steel for reinforcement.   MAINTENANCE AND INSTALLATION Not only are the materials largely sustainable, they are also chosen as they are relatively maintenance-free. For example, it also has a permanent magnet, a ring generator without gearbox, which means that there is no friction. The steel mast comes with a double coating, making it more durable. The installation is performed quickly and with a minimal impact for the environment. For the generation of energy, the wind turbine will be connected to the fuse box right behind the electricity meter, resulting in further savings on the purchase price of electricity as well as energy tax. SUPPORT OF LOCAL COMMUNITY In another clever move, EAZ wind turbines decided to take the development process to the local authorities and communities. With this, they guaranteed their support and made sure that the eventual design would fit in the landscape.   As the home turf of EAZ - the Dutch province of Groningen - is rapidly growing and expanding, as reflected by the improving economy, the region is becoming increasingly self-sustaining. More and more jobs are being created, putting pressure on local entrepreneurs to find ways of generating more energy in an efficient and sustainable manner. PLACEMENT OF WIND TURBINE One of their options is the purchase of one of these wind turbines, made easier because of the reduced cost price and lower impact on the environment. This way, it can be installed on a farm to provide in the energy needs. Secondly, people could opt for joining an initiative where they invest in a common wind turbine for the entire village. In this case, everyone in the area can directly benefit from the locally generated wind energy. Although these wind turbines might be better looking, it is still an infringement on the landscape. Therefore, EAZ has pledged to take great care in fitting it into the landscape. The already existing elements and lines are being taken into consideration, while the limited height ensures that it is less conspicuous. WHY DOES ANY OF IT MATTER? All well and good, but why would it matter what a wind turbine looks like? What does EAZ offer in an already crowded market that makes them stand out? Their continued success is a testament to the importance of keeping aesthetics and user demands in mind, so that wind turbines become more of a community product. The lower installation and maintenance costs, its adaptability to the landscape, and the decent yield: it adds up to a great proposition that is ready to scale up. After all, the truth of the matter is that the general opinion of wind turbines is still far from favourable. Perhaps unjustly so, but that does not make it any more urgent. EAZ should be commanded for their attempts to sway the public opinion through making wind turbines more accessible and friendly. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/energy/wind
A ‘wooden mill’ will undoubtedly bring up associations of the age-old, traditional mills of the Dutch type. Fierce, imposing wooden structures towering over the surrounding landscapes. Quite often, the wind turbines that are so common today pale in comparison. They stand out, with their unnatural materials and shapes. That is, until EAZ developed their unique wooden wind turbines. This Netherlands-based company, originating from the rural area of Groningen, wanted to develop a wind turbine that could easily be set up in densely populated areas. Normally, some of these areas cannot afford an actual wind turbine. Not only are they too expensive, due to the expensive materials and the complicated process of installing and servicing it, they are also facing heavy resistance from the community.   Effectively, this makes it hard to make wind energy solutions available in areas that do not have the required funds or social support. The only options left are solar panels or water power, which are usually not sufficient for providing in the electricity needs of the immediate area either.   EAZ WIND TURBINES As the need for renewable energy grows, so does the need for solutions that actually fit in to the area. And while ‘traditional’ wind turbines often do not fit in, the unique versions created by EAZ manage to blend in seamlessly. The design for their wind turbines have been made simpler, and much more cost-effective. Production is all performed in-house, using local labour and materials. As such, it will not nearly be as expensive to get the wind turbines produced. These materials, sourced locally, include a number of sustainable components from natural sources - including the blades, which are made of larch wood and finished with fibreglass. The stabiliser is also made of wood, with an internal frame of steel for reinforcement.   MAINTENANCE AND INSTALLATION Not only are the materials largely sustainable, they are also chosen as they are relatively maintenance-free. For example, it also has a permanent magnet, a ring generator without gearbox, which means that there is no friction. The steel mast comes with a double coating, making it more durable. The installation is performed quickly and with a minimal impact for the environment. For the generation of energy, the wind turbine will be connected to the fuse box right behind the electricity meter, resulting in further savings on the purchase price of electricity as well as energy tax. SUPPORT OF LOCAL COMMUNITY In another clever move, EAZ wind turbines decided to take the development process to the local authorities and communities. With this, they guaranteed their support and made sure that the eventual design would fit in the landscape.   