Community

About: <p>A community is you and me. A network of social, economic, ecological and many other relationships. We all work together and live in urban, suburban and rural areas. Social sustainability is becoming increasingly important on our small planet. We define: support, quality of life, development, adaptation, rights and labour.</p> <p>We belong to a group of individuals - <a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/society">our society</a> - in which we belong geographically. Certain environmental issues play an important role in our society. Here, sustainable solutions are sought, developed and implemented. This may differ from societies in other countries, but because of our global environmental issues and&nbsp;<span lang="en" tabindex="0">dependence</span>, we must learn to work more together so that we can all benefit from sharing sustainable knowledge to tackle, for example, climate change.</p> <p><a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/green-architecture">Green architecture</a> is important. Building with local materials that can be recycled and reused brings us a big step forward to have less impact on the environment. With green architecture we can build <a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/smart-cities">smart cities</a> where resources can be used more efficiently and information can be shared, thus improving our society, your community.</p> <p><a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/lifestyle">Lifestyle</a> is the way we live, the dynamics of personality. Fashion defines our self and together with food it is getting - at present - an even more important role in our society. It's not just about taste, but especially about the burden that the fashion industry, agriculture and the meat industry have on our resources, especially water.</p> <p>If there was an urge to come up with a sustainable way of living solutions and share these topics globally it&rsquo;s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about tiny houses, your experiences and expectations for the future at home and globally.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Global Sustainability X-change, that&rsquo;s what you can do together with WhatsOrb.&nbsp;<a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/newsletter/your-shared-sustainable-ideas-make-our-earth-a-better-place">What's in for me?</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
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Crisis What Crisis: The World Is full Of Opportunity. Read!
The corona crisis is making the world 'small' and many people worry. For many years I - and many around me - have been tense about the future of humanity on our planet Earth. With a crisis like the drought in the Netherlands in 2018, but also in my own environment: forest fires, tornadoes and floods doesn't makes my worries less. At the same time harrowing stories of refugees on and about the sea. Crisis What Crisis! I believe we should say goodbye to our current system where the global economy is predominant. It ensures the exploitation of people, the depletion of natural resources on earth and unimaginable animal suffering. But how? The film 'Economics Of Happiness' shows it nicely. It clearly exposes how the Ladakhs in India had great wealth of their own, until roads were built and multinationals made their appearance. People mirrored a fictional ideal and became unhappy. What did the Ladakhs do before that they were doing so well together? Things we can do here too? Recommended:  Consumerism In ‘The West’: A Society Built On Exploitation Far from the heat, noise, and chaos, atop India’s snow-capped mountains, I found peace How did the Ladakhs live before the major roads, in the 1980s? They grow their food in fields with an eye for the natural functioning of those fields, with an eye for the ecosystems. Working together is binding. Several generations meet in the field. Care for each other comes up close. They make their own clothes, have their own music and dance and history. They are proud, not of themselves, but of each other. Everyone is seen. There is no competition. Our lives look very different. But what ideas can we draw from their example for our own lives? {youtube}                                                                      The Economics of Happiness  The World Is full Of Opportunity: How Would Such A Life Look? Because of this Coronavirus period, we are suddenly much more at home. I noticed by the forced sitting at home that there is more rest among the children. Finally, there is time to make the crafts from the craft book, build the hut or make the bird house. They learn fanatically in the morning and continue singing and playing throughout the day. What would it be like if the competition and performance pressure of the school system disappears and we only learn for ourselves without comparing with others? And also mainly learn other things? About ecosystems, about caring for each other, making music (own music but more than just the national anthem), about making clothes yourself, baking pots, weaving baskets? What would it be like if there was time for this? What would it be like if we produce food without loss of quality of soil and biodiversity? Wouldn't it be nice if we felt with every harvest that the soil would be better instead of worse? Isn't it useful to pay more attention to everything that happens and is possible in our immediate environment? For example, for agriculture, health care, nature and the economy within an hour's walk. Recommended:  Smart Communities: Eco-Living Through Technology Opportunities: A Lot Is Already Happening In my immediate vicinity, Eefde and Zutphen in The Neterlands, there are already many beautiful initiatives to join, that bring us closer to nature and together and reduces our footprint. Some examples: A basic income (a Zutphens initiative) would kick-start the creation of less stress from crowds. Farming together according to permaculture principles provides income and food for others / a biodiverse environment. You can harvest yourself at the permaculture market garden 'De Veldhof in Joppe'.  You can also find a lot of healthy food in nature. 'Pluk De Stad' visualized it for Zutphen, among others. In Zutphen, ' KratjeLokaal ' delivers local food to your door every week. As a self-employed person, you can work together in various contexts, such as 'The Zutphense Coopkracht'. It ensures that you do not have to do it all alone and that you are also entitled to 'work at home'. Perhaps we should replace the 'healthcare' sector with the social cohesion sector. When people feel seen, less care is proven to be needed. We are used to family living far away, having distant friends, and some close by. We are used to living in subcultures, and without much contact with neighbors. There are often great ideological differences between people on a street. That does not always make it easy. What if we meet each other automatically, for example at the community garden or 'Animal Meadow Of Eefde? If we learn together, work together, will there be more understanding and mutual respect? And if people still need help despite their social embedding, this can simply come from the neighborhood with Buurtzorg or, for example, Help just home care, a cooperative of self-employed persons. Herbert Nijkamp's flock grazing grass fields and roadsides in Eefde. Children like to watch and play around the herd Opening roadsides for adaptation is a first step in the municipality of Lochem. For example, no less than 3000 m2 of roadside was sown with flower mixture by all the neighbors of a street. In Zutphen there are also green adoption projects such as the bee garden where people do yoga together, for example. We used to burn coal and wood, then oil and gas came, now we have learned to make energy from wind and sun. Let's take advantage of this, but after we cut back to the max, otherwise there will be acres of land left. choose a non-profit local energy company. They consider energy saving of paramount importance. For example ZutphenEnergie or LochemEnergie. You are as strong as your ecosystem, so make sure it is robust. De-stone your garden, give space to flowers and insects. Participate in the construction and maintenance of nature in your area, ensure a lot of neighborhood greenery. Zutphense and Eefdese green initiatives are: Emerpark, Gorsselse heather, biodiverse roadsides. It is a lot of fun to make your own clothes. A permanent fabric shop can be found in Epse, 'Javro Fabric Market', but (eco) fabrics are also for sale at the weekly market in Zutphen. There are also several good seamstresses, such as Radijsje in the Laarstraat. In addition, there are many second-hand clothing stores in Laarstraat that reduce the pressure on raw materials. The World: Locally And With Each Other Think in connection with this. You don't have to learn and do it all alone. There are many active people in your immediate environment. There are repair cafes to go to, the Zutphense Energy Shop with energy coaches, gardens where you are welcome like on the 'Kaardebol'. There are also various active Facebook groups to join, such as: 'the Zussen van Zutphen' or 'Ruilen and Sell'. Various people are linked here. This also applies to the equally beautiful Zutphen initiative 'Buddy to Buddy', in which asylum seekers get a native buddy. This has been awarded with the 'Appeltje van Oranje'. Queen Maxima from the Netherlands and members of 'Budy to Budy' receive the 'Appeltjes van Oranje reward It is possible in Zutphen and Eefde. So it can be done anywhere! By: Tjitske Ypma (on behalf of Stichting de Lynx) Before you go! Recommended:  Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about your community life? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
