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The hydrogen energy storage revolution in the Netherlands
The hydrogen revolution has been announced before – but now it really seems to be happening. The end of natural gas extraction in Groningen offers new opportunities. Are the Netherlands finally really for hydrogen? "Yes, my friends, I believe that water will one day be employed as fuel, that hydrogen and oxygen which constitute it will furnish an inexhaustible source of heat and light. Water will be the coal of the future!" You can read this quotation in The Mysterious Island, a novel by Jules Verne, written in 1876. Since the beginning of the nineteenth century by the discovery that by adding electricity to water hydrogen and oxygen are released (so-called electrolysis), and that the reverse process, bringing together of hydrogen and oxygen, water and electricity (the fuel cell effect), people dreamed of hydrogen and the arrival of the hydrogen revolution announced. A perfect energy storage "I believe this is really going to happen,” says director of the Dutch television series VPRO Tegenlicht Rob van Hattum (64). He has been working on this subject since he was just twenty years old. Van Hattum has made three documentaries about hydrogen, his last one being a movie released in 2004. Now, fifteen years later, hydrogen is still a hot item. “Solar and wind energy are difficult to store. And that is a problem, because you are dependent on nature, you have to have a buffer. Wind farms are now being shut down, because they can´t lose the energy. In hydrogen (liquid or in gaseous form) you can store energy perfectly." The hydrogen games Japan already proved that it is possible: the 2020 Olympic Games are already named 'the hydrogen games', because the entire energy supply will run on hydrogen. What about Holland? There is already a lot of experimenting with hydrogen in the Netherlands, by large and small parties. Gasunie has started a pilot project near Veendam in Groningen. An installation is being built in which, for the first time on a larger scale, sustainably generated electricity, originating from 8500 solar panels, is converted into hydrogen (and energy for the installation itself). An indispensable part of a delta plan The realization that hydrogen can play a role in the future energy supply is growing in the Netherlands. The Hydrogen Coalition, a group of 27 environmental organizations, knowledge institutions, governments and companies - including network operators and heavy industry (including Tata Steel and AkzoNobel) - called on the government last year to ‘give priority to hydrogen as an essential building block for the energy transition'. The message: invest big in development and innovation of the entire  hydrogen chain: hydrogen is an indispensable part of a (necessary) delta plan for Dutch energy supply. There are a lot of ideas, for instance to create a large island in the North Sea and put windmills down there. The hydrogen produced on site can be pumped to the mainland via existing gas pipelines, where it is stored underground and further distributed, to industry, to petrol stations, to homes. All kinds of opportunities The Netherlands hás to get rid of natural gas. Right now, the solution appears to be (expensive) heat pumps and insulation. But by no means all houses can be heated like this, says Van Hattum, and why should we when it can be done with hydrogen. The gas infrastructure is already there, after all. That gas network offers all kinds of opportunities. Not only is Groningen the gateway to the European gas trade, it can also become the hydrogen connection point in Europe. The north of the Netherlands has a good chance to take a leading role in the upcoming hydrogen revolution, with the Wadden Sea and the North Sea - where the winds are wild - as a hinterland, with the existing gas infrastructure and the gas storage fields and with the knowledge gained in sixty years of gas extraction and transport. The hydrogen revolution is close, and that is a fact. Will Van Hattum be right, and is this really going to happen? Watch his documentary ‘Deltaplan Waterstof' (Dutch language) on VPRO Tegenlicht to find out more on this topic. {youtube} https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy
The hydrogen revolution has been announced before – but now it really seems to be happening. The end of natural gas extraction in Groningen offers new opportunities. Are the Netherlands finally really for hydrogen? "Yes, my friends, I believe that water will one day be employed as fuel, that hydrogen and oxygen which constitute it will furnish an inexhaustible source of heat and light. Water will be the coal of the future!" You can read this quotation in The Mysterious Island, a novel by Jules Verne, written in 1876. Since the beginning of the nineteenth century by the discovery that by adding electricity to water hydrogen and oxygen are released (so-called electrolysis), and that the reverse process, bringing together of hydrogen and oxygen, water and electricity (the fuel cell effect), people dreamed of hydrogen and the arrival of the hydrogen revolution announced. A perfect energy storage "I believe this is really going to happen,” says director of the Dutch television series VPRO Tegenlicht Rob van Hattum (64). He has been working on this subject since he was just twenty years old. Van Hattum has made three documentaries about hydrogen, his last one being a movie released in 2004. Now, fifteen years later, hydrogen is still a hot item. “Solar and wind energy are difficult to store. And that is a problem, because you are dependent on nature, you have to have a buffer. Wind farms are now being shut down, because they can´t lose the energy. In hydrogen (liquid or in gaseous form) you can store energy perfectly." The hydrogen games Japan already proved that it is possible: the 2020 Olympic Games are already named 'the hydrogen games', because the entire energy supply will run on hydrogen. What about Holland? There is already a lot of experimenting with hydrogen in the Netherlands, by large and small parties. Gasunie has started a pilot project near Veendam in Groningen. An installation is being built in which, for the first time on a larger scale, sustainably generated electricity, originating from 8500 solar panels, is converted into hydrogen (and energy for the installation itself). An indispensable part of a delta plan The realization that hydrogen can play a role in the future energy supply is growing in the Netherlands. The Hydrogen Coalition, a group of 27 environmental organizations, knowledge institutions, governments and companies - including network operators and heavy industry (including Tata Steel and AkzoNobel) - called on the government last year to ‘give priority to hydrogen as an essential building block for the energy transition'. The message: invest big in development and innovation of the entire  hydrogen chain: hydrogen is an indispensable part of a (necessary) delta plan for Dutch energy supply. There are a lot of ideas, for instance to create a large island in the North Sea and put windmills down there. The hydrogen produced on site can be pumped to the mainland via existing gas pipelines, where it is stored underground and further distributed, to industry, to petrol stations, to homes. All kinds of opportunities The Netherlands hás to get rid of natural gas. Right now, the solution appears to be (expensive) heat pumps and insulation. But by no means all houses can be heated like this, says Van Hattum, and why should we when it can be done with hydrogen. The gas infrastructure is already there, after all. That gas network offers all kinds of opportunities. Not only is Groningen the gateway to the European gas trade, it can also become the hydrogen connection point in Europe. The north of the Netherlands has a good chance to take a leading role in the upcoming hydrogen revolution, with the Wadden Sea and the North Sea - where the winds are wild - as a hinterland, with the existing gas infrastructure and the gas storage fields and with the knowledge gained in sixty years of gas extraction and transport. The hydrogen revolution is close, and that is a fact. Will Van Hattum be right, and is this really going to happen? Watch his documentary ‘Deltaplan Waterstof' (Dutch language) on VPRO Tegenlicht to find out more on this topic. {youtube} https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy
The hydrogen energy storage revolution in the Netherlands
The hydrogen energy storage revolution in the Netherlands
Nuclear power: will it destroy or save the world?