As the home turf of EAZ - the Dutch province of Groningen - is rapidly growing and expanding, as reflected by the improving economy, the region is becoming increasingly self-sustaining. More and more jobs are being created, putting pressure on local entrepreneurs to find ways of generating more energy in an efficient and sustainable manner. PLACEMENT OF WIND TURBINE One of their options is the purchase of one of these wind turbines, made easier because of the reduced cost price and lower impact on the environment. This way, it can be installed on a farm to provide in the energy needs. Secondly, people could opt for joining an initiative where they invest in a common wind turbine for the entire village. In this case, everyone in the area can directly benefit from the locally generated wind energy. Although these wind turbines might be better looking, it is still an infringement on the landscape. Therefore, EAZ has pledged to take great care in fitting it into the landscape. The already existing elements and lines are being taken into consideration, while the limited height ensures that it is less conspicuous. WHY DOES ANY OF IT MATTER? All well and good, but why would it matter what a wind turbine looks like? What does EAZ offer in an already crowded market that makes them stand out? Their continued success is a testament to the importance of keeping aesthetics and user demands in mind, so that wind turbines become more of a community product. The lower installation and maintenance costs, its adaptability to the landscape, and the decent yield: it adds up to a great proposition that is ready to scale up. After all, the truth of the matter is that the general opinion of wind turbines is still far from favourable. Perhaps unjustly so, but that does not make it any more urgent. EAZ should be commanded for their attempts to sway the public opinion through making wind turbines more accessible and friendly. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/energy/wind
WOODEN WIND TURBINES: BROUGHT TO YOU BY EAZ-WIND
WOODEN WIND TURBINES: BROUGHT TO YOU BY EAZ-WIND
Urban Windmills: Wind energy; the future or a mere eyesore?
As the world is gearing up to combat one of the largest ever threats to our wellbeing, in the form of climate change, most countries have made ambitious pledges to drastically increase the share of renewable energy sources like wind energy by 2022. Yet critics will be quick to point at the relatively insignificant results so far: wind energy, for instance, barely provides for 1% of the global energy needs as of today.   Just how exactly are we planning on increasing this number? Especially considering the growing criticism of the visual aesthetics and noise annoyances of wind energy constructions like: windmills and windturbines. A once pristine piece of land or gorgeous view over the sea can be disrupted by the typical silhouettes of a large wind farm that can be seen from miles away. As such, it might spoil the view of those living around it and disrupt the silence with bothersome noises. All for the private gain of a few. Public outcry over the undesirable side-effects of these giants in the landscape will only grow louder, effectively limiting the number of new wind energy farms that can be build in rural areas. This puts more pressure on the metropolitan areas; and on finding ways of swaying public perception to be in favour of wind turbines. This is why innovative companies have been investing in a concept called urban windmills . WIND ENERGY BY URBAN WINDMILLS Urban windmills are compact, mostly silent wind turbines that have been perfected for use in skyscrapers, apartment buildings and stadiums. As such, they can be integrated within a landscape without requiring actual square footage; and with the huge plus of reduced noise emission. They can be as big or as small as required, from relatively small turbines on someone’s roof to larger ones integrated in a landmark object. Perhaps you have seen the futuristic movie Skyscraper , currently playing in cinemas, starring Dwayne Johnson and a massive 3,500 feet skyscraper in Hong Kong. It prominently features a huge wind turbine on the top floor. While this will not quite be the new skyline-norm, it certainly provides a clear image of the concept of urban windmills. LOWER EFFICIENCY The question is to what extent such innovations will lead to a sustainable and impactful increase in the use of renewable energy sources like wind energy. And although the idea of having a small windmill on your building’s roof or in your small garden is an attractive one; in practice you would find that it hardly delivers enough energy to power a single lightbulb.   This lower efficiency is a result of two things. First, the smaller size of the windturbine, allowing for use in a smaller area and with less impact on its environment; and secondly, the prevalence (or lack thereof) of strong winds in cities. Traditional windmills are typically placed in wide open, obstacle-free environments for a reason - as it allows them to catch as much wind as possible. This luxury is not available in urban areas, unless - as the movie Skyscraper  suggests - you place it significantly higher than all other buildings and objects around it. HIGHER COSTS While this certainly provides an interesting viewpoint for cities investing in tall buildings, one also has to consider another point. Placing a heavy, big wind energy turbine on top of a tall building - and maintaining it - requires a lot of energy. Actually, more energy than it will produce in the long run. Simply put: it requires more energy to