The corona crisis is making the world 'small' and many people worry. For many years I - and many around me - have been tense about the future of humanity on our planet Earth. With a crisis like the drought in the Netherlands in 2018, but also in my own environment: forest fires, tornadoes and floods doesn't makes my worries less. At the same time harrowing stories of refugees on and about the sea. Crisis What Crisis! I believe we should say goodbye to our current system where the global economy is predominant. It ensures the exploitation of people, the depletion of natural resources on earth and unimaginable animal suffering. But how? The film 'Economics Of Happiness' shows it nicely. It clearly exposes how the Ladakhs in India had great wealth of their own, until roads were built and multinationals made their appearance. People mirrored a fictional ideal and became unhappy. What did the Ladakhs do before that they were doing so well together? Things we can do here too? Recommended:  Consumerism In ‘The West’: A Society Built On Exploitation Far from the heat, noise, and chaos, atop India’s snow-capped mountains, I found peace How did the Ladakhs live before the major roads, in the 1980s? They grow their food in fields with an eye for the natural functioning of those fields, with an eye for the ecosystems. Working together is binding. Several generations meet in the field. Care for each other comes up close. They make their own clothes, have their own music and dance and history. They are proud, not of themselves, but of each other. Everyone is seen. There is no competition. Our lives look very different. But what ideas can we draw from their example for our own lives? {youtube}                                                                      The Economics of Happiness  The World Is full Of Opportunity: How Would Such A Life Look? Because of this Coronavirus period, we are suddenly much more at home. I noticed by the forced sitting at home that there is more rest among the children. Finally, there is time to make the crafts from the craft book, build the hut or make the bird house. They learn fanatically in the morning and continue singing and playing throughout the day. What would it be like if the competition and performance pressure of the school system disappears and we only learn for ourselves without comparing with others? And also mainly learn other things? About ecosystems, about caring for each other, making music (own music but more than just the national anthem), about making clothes yourself, baking pots, weaving baskets? What would it be like if there was time for this? What would it be like if we produce food without loss of quality of soil and biodiversity? Wouldn't it be nice if we felt with every harvest that the soil would be better instead of worse? Isn't it useful to pay more attention to everything that happens and is possible in our immediate environment? For example, for agriculture, health care, nature and the economy within an hour's walk. Recommended:  Smart Communities: Eco-Living Through Technology Opportunities: A Lot Is Already Happening In my immediate vicinity, Eefde and Zutphen in The Neterlands, there are already many beautiful initiatives to join, that bring us closer to nature and together and reduces our footprint. Some examples: A basic income (a Zutphens initiative) would kick-start the creation of less stress from crowds. Farming together according to permaculture principles provides income and food for others / a biodiverse environment. You can harvest yourself at the permaculture market garden 'De Veldhof in Joppe'.  You can also find a lot of healthy food in nature. 'Pluk De Stad' visualized it for Zutphen, among others. In Zutphen, ' KratjeLokaal ' delivers local food to your door every week. As a self-employed person, you can work together in various contexts, such as 'The Zutphense Coopkracht'. It ensures that you do not have to do it all alone and that you are also entitled to 'work at home'. Perhaps we should replace the 'healthcare' sector with the social cohesion sector. When people feel seen, less care is proven to be needed. We are used to family living far away, having distant friends, and some close by. We are used to living in subcultures, and without much contact with neighbors. There are often great ideological differences between people on a street. That does not always make it easy. What if we meet each other automatically, for example at the community garden or 'Animal Meadow Of Eefde? If we learn together, work together, will there be more understanding and mutual respect? And if people still need help despite their social embedding, this can simply come from the neighborhood with Buurtzorg or, for example, Help just home care, a cooperative of self-employed persons. Herbert Nijkamp's flock grazing grass fields and roadsides in Eefde. Children like to watch and play around the herd Opening roadsides for adaptation is a first step in the municipality of Lochem. For example, no less than 3000 m2 of roadside was sown with flower mixture by all the neighbors of a street. In Zutphen there are also green adoption projects such as the bee garden where people do yoga together, for example. We used to burn coal and wood, then oil and gas came, now we have learned to make energy from wind and sun. Let's take advantage of this, but after we cut back to the max, otherwise there will be acres of land left. choose a non-profit local energy company. They consider energy saving of paramount importance. For example ZutphenEnergie or LochemEnergie. You are as strong as your ecosystem, so make sure it is robust. De-stone your garden, give space to flowers and insects. Participate in the construction and maintenance of nature in your area, ensure a lot of neighborhood greenery. Zutphense and Eefdese green initiatives are: Emerpark, Gorsselse heather, biodiverse roadsides. It is a lot of fun to make your own clothes. A permanent fabric shop can be found in Epse, 'Javro Fabric Market', but (eco) fabrics are also for sale at the weekly market in Zutphen. There are also several good seamstresses, such as Radijsje in the Laarstraat. In addition, there are many second-hand clothing stores in Laarstraat that reduce the pressure on raw materials. The World: Locally And With Each Other Think in connection with this. You don't have to learn and do it all alone. There are many active people in your immediate environment. There are repair cafes to go to, the Zutphense Energy Shop with energy coaches, gardens where you are welcome like on the 'Kaardebol'. There are also various active Facebook groups to join, such as: 'the Zussen van Zutphen' or 'Ruilen and Sell'. Various people are linked here. This also applies to the equally beautiful Zutphen initiative 'Buddy to Buddy', in which asylum seekers get a native buddy. This has been awarded with the 'Appeltje van Oranje'. Queen Maxima from the Netherlands and members of 'Budy to Budy' receive the 'Appeltjes van Oranje reward It is possible in Zutphen and Eefde. So it can be done anywhere! By: Tjitske Ypma (on behalf of Stichting de Lynx) Before you go! Recommended:  Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about your community life? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Crisis What Crisis: The World Is full Of Opportunity. Read!
