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Fast Internet Globally. Environmental And Health Risks: 5G
Most of us are probably familiar with the 3G and 4G networks, as we will frequently see these symbols displayed on the screens of our mobile devices. We understand that this is where we get our internet connection on those devices from, even when we are not on any Wi-Fi network. With the advent of 5G, that promises even greater connection power and speed, we are likely to start relying even more on this next generation of mobile networks. Even more importantly, 5G is expected to have a great impact on the development of Internet of Things (IoT) applications, as it will serve as the gold standard for most internet connected devices - and will eventually connect and tie them all together. As of today, there is no actual standard yet in place for what would define a 5G network, so the industry is working hard to develop a viable version of it. First 5G roll-outs It is generally expected that the first 5G networks will be available to the general public after 2020, although several 5G test areas have already been established in cities such as Sacramento, Washington DC, Atlanta, Dallas and New York. This means that a significant portion of the population will already be exposed to 5G radiation before it will be released to the world as a whole. And while all government entities and corporations involved in the development and rollout of this highly anticipated successor of 3G are adamant that its radiation will not in any way be harmful, there has been a large number of scientists and doctors who have opposed those claims: around 250 of them, from all around the world, have appealed to nations working on 4G technology to call a halt to the commercial roll-out. Pressing health concerns Citing concerns for human health as well as the environment, these scientists are quick to point at the risks already associated with the use of our current wireless technologies, including 2G, 3G and 4G. These are frequently used in our cell phones, computers, and wearable tech devices - and while it has definitely improved many aspects of our lives, there have been indications that its radiofrequency exposure poses a health risk for humans, animals, and the larger environment. And no, this is not just a story flaunted about by some conspiracy theorists. Research published in peer-reviewed publications have confirmed their theory, and would support their main premise: more research is definitely needed if we want to ensure that a 5G roll-out would not be harmful to anything or anyone. Gains of 5G versus local interests However, by only focussing on the quick gains, most countries and corporations have ignored this scientific impasse. Instead, they are opting for a quick implementation of 5G test areas throughout densely populated areas. Local and federal regulations are adjusted accordingly, all to facilitate a smooth rollout. And all of this will make it even harder for communities and scientists to demand further research. Yet those who are looking beyond the surface will quickly find that even the wireless corporations themselves are acknowledging that the use of 5G will increase levels of radiofrequency radiation in the immediate area surrounding the antennas. Although there are some countries - including China, India and Russia - that have imposed stricter regulations on radiation limits, effectively prohibiting the implementation of any 5G networks. These countries are facing immense pressure from the industry to loosen their limits, which would allow them to bring 5G within their borders as well. A dangerous trend. Pushing through 5G To highlight the urgency of the matter: as part of the rollout of 5G, hundreds of thousands of wireless antennas will have to be installed in densely populated areas: recent estimates are that there will have to be a transmitter of sorts for every two to ten homes. These will especially be needed to increase the range and capacity, in anticipation of 5G. This makes it a network technology that requires a higher frequency. And thus, a network that is potentially more damaging to us and the world around us. Even more worrisome - most countries are pushing through legislation that allows them to place these antennas and transmitters virtually anywhere. So technically, they could even place them right in front of your home - and you, as homeowner, will have absolutely no say in the matter. It can hardly be called surprising that numerous communities have taken the network companies or local governments to court to fight the matter. The technicalities of 5G So what exactly would be the problem? Well, as explained before, 5G is committed to utilising several frequencies from those that are already being used, only with higher millimeter frequencies. Put simply: today’s mobile networks - including 3G and 4G - use microwaves. This type of electromagnetic radiation uses various frequencies up to 6 gigahertz, or GHz. It is able to wirelessly send data over those frequencies.   5G, on the other hand, requires a much greater spectrum band in higher frequency ranges, which could potentially be as high as 100 GHz or more. For this, so-called submillimeter and millimeter waves are used instead of microwaves: that are capable of super quick and big data transmissions. Measurable health effects The big difference between microwaves and those millimeter and submillimeter waves is that the latter are biologically active. This is to say, they are capable of interacting directly with our skin; as proven by, amongst others, Dr. Ben-Ishai of the Hebrew University in Israel. He showed how such wavelengths could affect our sweat ducts and skin. And he was certainly not the only one to claim that wireless technology has a real, measurable impact on our health. Even the wireless modalities that we use today (2G, 3G, 4G) have already been proven to have led to various health issues. This so-called mechanism of action has been substantiated by numerous researchers over the years, making it a virtually undisputed claim. 5G radiation use in warfare In fact, 5G frequencies are currently used by the Americans, Russians and Chinese in their weaponry. The defence agencies of these countries have been working on weapons that use the possibilities of this frequency range - with the ultimate goal of inciting unpleasant burning sensations on people’s skins .   Let’s take a moment to let that sink in: some of the greatest military nations on the planet are actively pursuing 5G technology as a means of doing harm to potential targets. As the Department of Defence of the United States explains: “ The sensation dissipates when the target moves out of the beam. The sensation is intense enough to cause a nearly instantaneous reflex action of the target to flee the beam .”   Just imagine what this means if you would be constantly exposed to this kind of radiation. Our human skin would basically act as some kind of receiver - or antenna, if you wish - as a result of our sweat duct’s conductivity. This process starts when we are near sub-THz technologies, which includes 5G. The possible health effects of this are not exactly known - apart from the ‘unpleasant burning sensation’ when directly exposed to a beam.   Need for further research It should suffice to say that further research into those health effects is very much warranted. If these invisible radiation waves are already capable of quite literally setting our skins on fire, who knows what side effects this will have on our organs or brain, just to name a few obvious suspects. “ We need to know if 5G increases the risk of skin diseases such as melanoma or other skin cancers ,” according to prominent researcher Ron Melnick. It is time to take a step back and put some real effort in the investigation of the potential health effects of 5G-related technologies, before we start implementing it on a greater scale. As Dr. Cindy Russell so accurately summarised it in her paper on the matter: “ 3G, 4G, 5G or a combination of zapping frequencies giving us immersive connection and entertainment but at a potentially steep price. ”   And as this ‘potentially steep price’ might include not only skin cancers but also arrhythmias, heart rate variability, bacterial affects, antibiotic resistance, immune system affects, chromatin affects, teratogenic effects, altered gene expression and cataracts - just to mention a few -, we would do well to listen to the doctors and think about our health before profits and gains. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/artificial-intel