The cold hard facts One billion people go to sleep every night without access to electricity. Two and a half billion people do not have access to clean cooking fuels or heating fuels to take care of their families. These statistics, highlighted in a TED-talk by energy scholar Joe Lassiter, are absolutely staggering. It is shocking to realise for us, in the western world, that there are many in developing countries living without things that we would consider a basic need. Just imagine telling your teenage son that there will be no more television at night. Or your 14-year-old daughter that there’ll be no more internet at home. Yet the issue of expanding the power grids and guaranteeing access to electricity or fuels is a double-edged sword that cuts much deeper than the simple logistics of increasing coverage. As it stands, the world is already pushing the envelope of what we can actually generate. The exploitation of fossil fuels and scarce resources have brought us to the edge of a deadly cliff. We are waging a war with Mother Nature that we are bound to lose - if the increasing volume and severity of natural disasters is anything to go by. Building  nuclear reactors There are solutions. One of the most frequently mentioned - and definitely most debated - being the construction of new nuclear reactors. Wait, hold on. The same nuclear reactors that we are working so hard to get rid of? That we, ever since disasters in Chernobyl and Fukushima, have vowed to replace by safer and greener alternatives? Yes. Those. In order to understand this movement, some key elements have to be understood. First of all, modern reactors are much safer than their notorious counterparts. At the same time, they are cleaner than most of the alternatives involving coal or other fossil fuels while generating much more energy at a lower cost. Their major downside is its negative image, fuelled by fears for nuclear mishaps leaving large areas uninhabitable. Nuclear reactors around the world Some of the world’s largest nations still heavily depend on nuclear power for their electricity needs, including the United States, France, Russia and Spain. Growth economies are in the process of constructing a large number of new plants, including in the Middle East, India, China and Pakistan. The sheer number of people living in those countries that require energy, plus the promises made in the Paris treaty towards fighting global warming and drastically reducing harmful emissions, have swayed their political leaders to be in favour of those nuclear giants. But who can blame them? They are doing what is best for their people. As the billions of people that previously lived in poverty move towards a more prosperous life, this inevitably includes access to gas, to electricity, to resources. We are struggling to live up to the demand as it is today, let alone what would happen if all 7,7 billion of us would want to turn on the light at the same time. Break the nuclear taboo Just as we are unwilling to let go of our newfound luxuries that run on  electricity or other scarce resources, so will those billions who are just now being introduced to it. Demand will double, triple, you name it - while we are fussing about sustainable ways of meeting it. And the best part? We will only start using more energy as we get access to more. Increased supply will drive up demand. It is a cycle that we cannot break free from. Nor will it be realistic to assume that it can fully be met through renewable sources like solar, wind and water energy. Coming back to the issue of nuclear power. It is understandable that many, especially those who lived through the disasters in the past, are hesitant to embrace the idea of more nuclear power plants. Experts largely agree that they have become safer and more reliable, yet do not rule out the potential for disaster at this time. Not to mention the costs and time associated with their construction and maintenance and the headache of decommissioning. But it might just be time to put our heads together and break through the nuclear taboo. Coming together and finding ways of tackling those issues, working towards a safe and clean implementation of nuclear energy, might be our best shot at preserving our world while getting all of us the resources we need in this day and age. https://www.whatsorb.com/waste/finlands-solution-to-nuclear-waste-storage-may-set-an-example-for-the-world
The cold hard facts One billion people go to sleep every night without access to electricity. Two and a half billion people do not have access to clean cooking fuels or heating fuels to take care of their families. These statistics, highlighted in a TED-talk by energy scholar Joe Lassiter, are absolutely staggering. It is shocking to realise for us, in the western world, that there are many in developing countries living without things that we would consider a basic need. Just imagine telling your teenage son that there will be no more television at night. Or your 14-year-old daughter that there’ll be no more internet at home. Yet the issue of expanding the power grids and guaranteeing access to electricity or fuels is a double-edged sword that cuts much deeper than the simple logistics of increasing coverage. As it stands, the world is already pushing the envelope of what we can actually generate. The exploitation of fossil