Energy

About: <p>Fossil&nbsp;fuels&nbsp;are non-renewable, they draw on finite resources that will eventually dwindle, becoming too expensive or too environmentally damaging to retrieve. In contrast, the many types of&nbsp;renewable energy&nbsp;resources such as wind and solar&nbsp;energy are constantly replenished and will never run out.<br />Wind turbines and solar panels are an increasingly common sight. But why? What are the benefits of renewable energies and how do they improve our health, environment, and economy?</p> <p>The WhatsOrb category &lsquo;Energy&rsquo; explores and shows the many positive impacts of clean energy, including the benefits of&nbsp;<a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/energy/wind">wind</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/energy/solar">solar</a> and&nbsp;geothermal. Next to it critical articles about nuclear and unknown energy sources.</p> <p>If there was an urge to come up with renewable energy forms and to ​​change energy use, it is now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about these topics and share them with the world. How you minimalize your energy consumption, the solar panels you choose and how did you isolate your house. In a nutshell; how to change your and other people&rsquo;s lifestyle.</p> <p>Global sustainability X change, that is what you can do together with WhatsOrb. <a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/newsletter/your-shared-sustainable-ideas-make-our-earth-a-better-place">What's in it for me</a>?</p>
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Wind Turbines: Limits Of This Renewable
Wind energy is valuable to generate power, but how useful is it? Some researchers say they have evidence that the more you use it, the less is available. Wind Turbines Energy: Highly Overestimated The wind is everywhere, but does it have enough power to turn wind turbines? US researchers say it's highly overestimated. Amanda Adams of the University of North Carolina and David Keith of Harvard say that wind farms could eventually limit energy. They say the limitation is not due to the economy or technique, but it is one of the atmospheric physics. When the wind blows against a blade, and it continues to rotate, it will transfer energy to the blade. From there on the power will slam into the turbine. That decelerates the wind. Harvested by advanced technical systems honed over decades of research and development, wind energy has become a mainstream energy resource. However, continued innovation is needed to realize the potential of wind to serve global demand for clean energy. Here, we outline three interdependent, cross-disciplinary grand challenges underpinning this research endeavor. The first is the need for a deeper understanding of the physics of atmospheric flow in the critical zone of plant operation. The second involves science and engineering of the largest dynamic, rotating machines in the world. The third encompasses optimization and control of fleets of wind plants working synergistically within the electricity grid. Addressing these challenges could enable wind power to provide as much as half of our global electricity needs. Recommended:  Wind Turbines: Cheaper, More Efficient. Make Them Telescopic The Limits Of Renewable Wind Turbines: Wind Shadows Each turbine carries a 'wind shadow'. So, wind farm entrepreneurs have to make arrangements to place their turbines as far apart from each other as possible. They should not get in each other's way. After all, a group of wind turbines breaks the force of the wind and leaves a long, trail where the wind is not as strong. This is called a wind shadow. The production depends on the calculations related to capacity and density. Commonly, a wind farm can handle an output of 2 to 4 watts per square meter, that is 2 to 4 megawatts over a square kilometre. Offshore wind farms involve complex optimisation challenges, as numerous factors must considered like wind direction, water depths, erosion zones, foundation costs, physical obstacles, types of cables, cable loss and the fact that the wind turbines do not cast 'shadows' on each other. The location of each individual turbine in a farm is also important to avoid that they so to speak 'steal' energy from the turbines behind them Recommended:  Vortex Bladeless Wind Turbine - The Future of Wind Turbines? Limitation Generating Capacity Wind Turbines: Not The Only Problem American scientists Keith and Adams say that the generating capacity of a wind farm larger than 100 square metres is limited to one watt per square metre. But that is not the only problem. Wind farms can cause turbulence and affect local temperatures. The American researchers base their results on simulations with small, medium-sized and substantial fictitious wind farms. They have applied this in different regions of the US, during summer and winter and several days in a row. The findings demonstrated that it would be challenging for large wind farms to maintain the production of wind energy with a power density far above 1.2 watts per square metre. {youtube}                        Engineering Mistake That Made Wind Turbines Inefficient | Massive Engineering Mistakes Wind Turbines Limits: Other Studies Are More Hopeful Climate News Network indicated that, in theory at least, renewable sources could meet more than 99% of American requirements. Also, Germany has more positive results than the US scientists. According to the Earth Policy Institute, the US at this moment has 60,000 megawatts online. This is more than enough to provide 14 million homes. Before you go! Recommended:  Gravitricity: Key Energy Storage Or Too Good To Be True? Do you like this article about Gravitricity or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write and publish your own article about wind turbines? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Wind energy is valuable to generate power, but how useful is it? Some researchers say they have evidence that the more you use it, the less is available. Wind Turbines Energy: Highly Overestimated The wind is everywhere, but does it have enough power to turn wind turbines? US researchers say it's highly overestimated. Amanda Adams of the University of North Carolina and David Keith of Harvard say that wind farms could eventually limit energy. They say the limitation is not due to the economy or technique, but it is one of the atmospheric physics. When the wind blows against a blade, and it continues to rotate, it will transfer energy to the blade. From there on the power will slam into the turbine. That decelerates the wind. Harvested by advanced technical systems honed over decades of research and development, wind energy has become a mainstream energy resource. However, continued innovation is needed to realize the potential of wind to serve global demand for clean energy. Here, we outline three interdependent, cross-disciplinary grand challenges underpinning this research endeavor. The first is the need for a deeper understanding of the physics of atmospheric flow in the critical zone of plant operation. The second involves science and engineering of the largest dynamic, rotating machines in the world. The third encompasses optimization and control of fleets of wind plants working synergistically within the electricity grid. Addressing these challenges could enable wind