Most of us are probably familiar with the 3G and 4G networks, as we will frequently see these symbols displayed on the screens of our mobile devices. We understand that this is where we get our internet connection on those devices from, even when we are not on any Wi-Fi network. With the advent of 5G, that promises even greater connection power and speed, we are likely to start relying even more on this next generation of mobile networks. Even more importantly, 5G is expected to have a great impact on the development of Internet of Things (IoT) applications, as it will serve as the gold standard for most internet connected devices - and will eventually connect and tie them all together. As of today, there is no actual standard yet in place for what would define a 5G network, so the industry is working hard to develop a viable version of it. First 5G roll-outs It is generally expected that the first 5G networks will be available to the general public after 2020, although several 5G test areas have already been established in cities such as Sacramento, Washington DC, Atlanta, Dallas and New York. This means that a significant portion of the population will already be exposed to 5G radiation before it will be released to the world as a whole. And while all government entities and corporations involved in the development and rollout of this highly anticipated successor of 3G are adamant that its radiation will not in any way be harmful, there has been a large number of scientists and doctors who have opposed those claims: around 250 of them, from all around the world, have appealed to nations working on 4G technology to call a halt to the commercial roll-out. Pressing health concerns Citing concerns for human health as well as the environment, these scientists are quick to point at the risks already associated with the use of our current wireless technologies, including 2G, 3G and 4G. These are frequently used in our cell phones, computers, and wearable tech devices - and while it has definitely improved many aspects of our lives, there have been indications that its radiofrequency exposure poses a health risk for humans, animals, and the larger environment. And no, this is not just a story flaunted about by some conspiracy theorists. Research published in peer-reviewed publications have confirmed their theory, and would support their main premise: more research is definitely needed if we want to ensure that a 5G roll-out would not be harmful to anything or anyone. Gains of 5G versus local interests However, by only focussing on the quick gains, most countries and corporations have ignored this scientific impasse. Instead, they are opting for a quick implementation of 5G test areas throughout densely populated areas. Local and federal regulations are adjusted accordingly, all to facilitate a smooth rollout. And all of this will make it even harder for communities and scientists to demand further research. Yet those who are looking beyond the surface will quickly find that even the wireless corporations themselves are acknowledging that the use of 5G will increase levels of radiofrequency radiation in the immediate area surrounding the antennas. Although there are some countries - including China, India and Russia - that have imposed stricter regulations on radiation limits, effectively prohibiting the implementation of any 5G networks. These countries are facing immense pressure from the industry to loosen their limits, which would allow them to bring 5G within their borders as well. A dangerous trend. Pushing through 5G To highlight the urgency of the matter: as part of the rollout of 5G, hundreds of thousands of wireless antennas will have to be installed in densely populated areas: recent estimates are that there will have to be a transmitter of sorts for every two to ten homes. These will especially be needed to increase the range and capacity, in anticipation of 5G. This makes it a network technology that requires a higher frequency. And thus, a network that is potentially more damaging to us and the world around us. Even more worrisome - most countries are pushing through legislation that allows them to place these antennas and transmitters virtually anywhere. So technically, they could even place them right in front of your home - and you, as homeowner, will have absolutely no say in the matter. It can hardly be called surprising that numerous communities have taken the network companies or local governments to court to fight the matter. The technicalities of 5G So what exactly would be the problem? Well, as explained before, 5G is committed to utilising several frequencies from those that are already being used, only with higher millimeter frequencies. Put simply: today’s mobile networks - including 3G and 4G - use microwaves. This type of electromagnetic radiation uses various frequencies up to 6 gigahertz, or GHz. It is able to wirelessly send data over those frequencies.   5G, on the other hand, requires a much greater spectrum band in higher frequency ranges, which could potentially be as high as 100 GHz or more. For this, so-called submillimeter and millimeter waves are used instead of microwaves: that are capable of super quick and big data transmissions. Measurable health effects The big difference between microwaves and those millimeter and submillimeter waves is that the latter are biologically active. This is to say, they are capable of interacting directly with our skin; as proven by, amongst others, Dr. Ben-Ishai of the Hebrew University in Israel. He showed how such wavelengths could affect our sweat ducts and skin. And he was certainly not the only one to claim that wireless technology has a real, measurable impact on our health. Even the wireless modalities that we use today (2G, 3G, 4G) have already been proven to have led to various health issues. This so-called mechanism of action has been substantiated by numerous researchers over the years, making it a virtually undisputed claim. 5G radiation use in warfare In fact, 5G frequencies are currently used by the Americans, Russians and Chinese in their weaponry. The defence agencies of these countries have been working on weapons that use the possibilities of this frequency range - with the ultimate goal of inciting unpleasant burning sensations on people’s skins .   Let’s take a moment to let that sink in: some of the greatest military nations on the planet are actively pursuing 5G technology as a means of doing harm to potential targets. As the Department of Defence of the United States explains: “ The sensation dissipates when the target moves out of the beam. The sensation is intense enough to cause a nearly instantaneous reflex action of the target to flee the beam .”   Just imagine what this means if you would be constantly exposed to this kind of radiation. Our human skin would basically act as some kind of receiver - or antenna, if you wish - as a result of our sweat duct’s conductivity. This process starts when we are near sub-THz technologies, which includes 5G. The possible health effects of this are not exactly known - apart from the ‘unpleasant burning sensation’ when directly exposed to a beam.   Need for further research It should suffice to say that further research into those health effects is very much warranted. If these invisible radiation waves are already capable of quite literally setting our skins on fire, who knows what side effects this will have on our organs or brain, just to name a few obvious suspects. “ We need to know if 5G increases the risk of skin diseases such as melanoma or other skin cancers ,” according to prominent researcher Ron Melnick. It is time to take a step back and put some real effort in the investigation of the potential health effects of 5G-related technologies, before we start implementing it on a greater scale. As Dr. Cindy Russell so accurately summarised it in her paper on the matter: “ 3G, 4G, 5G or a combination of zapping frequencies giving us immersive connection and entertainment but at a potentially steep price. ”   And as this ‘potentially steep price’ might include not only skin cancers but also arrhythmias, heart rate variability, bacterial affects, antibiotic resistance, immune system affects, chromatin affects, teratogenic effects, altered gene expression and cataracts - just to mention a few -, we would do well to listen to the doctors and think about our health before profits and gains. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/artificial-intel
Fast Internet Globally. Environmental And Health Risks: 5G
Fast Internet Globally. Environmental And Health Risks: 5G
A World Without Oil Fueled By Renewables.  Are We On Track?
