Energy

About: <p>Fossil&nbsp;fuels&nbsp;are non-renewable, they draw on finite resources that will eventually dwindle, becoming too expensive or too environmentally damaging to retrieve. In contrast, the many types of&nbsp;renewable energy&nbsp;resources such as wind and solar&nbsp;energy are constantly replenished and will never run out.<br />Wind turbines and solar panels are an increasingly common sight. But why? What are the benefits of renewable energies and how do they improve our health, environment, and economy?</p> <p>The WhatsOrb category &lsquo;Energy&rsquo; explores and shows the many positive impacts of clean energy, including the benefits of&nbsp;<a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/energy/wind">wind</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/energy/solar">solar</a> and&nbsp;geothermal. Next to it critical articles about nuclear and unknown energy sources.</p> <p>If there was an urge to come up with renewable energy forms and to ​​change energy use, it is now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about these topics and share them with the world. How you minimalize your energy consumption, the solar panels you choose and how did you isolate your house. In a nutshell; how to change your and other people&rsquo;s lifestyle.</p> <p>Global sustainability X change, that is what you can do together with WhatsOrb. <a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/newsletter/your-shared-sustainable-ideas-make-our-earth-a-better-place">What's in it for me</a>?</p>
Close Welcome writers, influencers and dreamers, make the world a greener place
Register here
Forgot password
Forgot password
or
or

Close
Close For sustainability news hunters! The WhatsOrb newsletter!

Receive monthly the newest updates about sustainability from influencers and fellow writers. Cutting edge innovations and global environmental developments.

Close For sustainability news hunters! The WhatsOrb newsletter!

Receive monthly the newest updates about sustainability from influencers and fellow writers. Cutting edge innovations and global environmental developments.

Close Reset password
your profile is 33% complete:
33%
Update profile Close
Close WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-Change

For writers, influencers and dreamers who want to make the world a greener place.

WhatsOrb reaches monthly about 28.000 thousand visitors who want - like you - to make the world a greener place. Share your expertise and all can benefit.

Become an influencer and write and share sustainable news and innovations globally
Are you a writer or do you have ideas about sustainability which you want to share? Register and share your green knowledge and news. WhatsOrb offers you global exposure for your article.

If your article meets certain standards, you receive promotional gains like Facebook promotions and Google Ads advertising.