install and operate an urban windmill than that it generates. Combined with the relatively high initial investment, as the required technology and materials are still rather expensive, it simply might not be feasible financially. And once the costs of having an urban windmill installed outgrow the expected revenue in its lifetime, one would do well to reconsider its application. CONCLUSION This leads to a somewhat sombre conclusion: a single big windmill in a rural area generates much more energy than a large number of small windmills in a densely populated area. This is not to say that wind energy like urban windmills are a bad idea per se. In certain areas, that are known for being very windy and offer more space (and fewer high-rises), they could already work. For employment in the inner cities, it simply is a concept that requires more innovating and would definitely benefit from lower cost prices, both in the initial investment requirement and energy needs.   https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/energy/wind
As the world is gearing up to combat one of the largest ever threats to our wellbeing, in the form of climate change, most countries have made ambitious pledges to drastically increase the share of renewable energy sources like wind energy by 2022. Yet critics will be quick to point at the relatively insignificant results so far: wind energy, for instance, barely provides for 1% of the global energy needs as of today.   Just how exactly are we planning on increasing this number? Especially considering the growing criticism of the visual aesthetics and noise annoyances of wind energy constructions like: windmills and windturbines. A once pristine piece of land or gorgeous view over the sea can be disrupted by the typical silhouettes of a large wind farm that can be seen from miles away. As such, it might spoil the view of those living around it and disrupt the silence with bothersome noises. All for the private gain of a few. Public outcry over the undesirable side-effects of these giants in the landscape will only grow louder, effectively limiting the number of new wind energy farms that can be build in rural areas. This puts more pressure on the metropolitan areas; and on finding ways of swaying public perception to be in favour of wind turbines. This is why innovative companies have been investing in a concept called urban windmills . WIND ENERGY BY URBAN WINDMILLS Urban windmills are compact, mostly silent wind turbines that have been perfected for use in skyscrapers, apartment buildings and stadiums. As such, they can be integrated within a landscape without requiring actual square footage; and with the huge plus of reduced noise emission. They can be as big or as small as required, from relatively small turbines on someone’s roof to larger ones integrated in a landmark object. Perhaps you have seen the futuristic movie Skyscraper , currently playing in cinemas, starring Dwayne Johnson and a massive 3,500 feet skyscraper in Hong Kong. It prominently features a huge wind turbine on the top floor. While this will not quite be the new skyline-norm, it certainly provides a clear image of the concept of urban windmills. LOWER EFFICIENCY The question is to what extent such innovations will lead to a sustainable and impactful increase in the use of renewable energy sources like wind energy. And although the idea of having a small windmill on your building’s roof or in your small garden is an attractive one; in practice you would find that it hardly delivers enough energy to power a single lightbulb.   This lower efficiency is a result of two things. First, the smaller size of the windturbine, allowing for use in a smaller area and with less impact on its environment; and secondly, the prevalence (or lack thereof) of strong winds in cities. Traditional windmills are typically placed in wide open, obstacle-free environments for a reason - as it allows them to catch as much wind as possible. This luxury is not available in urban areas, unless - as the movie Skyscraper  suggests - you place it significantly higher than all other buildings and objects around it. HIGHER COSTS While this certainly provides an interesting viewpoint for cities investing in tall buildings, one also has to consider another point. Placing a heavy, big wind energy turbine on top of a tall building - and maintaining it - requires a lot of energy. Actually, more energy than it will produce in the long run. Simply put: it requires more energy to install and operate an urban windmill than that it generates. Combined with the relatively high initial investment, as the required technology and materials are still rather expensive, it simply might not be feasible financially. And once the costs of having an urban windmill installed outgrow the expected revenue in its lifetime, one would do well to reconsider its application. CONCLUSION This leads to a somewhat sombre conclusion: a single big windmill in a rural area generates much more energy than a large number of small windmills in a densely populated area. This is not to say that wind energy like urban windmills are a bad idea per se. In certain areas, that are known for being very windy and offer more space (and fewer high-rises), they could already work. For employment in the inner cities, it simply is a concept that requires more innovating and would definitely benefit from lower cost prices, both in the initial investment requirement and energy needs.   https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/energy/wind
Urban Windmills: Wind energy; the future or a mere eyesore?