Just sit back and enjoy that thought for a minute. What if, suddenly, from one day to the next, there would be no more oil? Not a tank, not a gallon, not even a single drop? Aside from the obvious negative implications for those economies that are driven by the black gold, there will be plenty of other side-effects, both positive and negative.   Electric cars fueled by renewable energy sources I’m going to allow myself to indulge in the fantasy and explore ways of how the world will change because of it. Starting with the obvious one: we will no longer be able to fuel up our cars at the gas station down the street. So that will be a shame, leaving that big ol’ Chevy in the garage. Although there are plenty of alternatives.   Sustainable transport will be our go-to means of getting around. Most of us will own an electric car, fuelled by renewable energy sources - perhaps even of the self-driving variety, allowing us to sit back and relax as we are whisked from A to B. Alternatively, you can hop on the electric trains or metros, departing from fully sustainable and hyper-modern stations.   Drones, electric trucks and sustainable freight trains Goods are transported by drones, electric trucks, on sustainable freight trains, and smart container ships. All of which are obviously fitted with state-of-the-art tracking software and sensors, allowing for real-time analysis. Would you want to go on a long journey? There will be electric planes, ready to transport passengers to tropical destinations all around the world. Or you could opt for a sustainable cruise ship or yacht, sailing all the oceans of the world. No matter your destination, no matter your purpose - there will be a suitable means of transportation.   Sounds good? Well, yes. But let’s not ignore the reality of today: most of the mentioned forms of transportation are not even available yet, let alone a feasible option for the short term. The number of gas-guzzling cars far outweighs the number of electric vehicles, meaning that a sudden oil-stop would quite literally have society grinding to a halt. Perhaps we still have an electric scooter or an old-fashioned bike in the garage, although this will not be sufficient to cover large distances.   The unavoidable crash The entire aviation industry will crash - excuse the pun -, leaving those who frequently travel internationally hanging out to dry. As it stands, very few oil-free alternatives are available, quite possibly forcing the big airlines to scramble in their race to find an oil-free passenger plane. Just as it would be for the majority of the cruise- and yachting industry, in fact.   So, while the picture-perfect Jetsons-like vision of the future might sound appealing and admittedly become reality a whole lot sooner if oil were to suddenly disappear, the image for the foreseeable future would be far from rosy. International travel will become extremely difficult, whilst most of us will find ourselves limited in our mobility, having been robbed of our cars and buses. The trains and cars that remain will be far and few between - and most certainly incapable of handling the increased flow of passengers that are still hoping to retain their jobs or pursue an education.   The same goes for a gazillion other aspects of our life, all of which rely on oil. Deny all you want, but it is a painful fact that oil serves as the backbone of our society. Taking it all away would quite literally undermine all that we have built up, which could be disastrous for the world’s economy and set us back decades.   Nuclear power is relatively foolproof To illustrate this, just take a look at the energy needs of the world. Without oil, there is only one real alternative that would be able to meet the needs of the world - nuclear energy. All of the renewable energy sources that are currently available - hydro, wind, solar, geothermal, and wave energy - are nowhere near sufficient to power all of today’s society. Nuclear power is relatively foolproof, extremely clean, and very safe.   So that sounds great - who needs oil for energy generation anyway? Unfortunately, the matter is once again not as easy and smooth as it may seem. While the costs of building nuclear facilities and the lengthy timeline associated with it may have been historical bottlenecks, the major problem is public perception. Spurred on by organisations like Greenpeace, a large proportion of the general population is not in favour of nuclear energy, to say the least, or absolutely frightened by it, at its most extreme. Events like Chernobyl and Fukushima are ingrained within our collective memory, making the general acceptance of nuclear energy a hurdle that will be tricky to overcome. Not to mention the time that it would cost us to actually build enough nuclear power plants to deliver sufficient energy, once again leaving us in a grim, dark place for the first years after having lost our oil overnight. Our lives without oil After all, figuring out how to live our lives without oil will entail even more than 'just' the way we move and generate energy. It will change the way we eat, we live, the way that we dress. Our homes will have to become much greener, as we cannot use as much energy to heat it: insulation and ventilation are the key words, while our home appliances will have to be super efficient. Low-flush toilets, water saving dishwashers, and low-draw lightbulbs will become the new norm.   Our food will be produced locally, changing each season, depending on what is available in our vegetable gardens. The same applies for clothing: fabrics that are available locally will set the norm for our garments, quite possibly including some new innovative techniques to keep us warm (remember the need to save energy in our homes?). Wait, I once again described the ideal situation. Would it really be as simple as making an instant switch to a local economy, where we all live in sustainable homes and only eat the food and wear the clothes that are available at a given time? Without putting up much of a fight? Sustainable alternatives Well, probably not. Chances are that, as the result of an oil crisis, we will turn into cavemen instead - and definitely not in the good way. Instead of resorting to outfits made out of hides and skins of animals and hunting deers and gathering fruits and nuts, we will take our figurative spears and head off to loot the supermarkets. The prospect of food shortages will fuel our primal instincts, leading to chaotic, end-of-world-like situations were people panic and riot, stopping at nothing to get their hands on some food. Similarly, we will try to take our money out of the bank as quickly as possible, foreseeing the imminent crisis that will render our bank credit worthless. Quite useless, actually, as money will quickly lose its value in the world of a plummeting economy anyhow. The rest of this scenario plays out like an apocalyptic movie: our homes, bereft of any sort of energy, will become useless shells as we are no longer able to flush our toilets, watch our tv, heat our rooms, connect to the internet, and cook our food. As our lights quite literally go out, authorities will stand by helplessly as all of their crucial systems are flat on their behind as well, including police, hospitals and armies. Riots will break out and the phrase ‘survival of the fittest’ will be given a whole other meaning. All because of one silly, little, seemingly insignificant resource. Do not despair yet, though. You will be happy to hear that most governments have plans in place to prevent the last scenario from ever happening, starting by reducing their country’s reliance on oil. And although I may have attempted to paint a picture of oil being indispensable, there is evidence to the contrary. Entire countries are going ‘oil-free’, instead opting for a variety of renewable sources of energy to fuel their economies. In particular those countries who do not have much oil of their own are rapidly adjusting, fuelling innovations that can, in turn, be adapted and implemented by other countries as well. The main point? We cannot do it alone. We must do it together, with other countries. Together, we can find ways to live without oil. We can innovate, we can re-new, we can learn. That is, and has always been, the greatest strength of us, human beings.   But in order to avert the doom-scenario I briefly described above, and have a shot at making the dreamy ideal-world scenario I painted before that come true at some point in the future, we have got to take action. Today. Oil is ending - and the sooner we accept this, the earlier we can start looking for sustainable alternatives. This way, we can prevent a situation where we will suddenly find ourselves out of oil tomorrow - and give ourselves the opportunity to have a much smoother, calmer transition to a cleaner world. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy
Just sit back and enjoy that thought for a minute. What if, suddenly, from one day to the next, there would be no more oil? Not a tank, not a gallon, not even a single drop? Aside from the obvious negative implications for those economies that are driven by the black gold, there will be plenty of other side-effects, both positive and negative.   Electric cars fueled by renewable energy sources I’m going to allow myself to indulge in the fantasy and explore ways of how the world will change because of it. Starting with the obvious one: we will no longer be able to fuel up our cars at the gas station down the street. So that will be a shame, leaving that big ol’ Chevy in the garage. Although there are plenty of alternatives.   Sustainable transport will be our go-to means of getting around. Most of us will own an electric car, fuelled by renewable energy sources - perhaps even of the self-driving variety, allowing us to sit back and relax as we are whisked from A to B. Alternatively, you can hop on the electric trains or metros, departing from fully sustainable and hyper-modern stations.   Drones, electric trucks and sustainable freight trains Goods are transported by drones, electric trucks, on sustainable freight trains, and smart container ships. All of which are obviously fitted with state-of-the-art tracking software and sensors, allowing for real-time analysis. Would you want to go on a long journey? There will be electric planes, ready to transport passengers to tropical destinations all around the world. Or you could opt for a sustainable cruise ship or yacht, sailing all the oceans of the world. No matter your destination, no matter your purpose - there will be a suitable means of transportation.   Sounds good? Well, yes. But let’s not ignore the reality of today: most of the mentioned forms of transportation are not even available yet, let alone a feasible option for the short term. The number of gas-guzzling cars far outweighs the number of electric vehicles, meaning that a sudden oil-stop would quite literally have society grinding to a halt. Perhaps we still have an electric scooter or an old-fashioned bike in the garage, although this will not be sufficient to cover large distances.   The unavoidable crash The entire aviation industry will crash - excuse the pun -, leaving those who frequently travel internationally hanging out to dry. As it stands, very few oil-free alternatives are available, quite possibly forcing the big airlines to scramble in their race to find an oil-free passenger plane. Just as it would be for the majority of the cruise- and yachting industry, in fact.   So, while the picture-perfect Jetsons-like vision of the future might sound appealing and admittedly become reality a whole lot sooner if oil were to suddenly disappear, the image for the foreseeable future would be far from rosy. International travel will become extremely difficult, whilst most of us will find ourselves limited in our mobility, having been robbed of our cars and buses. The trains and cars that remain will be far and few between - and most certainly incapable of handling the increased flow of passengers that are still hoping to retain their jobs or pursue an education.   The same goes for a gazillion other aspects of our life, all of which rely on oil. Deny all you want, but it is a painful fact that oil serves as the backbone of our society. Taking it all away would quite literally undermine all that we have built up, which could be disastrous for the world’s economy and set us back decades.   Nuclear power is relatively foolproof To illustrate this, just take a look at the energy needs of the world. Without oil, there is only one real alternative that would be able to meet the needs of the world - nuclear energy. All of the renewable energy sources that are currently available - hydro, wind, solar, geothermal, and wave energy - are nowhere near sufficient to power all of today’s society. Nuclear power is relatively foolproof, extremely clean, and very safe.   So that sounds great - who needs oil for energy generation anyway? Unfortunately, the matter is once again not as easy and smooth as it may seem. While the costs of building nuclear facilities and the lengthy timeline associated with it may have been historical bottlenecks, the major problem is public perception. Spurred on by organisations like Greenpeace, a large proportion of the general population is not in favour of nuclear energy, to say the least, or absolutely frightened by it, at its most extreme. Events like Chernobyl and Fukushima are ingrained within our collective memory, making the general acceptance of nuclear energy a hurdle that will be tricky to overcome. Not to mention the time that it would cost us to actually build enough nuclear power plants to deliver sufficient energy, once again leaving us in a grim, dark place for the first years after having lost our oil overnight. Our lives without oil After all, figuring out how to live our lives without oil will entail even more than 'just' the way we move and generate energy. It will change the way we eat, we live, the way that we dress. Our homes will have to become much greener, as we cannot use as much energy to heat it: insulation and ventilation are the key words, while our home appliances will have to be super efficient. Low-flush toilets, water saving dishwashers, and low-draw lightbulbs will become the new norm.   Our food will be produced locally, changing each season, depending on what is available in our vegetable gardens. The same applies for clothing: fabrics that are available locally will set the norm for our garments, quite possibly including some new innovative techniques to keep us warm (remember the need to save energy in our homes?). Wait, I once again described the ideal situation. Would it really be as simple as making an instant switch to a local economy, where we all live in sustainable homes and only eat the food and wear the clothes that are available at a given time? Without putting up much of a fight? Sustainable alternatives Well, probably not. Chances are that, as the result of an oil crisis, we will turn into cavemen instead - and definitely not in the good way. Instead of resorting to outfits made out of hides and skins of animals and hunting deers and gathering fruits and nuts, we will take our figurative spears and head off to loot the supermarkets. The prospect of food shortages will fuel our primal instincts, leading to chaotic, end-of-world-like situations were people panic and riot, stopping at nothing to get their hands on some food. Similarly, we will try to take our money out of the bank as quickly as possible, foreseeing the imminent crisis that will render our bank credit worthless. Quite useless, actually, as money will quickly lose its value in the world of a plummeting economy anyhow. The rest of this scenario plays out like an apocalyptic movie: our homes, bereft of any sort of energy, will become useless shells as we are no longer able to flush our toilets, watch our tv, heat our rooms, connect to the internet, and cook our food. As our lights quite literally go out, authorities will stand by helplessly as all of their crucial systems are flat on their behind as well, including police, hospitals and armies. Riots will break out and the phrase ‘survival of the fittest’ will be given a whole other meaning. All because of one silly, little, seemingly insignificant resource. Do not despair yet, though. You will be happy to hear that most governments have plans in place to prevent the last scenario from ever happening, starting by reducing their country’s reliance on oil. And although I may have attempted to paint a picture of oil being indispensable, there is evidence to the contrary. Entire countries are going ‘oil-free’, instead opting for a variety of renewable sources of energy to fuel their economies. In particular those countries who do not have much oil of their own are rapidly adjusting, fuelling innovations that can, in turn, be adapted and implemented by other countries as well. The main point? We cannot do it alone. We must do it together, with other countries. Together, we can find ways to live without oil. We can innovate, we can re-new, we can learn. That is, and has always been, the greatest strength of us, human beings.   But in order to avert the doom-scenario I briefly described above, and have a shot at making the dreamy ideal-world scenario I painted before that come true at some point in the future, we have got to take action. Today. Oil is ending - and the sooner we accept this, the earlier we can start looking for sustainable alternatives. This way, we can prevent a situation where we will suddenly find ourselves out of oil tomorrow - and give ourselves the opportunity to have a much smoother, calmer transition to a cleaner world. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy
A World Without Oil Fueled By Renewables.  Are We On Track?
A World Without Oil Fueled By Renewables. Are We On Track?