Energy categorybanner Solar

MenuMenu
Solar Powered Sea Slugs Shed Light On Perpetual Green Energy
In an amazing achievement akin to adding solar panels to your body, a Northeast sea slug sucks raw materials from algae to provide its lifetime supply of solar-powered energy, according to a study by Rutgers University-New Brunswick and other scientists. Photo by: Karen N. Pelletreau. The sea slug, Elysia chlorotica, steals millions of green-colored plastids, which are like tiny solar panels, from algae.  Solar Powered Sea Slugs Shed Light On Search For Perpetual Green Energy "It's a remarkable feat because it's highly unusual for an animal to behave like a plant and survive solely on photosynthesis," said Debashish Bhattacharya, senior author of the study and distinguished professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology at Rutgers-New Brunswick. "The broader implication is in the field of artificial photosynthesis. That is, if we can figure out how the slug maintains stolen, isolated plastids to fix carbon without the plant nucleus, then maybe we can also harness isolated plastids for eternity as green machines to create bioproducts or energy. The existing paradigm is that to make green energy, we need the plant or alga to run the photosynthetic organelle, but the slug shows us that this does not have to be the case." Recommended:  Breaking: Did You Know, All You Read About CO2 Rise Is Half The Truth The sea slug Elysia chlorotica, a mollusk that can grow to more than 2 inches long, has been found in the intertidal zone between Nova Scotia, Canada, and Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, as well as in Florida. Juvenile sea slugs eat the nontoxic brown alga Vaucheria litorea and become photosynthetic - or solar-powered - after stealing millions of algal plastids, which are like tiny solar panels, and storing them in their gut lining, according to the study published online in the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution. What does a sea slug do? The sea slug is a herbivorous animals and feeds on plankton and decaying matter on the ocean floor, along with grazing on the rocks and coral reefs for algae. By munching on the decomposing plant matter on the ocean floor, the sea slug is of great benefit to every marine environment where the sea inhabits. Photo by: Karen N. Pelletreau. This microscopic image shows stolen algal plastids (in green) and lipids from algae (in yellow) inside the sea slug's digestive system.  Photosynthesis is when algae and plants use sunlight to create chemical energy (sugars) from carbon dioxide and water. The brown alga's plastids are photosynthetic organelles (like the organs in animals and people) with chlorophyll, a green pigment that absorbs light. Recommended:  Algae-Based Bioreactor Swallows CO2 Faster Than Trees! How? This particular alga is an ideal food source because it does not have walls between adjoining cells in its body and is essentially a long tube loaded with nuclei and plastids, Bhattacharya said. "When the sea slug makes a hole in the outer cell wall, it can suck out the cell contents and gather all of the algal plastids at once," he said. What is the lifespan of a sea slug? Most species seem to live for about one year, although the tropical Sea Hare Dolabella auricularia can live for six years in an aquarium and the Antarctic cephalaspidean Philine gibba can live for up to four and a half years in nature. Based on studies of other sea slugs, some scientists have argued that they steal and store plastids as food to be digested during hard times, like camels that store fat in their humps, Bhattacharya said. This study showed that's not the case for solar-powered Elysia chlorotica.                                              Sea slug Elysia chlorotica by Mary S. Tyler and Mary E. Rumpho                                    Solar Powered Sea Slugs Shed Light On Search For Perpetual Green Energy "It has this remarkable ability to steal these algal plastids, stop feeding and survive off the photosynthesis from the algae for the next six to eight months," he said. The team of Rutgers and other scientists used RNA sequencing (gene expression) to test their solar energy supply hypothesis. The data show that the slug responds actively to the stolen plastids by protecting them from digestion and turning on animal genes to utilize the algal photosynthetic products. Their findings mirror those found in corals that maintain dinoflagellates (also algae) - as intact cells and not stolen plastids - in symbiotic relationships. Do slugs bite? Believe it or not, slugs have the ability to bite. They have approximately 27,000 teeth! Whereas Elysia chlorotica stores plastids, the algal nuclei that are also sucked in don't survive, and scientists still don't know how the sea slug maintains the plastids and photosynthesis for months without the nuclei that are normally needed to control their function, Bhattacharya said. Cover photo: Ariana Dimitris. Elysia clarki Before you go! Recommended:  Energy Miracle Algae. 10.000 Barrels A Day, Less CO2: 2025 Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about 'green energy'? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
In an amazing achievement akin to adding solar panels to your body, a Northeast sea slug sucks raw materials from algae to provide its lifetime supply of solar-powered energy, according to a study by Rutgers University-New Brunswick and other scientists. Photo by: Karen N. Pelletreau. The sea slug, Elysia chlorotica, steals millions of green-colored plastids, which are like tiny solar panels, from algae.  Solar Powered Sea Slugs Shed Light On Search For Perpetual Green Energy "It's a remarkable feat because it's highly unusual for an animal to behave like a plant and survive solely on photosynthesis," said Debashish Bhattacharya, senior author of the study and distinguished professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology at Rutgers-New Brunswick. "The broader implication is in the field of artificial photosynthesis. That is, if we can figure out how the slug maintains stolen, isolated plastids to fix carbon without the plant nucleus, then maybe we can also harness isolated plastids for eternity as green machines to create bioproducts or energy. The existing paradigm is that to make green energy, we need the plant or alga to run the photosynthetic organelle, but the slug shows us that this does not have to be the case." Recommended:  Breaking: Did You Know, All You Read About CO2 Rise Is Half The Truth The sea slug Elysia chlorotica, a mollusk that can grow to more than 2 inches long, has been found in the intertidal zone between Nova Scotia, Canada, and Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, as well as in Florida. Juvenile sea slugs eat the nontoxic brown alga Vaucheria litorea and become photosynthetic - or solar-powered - after stealing millions of algal plastids, which are like tiny solar panels, and storing them in their gut lining, according to the study published online in the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution. What does a sea slug do? The sea slug is a herbivorous animals and feeds on plankton and decaying matter on the ocean floor, along with grazing on the rocks and coral reefs for algae. By munching on the decomposing plant matter on the ocean floor, the sea slug is of great benefit to every marine environment where the sea inhabits. Photo by: Karen N. Pelletreau. This microscopic image shows stolen algal plastids (in green) and lipids from algae (in yellow) inside the sea slug's digestive system.  Photosynthesis is when algae and plants use sunlight to create chemical energy (sugars) from carbon dioxide and water. The brown alga's plastids are photosynthetic organelles (like the organs in animals and people) with chlorophyll, a green pigment that absorbs light. Recommended:  Algae-Based Bioreactor Swallows CO2 Faster Than Trees! How? This particular alga is an ideal food source because it does not have walls between adjoining cells in its body and is essentially a long tube loaded with nuclei and plastids, Bhattacharya said. "When the sea slug makes a hole in the outer cell wall, it can suck out the cell contents and gather all of the algal plastids at once," he said. What is the lifespan of a sea slug? Most species seem to live for about one year, although the tropical Sea Hare Dolabella auricularia can live for six years in an aquarium and the Antarctic cephalaspidean Philine gibba can live for up to four and a half years in nature. Based on studies of other sea slugs, some scientists have argued that they steal and store plastids as food to be digested during hard times, like camels that store fat in their humps, Bhattacharya said. This study showed that's not the case for solar-powered Elysia chlorotica.                                              