Urban Windmills: Wind energy; the future or a mere eyesore?
On June 15 th we celebrate Global Wind Day. Organised by European Wind Energy Association and Global Wind Energy Council, this is the day to learn all about wind energy, one of the most promising sustainable energy sources, and discover its true potential. So please allow us to take you on a tour through history of wind energy from ancient times to present day and even take a sneak peek into the future! How and when did we start using wind energy? Wind is a very powerful force of nature. It can uproot trees, blow off roofs and, given enough time, it can build and destroy mountains. So it is only natural that humans have been looking for ways to harness this energy and use it to their advantage. The first use of wind energy came in form of sailing. Scientists have discovered ceramics from the Cucuteni-Trypillian culture in Eastern Europe that depicted sailboats as early as 6000 BC. Ancient Egyptians, Mesopotamians and proto-Austronesian people have also been known to actively use sailboats in the ancient times. Then came along Heron of Alexandria, ‘the greatest experimentalist of antiquity’. He invented the first wind wheel in 1 st century AD to operate an organ – this was the earliest known example of a wind-powered machine. While archaeologists cannot yet say when or where the first windmills were built, there is evidence of the Persians using windmills around 500-900 AD. Windmills were used to pump seawater for salt making by year 1000 AD in both China and Sicily. Heron's Wind Wheel In Europe windmills started to appear around 12 th century. They were used extensively for food production as their operation was not disrupted by winter in the way water mills’ was. The Dutch have later taken existing windmill designs and adapted them for draining lakes and marshes. If not for wind-powered mills, the Netherlands would’ve looked very different today – it is estimated that a whopping 17% of the country is land that was reclaimed from the sea and lakes! First wind turbine was built by Professor James Blyth in Scotland in July 1887. It was used to charge accumulators that provided electricity to light Blyth’s cottage, effectively making his cottage the first house in the world to have its electricity come from this green source. First wind turbine was built by Professor James Blyth in Scotland in July 1887 A favourite on the rise Naturally, many improvements were made to Professor’s design over the last 130 years. Sleek, horizontal axis turbines with are a far cry from Blyth’s vertical axis construction that looks like something from a sci-fi movie (even though it was made way before those even existed!). Wind energy is currently one of the most important sources of renewable energy. More than 90 countries use wind energy and with wind power being the fastest growing energy source in the world more countries are expected to adopt it in the coming years. China is world leader in wind energy adoption rate, and while wind power currently accounts only for 4% of nation’s total energy consumption this is likely to rapidly change in the upcoming years. On the other hand Denmark and Portugal have more than 40% of their electricity supplied by wind power – in fact, in March 2018 Portugal’s renewable energy sources generated 103,6% of mainland electricity consumption! The US is also adopting wind energy at a fast pace. So why is wind energy becoming so popular? It all has to do with our favourite word here at WhatsOrb – Sustainability.  Wind isn’t a resource the world can ever run out of and this fact alone already gives makes it much more advantageous from both environmental and economic perspectives compared to the more traditional energy sources like oil, natural gas and coal. But that isn’t the only benefit of switching over to wind power. Air pollution is the fourth largest threat to human health globally and energy production is the biggest source of it by far. Wind turbines, on the other hand, do not produce any emissions that can cause pollution and are thus much better for the environment. They also don’t require any water for cooling, which allows them to be used in water-stressed regions without causing further harm. All of these factors make wind energy very attractive and with costs getting lower and lower as technology gets perfected we can only expect it to become more popular in the years to come. What the future holds Wind energy offers a lot of benefits and with more and more plants being built every year it is clear that it will play a significant role in world’s power supply. Naturally, this means we will see more exciting developments in the technology and, hopefully, more uses for it. One of such developments was unveiled by GE this March. It is called Haliade-X and it promises to become the world’s most powerful offshore wind turbine to date. It will be 260m(853ft) tall, which is as tall as San