Innovations By COVID-19: Corona Unleashes Creative Thinking
It has already been said by many. COVID-19, better known as the Corona virus, has a seriously impressive track record. Not only for its speed in trapping the world in a pandemic modern times have never seen, but also for its impact on society. In only a few short months, the virus has managed to do exactly that what threats of climate change and whatnot have failed to do. Innovations By COVID-19: Corona Unleashes Creative Thinking The world has ground to a halt, with air quality having significantly improved in many countries and water cleaner than it has been in our lifetime. Once Venetians start seeing fish in the crystal-clear canals and Chinese children experience the joy of crisp, fresh air for the first time, it becomes clear that COVID-19 has done more than just unleash horror and death on the world. Recommended:  Lockdown Caused By The Coronavirus: A Relieve For Our Planet No, we are not trying to imply that COVID-19 is a good thing. We are just as worried about the death toll and implications for our society and our economy as the next person. However, it is undeniable that there are some rather unexpected side-effects. Not just the fact that nature and the environment is thriving, but also the innovation that it has unleashed. It has shown that mankind is remarkably resilient and able to make lemonade out of lemons. So, perhaps it is worth celebrating some of those innovations we have seen over the past weeks. Anti-virus snood One of the main messages that is put out is that sneezing or coughing should be covered up as much as possible, as this allows the virus to get airborne and affect others. This is why some clever minds from Manchesters came up with their snood (the lovechild of a scarf and a hat) that is able to trap germs. Photo by: Virustatic Shield. The Virustatic Shield snood  The fabric coating is similar to the carbohydrate structures on the surfaces of the cells covering the oesophagus. Or, put simply, the material functions like a germ-trap the same way flies might get stuck in a fly-trap. As the snood covers not just your mouth and nose but the majority of your face, it catches some 96% of all germs flying around. Recommended:  We Created The Coronavirus: A Milieu Flaw That Will Kill Us Fever-detecting helmets Now, let’s turn from the fashionable to the somewhat creepy. Chinese police agents have been equipped with pretty impressive fever-detecting smart helmets. These helmets feature an infrared temperature detector, coupled with an augmented-reality visor. This means that you are able to look through it at a crowd of people and detect people with a fever, sounding an alarm if one is spotted. Photo by: China News Service. Police officers in Chengdu, China, wearing smart helmets fitted with infrared cameras to detect citizens with high body temperatures It works for people who are up to 5 meters away, allowing officers to scout a pretty large crowd in a relatively short period of time. And, for the creepy part, the augmented reality part and Wi-Fi connection will allow for facial recognition, pulling up the name and relevant medical details for each subject observed. 3D-printed ventilator valves With the virus sweeping across the globe, medical professionals are stressing the importance of ventilators. With only a limited number available and many more people needing them, it is time to start getting creative. The Italian company Isinnova came to the rescue when a hospital sent out a cry for help as they ran out of Venturi valves, used to connect the ventilator to a face mask. Photo by: Filippo Venezia/EPAD. Printed valves help hospitals in Italy keep up with demand.  They decided to reverse engineer the valves before churning it out on a 3D-printer. The prototype was ready within 6 hours, with 100 working valves printed and supplied the following day. After their success, the company went on to 3D-printed adapters that can turn a snorkelling mask into a non-invasive ventilator, to aid in the shortage of oxygen masks. 3D-printed isolation cubes Speaking of shortages, the capacity of most hospitals is close to being exceeded - if it isn’t so already. Patients need to be isolated for long periods of time, slowing patient turnover. In order to come up with more wards for Corona-stricken patients, the Chinese company Winsun turned to its architectural scale 3D-printers to print 15 isolation cubes in a day. Originally designed as holiday homes, the company decided to share them with hospitals to give them some breathing room. The buildings come complete with showers and eco-toilets and are made of recycled materials. Recommended:  Tiny House With Solar Panels Is Off Grid: The Netherlands Photo by: Winsun. 3D-printed isolation wards have been put into use at Xianning Central Hospital, China  Virus testing booths South Korea has become the world’s poster child for Corona virus testing, as it has the highest percentage of tests performed on its population. The way they have done so is remarkable as well: one hospital in Seoul came up with fancy-looking testing booths, allowing medical staff to examine potential patients from behind a plastic panel. These booths resemble phone boxes, which can be pressurised to prevent any particles from escaping. {youtube}                                    Coronavirus: South Korea dials up testing with hospital 'phone booth' | AFP After getting in, patients will be granted a quick consult via intercom, after which a nose and throat swab will be taken using large arm-length rubber gloves built in the panel. After performing the tests, the entire booth can be disinfected and ventilated. Arm door opener As data seems to indicate that the virus can survive on metal surfaces for quite a long period of time, it was only a matter of time before a smart company came up with a way of preventing hand-to-door-opener contact. Belgian company Materialise came up with a hands-free door handle attachment, that can be downloaded for free on their website. Two simple parts can be screwed to the side of the handle, making it easy to open the door using your arm or elbow. Recommended:  Sustainable Great Inventions From Eco-Inventors: Worldwide Photo by: Paolo Vergalito. Materialise Armed and less dangerous … Materialise’s door opener  Virus fighting drones China has finally found a use for its drone army that could be considered innovative. In order to fight the spread of the disease, the tiny flying choppers were equipped with anything from fever-detecting sensors to disinfectant sprayers to loudspeakers to talk to large groups of people. Or they were employed as messengers, to deliver supplies to those in isolation or take test samples to and from the lab as soon as possible. They were combatting the virus faster and more efficient than a person could, while not running the risk of being infected. Recommended:  Drones Safeguarding Your Food: Future Farming Worldwide Photo by: China Daily. Airborne response … a drone sprays disinfectant on streets in China’s Hebei province Before you go! Recommended:  Smart Sustainable Lifestyle Changing Tips & Tricks For 2019 Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about innovations? Click on  'Re g ister'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
It has already been said by many. COVID-19, better known as the Corona virus, has a seriously impressive track record. Not only for its speed in trapping the world in a pandemic modern times have never seen, but also for its impact on society. In only a few short months, the virus has managed to do exactly that what threats of climate change and whatnot have failed to do. Innovations By COVID-19: Corona Unleashes Creative Thinking The world has ground to a halt, with air quality having significantly improved in many countries and water cleaner than it has been in our lifetime. Once Venetians start seeing fish in the crystal-clear canals and Chinese children experience the joy of crisp, fresh air for the first time, it becomes clear that COVID-19 has done more than just unleash horror and death on the world. Recommended:  Lockdown Caused By The Coronavirus: A Relieve For Our Planet No, we are not trying to imply that COVID-19 is a good thing. We are just as worried about the death toll and implications for our society and our economy as the next person. However, it is undeniable that there are some rather unexpected side-effects. Not just the fact that nature and the environment is thriving, but also the innovation that it has unleashed. It has shown that mankind is remarkably resilient and able to make lemonade out of lemons. So, perhaps it is worth celebrating some of those innovations we have seen over the past weeks. Anti-virus snood One of the main messages that is put out is that sneezing or coughing should be covered up as much as possible, as this allows the virus to get airborne and affect others. This is why some clever minds from Manchesters came up with their snood (the lovechild of a scarf and a hat) that is able to trap germs. Photo by: Virustatic Shield. The Virustatic Shield snood  The fabric coating is similar to the carbohydrate structures on the surfaces of the cells covering the oesophagus. Or, put simply, the material functions like a germ-trap the same way flies might get stuck in a fly-trap. As the snood covers not just your mouth and nose but the majority of your face, it catches some 96% of all germs flying around. Recommended:  We Created The Coronavirus: A Milieu Flaw That Will Kill Us Fever-detecting helmets Now, let’s turn from the fashionable to the somewhat creepy. Chinese police agents have been equipped with pretty impressive fever-detecting smart helmets. These helmets feature an infrared temperature detector, coupled with an augmented-reality visor. This means that you are able to look through it at a crowd of people and detect people with a fever, sounding an alarm if one is spotted. Photo by: China News Service. Police officers in Chengdu, China, wearing smart helmets fitted with infrared cameras to detect citizens with high body temperatures It works for people who are up to 5 meters away, allowing officers to scout a pretty large crowd in a relatively short period of time. And, for the creepy part, the augmented reality part and Wi-Fi connection will allow for facial recognition, pulling up the name and relevant medical details for each subject observed. 