Sea slug Elysia chlorotica by Mary S. Tyler and Mary E. Rumpho                                    Solar Powered Sea Slugs Shed Light On Search For Perpetual Green Energy "It has this remarkable ability to steal these algal plastids, stop feeding and survive off the photosynthesis from the algae for the next six to eight months," he said. The team of Rutgers and other scientists used RNA sequencing (gene expression) to test their solar energy supply hypothesis. The data show that the slug responds actively to the stolen plastids by protecting them from digestion and turning on animal genes to utilize the algal photosynthetic products. Their findings mirror those found in corals that maintain dinoflagellates (also algae) - as intact cells and not stolen plastids - in symbiotic relationships. Do slugs bite? Believe it or not, slugs have the ability to bite. They have approximately 27,000 teeth! Whereas Elysia chlorotica stores plastids, the algal nuclei that are also sucked in don't survive, and scientists still don't know how the sea slug maintains the plastids and photosynthesis for months without the nuclei that are normally needed to control their function, Bhattacharya said. Cover photo: Ariana Dimitris. Elysia clarki Before you go! Recommended:  Energy Miracle Algae. 10.000 Barrels A Day, Less CO2: 2025 Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about 'green energy'? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Solar Powered Sea Slugs Shed Light On Perpetual Green Energy
Solar Powered Sea Slugs Shed Light On Perpetual Green Energy
How Tiny holes Turn Solar Cells Transparent And Efficient
Solar cells with tiny holes! Forget rooftop solar panels to generate energy, South Korean researchers think solar windows will be a driver of adoption in the future.  Solar Cells Got Transparent By Tiny Holes What is transparent solar cell? Transparent Solar Panels. Conventional solar panels, more specifically solar photovoltaic panels, absorb sunlight and convert photons (particles of sunlight) into usable energy. The difficulty with making transparent solar panels is that the sunlight passes through the transparent material. A new see-through solar cell made from inexpensive silicon can generate useful levels of electricity from the light that falls on windows. The development avoids some of the problems of existing transparent solar cells, including high costs and the low levels of electricity they generate. Recommended:  Solar Powered Sea Slugs Shed Light On Perpetual Green Energy Most solar cells are opaque, and used mainly on rooftops and in outdoor installations. But researchers hope transparent solar cells can one day fill the vast building space now covered by exterior windows. Another technique! W hile Tesla CEO Elon Musk has been grappling with tiles that harvest sunlight to power homes, Maryland-based SolarWindow thinks the future could come from a different angle. The company claims that, when installed on a 50-story building, its solar windows could generate up to 50 times more power than conventional roof panels (December 2017).                 SolarWindow Technologies is a company gearing up to produce electricity generating windows. Contenders include dye-sensitised solar cells (DSSCs), which can be applied to windows as thin films. Other designs generate electricity from invisible infrared or ultraviolet light.                                                Punching holes in opaque solar cells turns them transparent   But these approaches have drawbacks, explains Kwanyong Seo of the Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology in South Korea, who leads the lab that developed the new cells. DSSCs use often expensive or unstable new materials, which tint light red, green or blue. ‘We don’t want to show a colour, although it is very pretty,’ says Seo. Recommended:  Solar Energy Turned Into Liquid Fuel Can Be Stored 18 Years Solar Cells Transparent And Efficient Does solar energy affect human health? Solar energy decreases greenhouse gas emissions Greenhouse gases, which are produced when fossil fuels are burned, lead to rising global temperatures and climate change. One home installing a solar energy system can have a measurable effect on the environment Seo’s solution is to engineer a conventional crystalline silicon wafer with tiny holes, about 100µm across, which are hidden from sight by spacing them at less than the minimum angular resolution of the human eye. The result is a neutrally-coloured, semi-transparent silicon solar cell. The darkest grade, which lets through 20% of light, has a conversion efficiency of 12.2%, Seo says. Are old solar panels toxic? Solar panels are manufactured using hazardous materials, such as sulfuric acid and phosphine gas, which make them difficult to recycle.  According to an analysis by Environmental Progress, solar panels create about 300 times more toxic waste per unit of electricity generated than nuclear power plants That’s less than opaque silicon cells, which can have efficiencies of above 20%, but more than most transparent solar cells, which range from 5 to 7%. The researchers developed the light transmission windows by taking into account the hole diameters in which visible light wavelengths can be transmitted. They are effective as windows because the efficiency doesn't decline if they are placed vertically. That isn't the case with traditional solar cells. According to one report if a solar cell is placed vertically it may lose as much as 30% of its efficiency.  The aim of the researchers is to increase efficiency to 15%.  Recommended:  Solar Energy The Lead Amid Emerging Photovoltaic: Perovskite “Silicon substrate is a very popular material in the semiconductor industry,” says Seo. “We believe that this vision can apply to many different applications, such as transparent electronics. It can also be applied to mobile devices as an energy source.” Before you go! Recommended:  Solar Farms In Space: Next Step In Renewable Energy Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about the effect of smart phones in your neighborhood? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Solar cells with tiny holes! Forget rooftop solar panels to generate energy, South Korean researchers think solar windows will be a driver of adoption in the future.  Solar Cells Got Transparent By Tiny Holes What is transparent solar cell? Transparent Solar Panels. Conventional solar panels, more specifically solar photovoltaic panels, absorb sunlight and convert photons (particles of sunlight) into usable energy. The difficulty with making transparent solar panels is that the sunlight passes through the transparent material. A new see-through solar cell made from inexpensive silicon can generate useful levels of electricity from the light that falls on windows. The development avoids some of the problems of existing transparent solar cells, including high costs and the low levels of electricity they generate. Recommended:  Solar Powered Sea Slugs Shed Light On Perpetual Green Energy Most solar cells are opaque, and used mainly on rooftops and in outdoor installations. But researchers hope transparent solar cells can one day fill the vast building space now covered by exterior windows. Another technique! W hile Tesla CEO Elon Musk has been grappling with tiles that harvest sunlight to power homes, Maryland-based SolarWindow thinks the future could come from a different angle. The company claims that, when installed on a 50-story building, its solar windows could generate up to 50 times more power than conventional roof panels (December 2017).                 SolarWindow Technologies is a company gearing up to produce electricity generating windows. Contenders include dye-sensitised solar cells (DSSCs), which can be applied to windows as thin films. Other designs generate electricity from invisible infrared or ultraviolet light.                                                Punching holes in opaque solar cells turns them transparent   But these approaches have drawbacks, explains Kwanyong Seo of the Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology in South Korea, who leads the lab that developed the new cells. DSSCs use often expensive or unstable new materials, which tint light red, green or blue. ‘We don’t want to show a colour, although it is very pretty,’ says Seo. Recommended:  Solar Energy Turned Into Liquid Fuel Can Be Stored 18 Years Solar Cells Transparent And Efficient Does solar energy affect human health? Solar energy decreases greenhouse gas emissions Greenhouse gases, which are produced when fossil fuels are burned, lead to rising global temperatures and climate change. One home installing a solar energy system can have a measurable effect on the environment Seo’s solution is to engineer a conventional crystalline silicon wafer with tiny holes, about 100µm across, which are hidden from sight by spacing them at less than the minimum angular resolution of the human eye. The result is a neutrally-coloured, semi-transparent silicon solar cell. The darkest grade, which lets through 20% of light, has a conversion efficiency of 12.2%, Seo says. Are old solar panels toxic? Solar panels are manufactured using hazardous materials, such as sulfuric acid and phosphine gas, which make them difficult to recycle.  