Francisco’s Transamerica Pyramid! Haliade-X also promises to be able to generate energy even at lower wind speeds and its simplified design will allow for easier repairs, allowing it to provide green energy at a lower cost. The Halliade-X, promises to become the world’s most powerful offshore wind turbine to date Another project to watch is SUMR (Segmented Ultralight Morphing Rotor) Wind, a collaboration between leading industry experts and universities that is even more ambitious than that of GE. Their goal is to perfect existing turbine design in every aspect and allow for creation of massive turbines that will be taller than the Eiffel Tower. These turbines are expected to reduce costs of offshore energy by as much as 50% by 2025. While GE’s and SUMR Wind’s projects are all about improving the existing tech, Makani Power is a company that is looking to introduce a new way of harvesting wind energy. Their energy kites can soar to 300m(984ft) and fly autonomously in loops, which allows it to generate high amounts of power in a very efficient manner. They are going to do flight tests in Hawaii this year and we are looking forward to seeing the results! Are there any cool wind power-related projects you’ve seen lately? Share them with us in the comments – we are ready to be blown away! https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy By: Ariana Murzina
On June 15 th we celebrate Global Wind Day. Organised by European Wind Energy Association and Global Wind Energy Council, this is the day to learn all about wind energy, one of the most promising sustainable energy sources, and discover its true potential. So please allow us to take you on a tour through history of wind energy from ancient times to present day and even take a sneak peek into the future! How and when did we start using wind energy? Wind is a very powerful force of nature. It can uproot trees, blow off roofs and, given enough time, it can build and destroy mountains. So it is only natural that humans have been looking for ways to harness this energy and use it to their advantage. The first use of wind energy came in form of sailing. Scientists have discovered ceramics from the Cucuteni-Trypillian culture in Eastern Europe that depicted sailboats as early as 6000 BC. Ancient Egyptians, Mesopotamians and proto-Austronesian people have also been known to actively use sailboats in the ancient times. Then came along Heron of Alexandria, ‘the greatest experimentalist of antiquity’. He invented the first wind wheel in 1 st century AD to operate an organ – this was the earliest known example of a wind-powered machine. While archaeologists cannot yet say when or where the first windmills were built, there is evidence of the Persians using windmills around 500-900 AD. Windmills were used to pump seawater for salt making by year 1000 AD in both China and Sicily. Heron's Wind Wheel In Europe windmills started to appear around 12 th century. They were used extensively for food production as their operation was not disrupted by winter in the way water mills’ was. The Dutch have later taken existing windmill designs and adapted them for draining lakes and marshes. If not for wind-powered mills, the Netherlands would’ve looked very different today – it is estimated that a whopping 17% of the country is land that was reclaimed from the sea and lakes! First wind turbine was built by Professor James Blyth in Scotland in July 1887. It was used to charge accumulators that provided electricity to light Blyth’s cottage, effectively making his cottage the first house in the world to have its electricity come from this green source. First wind turbine was built by Professor James Blyth in Scotland in July 1887 A favourite on the rise Naturally, many improvements were made to Professor’s design over the last 130 years. Sleek, horizontal axis turbines with are a far cry from Blyth’s vertical axis construction that looks like something from a sci-fi movie (even though it was made way before those even existed!). Wind energy is currently one of the most important sources of renewable energy. More than 90 countries use wind energy and with wind power being the fastest growing energy source in the world more countries are expected to adopt it in the coming years. China is world leader in wind energy adoption rate, and while wind power currently accounts only for 4% of nation’s total energy consumption this is likely to rapidly change in the upcoming years. On the other hand Denmark and Portugal have more than 40% of their electricity supplied by wind power – in fact, in March 2018 Portugal’s renewable energy sources generated 103,6% of mainland electricity consumption! The US is also adopting wind energy at a fast pace. So why is wind energy becoming so popular? It all has to do with our favourite word here at WhatsOrb – Sustainability.  