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Clean energy from water, but differently
It's like wave energy but under water We know hydropower from dams and from tidal currents. Here and there an attempt is made to convert the wave motion of the sea surface into current. The WaveRoller also converts the energy of waves into electricity, but then under water. The installation is placed close to the coast at a depth between 8 and 20 meters. Depending on tide conditions, the system is submerged and therefore not visible. Systems are anchored to the seabed. A single WaveRoller unit has a power between 350 kW and 1000 kW. The units can be used stand-alone or in farms. Waves harvest The back-and-forth movement of water, driven by waves, sets the WaveRoller panel in motion. To extract the maximum amount of energy from the waves with a WaveRoller, the device is installed under water at a depth of about 8 - 20 meters, where the wave surge is the most powerful. A single panel absorbs 1.5-2 MW of power from the wave surge. The panel uses the full depth of the water column from the seabed to the water surface. When the WaveRoller panel moves and absorbs the energy of ocean waves, it transfers the energy to a closed hydraulic system that is not in contact with the salt water. There is no risk of leakage in the ocean. A hydraulic motor drives an electricity generator. The electrical output of this renewable power plant is then connected to the electricity grid via a submarine cable. Predictable source The WaveRoller can be a welcome addition to the arsenal of windmills and solar panels to generate renewable energy more predictably and stably. Golf force is in fact much less affected by weather conditions than sun or wind. Waves can be more or less, but they are always on the ocean coasts. This also determines the ideal location for the system. Quiet coasts as are less suitable. But that does not mean that initiatives such as the WaveRoller cannot play a role in there area's. For example, you could think of golf energy parks off the Norwegian coast. Finally, we are already bringing Norwegian hydropower to other countries, and the wind farms in the North Sea are also connected to each other and to the mainland. By linking these together, countries would also be able to extract a substantial part of its clean energy needs from wave power. A first indication of the costs yields a comparable return as for wind energy. And here too, costs will decrease with the increase in the number of installations. Perhaps our green energy farmers should talk to Finland once. By: Duurzaam Nieuws
It's like wave energy but under water We know hydropower from dams and from tidal currents. Here and there an attempt is made to convert the wave motion of the sea surface into current. The WaveRoller also converts the energy of waves into electricity, but then under water. The installation is placed close to the coast at a depth between 8 and 20 meters. Depending on tide conditions, the system is submerged and therefore not visible. Systems are anchored to the seabed. A single WaveRoller unit has a power between 350 kW and 1000 kW. The units can be used stand-alone or in farms. Waves harvest The back-and-forth movement of water, driven by waves, sets the WaveRoller panel in motion. To extract the maximum amount of energy from the waves with a WaveRoller, the device is installed under water at a depth of about 8 - 20 meters, where the wave surge is the most powerful. A single panel absorbs 1.5-2 MW of power from the wave surge. The panel uses the full depth of the water column from the seabed to the water surface. When the WaveRoller panel moves and absorbs the energy of ocean waves, it transfers the energy to a closed hydraulic system that is not in contact with the salt water. There is no risk of leakage in the ocean. A hydraulic motor drives an electricity generator. The electrical output of this renewable power plant is then connected to the electricity grid via a submarine cable. Predictable source The WaveRoller can be a welcome addition to the arsenal of windmills and solar panels to generate renewable energy more predictably and stably. Golf force is in fact much less affected by weather conditions than sun or wind. Waves can be more or less, but they are always on the ocean coasts. This also determines the ideal location for the system. Quiet coasts as are less suitable. But that does not mean that initiatives such as the WaveRoller cannot play a role in there area's. For example, you could think of golf energy parks off the Norwegian coast. Finally, we are already bringing Norwegian hydropower to other countries, and the wind farms in the North Sea are also connected to each other and to the mainland. By linking these together, countries would also be able to extract a substantial part of its clean energy needs from wave power. A first indication of the costs yields a comparable return as for wind energy. And here too, costs will decrease with the increase in the number of installations. Perhaps our green energy farmers should talk to Finland once. By: Duurzaam Nieuws
Clean energy from water, but differently
Clean energy from water, but differently
The harrowing consequences of "sustainable" hydropower plants