fuels and scarce resources have brought us to the edge of a deadly cliff. We are waging a war with Mother Nature that we are bound to lose - if the increasing volume and severity of natural disasters is anything to go by. Building  nuclear reactors There are solutions. One of the most frequently mentioned - and definitely most debated - being the construction of new nuclear reactors. Wait, hold on. The same nuclear reactors that we are working so hard to get rid of? That we, ever since disasters in Chernobyl and Fukushima, have vowed to replace by safer and greener alternatives? Yes. Those. In order to understand this movement, some key elements have to be understood. First of all, modern reactors are much safer than their notorious counterparts. At the same time, they are cleaner than most of the alternatives involving coal or other fossil fuels while generating much more energy at a lower cost. Their major downside is its negative image, fuelled by fears for nuclear mishaps leaving large areas uninhabitable. Nuclear reactors around the world Some of the world’s largest nations still heavily depend on nuclear power for their electricity needs, including the United States, France, Russia and Spain. Growth economies are in the process of constructing a large number of new plants, including in the Middle East, India, China and Pakistan. The sheer number of people living in those countries that require energy, plus the promises made in the Paris treaty towards fighting global warming and drastically reducing harmful emissions, have swayed their political leaders to be in favour of those nuclear giants. But who can blame them? They are doing what is best for their people. As the billions of people that previously lived in poverty move towards a more prosperous life, this inevitably includes access to gas, to electricity, to resources. We are struggling to live up to the demand as it is today, let alone what would happen if all 7,7 billion of us would want to turn on the light at the same time. Break the nuclear taboo Just as we are unwilling to let go of our newfound luxuries that run on  electricity or other scarce resources, so will those billions who are just now being introduced to it. Demand will double, triple, you name it - while we are fussing about sustainable ways of meeting it. And the best part? We will only start using more energy as we get access to more. Increased supply will drive up demand. It is a cycle that we cannot break free from. Nor will it be realistic to assume that it can fully be met through renewable sources like solar, wind and water energy. Coming back to the issue of nuclear power. It is understandable that many, especially those who lived through the disasters in the past, are hesitant to embrace the idea of more nuclear power plants. Experts largely agree that they have become safer and more reliable, yet do not rule out the potential for disaster at this time. Not to mention the costs and time associated with their construction and maintenance and the headache of decommissioning. But it might just be time to put our heads together and break through the nuclear taboo. Coming together and finding ways of tackling those issues, working towards a safe and clean implementation of nuclear energy, might be our best shot at preserving our world while getting all of us the resources we need in this day and age. https://www.whatsorb.com/waste/finlands-solution-to-nuclear-waste-storage-may-set-an-example-for-the-world
Nuclear power: will it destroy or save the world?
Solar panels which generate energy out of rain
New hybrid solar panels also draw energy from rain New solar panels will also generate energy if the sun does not shine and even if it rains. The practical elaboration will probably take a few more years to come, but the hybrid technology is now somewhat more advanced. Solar energy is more and more popular worldwide, thanks to the sharp fall in prices during the last decade of solar panels that generate energy. The disadvantage is still that no sunlight equals no energy. At night, production is quiet anyway. Photo: Adobe Stock Solar panels and rain A new technology has been proposed at the Chinese University of Soochow, which places two transparent polymer layers on top of a photovoltaic solar cell. When raindrops fall on the layers and then roll off, the friction generates static electricity. "Our device can always generate electricity during the day, in any type of weather," said Baoquan Sun of the University of Soochow. "In addition, it can generate power even at night when it rains." The technology of the new solar panels Known as tribo-electric nanogenerator (Teng) - is not new in itself and has been used in solar panels before. But the design is new and a lot simpler and more efficient than the already existing one. Because one of the two polymer layers serves as an electrode for both the Teng and the solar cell. The device therefore also weighs a lot less. A proof of concept triboelectric nanogenerator produces electrical charges for a mass spectrometer. Prototype of  solar panel even better "In the future, we want to integrate this into mobile and flexible devices, such as electronic clothing," says Sun. "The efficiency of the output power needs to be further improved before it can be put into practice." Sun expects to be able to develop a prototype of its product within three to five years. Getting power from the wind Other Chinese researchers have already placed Tengs on solar cells in the past to extract electricity from wind. According to Sun, his device can also handle that technology. The hybrid solar panels could come in handy in our rainy and cloudy country. But everything depends on how much energy they can extract from raindrops. Source: www.hln.be https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy
New hybrid solar panels also draw energy from rain New solar panels will also generate energy if the sun does not shine and even if it rains. The practical elaboration will probably take a few more years to come, but the hybrid technology is now somewhat more advanced. Solar energy is more and more popular worldwide, thanks to the sharp fall in prices during the last decade of solar panels that generate energy. The disadvantage is still that no sunlight equals no energy. At night, production is quiet anyway. Photo: Adobe Stock Solar panels and rain A new technology has been proposed at the Chinese University of Soochow, which places two transparent polymer layers on top of a photovoltaic solar cell. When raindrops fall on the layers and then roll off, the friction generates static electricity. "Our device can always generate electricity during the day, in any type of weather," said Baoquan Sun of the University of Soochow. "In addition, it can generate power even at night when it rains." The technology of the new solar panels Known as tribo-electric nanogenerator (Teng) - is not new in itself and has been used in solar panels before. But the design is new and a lot simpler and more efficient than the already existing one. Because one of the two polymer layers serves as an electrode for both the Teng and the solar cell. The device therefore also weighs a lot less. A proof of concept triboelectric nanogenerator produces electrical charges for a mass spectrometer. Prototype of  solar panel even better "In the future, we want to integrate this into mobile and flexible devices, such as electronic clothing," says Sun. "The efficiency of the output power needs to be further improved before it can be put into practice." Sun expects to be able to develop a prototype of its product within three to five years. Getting power from the wind Other Chinese researchers have already placed Tengs on solar cells in the past to extract electricity from wind. According to Sun, his device can also handle that technology. The hybrid solar panels could come in handy in our rainy and cloudy country. But everything depends on how much energy they can extract from raindrops. Source: www.hln.be https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy
Solar panels which generate energy out of rain
The greening of India is good for the whole world
Guiding India towards a ecological sustainable nation. If we make efforts today to guide India towards an ecologically sustainable and socially inclusive nation, that will benefit more than 17 percent of the world's population, says Frank Rijsberman, director of the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI). "A sustainable future for India has an impact on the entire world."At the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI) our attention is drawn to the impressive economic performance of India and the progress made by the more than 1.32 billion people in terms of revenue and general well-being. With an annual GDP growth of about 7 percent, it becomes clear that this must be accompanied by a vision of sustainability and social inclusion. It must be our biggest priority. Growth potential Given the enormous growth potential of India, it is important to provide green solutions to support this growth rate. Green, low-CO2 solutions are of great importance in the development of services that provide clean water, sanitation and energy for everyone. This goes hand in hand with the guarantee of a resilient Indian ecology, the ability of the country to adapt to the effects of climate change and the possibility for the poorest people to also participate in economic activities and opportunities to do so. can grab. As the third largest energy consumer in the world, India is making major efforts to improve access to energy Policy choices are important for achieving resilient ecosystems. After all, strong and growing economies are seeing their energy needs rise. As the third largest energy consumer in the world, India is making major efforts to improve access to energy through programs that bring electricity to the countryside and supply households with electricity. However, as energy consumption in India grows and the access to electricity of some 50 million extra families becomes reality, the government's decisions to strengthen the country's economy will have far-reaching implications for India's sustainability. Innovative technology The use of modern technology to keep greenhouse gas emissions in check can make a big difference in achieving inclusive and sustainable growth. The collaboration between the GGGI, the Metropolitan Transport Corporation in Bangalore, and other stakeholders to launch the first electric buses in India is a good example of how innovation at local level can produce positive results in terms of energy efficiency. The success of this project is