Wind isn’t a resource the world can ever run out of and this fact alone already gives makes it much more advantageous from both environmental and economic perspectives compared to the more traditional energy sources like oil, natural gas and coal. But that isn’t the only benefit of switching over to wind power. Air pollution is the fourth largest threat to human health globally and energy production is the biggest source of it by far. Wind turbines, on the other hand, do not produce any emissions that can cause pollution and are thus much better for the environment. They also don’t require any water for cooling, which allows them to be used in water-stressed regions without causing further harm. All of these factors make wind energy very attractive and with costs getting lower and lower as technology gets perfected we can only expect it to become more popular in the years to come. What the future holds Wind energy offers a lot of benefits and with more and more plants being built every year it is clear that it will play a significant role in world’s power supply. Naturally, this means we will see more exciting developments in the technology and, hopefully, more uses for it. One of such developments was unveiled by GE this March. It is called Haliade-X and it promises to become the world’s most powerful offshore wind turbine to date. It will be 260m(853ft) tall, which is as tall as San Francisco’s Transamerica Pyramid! Haliade-X also promises to be able to generate energy even at lower wind speeds and its simplified design will allow for easier repairs, allowing it to provide green energy at a lower cost. The Halliade-X, promises to become the world’s most powerful offshore wind turbine to date Another project to watch is SUMR (Segmented Ultralight Morphing Rotor) Wind, a collaboration between leading industry experts and universities that is even more ambitious than that of GE. Their goal is to perfect existing turbine design in every aspect and allow for creation of massive turbines that will be taller than the Eiffel Tower. These turbines are expected to reduce costs of offshore energy by as much as 50% by 2025. While GE’s and SUMR Wind’s projects are all about improving the existing tech, Makani Power is a company that is looking to introduce a new way of harvesting wind energy. Their energy kites can soar to 300m(984ft) and fly autonomously in loops, which allows it to generate high amounts of power in a very efficient manner. They are going to do flight tests in Hawaii this year and we are looking forward to seeing the results! Are there any cool wind power-related projects you’ve seen lately? Share them with us in the comments – we are ready to be blown away! https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy By: Ariana Murzina
'Do you celebrate Global Wind Day on June 15th?'
#Cathing #wind energy high on roofs
High on the roof wind search can help to make flats and offices completely independent of fossil fuel. One of the wind and solar boxes of the test project in Utrecht (the Netherlands). In the city you cannot erect windmills. But a wind turbine fits on roofs. This can help to let flats and offices function fully on alternative energy. Suma enters an apartment building in the Utrecht Overvecht district. He takes the stairs up, then the elevator to the highest point. It is his sustainable dream that Suma - educated as an engineer - always brings to a dizzying height. He is the founder and director of the company Ibis Power, which places windmills on the roofs of flats and office buildings. No ordinary windmills, that's clear. On the roof of the seventies apartment is an elongated container. Inside is a rotating cylinder, which produces electricity on wind force. Ordinary windmills on a roof "Putting an ordinary windmill on a roof does not work. That would be unstable, dangerous and against all building regulations. Putting a mini-windmill on a roof, you can. You see that too, here and there on buildings in cities. "They hardly generate electricity," Suma says. "Our mission is to generate enough electricity on the roof for all residents living underneath." It is possible, but then the houses do also need insulation and heat pumps. Moreover, the entire roof has to be filled with the square turbines. A power nest, Suma calls them. The top of the square windmills has to be filled with solar cells, every square inch has to be used to generate green energy. "Only then can you provide an entire flat with it." And still not always. If there is no wind, or it is freezing, the houses still have to drain electricity from the electricity grid. Getting rit of gas pipes With the latest project, it must be possible to remove the gaspipe grid connection for six-and-a-half of the ten floors. The project in Utrecht is mainly a test; the electricity is for one of the houses in the flat. The prospects for Suma in Utrecht Overvecht are good, because exactly this neighborhood has been designated by the municipality as the first natural gas-free