Is Google And Amazon
How smart can we be? We ourselves! ‘Smart Technology’ for our home Robotic arms have taken a lot of work out of our hands in the industry. Yet we are busier than ever. We hardly have time to live. But now there are also robots for the house to assist us. They can take over many domestic tasks from us. Do they continue the liberation that was introduced with the vacuum cleaner and the washing machine? Google and Amazon's smart technology Photo by: LG Who does not know the dream of the gnomes who – unasked - do all the nasty chores in the house? They exist! Internet giants Google and Amazon, together with a number of electronics companies, have developed programs for various smart in-home help. 'Smart Technology', for example for the 'Assistant' who does not have eyes, and cannot walk or wave, but who can carry out oral assignments to operate the oven, the washing machine, kitchen machines or the shower thermostat. You can also ask questions about the weather report or the situation on the roads. In the future 'Assistants' will also send advertising messages. A listening ear, Google Home Photo by: #Google There are helpers who go further: they are meant as a 'pivot in the household' and are supposed to make themselves indispensable by arranging everything: the lighting in the house, the vacuuming or the laundry. For example, a robot can ensure that the sports clothes are washed on time if there is an appointment with the fitness center in the agenda. They can also give cooking tips, select news, have a conversation, play games with the children and take photos or films of special moments in the family. GPS effect Everything is taken care of by the industrious electronic gnomes: the laundry is done, the floor sucked, the children are entertained with stories, or games ... do they now offer residents the freedom to follow or develop new interest? It could be, but at a price: just as people become dependent on the navigation in the car, and no longer know where they actually are, residents can also become dependent on the helping electronics and the overview, and thus the control about the household. You might say that residents are now visiting themselves. But having said this, let's look at what residents, now that they are freed from the worries that housing brings with them, are going to do with their vacant time. Can they indeed follow or develop new interests thanks to the robots? Embarrisment of choice Thanks to the rat race, they can choose from an abundance of products. There is probably something in between that which arouses a new interest or sets a new development in motion, but a problem here is that the consumer - due to the constant advertising bombardment that the 'rat race' has to keep going - can have some trouble in recognizing  their own interests. This can make it difficult to make a meaningful choice ... from the visit to a theme park, a weekend to a strange city, a nature walk, eating out, a visit to the zoo, a new smartphone, new contemporary furniture, an  electric bicycle or an investment in renewable energy. End of choice stress Why do not they leave the choice to one of the house robots? The self-learning algorithms with which they are equipped recognize patterns in human behavior rather than the people involved, so these robots can also predict future needs! So making a choice with these algorithms is in good hands! For example, house robots could together ensure a smooth and carefree life. Without annoying housework and also without choice stress. Photo by: Click Americana Helpful house robots  But with this, these helpful robots can contribute to residents losing control, not only about the household but also about the choices they make and therefore about the direction in which they want to develop further. This makes these robots essentially different from simple machines such as the vacuum cleaner or the washing machine. ‘Big Brother’, George Orwell In the meantime, these robots, through Google, Amazon and also Facebook, pass on data about our way of living, buying and eating habits and other interests, to companies that can use these to offer products, for prices that are both geared to the residents . Big Brothers are watching us, and take advantage of that. The fact that the 'Assistant' will also send advertising messages in the future was already a warning. Photo: Cover 1984 George Orwell Invisible hand Now these Big Brothers can rightly be seen as a danger, but they only follow the automatism of the 'invisible hand', namely becoming big and strong and making as much advertising as possible. And in the latter they are particularly successful, as their home robots indeed contribute to consumers losing control of their private lives and are happy with all the choices that  the robots bring into their private lives. 1984 This can have an alarming consequence ... If the commercially interesting offers from companies are constantly coming up to the internet searches, products that do not have a commercial interest will no longer have a chance. All the more because the storage capacity of data centers irrevocably lags behind the exponentially growing collection of big data about consumers. Then choices have to be made, and then one day there may be no more critical sounds on the net. Like the 1984 book by George Orwell! Not only for the home Ultimately, it is not so exciting, or cute, or convenient to the offered robots with 'Smart Technology' to take home. They do not serve the residents but the 'invisible hand'. 'Smart Technology' is not only available in-house: robots and computers are also active in public areas. More about that in the next episode. By Philip Krabbendam https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/society
How smart can we be? We ourselves! ‘Smart Technology’ for our home Robotic arms have taken a lot of work out of our hands in the industry. Yet we are busier than ever. We hardly have time to live. But now there are also robots for the house to assist us. They can take over many domestic tasks from us. Do they continue the liberation that was introduced with the vacuum cleaner and the washing machine? Google and Amazon's smart technology Photo by: LG Who does not know the dream of the gnomes who – unasked - do all the nasty chores in the house? They exist! Internet giants Google and Amazon, together with a number of electronics companies, have developed programs for various smart in-home help. 'Smart Technology', for example for the 'Assistant' who does not have eyes, and cannot walk or wave, but who can carry out oral assignments to operate the oven, the washing machine, kitchen machines or the shower thermostat. You can also ask questions about the weather report or the situation on the roads. In the future 'Assistants' will also send advertising messages. A listening ear, Google Home Photo by: #Google There are helpers who go further: they are meant as a 'pivot in the household' and are supposed to make themselves indispensable by arranging everything: the lighting in the house, the vacuuming or the laundry. For example, a robot can ensure that the sports clothes are washed on time if there is an appointment with the fitness center in the agenda. They can also give cooking tips, select news, have a conversation, play games with the children and take photos or films of special moments in the family. GPS effect Everything is taken care of by the industrious electronic gnomes: the laundry is done, the floor sucked, the children are entertained with stories, or games ... do they now offer residents the freedom to follow or develop new interest? It could be, but at a price: just as people become dependent on the navigation in the car, and no longer know where they actually are, residents can also become dependent on the helping electronics and the overview, and thus the control about the household. You might say that residents are now visiting themselves. But having said this, let's look at what residents, now that they are freed from the worries that housing brings with them, are going to do with their vacant time. Can they indeed follow or develop new interests thanks to the robots? Embarrisment of choice Thanks to the rat race, they can choose from an abundance of products. There is probably something in between that which arouses a new interest or sets a new development in motion, but a problem here is that the consumer - due to the constant advertising bombardment that the 'rat race' has to keep going - can have some trouble in recognizing  their own interests. This can make it difficult to make a meaningful choice ... from the visit to a theme park, a weekend to a strange city, a nature walk, eating out, a visit to the zoo, a new smartphone, new contemporary furniture, an  electric bicycle or an investment in renewable energy. End of choice stress Why do not they leave the choice to one of the house robots? The self-learning algorithms with which they are equipped recognize patterns in human behavior rather than the people involved, so these robots can also predict future needs! So making a choice with these algorithms is in good hands! For example, house robots could together ensure a smooth and carefree life. Without annoying housework and also without choice stress. Photo by: Click Americana Helpful house robots  But with this, these helpful robots can contribute to residents losing control, not only about the household but also about the choices they make and therefore about the direction in which they want to develop further. This makes these robots essentially different from simple machines such as the vacuum cleaner or the washing machine. ‘Big Brother’, George Orwell In the meantime, these robots, through Google, Amazon and also Facebook, pass on data about our way of living, buying and eating habits and other interests, to companies that can use these to offer products, for prices that are both geared to the residents . Big Brothers are watching us, and take advantage of that. The fact that the 'Assistant' will also send advertising messages in the future was already a warning. Photo: Cover 1984 George Orwell Invisible hand Now these Big Brothers can rightly be seen as a danger, but they only follow the automatism of the 'invisible hand', namely becoming big and strong and making as much advertising as possible. And in the latter they are particularly successful, as their home robots indeed contribute to consumers losing control of their private lives and are happy with all the choices that  the robots bring into their private lives. 1984 This can have an alarming consequence ... If the commercially interesting offers from companies are constantly coming up to the internet searches, products that do not have a commercial interest will no longer have a chance. All the more because the storage capacity of data centers irrevocably lags behind the exponentially growing collection of big data about consumers. Then choices have to be made, and then one day there may be no more critical sounds on the net. Like the 1984 book by George Orwell! Not only for the home Ultimately, it is not so exciting, or cute, or convenient to the offered robots with 'Smart Technology' to take home. They do not serve the residents but the 'invisible hand'. 'Smart Technology' is not only available in-house: robots and computers are also active in public areas. More about that in the next episode. By Philip Krabbendam https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/society
Is Google And Amazon
Is Google And Amazon's Smart Technology At Home Sustainable?