3D-printed ventilator valves With the virus sweeping across the globe, medical professionals are stressing the importance of ventilators. With only a limited number available and many more people needing them, it is time to start getting creative. The Italian company Isinnova came to the rescue when a hospital sent out a cry for help as they ran out of Venturi valves, used to connect the ventilator to a face mask. Photo by: Filippo Venezia/EPAD. Printed valves help hospitals in Italy keep up with demand.  They decided to reverse engineer the valves before churning it out on a 3D-printer. The prototype was ready within 6 hours, with 100 working valves printed and supplied the following day. After their success, the company went on to 3D-printed adapters that can turn a snorkelling mask into a non-invasive ventilator, to aid in the shortage of oxygen masks. 3D-printed isolation cubes Speaking of shortages, the capacity of most hospitals is close to being exceeded - if it isn’t so already. Patients need to be isolated for long periods of time, slowing patient turnover. In order to come up with more wards for Corona-stricken patients, the Chinese company Winsun turned to its architectural scale 3D-printers to print 15 isolation cubes in a day. Originally designed as holiday homes, the company decided to share them with hospitals to give them some breathing room. The buildings come complete with showers and eco-toilets and are made of recycled materials. Recommended:  Tiny House With Solar Panels Is Off Grid: The Netherlands Photo by: Winsun. 3D-printed isolation wards have been put into use at Xianning Central Hospital, China  Virus testing booths South Korea has become the world’s poster child for Corona virus testing, as it has the highest percentage of tests performed on its population. The way they have done so is remarkable as well: one hospital in Seoul came up with fancy-looking testing booths, allowing medical staff to examine potential patients from behind a plastic panel. These booths resemble phone boxes, which can be pressurised to prevent any particles from escaping. {youtube}                                    Coronavirus: South Korea dials up testing with hospital 'phone booth' | AFP After getting in, patients will be granted a quick consult via intercom, after which a nose and throat swab will be taken using large arm-length rubber gloves built in the panel. After performing the tests, the entire booth can be disinfected and ventilated. Arm door opener As data seems to indicate that the virus can survive on metal surfaces for quite a long period of time, it was only a matter of time before a smart company came up with a way of preventing hand-to-door-opener contact. Belgian company Materialise came up with a hands-free door handle attachment, that can be downloaded for free on their website. Two simple parts can be screwed to the side of the handle, making it easy to open the door using your arm or elbow. Recommended:  Sustainable Great Inventions From Eco-Inventors: Worldwide Photo by: Paolo Vergalito. Materialise Armed and less dangerous … Materialise’s door opener  Virus fighting drones China has finally found a use for its drone army that could be considered innovative. In order to fight the spread of the disease, the tiny flying choppers were equipped with anything from fever-detecting sensors to disinfectant sprayers to loudspeakers to talk to large groups of people. Or they were employed as messengers, to deliver supplies to those in isolation or take test samples to and from the lab as soon as possible. They were combatting the virus faster and more efficient than a person could, while not running the risk of being infected. Recommended:  Drones Safeguarding Your Food: Future Farming Worldwide Photo by: China Daily. Airborne response … a drone sprays disinfectant on streets in China’s Hebei province Before you go! Recommended:  Smart Sustainable Lifestyle Changing Tips & Tricks For 2019 Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about innovations? Click on  'Re g ister'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Innovations By COVID-19: Corona Unleashes Creative Thinking
Mankind Could Disappear Globally But The Earth Will Survive
Mother Nature is one tough cookie. It is one element often overlooked in the current debate on climate change. We all seem so concerned with ‘saving the planet’ and ‘preserving our world for future generations’, that we forget how resilient this very planet might be. The Earth Will Survive In our eagerness to ensure her survival, we somehow convinced ourselves that we are the one thing keeping the planet going. Unfortunately, it is more likely that we need Earth a great deal more than she needs us. Let’s face it, we cannot credit the continued existence of our planet on our valiant efforts to keep her healthy and well. In fact, if we would have accidentally destroyed (parts of) her in the process if it weren’t for a bizarre combination of luck and resilience. Similarly, movies like The Day After Tomorrow have adequately picked up on another not-so-far-from-the-truth sentiment: the planet is actually trying to get rid of us, in a perfectly acceptable example of evolution and survival of the fittest. What is the biggest threat to humanity today? The Cambridge Project at Cambridge University states that the ‘greatest threats’ to the human species are man-made; they are artificial intelligence, global warming, nuclear war, and rogue biotechnology. Recommended:  Climate Change Makes Animals Adapt To Environmental Changes Nature has always recovered remarkably well after being hit hard. Survive and adapt seems to be her motto. Even the events that caused the dinosaurs and all living things on earth to go extinct did not alter her to the point of absolute destruction. Instead, nature picked up the pieces and glued them back together, bouncing back slowly by re-creating life and adapting to altered circumstances. {youtube}                                       What Would Happen If Humans Suddenly Disappeared? | Unveiled Nuclear Disasters: Earth Will Survive, Chernobyl As A Wildlife Refuge Take Chernobyl. An example of one of the worst things that could happen to any world - nuclear impact. Yet when looking at pictures from the exclusion zone, the only thing that can be said is that nature sure seems to be thriving in the absence of human activity. It has only been thirty-some years, making it remarkable how fast nature seems to have bounced back. After a short ten years, surveys demonstrated the existence of nearly identical ecosystems within and outside of the exclusion zone. The animals and plants seemingly adjusted to the radiation levels, quickly adapting to the changing circumstances. When was the last global catastrophe? The most recent and arguably best-known, the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event, which occurred approximately 66 million years ago (Ma), was a large-scale mass extinction of animal and plant species in a geologically short period of time. Recommended:  India’s CO2, Pollution, Artificial Rain: How To Survive? It has spurred research that has since shown that the amount of radiation required to actually damage or alter animal or plant reproduction is quite large - larger than the amount emitted by the Chernobyl disaster. Quite remarkable, considering the ill-effects it has conclusively shown on human beings. The forests in the area have recovered fast and are now thriving with wildlife, while lakes and other bodies of water are filled with healthy fish and insects. Towns have been taken back by nature, leading to surreal post-apocalyptic images of buildings overrun by plants. Recommended:  Regenerative Agriculture: Basics For Safe Food (Part 1 of 3) Thriving Nature After Nuclear Disaster: The earth Will Survive Of course, there are voices claiming that it isn’t all as rosy as some have made it out to be. That the animals are in fact suffering from genetic alterations that will ultimately lead to their demise. Yet the numbers seem to work against them, with the ecosystem within the fallout zone appearing way more robust than most would think. Being hailed as a ‘wildlife heaven’ and an ‘animal refuge’, nature is decidedly thriving. Will the world population decline? The UN as of 2017 predicts a decline of global population growth rate from +1.0% in 2020 to +0.5% in 2050 and to +0.1% in 2100. Randers' 'most likely scenario' predicts a peak in the world population in the early 2040s at about 8.1 billion people, followed by decline. The same could be said for Fukushima, a similarly deserted post-nuclear disaster zone. Even less than a decade after the events that drastically changed the fate of the area, it can be seen how nature thrives. Beautiful forests and grasslands have taken over and have transformed the place, making it seem almost surreal in its pristine beauty. Recommended:  Society Collapse: Climate Change, The Environment Or Us? Wildfires, Drought And Floods: Nature Regulates Itself Nuclear accidents are not the only way in which we accidentally gravely harmed our planet. Other careless forms of behaviour and reckless use of land have teamed up with climate change to present us with a range of challenging natural disasters. Over the past few years, the most notable ones have been wildfires, droughts and floods. Recommended:  Climate Extremes Australia Floods, Wildfires And Destruction We only just recovered from the devastating wildfires in California in the summer of 2018, when something started to burn Down Under. Both events have in common that they combined extreme weather and droughts with human-caused whoopsies. Burning cigarettes being thrown on dry leaves, farmers burning some of their waste, or arsonists deliberately starting bush fires - they have all led to the disastrous fires that destroyed millions of acres of land and ruthlessly killed ecosystems and its inhabitants. What was the worst earthquake in history? The 1960 Valdivia earthquake (Spanish: Terremoto de Valdivia) or the Great Chilean earthquake (Gran terremoto de Chile) on 22 May 1960 is the most powerful earthquake ever recorded. Various studies have placed it at 9.4–9.6 on the moment magnitude scale. Often, the land was already excessively dry from prolonged droughts, which can be blamed on global warming. Similarly, now that vegetation has been burned to the ground, people living in affected areas fear floods. The ground is ‘dead’, thus no longer able to absorb water like it used to, giving free rein to water flows once the rain starts. Earth Will Survive:  Nature Comes Back Stronger These fires seem like a surefire way of wiping out nature (pun fully intended). Yet once again, most will be surprised to find that nature, in a rather cruel twist, will eventually benefit from these disasters. For once, it will allow for a ‘reboot’ of areas that were made vulnerable by overpopulation (of both animals and humans) or artificial land use. Secondly, there is a reason why many farmers burned their land to the ground before using it: it is a proven way of fertilising the lands. Recommended:  Regenerative Farming: Agro-Ecology In Practice (Part 2 of 3) Wildfires are actually a natural occurrence, as they clear the forest floor of dead litter. This allows important nutrients to make their way back into the soil, encouraging new vegetation to grow. There are even some plants that require the fire in order to reproduce: seeds in some pinecones, for instance, are sealed with some kind of resin that melts in a fire. What causes destruction of nature? Habitat destruction by human activity is mainly for the purpose of harvesting natural resources for industrial production and urbanization. Clearing habitats for agriculture is the principal cause of habitat destruction. Other important causes of habitat destruction include mining, logging, trawling, and urban sprawl. There is a caveat, though. There always is. If the fire burns too long and becomes too intense, they will damage the ecosystem beyond repair. This is something that is exclusively caused by human actions, as nature will stop fires once they served their purpose. This means that fires - as well as radiation and pretty much all other damage that we have done to our planet - will only, and only, irreparably impact ecosystems beyond a certain point. Recommended:  Regenerative Agriculture: Its Full Potential (Part 3 of 3) Threshold For Irreparable Damage Is High And even those thresholds, including those ones stipulating the maximum rise in sea level or degrees Celsius allowed if we are to avert the worst consequences of global warming, are more for our sake than for nature’s. We might not survive in the new ecosystem, but fact is that new ecosystems will be created, adapting to the changed circumstances. Nature has a funny way of bouncing back. It’s just the question whether we will be in it. Before you go! Recommended:  Earth Matters. Nature And Us: What Was, What’s Left: Hope? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about nature? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Mother Nature is one tough cookie. It is one element often overlooked in the current debate on climate change. We all seem so concerned with ‘saving the planet’ and ‘preserving our world for future generations’, that we forget how resilient this very planet might be. The Earth Will Survive In our eagerness to ensure her survival, we somehow convinced ourselves that we are the one thing keeping the planet going. Unfortunately, it is more likely that we need Earth a great deal more than she needs us. Let’s face it, we cannot credit the continued existence of our planet on our valiant efforts to keep her healthy and well. In fact, if we would have accidentally destroyed (parts of) her in the process if it weren’t for a bizarre combination of luck and resilience. Similarly, movies like The Day After Tomorrow have adequately picked up on another not-so-far-from-the-truth sentiment: the planet is actually trying to get rid of us, in a perfectly acceptable example of evolution and survival of the fittest. What is the biggest threat to humanity today? The Cambridge Project at Cambridge University states that the ‘greatest threats’ to the human species are man-made; they are artificial intelligence, global warming, nuclear war, and rogue biotechnology. Recommended:  Climate Change Makes Animals Adapt To Environmental Changes Nature has always recovered remarkably well after being hit hard. Survive and adapt seems to be her motto. Even the events that caused the dinosaurs and all living things on earth to go extinct did not alter her to the point of absolute destruction. Instead, nature picked up the pieces and glued them back together, bouncing back slowly by re-creating life and adapting to altered circumstances. {youtube}                                       What Would Happen If Humans Suddenly Disappeared? | Unveiled Nuclear Disasters: Earth Will Survive, Chernobyl As A Wildlife Refuge Take Chernobyl. An example of one of the worst things that could happen to any world - nuclear impact. Yet when looking at pictures from the exclusion zone, the only thing that can be said is that nature sure seems to be thriving in the absence of human activity. It has only been thirty-some years, making it remarkable how fast nature seems to have bounced back. After a short ten years, surveys demonstrated the existence of nearly identical ecosystems within and outside of the exclusion zone. The animals and plants seemingly adjusted to the radiation levels, quickly adapting to the changing circumstances. When was the last global catastrophe? The most recent and arguably best-known, the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event, which occurred approximately 66 million years ago (Ma), was a large-scale mass extinction of animal and plant species in a geologically short period of time. Recommended:  India’s CO2, Pollution, Artificial Rain: How To Survive? It has spurred research that has since shown that the amount of radiation required to actually damage or alter animal or plant reproduction is quite large - larger than the amount emitted by the Chernobyl disaster. Quite remarkable, considering the ill-effects it has conclusively shown on human beings. The forests in the area have recovered fast and are now thriving with wildlife, while lakes and other bodies of water are filled with healthy fish and insects. Towns have been taken back by nature, leading to surreal post-apocalyptic images of buildings overrun by plants. Recommended:  Regenerative Agriculture: Basics For Safe Food (Part 1 of 3) Thriving Nature After Nuclear Disaster: The earth Will Survive Of course, there are voices claiming that it isn’t all as rosy as some have made it out to be. That the animals are in fact suffering from genetic alterations that will ultimately lead to their demise. Yet the numbers