According to an analysis by Environmental Progress, solar panels create about 300 times more toxic waste per unit of electricity generated than nuclear power plants That’s less than opaque silicon cells, which can have efficiencies of above 20%, but more than most transparent solar cells, which range from 5 to 7%. The researchers developed the light transmission windows by taking into account the hole diameters in which visible light wavelengths can be transmitted. They are effective as windows because the efficiency doesn't decline if they are placed vertically. That isn't the case with traditional solar cells. According to one report if a solar cell is placed vertically it may lose as much as 30% of its efficiency.  The aim of the researchers is to increase efficiency to 15%.  Recommended:  Solar Energy The Lead Amid Emerging Photovoltaic: Perovskite “Silicon substrate is a very popular material in the semiconductor industry,” says Seo. “We believe that this vision can apply to many different applications, such as transparent electronics. It can also be applied to mobile devices as an energy source.” Before you go! Recommended:  Solar Farms In Space: Next Step In Renewable Energy Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about the effect of smart phones in your neighborhood? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
How Tiny holes Turn Solar Cells Transparent And Efficient
How Tiny holes Turn Solar Cells Transparent And Efficient
Gravitricity: Fast, Versatile Energy Storage Solution, UK
Globally, we are generating more electricity from intermittent renewable green energy sources than ever before. We are slowly making steps to a decarbonized world, but for our renewable energy, we are still reliant on weather-dependent sources, like marine, wind, and solar. Gravitricity: Fast, Versatile Energy Storage Solution We will need new technologies to capture and store green energy during periods of low demand and with a quick release when needed. The idea of the British start-up Gravitricity almost seems too good to be true. By using enormous weights, the company wants to turn mine shafts into low-cost green energy storage systems – with 'some of the best characteristics of lithium batteries and pumped storage.' Is this the large-scale electricity storage the world needs, or is it, in fact, too good to be true? Why is energy storage important? Energy storage is of interest to the utility because they can store energy that is produced by their plants and not used (such as wind energy at night) and release the stored energy during the day when the demand is higher (and also the cost The gravitricity concept seems to be so simple. Gravitricity describes their innovative technology as a huge 'clock weight.' A cylindrical weight of 500 - 5000 tonnes is suspended in a deep (preferably already existing) shaft by a number of cables each of which is engaged with a winch capable of lifting its share of the weight. Electrical power is then absorbed or generated by raising or lowering the weight. The weight is guided by a system of tensioned guide wires (patents applied for) to prevent it from swinging and damaging the shaft. The winch system can be accurately controlled through the electrical drives to keep the weight stable in the hole.  Gravitricity: Fast, Versatile Energy Storage Solution Like A Dream What do you mean by energy? Energy is the capacity of a physical system to do work. Potential energy, sometimes symbolized U, is energy stored in a system. A stationary object in a gravitational field, or a stationary charged particle in an electric field, has potential energy. The target groups are network-constrained users and operators, distribution networks, and major power users. The technology operates in the 1MW to 20 MW power range. With a design life of fifty years, response time from zero to full power in less than one second and efficiency between 80 and 90 percent, Gravitricity versatile fast energy storage seems like a dream. It is a way to utilize existing mines or purpose-built shafts. ‘Future deployments will be able to utilize existing mines or purpose-built shafts, allowing development wherever storage is required,’ according to Gravitricity. And there is more: the start-up claims levelized costs well below lithium batteries. Recommended:  Environmental Costs Of Lithium Battery Addiction: Worldwide Gravitricity  Fanbase For all the above reasons, Gravitricity already has its fanbase. The company received an Innovate UK (the government’s innovation agency) funding of 650.000 pounds to start on its prototype. Also, Gravitricity is teaming up with the well-respected Dutch winch and offshore manufacturer Huisman Equipment BV. ‘The first full-scale prototype will be deployed in 2021 or 2022 at a disused mine in the UK,’ the start-up reveals. {youtube}                                                      Gravitricity: Fast, Versatile Energy Storage Solution: UK                                                               Gravitricity - fast, long-life energy storage Gravitricity:  Energy Storage  According to the Bloomberg New Energy Finance's Global Energy Outlook – the annual economic forecast for the world's power mix to 2050 – there will be '$600 billion of global spend on 'green' energy storage to 2040. ' Gravitricity 's energy storage goal is to 'provide balancing services on transmission grids as well as appealing to network-constrained users and generators, distribution networks and major power users seeking a reliable, fast response, and long-term means of storing power,' as they write on their website. Can energy be destroyed? The first law of thermodynamics, also known as Law of Conservation of Energy, states that energy can neither be created nor destroyed; energy can only be transferred or changed from one form to another. ... In other words, energy cannot be created or destroyed. What do you think: will Gravitricity versatile fast energy storage enable existing grid infrastructure to go further in a renewable energy world by providing this essential energy storage? Before you go! Recommended:  Hydrogen Energy Storage Revolution In The Netherlands Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Globally, we are generating more electricity from intermittent renewable green energy sources than ever before. We are slowly making steps to a decarbonized world, but for our renewable energy, we are still reliant on weather-dependent sources, like marine, wind, and solar. Gravitricity: Fast, Versatile Energy Storage Solution We will need new technologies to capture and store green energy during periods of low demand and with a quick release when needed. The idea of the British start-up Gravitricity almost seems too good to be true. By using enormous weights, the company wants to turn mine shafts into low-cost green energy storage systems – with 'some of the best characteristics of lithium batteries and pumped storage.' Is this the large-scale electricity storage the world needs, or is it, in fact, too good to be true? Why is energy storage important? Energy storage is of interest to the utility because they can store energy that is produced by their plants and not used (such as wind energy at night) and release the stored energy during the day when the demand is higher (and also the cost The gravitricity concept seems to be so simple. Gravitricity describes their innovative technology as a huge 'clock weight.' A cylindrical weight of 500 - 5000 tonnes is suspended in a deep (preferably already existing) shaft by a number of cables each of which is engaged with a winch capable of lifting its share of the weight. Electrical power is then absorbed or generated by raising or lowering the weight. The weight is guided by a system of tensioned guide wires (patents applied for) to prevent it from swinging and damaging the shaft. The winch system can be accurately controlled through the electrical drives to keep the weight stable in the hole.  