in line with the Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC), the efforts made by the country to reduce CO2 emissions and improve energy efficiency. Successful green growth projects, such as the bus project in Bangalore, have an impact on at least two key areas: they are successful experiences and demonstrate the value of national governments that prioritize sustainability issues; and more importantly, they point to the benefits in the longer term and to the return on green projects. The latter is important because it can attract more investments and thus enable more growth. Electric bus in India, Bangalore. Solar energy GGGI endorses the importance of financing programs that demonstrate the benefits of green technology solutions to power the country. We support the establishment of a debt fund for the realization of an energy sector alongside the electricity grid. We will continue to develop innovative funding models to convince more actors to engage, especially small and medium-sized companies that usually only see the enormous risks. Development organizations and governments can work together to achieve their common goal. For example, India has taken a commendable step with the International Solar Alliance. Our experience has shown us that working together with various partners offers enormous advantages for electrifying a country, in particular to increase the presence of solar energy systems, even to the most marginal households. At GGGI we see a healthy ecosystem when investors, lenders and development institutions share the financial burden. We therefore strive to increase the number of investors and funds that are committed to climate-proof investments. The New Climate Economy report confirms that the Investment Platform for Climate Action has attracted investors with a combined capital of 125,000 billion dollars. This can inspire governments around the world not to rely solely on budgetary resources. Delivering green ambitions The most important task today is to ensure that countries take daring measures to achieve the reduction of CO2 emissions. We encourage ambitious goals and provide support for their implementation. India attaches great importance to sustainability, technology transfer and capacity building. These are essential ingredients to realize the green ambitions. The International Solar Alliance is there to share knowledge. GGGI will work closely with the countries within this solar alliance. We will share our knowledge and experience about sustainable energy with India and offer a platform where other countries in the region and the rest of the world can receive information. With these efforts and the support of governments to make green policy choices, we are proposing a sustainable, greener planet. We have high expectations of the alliance but also see a sustainable future for India and for the world. Because sustainable growth definitely will accelerate through this global partnership. By: Frank Rijsberman is director of the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI). Cover photo: Scroll In
Guiding India towards a ecological sustainable nation. If we make efforts today to guide India towards an ecologically sustainable and socially inclusive nation, that will benefit more than 17 percent of the world's population, says Frank Rijsberman, director of the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI). "A sustainable future for India has an impact on the entire world."At the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI) our attention is drawn to the impressive economic performance of India and the progress made by the more than 1.32 billion people in terms of revenue and general well-being. With an annual GDP growth of about 7 percent, it becomes clear that this must be accompanied by a vision of sustainability and social inclusion. It must be our biggest priority. Growth potential Given the enormous growth potential of India, it is important to provide green solutions to support this growth rate. Green, low-CO2 solutions are of great importance in the development of services that provide clean water, sanitation and energy for everyone. This goes hand in hand with the guarantee of a resilient Indian ecology, the ability of the country to adapt to the effects of climate change and the possibility for the poorest people to also participate in economic activities and opportunities to do so. can grab. As the third largest energy consumer in the world, India is making major efforts to improve access to energy Policy choices are important for achieving resilient ecosystems. After all, strong and growing economies are seeing their energy needs rise. As the third largest energy consumer in the world, India is making major efforts to improve access to energy through programs that bring electricity to the countryside and supply households with electricity. However, as energy consumption in India grows and the access to electricity of some 50 million extra families becomes reality, the government's decisions to strengthen the country's economy will have far-reaching implications for India's sustainability. Innovative technology The use of modern technology to keep greenhouse gas emissions in check can make a big difference in achieving inclusive and sustainable growth. The collaboration between the GGGI, the Metropolitan Transport