seem to work against them, with the ecosystem within the fallout zone appearing way more robust than most would think. Being hailed as a ‘wildlife heaven’ and an ‘animal refuge’, nature is decidedly thriving. Will the world population decline? The UN as of 2017 predicts a decline of global population growth rate from +1.0% in 2020 to +0.5% in 2050 and to +0.1% in 2100. Randers' 'most likely scenario' predicts a peak in the world population in the early 2040s at about 8.1 billion people, followed by decline. The same could be said for Fukushima, a similarly deserted post-nuclear disaster zone. Even less than a decade after the events that drastically changed the fate of the area, it can be seen how nature thrives. Beautiful forests and grasslands have taken over and have transformed the place, making it seem almost surreal in its pristine beauty. Recommended:  Society Collapse: Climate Change, The Environment Or Us? Wildfires, Drought And Floods: Nature Regulates Itself Nuclear accidents are not the only way in which we accidentally gravely harmed our planet. Other careless forms of behaviour and reckless use of land have teamed up with climate change to present us with a range of challenging natural disasters. Over the past few years, the most notable ones have been wildfires, droughts and floods. Recommended:  Climate Extremes Australia Floods, Wildfires And Destruction We only just recovered from the devastating wildfires in California in the summer of 2018, when something started to burn Down Under. Both events have in common that they combined extreme weather and droughts with human-caused whoopsies. Burning cigarettes being thrown on dry leaves, farmers burning some of their waste, or arsonists deliberately starting bush fires - they have all led to the disastrous fires that destroyed millions of acres of land and ruthlessly killed ecosystems and its inhabitants. What was the worst earthquake in history? The 1960 Valdivia earthquake (Spanish: Terremoto de Valdivia) or the Great Chilean earthquake (Gran terremoto de Chile) on 22 May 1960 is the most powerful earthquake ever recorded. Various studies have placed it at 9.4–9.6 on the moment magnitude scale. Often, the land was already excessively dry from prolonged droughts, which can be blamed on global warming. Similarly, now that vegetation has been burned to the ground, people living in affected areas fear floods. The ground is ‘dead’, thus no longer able to absorb water like it used to, giving free rein to water flows once the rain starts. Earth Will Survive:  Nature Comes Back Stronger These fires seem like a surefire way of wiping out nature (pun fully intended). Yet once again, most will be surprised to find that nature, in a rather cruel twist, will eventually benefit from these disasters. For once, it will allow for a ‘reboot’ of areas that were made vulnerable by overpopulation (of both animals and humans) or artificial land use. Secondly, there is a reason why many farmers burned their land to the ground before using it: it is a proven way of fertilising the lands. Recommended:  Regenerative Farming: Agro-Ecology In Practice (Part 2 of 3) Wildfires are actually a natural occurrence, as they clear the forest floor of dead litter. This allows important nutrients to make their way back into the soil, encouraging new vegetation to grow. There are even some plants that require the fire in order to reproduce: seeds in some pinecones, for instance, are sealed with some kind of resin that melts in a fire. What causes destruction of nature? Habitat destruction by human activity is mainly for the purpose of harvesting natural resources for industrial production and urbanization. Clearing habitats for agriculture is the principal cause of habitat destruction. Other important causes of habitat destruction include mining, logging, trawling, and urban sprawl. There is a caveat, though. There always is. If the fire burns too long and becomes too intense, they will damage the ecosystem beyond repair. This is something that is exclusively caused by human actions, as nature will stop fires once they served their purpose. This means that fires - as well as radiation and pretty much all other damage that we have done to our planet - will only, and only, irreparably impact ecosystems beyond a certain point. Recommended:  Regenerative Agriculture: Its Full Potential (Part 3 of 3) Threshold For Irreparable Damage Is High And even those thresholds, including those ones stipulating the maximum rise in sea level or degrees Celsius allowed if we are to avert the worst consequences of global warming, are more for our sake than for nature’s. We might not survive in the new ecosystem, but fact is that new ecosystems will be created, adapting to the changed circumstances. Nature has a funny way of bouncing back. It’s just the question whether we will be in it. Before you go! Recommended:  Earth Matters. Nature And Us: What Was, What’s Left: Hope? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about nature? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Mankind Could Disappear Globally But The Earth Will Survive
The Corona Virus Continued: Will The Weather Help Us Beat It?
Despite many people thinking that they figured it out or that it is clear-cut, the link between the Corona virus and the weather is definitely not clearly established. For once, looking at the world map tracking the spread of the disease, the northern hemisphere seems to have been hit a lot harder than its southern counterpart.   Underdeveloped Health Care Keeping Numbers Down In particular, South America and Africa seem to suffer less. Granted, there have been identified cases on these continents, but the spread and intensity seems to be lower than it is elsewhere. Of course, there are always explanations. One of the more remarkable ones is that perhaps health care is not as developed in those countries, meaning that there might already be a sub-Saharan Corona hotspot that we are simply not aware of yet. Only two countries in Africa have the capacity of testing for Corona, which means that it could already be running rampant, as far as we know. Given the tight relationship between Africa and China, it surely is a possibility. Although there is another, perhaps more appealing, explanation. One that infers that the weather is somehow capable of influencing the virus. President Trump certainly seems to think so, as he claims that the virus is bound to go away in the next month or so, once the weather gets better.   {youtube}                                                             Will Warm Weather Stop the Coronavirus? Corona Season Or All Year Round Disease And as much as I enjoy mocking the United States’ supreme leader, there might be more truth to his words than you might suspect. Looking at the ‘regular’ flu, for instance, it is well-documented that most instances are in the winter months, between October and March. In the spring and summer months, it seems to dissipate. The causes for these typical flu seasons are well-researched. Those who gave it its name, “influenza”, might already have been on to something: this is Italian for influenza di freddo, or influence of the cold. This does not mean that the cold causes the flu. Viruses do. Yet the cold can certainly be a contributing factor. There have been some indications that viruses are able to survive better in colder, drier climates - thriving in European and American winters, and not doing nearly as good in humid, hotter regions. Recomended:  Coronavirus, COV ID-19 Sympto ms F lu And Global Climate Change Correlation Between Weather And Spread Of Viruses For starters, during the winter, people spend more time indoors and in closer proximity to one another. With the windows closed and people huddled together, you are more likely to breathe in the same air - making it easier to contract a virus. At the same time, the shorter days and lack of sunlight decreases our levels of vitamin D and melatonin, which compromises our immune systems and weakens our natural defences. As for the dry air, it has been hypothesised that this correlates with an impairment of the mucus in your nose and throat. This mucus plays a crucial role in catching, trapping and expelling potential viruses that are about to enter your body. Once the air gets colder and drier, the mucus becomes less gooey and thus less efficient, allowing viruses easier access.   These reasons listed above certainly add to the spread of any virus, including the Corona virus. While none of these necessary cause it, they certainly make it a lot easier for any virus to go around. Weather Might Dissipate Corona Virus Faster Than We Can Thus, logic seems to dictate that once the weather gets better, the Corona virus will not stand as much of a chance. People will start going outside more and opening their windows instead of cranking up the heating. Outside, the rays of the sun will provide them with higher amounts of vitamin D and boost their immune system.   