power to provide as much as half of our global electricity needs. Recommended:  Wind Turbines: Cheaper, More Efficient. Make Them Telescopic The Limits Of Renewable Wind Turbines: Wind Shadows Each turbine carries a 'wind shadow'. So, wind farm entrepreneurs have to make arrangements to place their turbines as far apart from each other as possible. They should not get in each other's way. After all, a group of wind turbines breaks the force of the wind and leaves a long, trail where the wind is not as strong. This is called a wind shadow. The production depends on the calculations related to capacity and density. Commonly, a wind farm can handle an output of 2 to 4 watts per square meter, that is 2 to 4 megawatts over a square kilometre. Offshore wind farms involve complex optimisation challenges, as numerous factors must considered like wind direction, water depths, erosion zones, foundation costs, physical obstacles, types of cables, cable loss and the fact that the wind turbines do not cast 'shadows' on each other. The location of each individual turbine in a farm is also important to avoid that they so to speak 'steal' energy from the turbines behind them Recommended:  Vortex Bladeless Wind Turbine - The Future of Wind Turbines? Limitation Generating Capacity Wind Turbines: Not The Only Problem American scientists Keith and Adams say that the generating capacity of a wind farm larger than 100 square metres is limited to one watt per square metre. But that is not the only problem. Wind farms can cause turbulence and affect local temperatures. The American researchers base their results on simulations with small, medium-sized and substantial fictitious wind farms. They have applied this in different regions of the US, during summer and winter and several days in a row. The findings demonstrated that it would be challenging for large wind farms to maintain the production of wind energy with a power density far above 1.2 watts per square metre. {youtube}                        Engineering Mistake That Made Wind Turbines Inefficient | Massive Engineering Mistakes Wind Turbines Limits: Other Studies Are More Hopeful Climate News Network indicated that, in theory at least, renewable sources could meet more than 99% of American requirements. Also, Germany has more positive results than the US scientists. According to the Earth Policy Institute, the US at this moment has 60,000 megawatts online. This is more than enough to provide 14 million homes. Before you go! Recommended:  Gravitricity: Key Energy Storage Or Too Good To Be True? Do you like this article about Gravitricity or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write and publish your own article about wind turbines? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Wind Turbines: Limits Of This Renewable
Wind Turbines: Limits Of This Renewable
Wind Turbines: Waste From These Blade Runners?
Wind turbines are very reliable in generating usable energy. Besides, turbines are economically exploitable. However, there are disadvantages to a wind turbine.  The biggest downside is waste. For years the wind turbines are used to produce sustainable energy. But then there is that inevitable moment: the wind turbine is obsolete. And then what? History Behind Wind Turbines Just like the sun, the wind is an energy source. A wind turbine generates electrical energy directly for its use and can be returned to the grid. The concept of a windmill has been known for centuries. It was formerly used to drive a millstone or a waterwheel, for example. However, we can also drive a generator (large dynamo) directly, which generates electricity. In the last few years the development of the windmill has grown, and the windmill, now often referred to as the wind turbine, is currently seen as the essential choice for generating clean electricity on a large scale. Old abandon wind turbines Recommended:  Green Energy: Old Watermills Become Hydro Power Turbines Clean Energy From Wind Turbines Burning fossil fuels can cause disastrous climate change. Governments and corporations around the world have promised to use only clean energy by 2050. To accomplish this goal, we have to use wind energy, among others. Wind turbines generate electricity without polluting the air, without affecting the climate and without depleting resources. Some CO2 is released during construction, maintenance and demolition of the turbine, but after 3 to 6 months of operation, a turbine has already saved that amount of CO2 emissions. Recommended:  Electric Cars Are Low On CO2: Gas Is The Best. Forget SUVs The Supple Fibreglass Of The Wind Turbine's Blades Did you know that the blades of a wind turbine can be larger than a wing of a Boeing 747? At the end of his life, try to throw that away. They cannot just be removed. You have to saw the lissom fibreglass. Therefore, you need a particular diamond-encrusted industrial saw to saw it into three pieces that can be tied back onto a trailer. Then they go to a special garbage dump. Recycle Parts Of A Wind Turbine Fortunately, there are parts of a wind turbine that can be recycled. Many materials can even be reused for new mills. The pole and foundation are no problem. They consist mainly of metal and cement, which is easy to recycle. However, the problem lies in the blades. Twenty years ago, the windmills were a lot smaller. Now they can be 200 metres high, which means that bigger blades are also needed. Larger blades, in turn, means more material that cannot be recycled easily. Recommended:  Recycling Asphalt Generates Massive Amount Of Electricity A Landfill Full Of Wind Turbine Blades It is hard to imagine, but there are places around the world that gather wind turbine blades. These landfills are the final resting place of these blades. The blades are non-recyclable. We are talking about thousands of tons of garbage. The expectation is that the amount of waste from wind turbines is going to quadruple over the next 15 years. It is hard to crush, recycle or repurpose the blades, but we need alternatives now. {youtube}                                              Why Thousands of Wind Turbine Blades Wind Up in Landfills A Method To Reuse The Fibreglass Blades Designers and researchers are looking for creative solutions. Global Fiberglass Solutions is one those creative thinkers. They are based in Sweetwater, Texas, and this company is a start-up that wants to reuse the blades. They created a method to break down the blades and turn them into traffic signs, pallets and fibre boards, used for walls and flooring. Recommended:  Sustainable Housing Reused Materials And Photo-voltaic Panels What Can We Expect In The Future? As we all notice, technology is changing rapidly. People are working hard on high-quality applications. For example, windmills and turbines are more environmental-friendly than ten-fifteen years ago. To leave them on the landfill is actually a waste. You could burn the blades, but to do that you have to cut them down first to get them into an oven. That costs energy. It would be better to re-use them. Did you know that in Rotterdam the blades of a wind turbine were used as playground equipment? TU Delft is also looking for new applications, for example, by designing bridges from old blades. Or maybe even better would be to recycle old discarded blades back to the basic components to turn them into new blades. This is not the last thing you heard about it. Before you go! Recommended:  Gravitricity: Key Energy Storage Or Too Good To Be True? Do you like this article about Gravitricity or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write and publish your own article about renwable energy and it's waste? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Wind turbines are very reliable in generating usable energy. Besides, turbines are economically exploitable. However, there are disadvantages to a wind turbine.  The biggest downside is waste. For years the wind turbines are used to produce sustainable energy. But then there is that inevitable moment: the wind turbine is obsolete. And then what? History Behind Wind Turbines Just like the sun, the wind is an energy source. A wind turbine generates electrical energy directly for its use and can be returned to the grid. The concept of a windmill has been known for centuries. It was formerly used to drive a millstone or a waterwheel, for example. However, we can also drive a generator (large dynamo) directly, which generates electricity. In the last few years the development of the windmill has grown, and the windmill, now often referred to as the wind turbine, is currently seen as the essential choice for generating clean electricity on a large scale. Old abandon wind turbines Recommended:  Green Energy: Old Watermills Become Hydro Power Turbines Clean Energy From Wind Turbines Burning fossil fuels can cause disastrous climate change. Governments and corporations around the world have promised to use only clean energy by 2050. To accomplish this goal, we have to use wind energy, among others. Wind turbines generate electricity without polluting the air, without affecting the climate and without depleting resources. Some CO2 is released during construction, maintenance and demolition of the turbine, but after 3 to 6 months of operation, a turbine has already saved that amount of CO2 emissions. Recommended:  Electric Cars Are Low On CO2: Gas Is The Best. Forget SUVs The Supple Fibreglass Of The Wind Turbine's Blades Did you know that the blades of a wind turbine can be larger than a wing of a Boeing 747? At the end of his life, try to throw that away. They cannot just be removed. You have to saw the lissom fibreglass. Therefore, you need a particular diamond-encrusted industrial saw to saw it into three pieces that can be tied back onto a trailer. Then they go to a special garbage dump. Recycle Parts Of A Wind Turbine Fortunately, there are parts of a wind turbine that can be recycled. Many materials can even be reused for new mills. The pole and foundation are no problem. They consist mainly of metal and cement, which is easy to recycle. However, the problem lies in the blades. Twenty years ago, the windmills were a lot smaller. Now they can be 200 metres high, which means that bigger blades are also needed. Larger blades, in turn, means more material that cannot be recycled easily. Recommended:  Recycling Asphalt Generates Massive Amount Of Electricity A Landfill Full Of Wind Turbine Blades It is hard to imagine, but there are places around the world that gather wind turbine blades. These landfills are the final resting place of these blades. The blades are non-recyclable. We are talking about thousands of tons of garbage. The expectation is that the amount of waste from wind turbines is going to quadruple over the next 15 years. It is hard to crush, recycle or repurpose the blades, but we need alternatives now. {youtube}                                              Why Thousands of Wind Turbine Blades Wind Up in Landfills A Method To Reuse The Fibreglass Blades Designers and researchers are looking for creative solutions. Global Fiberglass Solutions is one those creative thinkers. They are based in Sweetwater, Texas, and this company is a start-up that wants to reuse the blades. They created a method to break down the blades and turn them into traffic signs, pallets and fibre boards, used for walls and flooring. Recommended:  Sustainable Housing Reused Materials And Photo-voltaic Panels What Can We Expect In The Future? As we all notice, technology is changing rapidly. People are working hard on high-quality applications. For example, windmills and turbines are more environmental-friendly than ten-fifteen years ago. To leave them on the landfill is actually a waste. You could burn the blades, but to do that you have to cut them down first to get them into an oven. That costs energy. It would be better to re-use them. Did you know that in Rotterdam the blades of a wind turbine were used as playground equipment? TU Delft is also looking for new applications, for example, by designing bridges from old blades. Or maybe even better would be to recycle old discarded blades back to the basic components to turn them into new blades. This is not the last thing you heard about it. Before you go! Recommended:  Gravitricity: Key Energy Storage Or Too Good To Be True? Do you like this article about Gravitricity or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write and publish your own article about renwable energy and it's waste? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Wind Turbines: Waste From These Blade Runners?
Wind Turbines: Waste From These Blade Runners?
Wind Turbines: Cheaper, More Efficient. Make Them Telescopic
Wind turbine project the ELICAN is a first-of-its-kind telescopic wind turbine which takes offshore wind turbine technology to the next level. Wind Turbines which are telescopic It is more efficient, faster, and cheaper to build and install into the marine environment because it doesn’t require costly and scarce heavy-lifting vessels. The entire structure, foundation, turbine, and blades are assembled onshore. Recommended:  The First Floating Wind-farm Is Operating In Scotland Photo by: CORDIS Wind Turbines Which Are Telescopic: Construction                                            Wind Turbines: Cheaper, More Efficient. Make Them Telescopic The structure consists of a gravity-based foundation configuration that acts as a floating platform with an integrated auto-lift telescopic (made up of tubular sections designed to slide into one another) tower. All the parts are made of prefabricated concrete panels. The wind turbine is installed atop the tower as the final step before the entire structure is towed to its position out at sea. Recommended:  Wind Turbine From Wood: Made By EAZ-Wind, Netherlands Photo by: CORDIS. Telescopic wind turbine's 'mast' When they are towing the wind turbine out, the telescopic configuration of the tower in its collapsed position brings down the center of gravity. This also allows the bottom foundation to act as a self-stable floating barge temporarily. Once towed to location, the foundation is lowered and ballasted to rest on the seabed. The tower can then be pulled out to its final position utilizing cables and conventional heavy-lift strand jacks lifting the sections one level at a time. The entire process is carried out from a single access platform. Recommended:  Vortex Bladeless Wind Turbine - The Future of Wind Turbines? Wind Turbines: Cheaper, More Efficient It took three years from design to completion of the project. It was co-financed by the European Commission under their Horizon 2020 program for Research and Development, which aims to innovate and design