Gravitricity: Fast, Versatile Energy Storage Solution Like A Dream What do you mean by energy? Energy is the capacity of a physical system to do work. Potential energy, sometimes symbolized U, is energy stored in a system. A stationary object in a gravitational field, or a stationary charged particle in an electric field, has potential energy. The target groups are network-constrained users and operators, distribution networks, and major power users. The technology operates in the 1MW to 20 MW power range. With a design life of fifty years, response time from zero to full power in less than one second and efficiency between 80 and 90 percent, Gravitricity versatile fast energy storage seems like a dream. It is a way to utilize existing mines or purpose-built shafts. ‘Future deployments will be able to utilize existing mines or purpose-built shafts, allowing development wherever storage is required,’ according to Gravitricity. And there is more: the start-up claims levelized costs well below lithium batteries. Recommended:  Environmental Costs Of Lithium Battery Addiction: Worldwide Gravitricity  Fanbase For all the above reasons, Gravitricity already has its fanbase. The company received an Innovate UK (the government’s innovation agency) funding of 650.000 pounds to start on its prototype. Also, Gravitricity is teaming up with the well-respected Dutch winch and offshore manufacturer Huisman Equipment BV. ‘The first full-scale prototype will be deployed in 2021 or 2022 at a disused mine in the UK,’ the start-up reveals. {youtube}                                                      Gravitricity: Fast, Versatile Energy Storage Solution: UK                                                               Gravitricity - fast, long-life energy storage Gravitricity:  Energy Storage  According to the Bloomberg New Energy Finance's Global Energy Outlook – the annual economic forecast for the world's power mix to 2050 – there will be '$600 billion of global spend on 'green' energy storage to 2040. ' Gravitricity 's energy storage goal is to 'provide balancing services on transmission grids as well as appealing to network-constrained users and generators, distribution networks and major power users seeking a reliable, fast response, and long-term means of storing power,' as they write on their website. Can energy be destroyed? The first law of thermodynamics, also known as Law of Conservation of Energy, states that energy can neither be created nor destroyed; energy can only be transferred or changed from one form to another. ... In other words, energy cannot be created or destroyed. What do you think: will Gravitricity versatile fast energy storage enable existing grid infrastructure to go further in a renewable energy world by providing this essential energy storage? Before you go! Recommended:  Hydrogen Energy Storage Revolution In The Netherlands Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Gravitricity: Fast, Versatile Energy Storage Solution, UK
Gravitricity: Fast, Versatile Energy Storage Solution, UK
The Illusions Of Renewables. Solar And Wind Will Not Save Our Climate
Far too often, the debate on climate change shifts to one of fossil fuels versus renewable energy. If we were to completely let go of the ‘wasteful’ and switch to energy generated by natural elements such as wind, solar or waves, it would - or so it is alleged - save our planet. This thought has been at the center of the climate debate for more than 30 years, setting in motion large-scale renewable energy projects. The Illusions Of Renewables However, looking at today’s landscape, we see that there isn’t a single nation that has completely shifted its energy needs to renewable sources. Some Scandinavian countries are well underway to realising a near-zero carbon electricity supply, but what stands out here, is the fact that renewables like solar and wind only make up a small percentage of this. It is a well-documented fact that the number of solar panels or wind turbines required to even come close to the amount of energy generated by ‘regular’ producers is massive. At the same time, these enormous grids required will lead to higher costs of generating electricity, huge amounts of energy required for its production, and leave behind a large environmental footprint. Additionally, it is a rather unreliable source of energy.   In short, solar and wind energy are not just falling short of what they ought to be producing in order to be an adequate replacement, they are also largely unnecessary when looking at the bigger picture. Which will, eventually, really be a good thing. Renewables History When listening to a regular climate change debate, one will be quick to conclude that renewable energy - in particular solar and wind energy - is a relatively new invention. Wind turbines have, after all, not been recorded in modern history as a common sight until recently. Yet the reality is that wind and sunlight are some of the oldest sources of energy that we have. Already back in 1833, a man named John Etzler was involved in a proposal that sought to construct solar power plants. These would employ mirrors to concentrate sunlight on boilers. Solar panels that are capable of generating electricity have even been mentioned in literature back in the late 1800s. The schools of thought were there, waiting to be picked up - but unfortunately being overrun by the power of coal and other fossil fuels. Yet renewables were never far from our mind, as there have been numerous mentions of solar energy in publications throughout the 20th century - pointing at it as the next ‘big thing’ in power generation. This started in 1891, with The New York Times reporting that solar energy is not yet economical in an article titled “ Solar Energy: What the Sun's Rays Can Do and May Yet Be Able to Do ”, in which it concluded "… the day is not unlikely to arrive before long… ”. Solar And Wind Energy Revolution! Did It Arrive? That day did arrive, yet it never really ‘caught on’, despite the hype being attributed to it by journalists and experts alike. In 1931, another journalist of The New York Times had discovered this ‘hidden treasure’, writing about “ the evolution of civilization similar to that which followed the invention by James Watt of the steam engine ”. In the following decades, renewables slowly got more attention and found themselves at the center of scientific and political debate, with subsidies, tax cuts and grants being thrown at it. Especially around the turn of the century, it seemed as if the ‘big breakthrough’ was waiting to happen - only waiting on that last bit of funding. A massive $2 trillion was spent on wind and solar energy combined between 2007 and 2016, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance, with governments spending up to 100 times more on its subsidies than it did for nuclear and fossil fuels.   The results? Far from as impressive: in 2016, solar and wind generated energy only made up 1.3 and 3.9 percent of the earth’s total, respectively. ( Recommended :  Vortex Wind Turbine: Energy Generator Without Blades ) Denmark And Germany As Role Model? Of course, these numbers above are merely an average. Some countries, like Denmark, show more promising numbers for its decarbonisation process: where wind energy in particular is thriving, making up 48 percent of the total electricity in the country. Does this make them the role model for renewables that we need to create a blueprint for other countries as well? Well, it is important to understand the specific reasons why this tiny Scandinavian country was able to achieve this. Firstly, it is small. Really small. It has fewer than 6 million inhabitants, occupies a piece of land that can be crossed in only a few hours, and is a minor player on the world’s economic stage.   While small, it is located in a favourable region, with many European neighbours willing to import the excess wind energy generated, lowering the risk of a costly surplus. Regardless, Denmark’s electricity prices are still amongst the highest in the world. And while this is justified by claiming that the industry is one of its most important export products, it is still striking.   Areas that are deploying solar energy on a large scale have seen similar uptakes in electricity price. Denmark’s neighbour Germany has long boasted a status as the poster child of renewables, but is facing similar issues. Their electricity is the second most expensive in Europe, after Denmark, while emissions are not declining as much as they would like.   