Save Europe's last wild rivers The documentary "Blue Heart" is part of the Campaign "Save the Blue Heart of Europe" that offers resistance to the almost 3000 plans that are on the table for the construction of hydroelectric power stations in the Balkan region. Hydropower is the only renewable energy source that contributes to climate change, forces people to flee and threatens animal species to become extinct. The Balkans is an area where, in contrast to the rest of the continent, rivers are still free flowing and healthy. The 270 kilometer long Vjosa in Albania is the largest wild river in Europe. There are plans to build 38 hydropower dams, on one river. There may be 2,796 dams throughout the Balkans. The American company Patagonia cooperates with NGOs like Riverwatch and EcoAlbania to strengthen the voices of the local population. You see the result in "Blue Heart". Movement of hope The documentary map three reasons against the destruction of rivers for the local population and NGOs. It is in Albania over the Vjosa river, in Macedonia over the Mavroro national park and in Bosnia and Herzegovina over the Sava river that also flows through Serbia, Slovenia and Croatia. It shows a nice balance between the distressing future situation and the success stories. Dams have contributed since 1970 to an average decrease of 81 percent in terms of living in freshwater sources. Idbar Dam Bosnie. Photo by: Andrew Burr Animal species threatened with extinction Another consequence would be the destruction of the habitat around and in the rivers. This can ensure that endangered species like the lynx will die out. Dams have contributed since 1970 to an average decrease of 81 percent in terms of living in freshwater sources. Some animal species have therefore already become extinct. Two thirds of the world's population lives in areas with water shortages. Dams and diversions intensify the problem. Reservoirs and rivers suffer from a reduced water level as a result of the warming river drainage. Often it rises to temperatures that are fatal for animal species that love cold water. Some parts of the river are also sucked dry, causing local species to die from the warm waters without a place of refuge. Reducing the flow, retaining heat in reservoirs and causing toxic algal blooms creates poor water quality. Two thirds of the world's population lives in areas with water shortages. Dams and diversions intensify the problem. A report from the United Nations showed that reservoirs around the world evaporate more water than is used by humans. No money, no dams Because there are no precise estimates of the costs of the dams, that industry is very susceptible to corruption. Better alternatives are wind and solar energy. These projects can be built faster and the costs are much more manageable. According to the campaign, worldwide wind and solar energy would create up to four times more jobs than small-scale hydropower projects. The European bank for reconstruction and development (EBRD), the European Investment Bank (EIB) and the International World Bank for Finance (IFC) have to stop investing in hydroelectric power stations, says the requirement in "Blue Heart". In June a petition will be presented to the banks to enforce the requirement. By: Luka van Royen
Save Europe's last wild rivers The documentary "Blue Heart" is part of the Campaign "Save the Blue Heart of Europe" that offers resistance to the almost 3000 plans that are on the table for the construction of hydroelectric power stations in the Balkan region. Hydropower is the only renewable energy source that contributes to climate change, forces people to flee and threatens animal species to become extinct. The Balkans is an area where, in contrast to the rest of the continent, rivers are still free flowing and healthy. The 270 kilometer long Vjosa in Albania is the largest wild river in Europe. There are plans to build 38 hydropower dams, on one river. There may be 2,796 dams throughout the Balkans. The American company Patagonia cooperates with NGOs like Riverwatch and EcoAlbania to strengthen the voices of the local population. You see the result in "Blue Heart". Movement of hope The documentary map three reasons against the destruction of rivers for the local population and NGOs. It is in Albania over the Vjosa river, in Macedonia over the Mavroro national park and in Bosnia and Herzegovina over the Sava river that also flows through Serbia, Slovenia and Croatia. It shows a nice balance between the distressing future situation and the success stories. Dams have contributed since 1970 to an average decrease of 81 percent in terms of living in freshwater sources. Idbar Dam Bosnie. Photo by: Andrew Burr Animal species threatened with extinction Another consequence would be the destruction of the habitat around and in the rivers. This can ensure that endangered species like the lynx will die out. Dams have contributed since 1970 to an average decrease of 81 percent in terms of living in freshwater sources. Some animal species have therefore already become extinct. Two thirds of the world's population lives in areas with water shortages. Dams and diversions intensify the problem. Reservoirs and rivers suffer from a reduced water level as a result of the warming river drainage. Often it rises to temperatures that are fatal for animal species that love cold water. Some parts of the river are also sucked dry, causing local species to die from the warm waters without a place of refuge. Reducing the flow, retaining heat in reservoirs and causing toxic algal blooms creates poor water quality. Two thirds of the world's population lives in areas with water shortages. Dams and diversions intensify the problem. A report from the United Nations showed that reservoirs around the world evaporate more water than is used by humans. No money, no dams Because there are no precise estimates of the costs of the dams, that industry is very susceptible to corruption. Better alternatives are wind and solar energy. These projects can be built faster and the costs are much more manageable. According to the campaign, worldwide wind and solar energy would create up to four times more jobs than small-scale hydropower projects. The European bank for reconstruction and development (EBRD), the European Investment Bank (EIB) and the International World Bank for Finance (IFC) have to stop investing in hydroelectric power stations, says the requirement in "Blue Heart". In June a petition will be presented to the banks to enforce the requirement. By: Luka van Royen
The harrowing consequences of "sustainable" hydropower plants
The harrowing consequences of "sustainable" hydropower plants
The worlds cleanest #battery. Blue energy storage. Researcher wins the Kivi award.