greener types of energy. The program helps finance ground-breaking ideas such as the ELICAN project – ones that will help the EU reach its target to go carbon-neutral by 2050. Photo & Graph by: ELISA/ Esteyco According to Javier Nieto, the Offshore Division Manager at ESTEYCO: The aim is to build bigger and more commercially viable wind turbine farms, which will contain from 50 to 70 constructions each. This target is still a long way off, but the hope is that Europe can lead the way as an innovator on environmental policies and inspire other nations and continents to start going green, sooner, rather than later. The installation costs are reduced by 35% compared to conventional offshore wind turbines, which require all the parts to be assembled at the final location. And the system can be easily scaled up to meet the needs of installing giant next-gen offshore wind turbines, such as the 12MW, when it arrives. Before you go! Recommended:  Gravitricity: Key Energy Storage Or Too Good To Be True? Do you like this article about Gravitricity or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write and publish your own article about wind turbines? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Wind turbine project the ELICAN is a first-of-its-kind telescopic wind turbine which takes offshore wind turbine technology to the next level. Wind Turbines which are telescopic It is more efficient, faster, and cheaper to build and install into the marine environment because it doesn’t require costly and scarce heavy-lifting vessels. The entire structure, foundation, turbine, and blades are assembled onshore. Recommended:  The First Floating Wind-farm Is Operating In Scotland Photo by: CORDIS Wind Turbines Which Are Telescopic: Construction                                            Wind Turbines: Cheaper, More Efficient. Make Them Telescopic The structure consists of a gravity-based foundation configuration that acts as a floating platform with an integrated auto-lift telescopic (made up of tubular sections designed to slide into one another) tower. All the parts are made of prefabricated concrete panels. The wind turbine is installed atop the tower as the final step before the entire structure is towed to its position out at sea. Recommended:  Wind Turbine From Wood: Made By EAZ-Wind, Netherlands Photo by: CORDIS. Telescopic wind turbine's 'mast' When they are towing the wind turbine out, the telescopic configuration of the tower in its collapsed position brings down the center of gravity. This also allows the bottom foundation to act as a self-stable floating barge temporarily. Once towed to location, the foundation is lowered and ballasted to rest on the seabed. The tower can then be pulled out to its final position utilizing cables and conventional heavy-lift strand jacks lifting the sections one level at a time. The entire process is carried out from a single access platform. Recommended:  Vortex Bladeless Wind Turbine - The Future of Wind Turbines? Wind Turbines: Cheaper, More Efficient It took three years from design to completion of the project. It was co-financed by the European Commission under their Horizon 2020 program for Research and Development, which aims to innovate and design greener types of energy. The program helps finance ground-breaking ideas such as the ELICAN project – ones that will help the EU reach its target to go carbon-neutral by 2050. Photo & Graph by: ELISA/ Esteyco According to Javier Nieto, the Offshore Division Manager at ESTEYCO: The aim is to build bigger and more commercially viable wind turbine farms, which will contain from 50 to 70 constructions each. This target is still a long way off, but the hope is that Europe can lead the way as an innovator on environmental policies and inspire other nations and continents to start going green, sooner, rather than later. The installation costs are reduced by 35% compared to conventional offshore wind turbines, which require all the parts to be assembled at the final location. And the system can be easily scaled up to meet the needs of installing giant next-gen offshore wind turbines, such as the 12MW, when it arrives. Before you go! Recommended:  Gravitricity: Key Energy Storage Or Too Good To Be True? Do you like this article about Gravitricity or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write and publish your own article about wind turbines? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Wind Turbines: Cheaper, More Efficient. Make Them Telescopic
Wind Turbines: Cheaper, More Efficient. Make Them Telescopic
Gravitricity: Key Energy Storage Or Too Good To Be True?
The idea of the British start-up Gravitricity almost seems too good to be true. By using enormous weights, the company wants to turn mine shafts into low-cost green energy storage systems Globally, we are generating more electricity from intermittent renewable green energy sources than ever before. We are slowly making steps to a decarbonized world, but for our renewable energy, we are still reliant on weather-dependent sources, like marine, wind, and solar. Gravitricity: Fast, Versatile Energy Storage Solution We will need new technologies to capture and store green energy during periods of low demand and with a quick release when needed. The idea of the British start-up Gravitricity almost seems too good to be true. By using enormous weights, the company wants to turn mine shafts into low-cost green energy storage systems – with 'some of the best characteristics of lithium batteries and pumped storage.' Is this the large-scale electricity storage the world needs, or is it, in fact, too good to be true? Why is energy storage important? Energy storage is of interest to the utility because they can store energy that is produced by their plants and not used (such as wind energy at night) and release the stored energy during the day when the demand is higher (and also the cost How Gravitricity Works The gravitricity concept seems to be so simple. Gravitricity describes their innovative technology as a huge 'clock weight.' A cylindrical weight of 500 - 5000 tonnes is suspended in a deep (preferably already existing) shaft by a number of cables each of which is engaged with a winch capable of lifting its share of the weight. Electrical power is then absorbed or generated by raising or lowering the weight. The weight is guided by a system of tensioned guide wires (patents applied for) to prevent it from swinging and damaging the shaft. The winch system can be accurately controlled through the electrical drives to keep the weight stable in the hole.  