Corporation in Bangalore, and other stakeholders to launch the first electric buses in India is a good example of how innovation at local level can produce positive results in terms of energy efficiency. The success of this project is in line with the Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC), the efforts made by the country to reduce CO2 emissions and improve energy efficiency. Successful green growth projects, such as the bus project in Bangalore, have an impact on at least two key areas: they are successful experiences and demonstrate the value of national governments that prioritize sustainability issues; and more importantly, they point to the benefits in the longer term and to the return on green projects. The latter is important because it can attract more investments and thus enable more growth. Electric bus in India, Bangalore. Solar energy GGGI endorses the importance of financing programs that demonstrate the benefits of green technology solutions to power the country. We support the establishment of a debt fund for the realization of an energy sector alongside the electricity grid. We will continue to develop innovative funding models to convince more actors to engage, especially small and medium-sized companies that usually only see the enormous risks. Development organizations and governments can work together to achieve their common goal. For example, India has taken a commendable step with the International Solar Alliance. Our experience has shown us that working together with various partners offers enormous advantages for electrifying a country, in particular to increase the presence of solar energy systems, even to the most marginal households. At GGGI we see a healthy ecosystem when investors, lenders and development institutions share the financial burden. We therefore strive to increase the number of investors and funds that are committed to climate-proof investments. The New Climate Economy report confirms that the Investment Platform for Climate Action has attracted investors with a combined capital of 125,000 billion dollars. This can inspire governments around the world not to rely solely on budgetary resources. Delivering green ambitions The most important task today is to ensure that countries take daring measures to achieve the reduction of CO2 emissions. We encourage ambitious goals and provide support for their implementation. India attaches great importance to sustainability, technology transfer and capacity building. These are essential ingredients to realize the green ambitions. The International Solar Alliance is there to share knowledge. GGGI will work closely with the countries within this solar alliance. We will share our knowledge and experience about sustainable energy with India and offer a platform where other countries in the region and the rest of the world can receive information. With these efforts and the support of governments to make green policy choices, we are proposing a sustainable, greener planet. We have high expectations of the alliance but also see a sustainable future for India and for the world. Because sustainable growth definitely will accelerate through this global partnership. By: Frank Rijsberman is director of the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI). Cover photo: Scroll In
The greening of India is good for the whole world
Hydrogen production in South Australia and the Netherlands
South Australia and the Netherlands are working on large-scale hydrogen production South Australia is already the proud owner of the largest li-ion storage battery in the world and the largest virtual power plant in the world. Now there may well be a flagship: various electrolysis installations, with a capacity of 50 megawatts, for hydrogen production. Developer Neoen received $ 1 mln from the Renewable Technology Fund of the state, to start a feasibility study on the 'super hub'. The electrolysis units must be erected at the city of Adelaide, where a solar and wind farm of 300 megawatts is planned. Hydrogen in South Australia The plan for the hydrogen super hub is part of a state government roadmap to further develop and scale up technologies in the field of hydrogen. Tom Koutsantonis, Minister of Energy of the Australian state, explained to ABC; Our roadmap for hydrogen lays the foundation for South Australia to become world leader in the field of hydrogen production. Sustainable energy starts with electrolysis Electrolysis is the underlying process of Power-to-Gas. This technology splits water into hydrogen and oxygen, using (sustainable) electricity. Hydrogen is an emission-free fuel that can be used for various purposes, such as heavy transport. By: Hidde Middelweerd Large-scale hydrogen production in the Netherlands In 2030, hydrogen will be ready for a large-scale introduction in many sectors in the Netherlands. The focus on hydrogen is not limited to mobility and transport applications, but focuses on the entire energy and raw materials supply. That is the conclusion of the Hydrogen Roadmap. Ulco Vermeulen, chairman of the TKI New Gas of the Top Sector Energy, presented the report this week to the Ministry of Economic Affairs and Climate. The Roadmap describes where and how sustainable hydrogen can be used in the Dutch energy and raw materials system. Gray, blue and green hydrogen The ultimate