Not a day goes by without hearing anything about the search for green energy.  But did you know that there is something like blue energy, also called Blue Energy? That way you can generate power from water. Blue Energy uses the difference in salt concentration between, for example, sea and river water. The principle for this dates back to the 1970s, but only a few years ago the technology is good enough to make real work of it. This is done, for example, on the Afsluitdijk, which separates the salty Wadden Sea from the sweet IJsselmeer. The principle behind Blue Energy is as simple as it is genius. If salt (sea) water comes into contact with fresh (river) water, the dissolved salt would love to go to the fresh water. This results in a flow of positive (sodium) and negative (chlorine) charged atoms (ions). If you separate them from each other, a positive and a negative pole is created just like in a battery. If you connect the two to each other with a cable, there is current that you can use. The worlds first blue-powerplant in the Netherlands on the Afsluitdijk. The Afsluitdijk dams off the Zuiderzee and is a salt water inlet of the North Sea. Because of the Afsluitdijk the IJsselmeer lake is the largest fresh water basin of the Netherlands. Another function of the dike is the connection it makes between Friesland and North Holland (Yes cars drive over the dike). It’s a pretty cool story actually, as it seems that where salt water and fresh water meet it’s possible to generate energy out of this. Never heard of it before, but it sure sounds like a pretty safe and green way to to get energy. So how does it work? Well salt water has a lot more charged salt particles, ions, than fresh water. If you separate the salt and fresh water by a special filter that only allows either positive or negative charged particles through then the difference in tension generates energy. Well yes, I read it too but still don’t quite understand, but I get a basic grasp. The plant at the Afsluitdijk is actually a test installation that allows scientists to further explore this way of generating energy. According to calculation the Afsluitdijk should be able to power about 500,0000 households. Chemistry plays a crucial role in building this blue battery. In order to separate the positive and negative particles (the ions), you need membranes. These are thin partitions that chemists make. By playing on the lab with the substances in it, they can build membranes that only allow certain atoms to pass through.  For example, on the left you only collect the positive ions and on the right only the negative ions. The result: Blue Energy, thanks to chemistry. There is a large pilot plant on the Afsluitdijk to make the idea of ​​Blue Energy a reality. The University of Twente, water research institute Wetsus and Fujifilm are closely involved. {youtube}  By: Chemieisoveral. Kivi award for inventor blue power plant The Academic Society Award from the Royal Institute of Engineers (Kivi) goes to Kitty Nijmeijer. The Professor of Membrane Technology at Eindhoven University of Technology is conducting pioneering research that led in 2014 to the construction of the first blue power plant in the world, on the Afsluitdijk. Professor Nijmeijer Nijmeijer receives the prize because of the great importance of her research and the appealing way in which she manages to connect science and society. She will be awarded on 21 March during the Day of the Engineer. Membranes can also be used for the removal of medicine residues from water, the recovery of valuable substances so that they can be reused and for making bioplastics or biofuels. "I am very happy and very honored to have won the Academic Society Award", says Nijmeijer. "Since the beginning of my scientific career I have tried to connect research and society, even when it was not so obvious, and this award is a great recognition for me personally and for the research of our group."  Making circular economy feasible Professor Nijmeijer continues: "I notice that people often do not know how important research and technology is for humanity, and technology will become even more important in the future, and I am convinced that we will have to transform our linear economy into a sustainable, circular This is a huge technological and social transition, and only engineers can translate abstract scientific research into concrete applications By telling us in an understandable way about our research, I want to show them how beautiful technology is and I want to convey that virtually everything we use, consume and do is only possible thanks to that technology. "Kivi director Micaela dos Ramos: "The research of Professor Kitty Nijmeijer brings important innovations at the interface of sustainable energy, water, materials and raw materials. Kivi distinguishes it because of the high quality and societal significance of its research and the way in which it to work tirelessly through various bodies to generate knowledge and awareness for these themes and to stimulate the debate." By: Engeneersonline