Storing Mechanical Energy Like A Dream What do you mean by energy? Energy is the capacity of a physical system to do work. Potential energy, sometimes symbolized U, is energy stored in a system. A stationary object in a gravitational field, or a stationary charged particle in an electric field, has potential energy. The target groups are network-constrained users and operators, distribution networks, and major power users. The technology operates in the 1MW to 20 MW power range. With a design life of fifty years, response time from zero to full power in less than one second and efficiency between 80 and 90 percent, Gravitricity versatile fast energy storage seems like a dream. It is a way to utilize existing mines or purpose-built shafts. ‘Future deployments will be able to utilize existing mines or purpose-built shafts, allowing development wherever storage is required,’ according to Gravitricity. And there is more: the start-up claims levelized costs well below lithium batteries. Recommended:  Environmental Costs Of Lithium Battery Addiction: Worldwide Gravitricity  Fanbase For all the above reasons, Gravitricity already has its fanbase. The company received an Innovate UK (the government’s innovation agency) funding of 650.000 pounds to start on its prototype. Also, Gravitricity is teaming up with the well-respected Dutch winch and offshore manufacturer Huisman Equipment BV. ‘The first full-scale prototype will be deployed in 2021 or 2022 at a disused mine in the UK,’ the start-up reveals. {youtube}                                                      Gravitricity: Fast, Versatile Energy Storage Solution: UK                                                               Gravitricity - fast, long-life energy storage Essential  Energy Storage Or To Good To Be True?  According to the Bloomberg New Energy Finance's Global Energy Outlook – the annual economic forecast for the world's power mix to 2050 – there will be '$600 billion of global spend on 'green' energy storage to 2040. ' Gravitricity's energy storage goal is to 'provide balancing services on transmission grids as well as appealing to network-constrained users and generators, distribution networks and major power users seeking a reliable, fast response, and long-term means of storing power,' as they write on their website. Can energy be destroyed? The first law of thermodynamics, also known as Law of Conservation of Energy, states that energy can neither be created nor destroyed; energy can only be transferred or changed from one form to another. ... In other words, energy cannot be created or destroyed. What do you think: will Gravitricity versatile fast energy storage enable existing grid infrastructure to go further in a renewable energy world by providing this essential energy storage? Before you go! Recommended:  Hydrogen Energy Storage Revolution In The Netherlands Do you like this article about Gravitricity or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write and publish your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
The idea of the British start-up Gravitricity almost seems too good to be true. By using enormous weights, the company wants to turn mine shafts into low-cost green energy storage systems Globally, we are generating more electricity from intermittent renewable green energy sources than ever before. We are slowly making steps to a decarbonized world, but for our renewable energy, we are still reliant on weather-dependent sources, like marine, wind, and solar. Gravitricity: Fast, Versatile Energy Storage Solution We will need new technologies to capture and store green energy during periods of low demand and with a quick release when needed. The idea of the British start-up Gravitricity almost seems too good to be true. By using enormous weights, the company wants to turn mine shafts into low-cost green energy storage systems – with 'some of the best characteristics of lithium batteries and pumped storage.' Is this the large-scale electricity storage the world needs, or is it, in fact, too good to be true? Why is energy storage important? Energy storage is of interest to the utility because they can store energy that is produced by their plants and not used (such as wind energy at night) and release the stored energy during the day when the demand is higher (and also the cost How Gravitricity Works The gravitricity concept seems to be so simple. Gravitricity describes their innovative technology as a huge 'clock weight.' A cylindrical weight of 500 - 5000 tonnes is suspended in a deep (preferably already existing) shaft by a number of cables each of which is engaged with a winch capable of lifting its share of the weight. Electrical power is then absorbed or generated by raising or lowering the weight. The weight is guided by a system of tensioned guide wires (patents applied for) to prevent it from swinging and damaging the shaft. The winch system can be accurately controlled through the electrical drives to keep the weight stable in the hole.  Storing Mechanical Energy Like A Dream What do you mean by energy? Energy is the capacity of a physical system to do work. Potential energy, sometimes symbolized U, is energy stored in a system. A stationary object in a gravitational field, or a stationary charged particle in an electric field, has potential energy. The target groups are network-constrained users and operators, distribution networks, and major power users. The technology operates in the 1MW to 20 MW power range. With a design life of fifty years, response time from zero to full power in less than one second and efficiency between 80 and 90 percent, Gravitricity versatile fast energy storage seems like a dream. It is a way to utilize existing mines or purpose-built shafts. ‘Future deployments will be able to utilize existing mines or purpose-built shafts, allowing development wherever storage is required,’ according to Gravitricity. And there is more: the start-up claims levelized costs well below lithium batteries. Recommended:  Environmental Costs Of Lithium Battery Addiction: Worldwide Gravitricity  Fanbase For all the above reasons, Gravitricity already has its fanbase. The company received an Innovate UK (the government’s innovation agency) funding of 650.000 pounds to start on its prototype. Also, Gravitricity is teaming up with the well-respected Dutch winch and offshore manufacturer Huisman Equipment BV. ‘The first full-scale prototype will be deployed in 2021 or 2022 at a disused mine in the UK,’ the start-up reveals. {youtube}                                                      Gravitricity: Fast, Versatile Energy Storage Solution: UK                                                               Gravitricity - fast, long-life energy storage Essential  Energy Storage Or To Good To Be True?  According to the Bloomberg New Energy Finance's Global Energy Outlook – the annual economic forecast for the world's power mix to 2050 – there will be '$600 billion of global spend on 'green' energy storage to 2040. ' Gravitricity's energy storage goal is to 'provide balancing services on transmission grids as well as appealing to network-constrained users and generators, distribution networks and major power users seeking a reliable, fast response, and long-term means of storing power,' as they write on their website. Can energy be destroyed? The first law of thermodynamics, also known as Law of Conservation of Energy, states that energy can neither be created nor destroyed; energy can only be transferred or changed from one form to another. ... In other words, energy cannot be created or destroyed. What do you think: will Gravitricity versatile fast energy storage enable existing grid infrastructure to go further in a renewable energy world by providing this essential energy storage? Before you go! Recommended:  Hydrogen Energy Storage Revolution In The Netherlands Do you like this article about Gravitricity or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write and publish your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Gravitricity: Key Energy Storage Or Too Good To Be True?
Gravitricity: Key Energy Storage Or Too Good To Be True?