Blockchain For Sustainability: Implementing A Better World
Much has been written about the technology of blockchain. This invention of the as of yet unidentified person or entity Satoshi Nakamoto, who published it in 2008, is one of the most hyped methods that will affect businesses on a global level. In its simplest form, blockchain is best described as a ledger or database of sorts. One with an unparalleled level of security, through advanced cryptography techniques, that makes it resistant to modification.   At the same time, its public and decentralised nature ensures that everyone can have access to it and add to it as they want - after which the peer-to-peer network, over which the database is distributed, has to verify the new data before it literally becomes set in stone. This makes it an ideal solution for any industry where it is crucial that data is accurate, publicly available, and can be relied on. APPLICATIONS IN  SUSTAINABILITY While blockchain has achieved most of its fame as the platform enabling cryptocurrencies, such as Bitcoin, it shows plenty of promise for other, widely varying industries as well. To illustrate this versatility, the World Economic Forum has published a comprehensive report on the use of blockchain in environmental conservation, adeptly titled ‘Building Block(chain)s for a Better Planet’.   It looks at potential game-changing applications of blockchain in battling the greatest dangers that our planet is facing, including environmental degradation, air pollution and climate change. In this, examples of initiatives per challenge are singled out, that could potentially have a massive positive impact on our globe. BLOCKCHAIN IN CLIMATE CHANGE The applications for blockchain in combatting climate change are diverse. It could include initiatives relevant to any of us, for example through a citizen loyalty and reward platform, which allows citizens of a certain area to register and be rewarded for their own smart and green home innovations. This includes lighting, heating, and other sustainable smart home improvements.   Another application of blockchain in battling climate change is its function in allowing for sustainable land use. Through blockchain, mining and agricultural activities can closely and publicly be monitored, and through automation of data collection, the entire process can become more sustainable and durable. Similarly, blockchain could enhance clean power initiatives, for example through peer-to-peer renewable energy trading systems or an optimised distributed grid management.   BLOCKCHAIN IN BIODIVERSITY AND CONSERVATION Applicaties of blockchain can also be used to increase global  biodiversity and conservation. It could, for instance, be used to track the geographic reach and movements of endangered animal species, while at the same time raise more funds for investments in habitat restoration and species conservation.   Natural resources, such as wood, can also be better protected and tracked if it is included in a blockchain ledger, that requires the input of producers and manufacturers alike. At the same time, it could incentivise farmers and reward them for responsible waste management or limited use of pesticide on their land.   The word ‘sustainable production’ and ‘sustainable trade’ can also be given more meaning, now that it is possible to track the entire supply chain of produce or livestock. The transparant supply chain will allow consumers to look right back to the origins of a product, and verify whether its production has in fact be sustainable. BLOCKCHAIN FOR HEALTHY  OCEANS The application of blockchain for the protection of species and habitats in our oceans is mentioned as well, allowing for a decentralised and open-source database with ocean data and tracking data. Secondly, it will allow for more sustainable fishing solutions: fish can be tracked, while illegal fishing can quickly be identified. Additionally, pollution of the oceans can largely be prevented, for example through incentivised ocean plastic recycling initiatives, as well as a transparent ledger for faster, safer and more efficient shipping routes. Finally, the impact from climate change can be made visible, for instance through real-time monitoring of the ocean temperature and collection of data on ocean conditions. And, once again, the ease of fundraising through blockchain will also make a world of difference for our oceans, as people can easily, directly and safely donate to ocean clean-up efforts or the protection of endangered sea-species. BLOCKCHAIN FOR CLEAN WATER   Another huge challenge that the world is facing is the availability of clean and safe drinking water. Blockchain could assist through increasing water supply - through water monitoring and micropayment generation for water meter donations - as well as increased water efficiency, through the introduction of peer-to-peer trading systems of excess water supplies and smart meters.   The quality of  water can be improved through control applications. Similarly, adequate sanitation efforts could “feed” more efficient water treatment systems. All the while, blockchain could empower drought planning through monitoring and forecasting of precipitation and the provision of automated crop insurances for drought periods.   BLOCKCHAIN FOR CLEAN AIR Alongside water, a second resource crucial to mankind is air. After all, without clean water and clean air, life would not be possible. As such, the applications of blockchain towards improving the quality of air are potentially very valuable as well. These include filtering and capturing solutions, such as the automatic activation of air-filtration devices and the collation of data on air pollutants from various sources.   Similarly, air quality can be monitored through intelligent methane monitoring systems and real-time, local monitoring of particulates and NO2. Through early warning systems, operating on blockchain, we can be quicker and more effective in combatting potentially hazardous or health-comprising situations.   BLOCKCHAIN FOR WEATHER AND DISASTER RESILIENCE A final byproduct of our current environmental problems, is the occurrence of extreme weather and natural distasters. Once again something that blockchain can offer various applications for: from prediction and forecasting to early warning systems, and from resilience planning and resilient infrastructure to the quick deployment of financial instruments to fund recovery efforts and insurance claims.   WHY INCLUDE BLOCKCHAIN? Blockchain has the potential to not only aid, but also transform the way in which we deal with  environmental issues. Its potential impact on existing and innovative solutions alike could be huge, especially through the ease and the transparency of the system. Everyone will know what is being done and by who, without any room for error or fraud. Not only will it become painfully obvious where the sore points are, therefore making it easier to identify and punish wrongdoers or great polluters, blockchain is also able to reward and incentivise those who are doing the right thing.   As such, industry and consumers alike are pushed to take a good, critical look at their use of resources and the way that they treat the environment. A technology that, therefore, does not only have disruptive and transformative attributes, but that also harnesses the collective self-interests to let people combine their efforts to push the world to a better place. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/blockchain