Not a day goes by without hearing anything about the search for green energy.  But did you know that there is something like blue energy, also called Blue Energy? That way you can generate power from water. Blue Energy uses the difference in salt concentration between, for example, sea and river water. The principle for this dates back to the 1970s, but only a few years ago the technology is good enough to make real work of it. This is done, for example, on the Afsluitdijk, which separates the salty Wadden Sea from the sweet IJsselmeer. The principle behind Blue Energy is as simple as it is genius. If salt (sea) water comes into contact with fresh (river) water, the dissolved salt would love to go to the fresh water. This results in a flow of positive (sodium) and negative (chlorine) charged atoms (ions). If you separate them from each other, a positive and a negative pole is created just like in a battery. If you connect the two to each other with a cable, there is current that you can use. The worlds first blue-powerplant in the Netherlands on the Afsluitdijk. The Afsluitdijk dams off the Zuiderzee and is a salt water inlet of the North Sea. Because of the Afsluitdijk the IJsselmeer lake is the largest fresh water basin of the Netherlands. Another function of the dike is the connection it makes between Friesland and North Holland (Yes cars drive over the dike). It’s a pretty cool story actually, as it seems that where salt water and fresh water meet it’s possible to generate energy out of this. Never heard of it before, but it sure sounds like a pretty safe and green way to to get energy. So how does it work? Well salt water has a lot more charged salt particles, ions, than fresh water. If you separate the salt and fresh water by a special filter that only allows either positive or negative charged particles through then the difference in tension generates energy. Well yes, I read it too but still don’t quite understand, but I get a basic grasp. The plant at the Afsluitdijk is actually a test installation that allows scientists to further explore this way of generating energy. According to calculation the Afsluitdijk should be able to power about 500,0000 households. Chemistry plays a crucial role in building this blue battery. In order to separate the positive and negative particles (the ions), you need membranes. These are thin partitions that chemists make. By playing on the lab with the substances in it, they can build membranes that only allow certain atoms to pass through.  For example, on the left you only collect the positive ions and on the right only the negative ions. The result: Blue Energy, thanks to chemistry. There is a large pilot plant on the Afsluitdijk to make the idea of ​​Blue Energy a reality. The University of Twente, water research institute Wetsus and Fujifilm are closely involved. {youtube}  By: Chemieisoveral. Kivi award for inventor blue power plant The Academic Society Award from the Royal Institute of Engineers (Kivi) goes to Kitty Nijmeijer. The Professor of Membrane Technology at Eindhoven University of Technology is conducting pioneering research that led in 2014 to the construction of the first blue power plant in the world, on the Afsluitdijk. Professor Nijmeijer Nijmeijer receives the prize because of the great importance of her research and the appealing way in which she manages to connect science and society. She will be awarded on 21 March during the Day of the Engineer. Membranes can also be used for the removal of medicine residues from water, the recovery of valuable substances so that they can be reused and for making bioplastics or biofuels. "I am very happy and very honored to have won the Academic Society Award", says Nijmeijer. "Since the beginning of my scientific career I have tried to connect research and society, even when it was not so obvious, and this award is a great recognition for me personally and for the research of our group."  Making circular economy feasible Professor Nijmeijer continues: "I notice that people often do not know how important research and technology is for humanity, and technology will become even more important in the future, and I am convinced that we will have to transform our linear economy into a sustainable, circular This is a huge technological and social transition, and only engineers can translate abstract scientific research into concrete applications By telling us in an understandable way about our research, I want to show them how beautiful technology is and I want to convey that virtually everything we use, consume and do is only possible thanks to that technology. "Kivi director Micaela dos Ramos: "The research of Professor Kitty Nijmeijer brings important innovations at the interface of sustainable energy, water, materials and raw materials. Kivi distinguishes it because of the high quality and societal significance of its research and the way in which it to work tirelessly through various bodies to generate knowledge and awareness for these themes and to stimulate the debate." By: Engeneersonline
The worlds cleanest #battery. Blue energy storage. Researcher wins the Kivi award.
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