area. The gas network has had its best time here. There must be no new gas pipes but clean energy. The Ibis Powernest costs 55,000 euros (excluding installation costs). That can be recouped in seven to fifteen years, says Suma, depending on the location. "Near the sea it is going faster, given the wind speeds, then near the central Netherlands." Ibis Power works with six permanent employees, at an office in Eindhoven. The windmill of the powernest comes from Taiwan, the upright solar panels China. The company works together with a large construction and energy group for installation on roofs. There are also companies that try to sell flat windmill boxes to the ridge of ordinary terraced houses. Suma points from the roof of the flat over the houses and buildings. "They have to get rid of the natural gas as soon as possible." To arrange that, all sustainable technologies and alternative energy sources must be used, he says. Construction companies and municipalities are starting to get that through more and more. All buildings and houses must eventually become natural gas-free. Because of the climate agreement of Paris, and to liberate gas extraction area Groningen from quakes. But to make that change really a success, something has to change. The scale must go up, the costs down. In addition, some government regulations must change, Suma says. "Officially our wind energy roof still counts as an extra layer of living, which slows down processes." The tricky thing is also to distribute generated electricity well between all the underlying residential blocks. C oast provinces Apart from Utrecht, there is also a test mill on a roof in Nieuwerkerk aan den IJssel. Now that the attention for climate problems and 'Groningen' is increasing, the phone is constantly ringing at the company. Very different from ten years ago, when Suma started. He came up with the idea when he did PhD research in Miami, where air-conditioners were blowing all day. That made him think. "The energy consumption is cities is heavily polluting, that must be different." He also sees a sales market in the United States (New York), the Caribbean and Asia. Ibis Power wants to work internationally. Suma has just returned from Berlin, where he won a sustainability prize. He will soon have to go to the Chinese city of Shenzhen, where he also hopes to win the prizes. In the Netherlands, the company mainly targets potential customers in the coastal provinces. There are the most energy-hungry buildings. "We already count 2,163 suitable buildings," Suma explains. The latest project will be in Rotterdam. A ‘powernest’ must rake every bit of wind blowing in the city. Valves of the metal casing therefore press the wind through the opening so that it gets an extra swivel. "The wind speed accelerates to 160 percent of the original power," says Suma. "The funnel effect", he calls it. Other turbines on roof It sounds so unique, a reclining windmill on a roof. Nevertheless, Ibis Power is not the only one. There are some competitors who want the same, says Suma. "Our advantage: they have less practical experience." There is a Swiss company that sells the same kind of windmill roof, for flats and offices. They are nice and high. There are also some companies that try to sell flat windmill boxes to the ridge of ordinary terraced houses. They can also catch some wind and produce electricity, to feed the lamps directly. One appeared on a house in Vlieland (island in the north from the Netherlands), the yield was still thin. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/energy/wind Frank Straver
High on the roof wind search can help to make flats and offices completely independent of fossil fuel. One of the wind and solar boxes of the test project in Utrecht (the Netherlands). In the city you cannot erect windmills. But a wind turbine fits on roofs. This can help to let flats and offices function fully on alternative energy. Suma enters an apartment building in the Utrecht Overvecht district. He takes the stairs up, then the elevator to the highest point. It is his sustainable dream that Suma - educated as an engineer - always brings to a dizzying height. He is the founder and director of the company Ibis Power, which places windmills on the roofs of flats and office buildings. No ordinary windmills, that's clear. On the roof of the seventies apartment is an elongated container. Inside is a rotating cylinder, which produces electricity on wind force. Ordinary windmills on a roof "Putting an ordinary windmill on a roof does not work. That would be unstable, dangerous and against all building regulations. Putting a mini-windmill on a roof, you can. You see that too, here and there on buildings in cities. "They hardly generate electricity," Suma says. "Our mission is to generate enough electricity on the roof for all residents living underneath." It is possible, but then the houses do also need insulation and heat