The Illusions Of Renewables. Solar And Wind Will Not Save Us
ar too often, the debate on climate change shifts to one of the fossil fuels versus renewable energy. If we were to completely let go of the ‘wasteful’ and switch to electricity generated by natural elements such as wind, solar, or waves, it would - or so it is alleged - save our planet. This thought has been at the center of the climate debate for more than 30 years, setting in motion large-scale renewable energy projects. The Illusions Of Renewables However, looking at today’s landscape, we see that there isn’t a single nation that has completely shifted its energy needs to renewable sources. Some Scandinavian countries are well underway to realizing a near-zero carbon electricity supply, but what stands out here is the fact that renewables like solar and wind only make up a small percentage of this. It is a well-documented fact that the number of solar panels or wind turbines required even to come close to the amount of energy generated by ‘regular’ producers is massive. At the same time, these enormous grids required will lead to higher costs of generating electricity, vast amounts of energy needed for its production, and leave behind a significant environmental footprint. Additionally, it is a somewhat unreliable source of energy.   In short, solar and wind energy are not just falling short of what they ought to be producing to be an adequate replacement; they are also mostly unnecessary when looking at the bigger picture, which will, eventually, really be a good thing. Renewables History When listening to a regular climate change debate, one will be quick to conclude that renewable energy - in particular solar and wind energy - is a relatively new invention. Wind turbines have, after all, not been recorded in modern history as a familiar sight until recently. Yet the reality is that wind and sunlight are some of the oldest sources of energy that we have. Already back in 1833, a man named John Etzler was involved in a proposal that sought to construct solar power plants. These would employ mirrors to concentrate sunlight on boilers. Solar panels that are capable of generating electricity have even been mentioned in literature back in the late 1800s. The schools of thought were there, waiting to pick up - but unfortunately being overrun by the power of coal and other fossil fuels. Yet renewables were never far from our mind, as there have been numerous mentions of solar energy in publications throughout the 20th century - pointing at it as the next ‘big thing’ in power generation. Thoughts about renewable energy started in 1891, with The New York Times. The New York Times was reporting that solar energy is not yet economical in an article titled “ Solar Energy: What the Sun's Rays Can Do, and May Yet Be Able to Do,” in which it concluded, "… the day is not unlikely to arrive before long… ”. Solar And Wind Energy Revolution! Did It Arrive? That day did arrive, yet it never really ‘caught on,’ despite the hype being attributed to it by journalists and experts alike. In 1931, another journalist of The New York Times discovered this ‘hidden treasure,’ writing about “ the evolution of civilization similar to that which followed the invention by James Watt of the steam engine.” In the following decades, renewables slowly got more attention. They found themselves at the center of scientific and political debate, with subsidies, tax cuts, and grants thrown at it. Especially around the turn of the century, it seemed as if the ‘big breakthrough’ was waiting to happen - only waiting on that last bit of funding. A massive $2 trillion was spent on wind and solar energy combined between 2007 and 2016, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance, with governments spending up to 100 times more on its subsidies than it did for nuclear and fossil fuels.   The results? Far from as impressive: in 2016, solar and wind-generated energy only made up 1.3 and 3.9 percent of the earth’s total, respectively. Recommended :  Vortex Wind Turbine: Energy Generator Without Blades Denmark And Germany As Role Model? Of course, these numbers above are merely an average. Some countries, like Denmark, show more promising numbers for its decarbonization process: where wind energy, in particular, is thriving, making up 48 percent of the total electricity in the country. Does this make them the role model for renewables that we need to create a blueprint for other countries as well? Well, it is vital to understand the specific reasons why this tiny Scandinavian country was able to achieve this. Firstly, it is small. It has fewer than 6 million inhabitants, occupies a piece of land that can be crossed in only a few hours, and is a minor player on the world’s economic stage.   While small, it is located in a favorable region, with many European neighbors willing to import the excess wind energy generated, lowering the risk of a costly surplus. Regardless, Denmark’s electricity prices are still amongst the highest in the world. And while this is justified by claiming that the industry is one of its most important export products, it is still striking.   Areas that are deploying solar energy on a large scale have seen similar uptakes in electricity prices. Denmark’s neighbor Germany has long boasted a status as the poster child of renewables but is facing the same issues. Their electricity is the second most expensive in Europe, after Denmark, while emissions are not declining as much as they would like.   Danish Tax Minister Karsten Lauritzen said that the Government should rethink the level of tax on electricity consumption, which is currently the highest in Europe. According to the Tax Ministry, approximately 40 percent of a household electricity bill is tax, but these revenues were and are necessary for Denmark to subsidize the development of renewable energy. Carbon Emissions Least Production: France And Sweden Therefore, measuring the share of solar and wind-based energy sources in the total energy production will paint a somewhat misleading image - and show the inefficiency of solar and wind. A much better benchmark can found when looking at the number of carbon emissions per capita. Here, France and Sweden are ranking high. The surprising thing? While those countries have successfully cut their carbon emissions, they have done so by employing only limited wind and solar sources. Sweden is deriving 95 percent of its electricity from zero-carbon sources, and France 88 percent. What are these sources? Nuclear and hydroelectric power. Other countries, including Norway, Brazil, and Costa Rica, have similarly harnessed hydroelectric power, effectively decarbonizing their economies. Nuclear is slightly more scalable and reliable, compared to hydroelectricity’s relatively sizeable environmental impact. Hydropower, as demonstrated by Brazil and California, is inherently unreliable. Meaning that countries will have to fall back on fossil fuels if production unexpectedly falls short. Thus, nuclear energy appears to be the only zero-carbon source that is capable of saving our planet - it is scalable, reliable, and efficient. Renewables Not Necessary To Save The Climate   Good news, so far: we do not need renewables to solve climate change. Renewables require a lot of lands and specific wasteful ‘ingredients’ like concrete, steel, and glass for its production - nuclear plants only need a fraction of this.   {youtube}                                              The Illusions Of Renewables. Solar And Wind Will Not Save Our Climate To demonstrate this: solar panels have shown to rake up to 300 times more toxic waste than nuclear energy. And even after having been produced in a wasteful manner, they still harm the environment by occupying large areas of land, threatening the local ecosystem - all in exchange for a relatively minor share of electricity. Recommended :  Solar Farms In Space: Next Step In Renewable Energy The Illusions Of Renewables. Are We Headed For A Solar Waste Crisis? While people are up in arms about nuclear waste, only very few seem to be concerned about the concept of solar waste. And solar waste there is: most countries do not have an adequate plan for safely disposing of this often toxic waste, while its pile is growing steadily. Nuclear waste makes all the alarm bells in our heads go off, while solar trash seems to be regarded with something akin to indifference. Solar Waste Versus Nuclear   Let’s start with some cold, hard facts. Every unit of energy generated by solar creates 3000 times more toxic waste than a group of electricity generated by nuclear power. Put it in perspective: Environmental Progress calculated that, if all waste generated over the next 25 years got stacked on a football field, the pile of nuclear waste would be about the same height as the Leaning Tower of Pisa (52 meters), while the solar waste pile would be as high as two Mt. Everests (16 km). Developing countries, on the other hand, are facing similar issues. China, India, and Ghana are dealing with those living in communities near waste dumps. Waste got burned in an attempt to salvage copper wires, which gets resold. This process requires the burning of surrounding plastics, meaning that the smoke that is released is very harmful and straight-up toxic to human health. Nuclear waste, on the other hand, is carefully stored and managed, sing the highest levels of caution and safety, waste is contained in cement-filled drums and stored in secured facilities for decades or even centuries on end. When comparing this to the lackluster way in which solar waste is simply ‘dumped atop the pile’ of electronic waste, it is not hard to see where we are doing something wrong. Solar panels contain a large number of dangerous materials, including lead, chromium, and cadmium - not just harmful on direct impact, but also capable of infiltrating drinking water supplies.   The Illusions Of Renewables: Actual Dangers Versus Perceived Dangers The dilemma is not as severe when carefully observing those facts. The share of nuclear energy in the world’s electricity market is more significant, yet created using ‘less.’ Less waste, less land area, less of an ecological and environmental footprint. While we are keen on implementing more solar and wind, the reality is that these energy sources are often showing far from rosy numbers below the line.   We would do well to move beyond this illusion of renewables and explore other zero-carbon sources of energy, in particular nuclear power. There are relatively few drawbacks to this stable and secure source of energy, that has remained at the center of societal scrutiny since its earlier days. Nuclear power is one way of tackling climate change in a meaningful manner - something that, unfortunately, cannot be said about wind or solar. It is time to make decisions based on facts rather than on dreams of renewables. Before you go! Recommended:  COP25: Can Paris Accord Signatories Beat The Fossil Industry Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
ar too often, the debate on climate change shifts to one of the fossil fuels versus renewable energy. If we were to completely let go of the ‘wasteful’ and switch to electricity generated by natural elements such as wind, solar, or waves, it would - or so it is alleged - save our planet. This thought has been at the center of the climate debate for more than 30 years, setting in motion large-scale renewable energy projects. The Illusions Of Renewables However, looking at today’s landscape, we see that there isn’t a single nation that has completely shifted its energy needs to renewable sources. Some Scandinavian countries are well underway to realizing a near-zero carbon electricity supply, but what stands out here is the fact that renewables like solar and wind only make up a small percentage of this. It is a well-documented fact that the number of solar panels or wind turbines required even to come close to the amount of energy generated by ‘regular’ producers is massive. At the same time, these enormous grids required will lead to higher costs of generating electricity, vast amounts of energy needed for its production, and leave behind a significant environmental footprint. Additionally, it is a somewhat unreliable source of energy.   In short, solar and wind energy are not just falling short of what they ought to be producing to be an adequate replacement; they are also mostly unnecessary when looking at the bigger picture, which will, eventually, really be a good thing. Renewables History When listening to a regular climate change debate, one will be quick to conclude that renewable energy - in particular solar and wind energy - is a relatively new invention. Wind turbines have, after all, not been recorded in modern history as a familiar sight until recently. Yet the reality is that wind and sunlight are some of the oldest sources of energy that we have. Already back in 1833, a man named John Etzler was involved in a proposal that sought to construct solar power plants. These would employ mirrors to concentrate sunlight on boilers. Solar panels that are capable of generating electricity have even been mentioned in literature back in the late 1800s. The schools of thought were there, waiting to pick up - but unfortunately being overrun by the power of coal and other fossil fuels. Yet renewables were never far from our mind, as there have been numerous mentions of solar energy in publications throughout the 20th century - pointing at it as the next ‘big thing’ in power generation. Thoughts about renewable energy started in 1891, with The New York Times. The New York Times was reporting that solar energy is not yet economical in an article titled “ Solar Energy: What the Sun's Rays Can Do, and May Yet Be Able to Do,” in which it concluded, "… the day is not unlikely to arrive before long… ”. Solar And Wind Energy Revolution! Did It Arrive? That day did arrive, yet it never really ‘caught on,’ despite the hype being attributed to it by journalists and experts alike. In 1931, another journalist of The New York Times discovered this ‘hidden treasure,’ writing about “ the evolution of civilization similar to that which followed the invention by James Watt of the steam engine.” In the following decades, renewables slowly got more attention. They found themselves at the center of scientific and political debate, with subsidies, tax cuts, and grants thrown at it. Especially around the turn of the century, it seemed as if the ‘big breakthrough’ was waiting to happen - only waiting on that last bit of funding. A massive $2 trillion was spent on wind and solar energy combined between 2007 and 2016, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance, with governments spending up to 100 times more on its subsidies than it did for nuclear and fossil fuels.   