Danish Tax Minister Karsten Lauritzen said that the Government should rethink the level of tax on electricity consumption, which is currently the highest in Europe. According to the Tax Ministry, approximately 40 percent of a household electricity bill is tax but these revenues were and are nessecarry in Denmmark to subsidize the development of renewable energy. Carbon Emissions Least Production: France And Sweden Therefore, measuring the share of solar and wind based energy sources in the total energy production will paint a somewhat misleading image - and show the inefficiency of solar and wind. A much better benchmark can be found when looking at the amount of carbon emissions per capita. Here, France and Sweden are ranking high. The surprising thing? While those countries have successfully cut their carbon emissions, they have done so by employing only limited wind and solar sources. Sweden is deriving 95 percent of its electricity from zero-carbon sources, and France 88 percent. What these sources are? Nuclear and hydroelectric power. Other countries, including Norway, Brazil and Costa Rica, have harnessed hydroelectric power in a similar fashion, effectively decarbonising their economies. Nuclear is slightly more scalable and reliable, compared to hydroelectricity’s relatively large environmental impact. Hydroelectricity, as demonstrated by Brazil and California, is inherently unreliable and will not let itself be steered, meaning that countries will have to fall back on fossil fuels if production unexpectedly falls short. Thus, nuclear energy appears to be the only zero-carbon source that is capable of saving our planet - it is scalable, reliable, and efficient. Renewables Not Necessary To Save The Climate   Good news, so far: we do not need renewables to solve climate change. Renewables require a lot of land and specific wasteful ‘ingredients’ like concrete, steel and glass for its production - nuclear plants only need a fraction of this.   {youtube}                                              The Illusions Of Renewables. Solar And Wind Will Not Save Our Climate To demonstrate this: solar panels have been shown to rake up to 300 times more toxic waste than nuclear energy. And even after having been produced in a wasteful manner, they still harm the environment by occupying large areas of land, threatening the local ecosystem - all in exchange for a relatively minor share of electricity. ( Recommended :  Solar Farms In Space: Next Step In Renewable Energy ) The Illusions Of Renewables. Are We Headed For A Solar Waste Crisis? While people are up in arms about nuclear waste, only very few really seem to be concerned about the concept of solar waste. And solar waste there is: most countries do not have an adequate plan for safely disposing this often toxic waste, while its pile is growing steadily. Nuclear waste makes all the alarm bells in our heads go off, while solar waste seems to be regarded with something akin to indifference. Solar Waste Versus Nuclear   Let’s start with some cold, hard facts. Every unit of energy generated by solar creates 3000 times more toxic waste than a unit of energy generated by nuclear energy. To put it in a perspective that hits home: Environmental Progress calculated that, if all waste generated over the next 25 years would be stacked on a football field, the pile of nuclear waste would be about the same height as the Leaning Tower of Pisa (52 meters), while the solar waste pile would be as high as two Mt. Everests (16 km). Developing countries, on the other hand, are facing similar issues. China, India and Ghana are dealing with those living in communities near waste dumps. Here, waste is often burned in an attempt to salvage copper wires, which are consequently resold. This process requires the burning of surrounding plastics, meaning that the smoke that is released is very harmful and straight-up toxic to human health. Nuclear waste, on the other hand, is carefully stored and managed. Using the highest levels of caution and safety, waste is contained in cement-filled drums and stored in secured facilities for decades or even centuries on end. When comparing this to the lacklustre way in which solar waste is simply ‘dumped atop the pile’ of electronic waste, it is not hard to see where we are doing something wrong. Solar panels contain a large number of dangerous materials, including lead, chromium and cadmium - not just harmful on direct impact, but also potentially capable of infiltrating drinking water supplies.   The Illusions Of Renewables: Actual Dangers Versus Perceived Dangers The dilemma is not as tough when carefully observing those facts. The share of nuclear energy in the world’s electricity market is larger, yet created using ‘less’. Less waste, less land area, less of an ecological and environmental footprint. While we are keen on implementing more solar and wind, the reality is that these energy sources are often showing far from rosy numbers below the line.   We would do well to move beyond this illusion of renewables and explore other zero-carbon sources of energy, in particular nuclear energy. There are relatively few drawbacks to this stable and secure source of energy, that has remained at the center of societal scrutiny since its earlier days. Nuclear energy is one way of tackling climate change in a meaningful manner - something that unfortunately cannot be said about wind or solar. It is time to make decisions based on facts rather than on dreams of renewables. Before you go! Recommended:  COP25: Can Paris Accord Signatories Beat The Fossil Industry Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Far too often, the debate on climate change shifts to one of fossil fuels versus renewable energy. If we were to completely let go of the ‘wasteful’ and switch to energy generated by natural elements such as wind, solar or waves, it would - or so it is alleged - save our planet. This thought has been at the center of the climate debate for more than 30 years, setting in motion large-scale renewable energy projects. The Illusions Of Renewables However, looking at today’s landscape, we see that there isn’t a single nation that has completely shifted its energy needs to renewable sources. Some Scandinavian countries are well underway to realising a near-zero carbon electricity supply, but what stands out here, is the fact that renewables like solar and wind only make up a small percentage of this. It is a well-documented fact that the number of solar panels or wind turbines required to even come close to the amount of energy generated by ‘regular’ producers is massive. At the same time, these enormous grids required will lead to higher costs of generating electricity, huge amounts of energy required for its production, and leave behind a large environmental footprint. Additionally, it is a rather unreliable source of energy.   In short, solar and wind energy are not just falling short of what they ought to be producing in order to be an adequate replacement, they are also largely unnecessary when looking at the bigger picture. Which will, eventually, really be a good thing. Renewables History When listening to a regular climate change debate, one will be quick to conclude that renewable energy - in particular solar and wind energy - is a relatively new invention. Wind turbines have, after all, not been recorded in modern history as a common sight until recently. Yet the reality is that wind and sunlight are some of the oldest sources of energy that we have. Already back in 1833, a man named John Etzler was involved in a proposal that sought to construct solar power plants. These would employ mirrors to concentrate sunlight on boilers. Solar panels that are capable of generating electricity have even been mentioned in literature back in the late 1800s. The schools of thought were there, waiting to be picked up - but unfortunately being overrun by the power of coal and other fossil fuels. Yet renewables were never far from our mind, as there have been numerous mentions of solar energy in publications throughout the 20th century - pointing at it as the next ‘big thing’ in power generation. This started in 1891, with The New York Times reporting that solar energy is not yet economical in an article titled “ Solar Energy: What the Sun's Rays Can Do and May Yet Be Able to Do ”, in which it concluded "… the day is not unlikely to arrive before long… ”. Solar And Wind Energy Revolution! Did It Arrive? That day did arrive, yet it never really ‘caught on’, despite the hype being attributed to it by journalists and experts alike. In 1931, another journalist of The New York Times had discovered this ‘hidden treasure’, writing about “ the evolution of civilization similar to that which followed the invention by James Watt of the steam engine ”. In the following decades, renewables slowly got more attention and found themselves at the center of scientific and political debate, with subsidies, tax cuts and grants being thrown at it. Especially around the turn of the century, it seemed as if the ‘big breakthrough’ was waiting to happen - only waiting on that last bit of funding. A massive $2 trillion was spent on wind and solar energy combined between 2007 and 2016, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance, with governments spending up to 100 times more on its subsidies than it did for nuclear and fossil fuels.   