Much has been written about the technology of blockchain. This invention of the as of yet unidentified person or entity Satoshi Nakamoto, who published it in 2008, is one of the most hyped methods that will affect businesses on a global level. In its simplest form, blockchain is best described as a ledger or database of sorts. One with an unparalleled level of security, through advanced cryptography techniques, that makes it resistant to modification.   At the same time, its public and decentralised nature ensures that everyone can have access to it and add to it as they want - after which the peer-to-peer network, over which the database is distributed, has to verify the new data before it literally becomes set in stone. This makes it an ideal solution for any industry where it is crucial that data is accurate, publicly available, and can be relied on. APPLICATIONS IN  SUSTAINABILITY While blockchain has achieved most of its fame as the platform enabling cryptocurrencies, such as Bitcoin, it shows plenty of promise for other, widely varying industries as well. To illustrate this versatility, the World Economic Forum has published a comprehensive report on the use of blockchain in environmental conservation, adeptly titled ‘Building Block(chain)s for a Better Planet’.   It looks at potential game-changing applications of blockchain in battling the greatest dangers that our planet is facing, including environmental degradation, air pollution and climate change. In this, examples of initiatives per challenge are singled out, that could potentially have a massive positive impact on our globe. BLOCKCHAIN IN CLIMATE CHANGE The applications for blockchain in combatting climate change are diverse. It could include initiatives relevant to any of us, for example through a citizen loyalty and reward platform, which allows citizens of a certain area to register and be rewarded for their own smart and green home innovations. This includes lighting, heating, and other sustainable smart home improvements.   Another application of blockchain in battling climate change is its function in allowing for sustainable land use. Through blockchain, mining and agricultural activities can closely and publicly be monitored, and through automation of data collection, the entire process can become more sustainable and durable. Similarly, blockchain could enhance clean power initiatives, for example through peer-to-peer renewable energy trading systems or an optimised distributed grid management.   BLOCKCHAIN IN BIODIVERSITY AND CONSERVATION Applicaties of blockchain can also be used to increase global  biodiversity and conservation. It could, for instance, be used to track the geographic reach and movements of endangered animal species, while at the same time raise more funds for investments in habitat restoration and species conservation.   Natural resources, such as wood, can also be better protected and tracked if it is included in a blockchain ledger, that requires the input of producers and manufacturers alike. At the same time, it could incentivise farmers and reward them for responsible waste management or limited use of pesticide on their land.   The word ‘sustainable production’ and ‘sustainable trade’ can also be given more meaning, now that it is possible to track the entire supply chain of produce or livestock. The transparant supply chain will allow consumers to look right back to the origins of a product, and verify whether its production has in fact be sustainable. BLOCKCHAIN FOR HEALTHY  OCEANS The application of blockchain for the protection of species and habitats in our oceans is mentioned as well, allowing for a decentralised and open-source database with ocean data and tracking data. Secondly, it will allow for more sustainable fishing solutions: fish can be tracked, while illegal fishing can quickly be identified. Additionally, pollution of the oceans can largely be prevented, for example through incentivised ocean plastic recycling initiatives, as well as a transparent ledger for faster, safer and more efficient shipping routes. Finally, the impact from climate change can be made visible, for instance through real-time monitoring of the ocean temperature and collection of data on ocean conditions. And, once again, the ease of fundraising through blockchain will also make a world of difference for our oceans, as people can easily, directly and safely donate to ocean clean-up efforts or the protection of endangered sea-species. BLOCKCHAIN FOR CLEAN WATER   Another huge challenge that the world is facing is the availability of clean and safe drinking water. Blockchain could assist through increasing water supply - through water monitoring and micropayment generation for water meter donations - as well as increased water efficiency, through the introduction of peer-to-peer trading systems of excess water supplies and smart meters.   The quality of  water can be improved through control applications. Similarly, adequate sanitation efforts could “feed” more efficient water treatment systems. All the while, blockchain could empower drought planning through monitoring and forecasting of precipitation and the provision of automated crop insurances for drought periods.   BLOCKCHAIN FOR CLEAN AIR Alongside water, a second resource crucial to mankind is air. After all, without clean water and clean air, life would not be possible. As such, the applications of blockchain towards improving the quality of air are potentially very valuable as well. These include filtering and capturing solutions, such as the automatic activation of air-filtration devices and the collation of data on air pollutants from various sources.   Similarly, air quality can be monitored through intelligent methane monitoring systems and real-time, local monitoring of particulates and NO2. Through early warning systems, operating on blockchain, we can be quicker and more effective in combatting potentially hazardous or health-comprising situations.   BLOCKCHAIN FOR WEATHER AND DISASTER RESILIENCE A final byproduct of our current environmental problems, is the occurrence of extreme weather and natural distasters. Once again something that blockchain can offer various applications for: from prediction and forecasting to early warning systems, and from resilience planning and resilient infrastructure to the quick deployment of financial instruments to fund recovery efforts and insurance claims.   WHY INCLUDE BLOCKCHAIN? Blockchain has the potential to not only aid, but also transform the way in which we deal with  environmental issues. Its potential impact on existing and innovative solutions alike could be huge, especially through the ease and the transparency of the system. Everyone will know what is being done and by who, without any room for error or fraud. Not only will it become painfully obvious where the sore points are, therefore making it easier to identify and punish wrongdoers or great polluters, blockchain is also able to reward and incentivise those who are doing the right thing.   As such, industry and consumers alike are pushed to take a good, critical look at their use of resources and the way that they treat the environment. A technology that, therefore, does not only have disruptive and transformative attributes, but that also harnesses the collective self-interests to let people combine their efforts to push the world to a better place. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/blockchain
Blockchain For Sustainability: Implementing A Better World
Blockchain For Sustainability: Implementing A Better World
Sustainable House Day - You Are Cordially Invited: Australia
As a global platform, WhatsOrb presents an opportunity to share interesting local events and holidays related to sustainability with the world. So today I would like to share with you a great initiative coming from the Land Down Under – Sustainable House Day. Sustainable House Day’s goal is to inspire people Established in 2001, this event allows Australians to visit and learn from the most environmentally friendly houses in the country. Sustainable House Day’s goal is to inspire people to live more sustainably and show how they can reduce their energy bills and help the environment. This is a unique opportunity for Australians to meet the people that have transformed their living and working spaces, learn from their experience and get a lot of practical information on how to make their own houses 'greener'. Unfortunately for those of us that aren’t in Australia on that day we cannot see the houses in person, but luckily we can still have a peek at some of these unique dwellings. The garden of eco-friendly delights Photo taken by the owner, taken from Sustainable House Day listing First up is Jaspar’s Home and Gardens. It is a great example of an existing home that was improved upon to make it more sustainable and support surrounding wildlife. The house features solar panels that provide low-cost electricity and re-glazed and draught-proofed sash windows that help insulate the home. There are also above ground water tanks that supply all water throughout the house, including drinking water. While the house itself is quite “green”, it is the