The rising humidity will make for healthier and more effective mucus. And finally, the warmer weather will make it harder for the virus to survive outside of their hosts: increased UV light will break down nucleic acid, in doing so, sterilising surfaces and preventing survival. It is not surprising that UV light is often used in hospitals to sterilise equipment. The climate of countries that are hit the hardest, including China, South Korea and Northern Italy, seem to agree with those findings - indicating that they also hold true for the Corona virus. Their current weather is cold and dry, the ideal combination for a rapid spread.   The Jury Is Still Out: Seasonality Debated It is, however, still too early to say how this particular virus will behave in warmer weather. Scientists are unsure and do not dare to claim that warmer weather will wipe out our worries, in line with the reasoning shared above. Yes, the Corona virus and the flu have a lot in common - the symptoms, the way of spreading, the way in which it affects the respiratory system. Yet there have been examples of similar viruses lacking this seasonality. Take SARS and MERS, for instance. Both share more than 90% of their DNA with the ‘regular’ flu. However, SARS was only contained in July 2003, largely thanks to early intervention measures - but after having survived the spring and most of the summer. MERS actually started in regions known for their heat and humidity - most notably the Middle East. Thus, it is hard to argue those are seasonal, which could mean that the Corona virus might be equally resistant to the weather. We Have To Stop The Spread Of The Disease Ourselves Truth is, we cannot say if the weather will help us beat this nasty disease. We have to wait and see how it develops in the next few months, in particular how it will affect the Southern Hemisphere as seasons change. Regardless, we cannot rely on the weather alone, as President Trump might be doing so confidently. We are to take action to prevent a further spread of the disease if we do not want it to turn into a full-blown pandemic.   Thankfully, most countries show very little hesitation when it comes to taking action - even if it means that those actions will severely disrupt daily life and the economy at large. If only we would show the same dedication and vigour when it comes to solving climate change, we would start to get somewhere. Before you go! Recommended:  Smart Sustainable Lifestyle Changing Tips & Tricks For 2019 Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about the coronavirus? Click on  'Re g ister'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Despite many people thinking that they figured it out or that it is clear-cut, the link between the Corona virus and the weather is definitely not clearly established. For once, looking at the world map tracking the spread of the disease, the northern hemisphere seems to have been hit a lot harder than its southern counterpart.   Underdeveloped Health Care Keeping Numbers Down In particular, South America and Africa seem to suffer less. Granted, there have been identified cases on these continents, but the spread and intensity seems to be lower than it is elsewhere. Of course, there are always explanations. One of the more remarkable ones is that perhaps health care is not as developed in those countries, meaning that there might already be a sub-Saharan Corona hotspot that we are simply not aware of yet. Only two countries in Africa have the capacity of testing for Corona, which means that it could already be running rampant, as far as we know. Given the tight relationship between Africa and China, it surely is a possibility. Although there is another, perhaps more appealing, explanation. One that infers that the weather is somehow capable of influencing the virus. President Trump certainly seems to think so, as he claims that the virus is bound to go away in the next month or so, once the weather gets better.   {youtube}                                                             Will Warm Weather Stop the Coronavirus? Corona Season Or All Year Round Disease And as much as I enjoy mocking the United States’ supreme leader, there might be more truth to his words than you might suspect. Looking at the ‘regular’ flu, for instance, it is well-documented that most instances are in the winter months, between October and March. In the spring and summer months, it seems to dissipate. The causes for these typical flu seasons are well-researched. Those who gave it its name, “influenza”, might already have been on to something: this is Italian for influenza di freddo, or influence of the cold. This does not mean that the cold causes the flu. Viruses do. Yet the cold can certainly be a contributing factor. There have been some indications that viruses are able to survive better in colder, drier climates - thriving in European and American winters, and not doing nearly as good in humid, hotter regions. Recomended:  Coronavirus, COV ID-19 Sympto ms F lu And Global Climate Change Correlation Between Weather And Spread Of Viruses For starters, during the winter, people spend more time indoors and in closer proximity to one another. With the windows closed and people huddled together, you are more likely to breathe in the same air - making it easier to contract a virus. At the same time, the shorter days and lack of sunlight decreases our levels of vitamin D and melatonin, which compromises our immune systems and weakens our natural defences. As for the dry air, it has been hypothesised that this correlates with an impairment of the mucus in your nose and throat. This mucus plays a crucial role in catching, trapping and expelling potential viruses that are about to enter your body. Once the air gets colder and drier, the mucus becomes less gooey and thus less efficient, allowing viruses easier access.   These reasons listed above certainly add to the spread of any virus, including the Corona virus. While none of these necessary cause it, they certainly make it a lot easier for any virus to go around. Weather Might Dissipate Corona Virus Faster Than We Can Thus, logic seems to dictate that once the weather gets better, the Corona virus will not stand as much of a chance. People will start going outside more and opening their windows instead of cranking up the heating. Outside, the rays of the sun will provide them with higher amounts of vitamin D and boost their immune system.   The rising humidity will make for healthier and more effective mucus. And finally, the warmer weather will make it harder for the virus to survive outside of their hosts: increased UV light will break down nucleic acid, in doing so, sterilising surfaces and preventing survival. It is not surprising that UV light is often used in hospitals to sterilise equipment. The climate of countries that are hit the hardest, including China, South Korea and Northern Italy, seem to agree with those findings - indicating that they also hold true for the Corona virus. Their current weather is cold and dry, the ideal combination for a rapid spread.   The Jury Is Still Out: Seasonality Debated It is, however, still too early to say how this particular virus will behave in warmer weather. Scientists are unsure and do not dare to claim that warmer weather will wipe out our worries, in line with the reasoning shared above. Yes, the Corona virus and the flu have a lot in common - the symptoms, the way of spreading, the way in which it affects the respiratory system. Yet there have been examples of similar viruses lacking this seasonality. Take SARS and MERS, for instance. Both share more than 90% of their DNA with the ‘regular’ flu. However, SARS was only contained in July 2003, largely thanks to early intervention measures - but after having survived the spring and most of the summer. MERS actually started in regions known for their heat and humidity - most notably the Middle East. Thus, it is hard to argue those are seasonal, which could mean that the Corona virus might be equally resistant to the weather. We Have To Stop The Spread Of The Disease Ourselves Truth is, we cannot say if the weather will help us beat this nasty disease. We have to wait and see how it develops in the next few months, in particular how it will affect the Southern Hemisphere as seasons change. Regardless, we cannot rely on the weather alone, as President Trump might be doing so confidently. We are to take action to prevent a further spread of the disease if we do not want it to turn into a full-blown pandemic.   Thankfully, most countries show very little hesitation when it comes to taking action - even if it means that those actions will severely disrupt daily life and the economy at large. If only we would show the same dedication and vigour when it comes to solving climate change, we would start to get somewhere. Before you go! Recommended:  Smart Sustainable Lifestyle Changing Tips & Tricks For 2019 Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about the coronavirus? Click on  'Re g ister'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
The Corona Virus Continued: Will The Weather Help Us Beat It?
The Corona Virus Continued: Will The Weather Help Us Beat It?