The results? Far from as impressive: in 2016, solar and wind generated energy only made up 1.3 and 3.9 percent of the earth’s total, respectively. ( Recommended :  Vortex Wind Turbine: Energy Generator Without Blades ) Denmark And Germany As Role Model? Of course, these numbers above are merely an average. Some countries, like Denmark, show more promising numbers for its decarbonisation process: where wind energy in particular is thriving, making up 48 percent of the total electricity in the country. Does this make them the role model for renewables that we need to create a blueprint for other countries as well? Well, it is important to understand the specific reasons why this tiny Scandinavian country was able to achieve this. Firstly, it is small. Really small. It has fewer than 6 million inhabitants, occupies a piece of land that can be crossed in only a few hours, and is a minor player on the world’s economic stage.   While small, it is located in a favourable region, with many European neighbours willing to import the excess wind energy generated, lowering the risk of a costly surplus. Regardless, Denmark’s electricity prices are still amongst the highest in the world. And while this is justified by claiming that the industry is one of its most important export products, it is still striking.   Areas that are deploying solar energy on a large scale have seen similar uptakes in electricity price. Denmark’s neighbour Germany has long boasted a status as the poster child of renewables, but is facing similar issues. Their electricity is the second most expensive in Europe, after Denmark, while emissions are not declining as much as they would like.   Danish Tax Minister Karsten Lauritzen said that the Government should rethink the level of tax on electricity consumption, which is currently the highest in Europe. According to the Tax Ministry, approximately 40 percent of a household electricity bill is tax but these revenues were and are nessecarry in Denmmark to subsidize the development of renewable energy. Carbon Emissions Least Production: France And Sweden Therefore, measuring the share of solar and wind based energy sources in the total energy production will paint a somewhat misleading image - and show the inefficiency of solar and wind. A much better benchmark can be found when looking at the amount of carbon emissions per capita. Here, France and Sweden are ranking high. The surprising thing? While those countries have successfully cut their carbon emissions, they have done so by employing only limited wind and solar sources. Sweden is deriving 95 percent of its electricity from zero-carbon sources, and France 88 percent. What these sources are? Nuclear and hydroelectric power. Other countries, including Norway, Brazil and Costa Rica, have harnessed hydroelectric power in a similar fashion, effectively decarbonising their economies. Nuclear is slightly more scalable and reliable, compared to hydroelectricity’s relatively large environmental impact. Hydroelectricity, as demonstrated by Brazil and California, is inherently unreliable and will not let itself be steered, meaning that countries will have to fall back on fossil fuels if production unexpectedly falls short. Thus, nuclear energy appears to be the only zero-carbon source that is capable of saving our planet - it is scalable, reliable, and efficient. Renewables Not Necessary To Save The Climate   Good news, so far: we do not need renewables to solve climate change. Renewables require a lot of land and specific wasteful ‘ingredients’ like concrete, steel and glass for its production - nuclear plants only need a fraction of this.   {youtube}                                              The Illusions Of Renewables. Solar And Wind Will Not Save Our Climate To demonstrate this: solar panels have been shown to rake up to 300 times more toxic waste than nuclear energy. And even after having been produced in a wasteful manner, they still harm the environment by occupying large areas of land, threatening the local ecosystem - all in exchange for a relatively minor share of electricity. ( Recommended :  Solar Farms In Space: Next Step In Renewable Energy ) The Illusions Of Renewables. Are We Headed For A Solar Waste Crisis? While people are up in arms about nuclear waste, only very few really seem to be concerned about the concept of solar waste. And solar waste there is: most countries do not have an adequate plan for safely disposing this often toxic waste, while its pile is growing steadily. Nuclear waste makes all the alarm bells in our heads go off, while solar waste seems to be regarded with something akin to indifference. Solar Waste Versus Nuclear   Let’s start with some cold, hard facts. Every unit of energy generated by solar creates 3000 times more toxic waste than a unit of energy generated by nuclear energy. To put it in a perspective that hits home: Environmental Progress calculated that, if all waste generated over the next 25 years would be stacked on a football field, the pile of nuclear waste would be about the same height as the Leaning Tower of Pisa (52 meters), while the solar waste pile would be as high as two Mt. Everests (16 km). Developing countries, on the other hand, are facing similar issues. China, India and Ghana are dealing with those living in communities near waste dumps. Here, waste is often burned in an attempt to salvage copper wires, which are consequently resold. This process requires the burning of surrounding plastics, meaning that the smoke that is released is very harmful and straight-up toxic to human health. Nuclear waste, on the other hand, is carefully stored and managed. Using the highest levels of caution and safety, waste is contained in cement-filled drums and stored in secured facilities for decades or even centuries on end. When comparing this to the lacklustre way in which solar waste is simply ‘dumped atop the pile’ of electronic waste, it is not hard to see where we are doing something wrong. Solar panels contain a large number of dangerous materials, including lead, chromium and cadmium - not just harmful on direct impact, but also potentially capable of infiltrating drinking water supplies.   The Illusions Of Renewables: Actual Dangers Versus Perceived Dangers The dilemma is not as tough when carefully observing those facts. The share of nuclear energy in the world’s electricity market is larger, yet created using ‘less’. Less waste, less land area, less of an ecological and environmental footprint. While we are keen on implementing more solar and wind, the reality is that these energy sources are often showing far from rosy numbers below the line.   We would do well to move beyond this illusion of renewables and explore other zero-carbon sources of energy, in particular nuclear energy. There are relatively few drawbacks to this stable and secure source of energy, that has remained at the center of societal scrutiny since its earlier days. Nuclear energy is one way of tackling climate change in a meaningful manner - something that unfortunately cannot be said about wind or solar. It is time to make decisions based on facts rather than on dreams of renewables. Before you go! Recommended:  COP25: Can Paris Accord Signatories Beat The Fossil Industry Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
The Illusions Of Renewables. Solar And Wind Will Not Save Our Climate
The Illusions Of Renewables. Solar And Wind Will Not Save Our Climate
Solar Farms In Space: Next Step In Renewable Energy
The green energy revolution continues to accelerate - solar parks are a familiar sight all over the world. But China wants to take solar energy to a whole new level. The nation’s ambition is to put a solar power station in orbit by 2050. With this power station, China will have access to the most reliable source of renewable energy, since the sun always shines in space. If this difficult and costly plan will work, it will make China the first nation to harness the sun’s energy in space and beam it to Earth. Are solar farms in spaces the answer to our prayers or a mission impossible? Solar energy: the inexhaustible source It seems to be a great idea: space-based solar power as an inexhaustible source of energy. "You don’t have to deal with the day and night cycle, and you don’t have to deal with clouds or seasons, so you end up having eight to nine times more power available to you," said Ali Hajimiri, a professor of electrical engineering at the California Institute of Technology and director of the university’s Space Solar Power Project for solar farms in space. ( Recommended: Solar Energy Turned Into Liquid Fuel Can Be Stored For 18 Years ) Energy demands So why haven’t anyone thought of this before? Well, the thought of using solar farms in space is nothing new. The idea was very vivid in the 1970s. The research stalled largely because the technological demands of a solar power station in space were thought to be too complex. But nowadays, there is a huge progression in technology compared to a few years ago. The improvements in the design and efficiency of photovoltaic cells and advances in wireless transmission are making it possible to pick up where researchers left off. How much of a difference will these improvements make? Asked John Mankins, a physicist who led the agency’s efforts in the field in the 1990s before NASA abandoned the investigating. “We’re seeing a bit of a resurgence now, and it’s probably because the ability to make solar farms in space is there, thanks to new technologies."   