objective is to produce sustainable hydrogen, for example by means of electricity from solar and wind energy . Electricity is necessary to split water into hydrogen and oxygen via electrolysis. To give the use of hydrogen a boost first, gray and blue hydrogen are also accepted. Natural gas is the basis for gray hydrogen. When the resulting CO2 is subsequently captured and stored in empty gas fields, for example, blue, climate-neutral hydrogen is used. The possibilities for the use of hydrogen gas are endless according to the Roadmap. For example, it is an alternative for diesel in trucks , for natural gas in the built environment and for trains and ships where battery-electric solutions are not yet sufficient. The current gas infrastructure can be used for the transport of hydrogen. Leading position in the Netherlands The Netherlands currently has over 100 hydrogen initiatives and that number is growing. Investments are now necessary in the form of pilots and demonstration projects to gain experience and knowledge. The sectors industry and mobility are currently the most promising markets for this. The Netherlands has a strong industrial position, excellent infrastructure and enough knowledge to develop strongly. When this plan is properly addressed, the Netherlands can become the leader in Europe in the field of hydrogen. By: Britt van den Elshou.t Cover photo: Adobe Stock https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy
South Australia and the Netherlands are working on large-scale hydrogen production South Australia is already the proud owner of the largest li-ion storage battery in the world and the largest virtual power plant in the world. Now there may well be a flagship: various electrolysis installations, with a capacity of 50 megawatts, for hydrogen production. Developer Neoen received $ 1 mln from the Renewable Technology Fund of the state, to start a feasibility study on the 'super hub'. The electrolysis units must be erected at the city of Adelaide, where a solar and wind farm of 300 megawatts is planned. Hydrogen in South Australia The plan for the hydrogen super hub is part of a state government roadmap to further develop and scale up technologies in the field of hydrogen. Tom Koutsantonis, Minister of Energy of the Australian state, explained to ABC; Our roadmap for hydrogen lays the foundation for South Australia to become world leader in the field of hydrogen production. Sustainable energy starts with electrolysis Electrolysis is the underlying process of Power-to-Gas. This technology splits water into hydrogen and oxygen, using (sustainable) electricity. Hydrogen is an emission-free fuel that can be used for various purposes, such as heavy transport. By: Hidde Middelweerd Large-scale hydrogen production in the Netherlands In 2030, hydrogen will be ready for a large-scale introduction in many sectors in the Netherlands. The focus on hydrogen is not limited to mobility and transport applications, but focuses on the entire energy and raw materials supply. That is the conclusion of the Hydrogen Roadmap. Ulco Vermeulen, chairman of the TKI New Gas of the Top Sector Energy, presented the report this week to the Ministry of Economic Affairs and Climate. The Roadmap describes where and how sustainable hydrogen can be used in the Dutch energy and raw materials system. Gray, blue and green hydrogen The ultimate objective is to produce sustainable hydrogen, for example by means of electricity from solar and wind energy . Electricity is necessary to split water into hydrogen and oxygen via electrolysis. To give the use of hydrogen a boost first, gray and blue hydrogen are also accepted. Natural gas is the basis for gray hydrogen. When the resulting CO2 is subsequently captured and stored in empty gas fields, for example, blue, climate-neutral hydrogen is used. The possibilities for the use of hydrogen gas are endless according to the Roadmap. For example, it is an alternative for diesel in trucks , for natural gas in the built environment and for trains and ships where battery-electric solutions are not yet sufficient. The current gas infrastructure can be used for the transport of hydrogen. Leading position in the Netherlands The Netherlands currently has over 100 hydrogen initiatives and that number is growing. Investments are now necessary in the form of pilots and demonstration projects to gain experience and knowledge. The sectors industry and mobility are currently the most promising markets for this. The Netherlands has a strong industrial position, excellent infrastructure and enough knowledge to develop strongly. When this plan is properly addressed, the Netherlands can become the leader in Europe in the field of hydrogen. By: Britt van den Elshou.t Cover photo: Adobe Stock https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy
Hydrogen production in South Australia and the Netherlands
Hydrogen production in South Australia and the Netherlands
Energy

The demand for energy is great and will only grow further in the coming years. We have already learned how to harvest the power of sunlight, wind and tides, but there are many forms of sustainable energy yet to be explored. We will bring you up-to-date on the latest progress in the search of renewable energy and other sustainable energy sources.

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