Pandemic and Ecological Reset: The World Green Again
The World Green Again. The aftermath of the coronavirus pandemic written by an 'observer' who lived in the Alps, France in 2024. (fiction) Pandemic and Ecological Reset Many people died of the coronavirus pandemic and this made us see the world differently – finally.  We became convinced that the coronavirus pandemic had taught us that we could not continue our consumption habits – our lifestyle - as we had done before. In May 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic reached its 'first' peak. About a billion people were infected worldwide and 40 million died. In October 2020, researchers found out that the coronavirus would come back as a 'normal' seasonal flu and wreak havoc on infected people every year. Another bad trait was that the coronavirus behaved like the Dengue virus. When people became infected for the second time, the chances of recovery were smaller than the first time. The third time people would get it, it would kill most people. In the winter of 2021, nearly 2 billion people became infected and nearly 100 million died because of the coronavirus pandemic. {youtube}                                                                   What Was the 1918 Influenza Pandemic? Ecological Reset: The Vaccin Fortunately, researchers had found a vaccine made to respond to the natural mutation (s) of the coronavirus. This meant that it worked as a smart vaccine that adapted to a potential new corona variant that was made almost 90% directly immobile by the vaccine. Photo by: Dimitri Houtteman In 2022, half a billion people had died from the new strains of the coronavirus, but new vaccines began to have a visible effect on the number of fatalities. Of course, the economy had slowed since the start of the pandemic in 2020. Air travel had almost come to a complete standstill. The export of goods was limited and social life in any form came to a 'temporary' halt (weeks to six months). Recommended:  Green Trains Or Flying High? Travel The Globe Sustainable The World Green Again All this had a remarkably positive effect on the environment. CO2 in the atmosphere went down so rapidly that it dropped from 414 ppm in 2020 to 380 ppm in 2023. Nature started to recover. People started using their ornamental gardens to grow vegetables, herbs and fruits. all over the world people started to grow their own food. Chickens and other livestock were kept on a small scale and - as in the 1960s - were fed food remnants. Due to power shortages, people used their computers and mobile phones less. Community life began to flourish again. Books were read again and children started playing outside more often. There was much less traffic. Gasoline was limited and sales of 'old-fashioned' bicycles had never been higher. Photo by: NeONBRAND Countries restarted the production of certain goods that they had stopped sometime in the 1980s of the last century because it was cheaper to outsource it to low income countries. But now it was ‘again’ to be more important to be independent from other countries. It was also about the health of the environment, of people, of animals, of ... Recommended:  Society Collapse: Climate Change, The Environment Or Us? Ecological Reset: Savior Of Humanity The coronavirus pandemic turned out to be the savior of humanity and taught us to look at nature differently. All governments worldwide no longer had economic growth as their main focus, but well-being for everyone on our planet. The effects of the coronavirus pandemic are still felt worldwide and will be felt for the next 10 years but it was necessary to save humanity from its own demise. Coverphoto by: Chromatograph Before you go! Recommended:  Coronavirus: What A Blessing For The Planet. Provocative? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about the coronavirus? Click on  'Re g ister'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
The World Green Again. The aftermath of the coronavirus pandemic written by an 'observer' who lived in the Alps, France in 2024. (fiction) Pandemic and Ecological Reset Many people died of the coronavirus pandemic and this made us see the world differently – finally.  We became convinced that the coronavirus pandemic had taught us that we could not continue our consumption habits – our lifestyle - as we had done before. In May 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic reached its 'first' peak. About a billion people were infected worldwide and 40 million died. In October 2020, researchers found out that the coronavirus would come back as a 'normal' seasonal flu and wreak havoc on infected people every year. Another bad trait was that the coronavirus behaved like the Dengue virus. When people became infected for the second time, the chances of recovery were smaller than the first time. The third time people would get it, it would kill most people. In the winter of 2021, nearly 2 billion people became infected and nearly 100 million died because of the coronavirus pandemic. {youtube}                                                                   What Was the 1918 Influenza Pandemic? Ecological Reset: The Vaccin Fortunately, researchers had found a vaccine made to respond to the natural mutation (s) of the coronavirus. This meant that it worked as a smart vaccine that adapted to a potential new corona variant that was made almost 90% directly immobile by the vaccine. Photo by: Dimitri Houtteman In 2022, half a billion people had died from the new strains of the coronavirus, but new vaccines began to have a visible effect on the number of fatalities. Of course, the economy had slowed since the start of the pandemic in 2020. Air travel had almost come to a complete standstill. The export of goods was limited and social life in any form came to a 'temporary' halt (weeks to six months). Recommended:  Green Trains Or Flying High? Travel The Globe Sustainable The World Green Again All this had a remarkably positive effect on the environment. CO2 in the atmosphere went down so rapidly that it dropped from 414 ppm in 2020 to 380 ppm in 2023. Nature started to recover. People started using their ornamental gardens to grow vegetables, herbs and fruits. all over the world people started to grow their own food. Chickens and other livestock were kept on a small scale and - as in the 1960s - were fed food remnants. Due to power shortages, people used their computers and mobile phones less. Community life began to flourish again. Books were read again and children started playing outside more often. There was much less traffic. Gasoline was limited and sales of 'old-fashioned' bicycles had never been higher. Photo by: NeONBRAND Countries restarted the production of certain goods that they had stopped sometime in the 1980s of the last century because it was cheaper to outsource it to low income countries. But now it was ‘again’ to be more important to be independent from other countries. It was also about the health of the environment, of people, of animals, of ... Recommended:  Society Collapse: Climate Change, The Environment Or Us? Ecological Reset: Savior Of Humanity The coronavirus pandemic turned out to be the savior of humanity and taught us to look at nature differently. All governments worldwide no longer had economic growth as their main focus, but well-being for everyone on our planet. The effects of the coronavirus pandemic are still felt worldwide and will be felt for the next 10 years but it was necessary to save humanity from its own demise. Coverphoto by: Chromatograph Before you go! Recommended:  Coronavirus: What A Blessing For The Planet. Provocative? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about the coronavirus? Click on  'Re g ister'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Pandemic and Ecological Reset: The World Green Again
Pandemic and Ecological Reset: The World Green Again
Community

A community is you and me. A network of social, economic, ecological and many other relationships. We all work together and live in urban, suburban and rural areas. Social sustainability is becoming increasingly important on our small planet. We define: support, quality of life, development, adaptation, rights and labour.

We belong to a group of individuals - our society - in which we belong geographically. Certain environmental issues play an important role in our society. Here, sustainable solutions are sought, developed and implemented. This may differ from societies in other countries, but because of our global environmental issues and dependence, we must learn to work more together so that we can all benefit from sharing sustainable knowledge to tackle, for example, climate change.

Green architecture is important. Building with local materials that can be recycled and reused brings us a big step forward to have less impact on the environment. With green architecture we can build smart cities where resources can be used more efficiently and information can be shared, thus improving our society, your community.

Lifestyle is the way we live, the dynamics of personality. Fashion defines our self and together with food it is getting - at present - an even more important role in our society. It's not just about taste, but especially about the burden that the fashion industry, agriculture and the meat industry have on our resources, especially water.

If there was an urge to come up with a sustainable way of living solutions and share these topics globally it’s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about tiny houses, your experiences and expectations for the future at home and globally. 

Global Sustainability X-change, that’s what you can do together with WhatsOrb. What's in for me?

 

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