According to Mankins, there is another factor driving the revived interest in this kind of renewable power. The world’s population is growing – it’s expected to swell to 9 billion by 2050. Space-based solar power can become essential to meet the energy demands of people in parts of the world that aren’t particularly sunny. “If you look at the next 50 years, the demand for energy is stupendous. If you can harvest sunlight with solar farms in space where the sun is always shining and deliver it with essentially no interruptions to Earth — and you can do all that at an affordable price, you win." {youtube}                                                                       Solar Farms In Space: Next Step In Renewable Energy                                                                                Mission impossible? Details of China’s plan remain a secret. According to Mankins, the nation can 'launch tens of thousands of 'solar satellites' that would link up to form an enormous cone-shaped structure that orbits about 22,000 miles above Earth. They would be covered with photovoltaic panels to convert sunlight into energy, which would be beamed wirelessly to ground-based receivers. Such a solar facility could generate a steady flow of 2,000 gigawatts of power.’ There are still some hurdles to overcome, like the weight of the solar panels. ( Recommended: Waste In Space Will Be Fetched By The Cubesail carbage Truck ) It will also cost billions of dollars to make these solar farms in space happen. The research, the tests and the solar satellites itself (price tag: about ten billion each) will make this a very expensive project – to say the least. China hasn’t revealed how much it’s spending to develop its solar power stations, but the China Daily reported that the nation is already building a test facility in the southwestern city of Chongqing. It doesn’t seem like a mission impossible. China is taking a key position in the development of solar farms in space. According to John Mankins, a solar power station in space is a wonderful thing. “For a lot of locations, rooftop solar is fabulous, but a lot of the world is not like Arizona (or other sunny places). Millions of people live where large, ground-based solar arrays are not economical,” he said. Mankins hailed recent developments in the field and said he is keen to follow China’s new initiative. What do you think - is this next step in renewable energy? ( Recommended: All About Solar Energy )
The green energy revolution continues to accelerate - solar parks are a familiar sight all over the world. But China wants to take solar energy to a whole new level. The nation’s ambition is to put a solar power station in orbit by 2050. With this power station, China will have access to the most reliable source of renewable energy, since the sun always shines in space. If this difficult and costly plan will work, it will make China the first nation to harness the sun’s energy in space and beam it to Earth. Are solar farms in spaces the answer to our prayers or a mission impossible? Solar energy: the inexhaustible source It seems to be a great idea: space-based solar power as an inexhaustible source of energy. "You don’t have to deal with the day and night cycle, and you don’t have to deal with clouds or seasons, so you end up having eight to nine times more power available to you," said Ali Hajimiri, a professor of electrical engineering at the California Institute of Technology and director of the university’s Space Solar Power Project for solar farms in space. ( Recommended: Solar Energy Turned Into Liquid Fuel Can Be Stored For 18 Years ) Energy demands So why haven’t anyone thought of this before? Well, the thought of using solar farms in space is nothing new. The idea was very vivid in the 1970s. The research stalled largely because the technological demands of a solar power station in space were thought to be too complex. But nowadays, there is a huge progression in technology compared to a few years ago. The improvements in the design and efficiency of photovoltaic cells and advances in wireless transmission are making it possible to pick up where researchers left off. How much of a difference will these improvements make? Asked John Mankins, a physicist who led the agency’s efforts in the field in the 1990s before NASA abandoned the investigating. “We’re seeing a bit of a resurgence now, and it’s probably because the ability to make solar farms in space is there, thanks to new technologies."   According to Mankins, there is another factor driving the revived interest in this kind of renewable power. The world’s population is growing – it’s expected to swell to 9 billion by 2050. Space-based solar power can become essential to meet the energy demands of people in parts of the world that aren’t particularly sunny. “If you look at the next 50 years, the demand for energy is stupendous. If you can harvest sunlight with solar farms in space where the sun is always shining and deliver it with essentially no interruptions to Earth — and you can do all that at an affordable price, you win." {youtube}                                                                       Solar Farms In Space: Next Step In Renewable Energy                                                                                Mission impossible? Details of China’s plan remain a secret. According to Mankins, the nation can 'launch tens of thousands of 'solar satellites' that would link up to form an enormous cone-shaped structure that orbits about 22,000 miles above Earth. They would be covered with photovoltaic panels to convert sunlight into energy, which would be beamed wirelessly to ground-based receivers. Such a solar facility could generate a steady flow of 2,000 gigawatts of power.’ There are still some hurdles to overcome, like the weight of the solar panels. ( Recommended: Waste In Space Will Be Fetched By The Cubesail carbage Truck ) It will also cost billions of dollars to make these solar farms in space happen. The research, the tests and the solar satellites itself (price tag: about ten billion each) will make this a very expensive project – to say the least. China hasn’t revealed how much it’s spending to develop its solar power stations, but the China Daily reported that the nation is already building a test facility in the southwestern city of Chongqing. It doesn’t seem like a mission impossible. China is taking a key position in the development of solar farms in space. According to John Mankins, a solar power station in space is a wonderful thing. “For a lot of locations, rooftop solar is fabulous, but a lot of the world is not like Arizona (or other sunny places). Millions of people live where large, ground-based solar arrays are not economical,” he said. Mankins hailed recent developments in the field and said he is keen to follow China’s new initiative. What do you think - is this next step in renewable energy? ( Recommended: All About Solar Energy )
Solar Farms In Space: Next Step In Renewable Energy
Solar Farms In Space: Next Step In Renewable Energy
Energy

Fossil fuels are non-renewable, they draw on finite resources that will eventually dwindle, becoming too expensive or too environmentally damaging to retrieve. In contrast, the many types of renewable energy resources such as wind and solar energy are constantly replenished and will never run out.
Wind turbines and solar panels are an increasingly common sight. But why? What are the benefits of renewable energies and how do they improve our health, environment, and economy?

The WhatsOrb category ‘Energy’ explores and shows the many positive impacts of clean energy, including the benefits of windsolar and geothermal. Next to it critical articles about nuclear and unknown energy sources.

If there was an urge to come up with renewable energy forms and to ​​change energy use, it is now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about these topics and share them with the world. How you minimalize your energy consumption, the solar panels you choose and how did you isolate your house. In a nutshell; how to change your and other people’s lifestyle.

Global sustainability X change, that is what you can do together with WhatsOrb. What's in it for me?

Get updates on environmental sustainability in your mailbox every month.