garden that can become a great example of sustainability that goes beyond reducing resource usage. The garden beds are watered with filtered grey water and are covered with deep mulch to retain the water. Jasper grows many fruit trees and vegetables without use of any artificial fertilisers, making it all that much more enjoyable. When he has any vegetable waste from cooking, he puts it into his worm farms to compost that can later be used to grow more vegetables. In the meanwhile, his 6 native bee hives help with flower fertilisation and ducks assist with pest control. Lastly, he created habitats such as water features, log piles, drilled logs and other to increase local wildlife. This is a truly great use of his resources that takes sustainability to a new level – and by his own estimations all of the improvements cost him a mere AUD 30,000 (approx. EUR 18’500 or USD 21’000)! Latest in sustainable  house construction Photo by the owner, taken from the Sustainable House Day listing Another interesting example is Lekofly, an iBuilds Melbourne display centre that a result of a holistic approach to sustainability. This house demonstrates how a combination of various materials and technologies can create a modern stylish building that will save consumers hundreds of dollars every year in energy costs. With iBuild’s technology sustainability starts with materials. They use recyclable and locally sourced materials that are termite and fire resistant and are guaranteed to last. These materials are used to produce unique modules that are then transported to the final destinations and assembled into finished houses. This model allows them to cut down transportation emissions, costs and time, as well as leave the neighbours happier due to lack of noise and dust pollution. The finished product is a highly energy efficient house that can be disassembled and relocated at any time. Naturally, one can add features like solar panels and water tanks to make it more self-sufficient. A self-sufficient tiny house with a small footprint Photo by Richard Ellender, taken from Sustainable House Day listing And of course this list won’t be complete without a tiny house. The Mayflower was designed and constructed by Tiny Footprint in just 8 weeks time. Its design is truly stunning and it wouldn’t look out of place in an interior magazine, while creative use of space makes it feel much bigger than it is. However, the true beauty of this house lies in its use of sustainable solutions. The Mayflower was designed to be used  off-grid and thus has no dependence on mains electricity, water and septic. This is achieved by using a composting toilet, low flow shower head, specialised rain and grey water collection systems, energy-efficient lights and appliances and of course solar panels. The house is completely insulated, allowing it to stay warm during winter with little need for heating, while the ceiling fan and carefully positioned windows and skylights provide the much needed cooling during hot Australian summers. Does your house have sustainable features? Or have you visited one of the houses during the event this year? Share your pictures and stories with us on social media and don’t forget to tag WhatsOrb so we can see it! https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/green-architecture
As a global platform, WhatsOrb presents an opportunity to share interesting local events and holidays related to sustainability with the world. So today I would like to share with you a great initiative coming from the Land Down Under – Sustainable House Day. Sustainable House Day’s goal is to inspire people Established in 2001, this event allows Australians to visit and learn from the most environmentally friendly houses in the country. Sustainable House Day’s goal is to inspire people to live more sustainably and show how they can reduce their energy bills and help the environment. This is a unique opportunity for Australians to meet the people that have transformed their living and working spaces, learn from their experience and get a lot of practical information on how to make their own houses 'greener'. Unfortunately for those of us that aren’t in Australia on that day we cannot see the houses in person, but luckily we can still have a peek at some of these unique dwellings. The garden of eco-friendly delights Photo taken by the owner, taken from Sustainable House Day listing First up is Jaspar’s Home and Gardens. It is a great example of an existing home that was improved upon to make it more sustainable and support surrounding wildlife. The house features solar panels that provide low-cost electricity and re-glazed and draught-proofed sash windows that help insulate the home. There are also above ground water tanks that supply all water throughout the house, including drinking water. While the house itself is quite “green”, it is the garden that can become a great example of sustainability that goes beyond reducing resource usage. The garden beds are watered with filtered grey water and are covered with deep mulch to retain the water. Jasper grows many fruit trees and vegetables without use of any artificial fertilisers, making it all that much more enjoyable. When he has any vegetable waste from cooking, he puts it into his worm farms to compost that can later be used to grow more vegetables. In the meanwhile, his 6 native bee hives help with flower fertilisation and ducks assist with pest control. Lastly, he created habitats such as water features, log piles, drilled logs and other to increase local wildlife. This is a truly great use of his resources that takes sustainability to a new level – and by his own estimations all of the improvements cost him a mere AUD 30,000 (approx. EUR 18’500 or USD 21’000)! Latest in sustainable  house construction Photo by the owner, taken from the Sustainable House Day listing Another interesting example is Lekofly, an iBuilds Melbourne display centre that a result of a holistic approach to sustainability. This house demonstrates how a combination of various materials and technologies can create a modern stylish building that will save consumers hundreds of dollars every year in energy costs. With iBuild’s technology sustainability starts with materials. They use recyclable and locally sourced materials that are termite and fire resistant and are guaranteed to last. These materials are used to produce unique modules that are then transported to the final destinations and assembled into finished houses. This model allows them to cut down transportation emissions, costs and time, as well as leave the neighbours happier due to lack of noise and dust pollution. The finished product is a highly energy efficient house that can be disassembled and relocated at any time. Naturally, one can add features like solar panels and water tanks to make it more self-sufficient. A self-sufficient tiny house with a small footprint Photo by Richard Ellender, taken from Sustainable House Day listing And of course this list won’t be complete without a tiny house. The Mayflower was designed and constructed by Tiny Footprint in just 8 weeks time. Its design is truly stunning and it wouldn’t look out of place in an interior magazine, while creative use of space makes it feel much bigger than it is. However, the true beauty of this house lies in its use of sustainable solutions. The Mayflower was designed to be used  off-grid and thus has no dependence on mains electricity, water and septic. This is achieved by using a composting toilet, low flow shower head, specialised rain and grey water collection systems, energy-efficient lights and appliances and of course solar panels. The house is completely insulated, allowing it to stay warm during winter with little need for heating, while the ceiling fan and carefully positioned windows and skylights provide the much needed cooling during hot Australian summers. Does your house have sustainable features? Or have you visited one of the houses during the event this year? Share your pictures and stories with us on social media and don’t forget to tag WhatsOrb so we can see it! https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/green-architecture
Sustainable House Day - You Are Cordially Invited: Australia
Sustainable House Day - You Are Cordially Invited: Australia
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