pumps. Moreover, the entire roof has to be filled with the square turbines. A power nest, Suma calls them. The top of the square windmills has to be filled with solar cells, every square inch has to be used to generate green energy. "Only then can you provide an entire flat with it." And still not always. If there is no wind, or it is freezing, the houses still have to drain electricity from the electricity grid. Getting rit of gas pipes With the latest project, it must be possible to remove the gaspipe grid connection for six-and-a-half of the ten floors. The project in Utrecht is mainly a test; the electricity is for one of the houses in the flat. The prospects for Suma in Utrecht Overvecht are good, because exactly this neighborhood has been designated by the municipality as the first natural gas-free area. The gas network has had its best time here. There must be no new gas pipes but clean energy. The Ibis Powernest costs 55,000 euros (excluding installation costs). That can be recouped in seven to fifteen years, says Suma, depending on the location. "Near the sea it is going faster, given the wind speeds, then near the central Netherlands." Ibis Power works with six permanent employees, at an office in Eindhoven. The windmill of the powernest comes from Taiwan, the upright solar panels China. The company works together with a large construction and energy group for installation on roofs. There are also companies that try to sell flat windmill boxes to the ridge of ordinary terraced houses. Suma points from the roof of the flat over the houses and buildings. "They have to get rid of the natural gas as soon as possible." To arrange that, all sustainable technologies and alternative energy sources must be used, he says. Construction companies and municipalities are starting to get that through more and more. All buildings and houses must eventually become natural gas-free. Because of the climate agreement of Paris, and to liberate gas extraction area Groningen from quakes. But to make that change really a success, something has to change. The scale must go up, the costs down. In addition, some government regulations must change, Suma says. "Officially our wind energy roof still counts as an extra layer of living, which slows down processes." The tricky thing is also to distribute generated electricity well between all the underlying residential blocks. C oast provinces Apart from Utrecht, there is also a test mill on a roof in Nieuwerkerk aan den IJssel. Now that the attention for climate problems and 'Groningen' is increasing, the phone is constantly ringing at the company. Very different from ten years ago, when Suma started. He came up with the idea when he did PhD research in Miami, where air-conditioners were blowing all day. That made him think. "The energy consumption is cities is heavily polluting, that must be different." He also sees a sales market in the United States (New York), the Caribbean and Asia. Ibis Power wants to work internationally. Suma has just returned from Berlin, where he won a sustainability prize. He will soon have to go to the Chinese city of Shenzhen, where he also hopes to win the prizes. In the Netherlands, the company mainly targets potential customers in the coastal provinces. There are the most energy-hungry buildings. "We already count 2,163 suitable buildings," Suma explains. The latest project will be in Rotterdam. A ‘powernest’ must rake every bit of wind blowing in the city. Valves of the metal casing therefore press the wind through the opening so that it gets an extra swivel. "The wind speed accelerates to 160 percent of the original power," says Suma. "The funnel effect", he calls it. Other turbines on roof It sounds so unique, a reclining windmill on a roof. Nevertheless, Ibis Power is not the only one. There are some competitors who want the same, says Suma. "Our advantage: they have less practical experience." There is a Swiss company that sells the same kind of windmill roof, for flats and offices. They are nice and high. There are also some companies that try to sell flat windmill boxes to the ridge of ordinary terraced houses. They can also catch some wind and produce electricity, to feed the lamps directly. One appeared on a house in Vlieland (island in the north from the Netherlands), the yield was still thin. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/energy/wind Frank Straver
#Cathing #wind energy high on roofs
#Cathing #wind energy high on roofs
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The demand for energy is great and will only grow further in the coming years. We have already learned how to harvest the power of sunlight, wind and tides, but there are many forms of sustainable energy yet to be explored. We will bring you up-to-date on the latest progress in the search of renewable energy and other sustainable energy sources.

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