The results? Far from as impressive: in 2016, solar and wind-generated energy only made up 1.3 and 3.9 percent of the earth’s total, respectively. Recommended :  Vortex Wind Turbine: Energy Generator Without Blades Denmark And Germany As Role Model? Of course, these numbers above are merely an average. Some countries, like Denmark, show more promising numbers for its decarbonization process: where wind energy, in particular, is thriving, making up 48 percent of the total electricity in the country. Does this make them the role model for renewables that we need to create a blueprint for other countries as well? Well, it is vital to understand the specific reasons why this tiny Scandinavian country was able to achieve this. Firstly, it is small. It has fewer than 6 million inhabitants, occupies a piece of land that can be crossed in only a few hours, and is a minor player on the world’s economic stage.   While small, it is located in a favorable region, with many European neighbors willing to import the excess wind energy generated, lowering the risk of a costly surplus. Regardless, Denmark’s electricity prices are still amongst the highest in the world. And while this is justified by claiming that the industry is one of its most important export products, it is still striking.   Areas that are deploying solar energy on a large scale have seen similar uptakes in electricity prices. Denmark’s neighbor Germany has long boasted a status as the poster child of renewables but is facing the same issues. Their electricity is the second most expensive in Europe, after Denmark, while emissions are not declining as much as they would like.   Danish Tax Minister Karsten Lauritzen said that the Government should rethink the level of tax on electricity consumption, which is currently the highest in Europe. According to the Tax Ministry, approximately 40 percent of a household electricity bill is tax, but these revenues were and are necessary for Denmark to subsidize the development of renewable energy. Carbon Emissions Least Production: France And Sweden Therefore, measuring the share of solar and wind-based energy sources in the total energy production will paint a somewhat misleading image - and show the inefficiency of solar and wind. A much better benchmark can found when looking at the number of carbon emissions per capita. Here, France and Sweden are ranking high. The surprising thing? While those countries have successfully cut their carbon emissions, they have done so by employing only limited wind and solar sources. Sweden is deriving 95 percent of its electricity from zero-carbon sources, and France 88 percent. What are these sources? Nuclear and hydroelectric power. Other countries, including Norway, Brazil, and Costa Rica, have similarly harnessed hydroelectric power, effectively decarbonizing their economies. Nuclear is slightly more scalable and reliable, compared to hydroelectricity’s relatively sizeable environmental impact. Hydropower, as demonstrated by Brazil and California, is inherently unreliable. Meaning that countries will have to fall back on fossil fuels if production unexpectedly falls short. Thus, nuclear energy appears to be the only zero-carbon source that is capable of saving our planet - it is scalable, reliable, and efficient. Renewables Not Necessary To Save The Climate   Good news, so far: we do not need renewables to solve climate change. Renewables require a lot of lands and specific wasteful ‘ingredients’ like concrete, steel, and glass for its production - nuclear plants only need a fraction of this.   {youtube}                                              The Illusions Of Renewables. Solar And Wind Will Not Save Our Climate To demonstrate this: solar panels have shown to rake up to 300 times more toxic waste than nuclear energy. And even after having been produced in a wasteful manner, they still harm the environment by occupying large areas of land, threatening the local ecosystem - all in exchange for a relatively minor share of electricity. Recommended :  Solar Farms In Space: Next Step In Renewable Energy The Illusions Of Renewables. Are We Headed For A Solar Waste Crisis? While people are up in arms about nuclear waste, only very few seem to be concerned about the concept of solar waste. And solar waste there is: most countries do not have an adequate plan for safely disposing of this often toxic waste, while its pile is growing steadily. Nuclear waste makes all the alarm bells in our heads go off, while solar trash seems to be regarded with something akin to indifference. Solar Waste Versus Nuclear   Let’s start with some cold, hard facts. Every unit of energy generated by solar creates 3000 times more toxic waste than a group of electricity generated by nuclear power. Put it in perspective: Environmental Progress calculated that, if all waste generated over the next 25 years got stacked on a football field, the pile of nuclear waste would be about the same height as the Leaning Tower of Pisa (52 meters), while the solar waste pile would be as high as two Mt. Everests (16 km). Developing countries, on the other hand, are facing similar issues. China, India, and Ghana are dealing with those living in communities near waste dumps. Waste got burned in an attempt to salvage copper wires, which gets resold. This process requires the burning of surrounding plastics, meaning that the smoke that is released is very harmful and straight-up toxic to human health. Nuclear waste, on the other hand, is carefully stored and managed, sing the highest levels of caution and safety, waste is contained in cement-filled drums and stored in secured facilities for decades or even centuries on end. When comparing this to the lackluster way in which solar waste is simply ‘dumped atop the pile’ of electronic waste, it is not hard to see where we are doing something wrong. Solar panels contain a large number of dangerous materials, including lead, chromium, and cadmium - not just harmful on direct impact, but also capable of infiltrating drinking water supplies.   The Illusions Of Renewables: Actual Dangers Versus Perceived Dangers The dilemma is not as severe when carefully observing those facts. The share of nuclear energy in the world’s electricity market is more significant, yet created using ‘less.’ Less waste, less land area, less of an ecological and environmental footprint. While we are keen on implementing more solar and wind, the reality is that these energy sources are often showing far from rosy numbers below the line.   We would do well to move beyond this illusion of renewables and explore other zero-carbon sources of energy, in particular nuclear power. There are relatively few drawbacks to this stable and secure source of energy, that has remained at the center of societal scrutiny since its earlier days. Nuclear power is one way of tackling climate change in a meaningful manner - something that, unfortunately, cannot be said about wind or solar. It is time to make decisions based on facts rather than on dreams of renewables. Before you go! Recommended:  COP25: Can Paris Accord Signatories Beat The Fossil Industry Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
The Illusions Of Renewables. Solar And Wind Will Not Save Us
The Illusions Of Renewables. Solar And Wind Will Not Save Us
Energy

Fossil fuels are non-renewable, they draw on finite resources that will eventually dwindle, becoming too expensive or too environmentally damaging to retrieve. In contrast, the many types of renewable energy resources such as wind and solar energy are constantly replenished and will never run out.
Wind turbines and solar panels are an increasingly common sight. But why? What are the benefits of renewable energies and how do they improve our health, environment, and economy?

The WhatsOrb category ‘Energy’ explores and shows the many positive impacts of clean energy, including the benefits of windsolar and geothermal. Next to it critical articles about nuclear and unknown energy sources.

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