Community

About: <p>A community is you and me. A network of social, economic, ecological and many other relationships. We all work together and live in urban, suburban and rural areas. Social sustainability is becoming increasingly important on our small planet. We define: support, quality of life, development, adaptation, rights and labour.</p> <p>We belong to a group of individuals - <a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/society">our society</a> - in which we belong geographically. Certain environmental issues play an important role in our society. Here, sustainable solutions are sought, developed and implemented. This may differ from societies in other countries, but because of our global environmental issues and&nbsp;<span lang="en" tabindex="0">dependence</span>, we must learn to work more together so that we can all benefit from sharing sustainable knowledge to tackle, for example, climate change.</p> <p><a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/green-architecture">Green architecture</a> is important. Building with local materials that can be recycled and reused brings us a big step forward to have less impact on the environment. With green architecture we can build <a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/smart-cities">smart cities</a> where resources can be used more efficiently and information can be shared, thus improving our society, your community.</p> <p><a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/lifestyle">Lifestyle</a> is the way we live, the dynamics of personality. Fashion defines our self and together with food it is getting - at present - an even more important role in our society. It's not just about taste, but especially about the burden that the fashion industry, agriculture and the meat industry have on our resources, especially water.</p> <p>If there was an urge to come up with a sustainable way of living solutions and share these topics globally it&rsquo;s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about tiny houses, your experiences and expectations for the future at home and globally.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Global Sustainability X-change, that&rsquo;s what you can do together with WhatsOrb.&nbsp;<a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/newsletter/your-shared-sustainable-ideas-make-our-earth-a-better-place">What's in for me?</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
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Crisis What Crisis: The World Is full Of Opportunities
The corona crisis is making the world 'small,', and many people worry. For many years I - and many around me - have been tense about the future of humanity on our planet Earth. With a crisis like a drought in the Netherlands in 2018, but also in my environment: forest fires, tornadoes, and floods doesn't make my worries less. At the same time harrowing stories of refugees on and about the sea. Crisis What Crisis! I believe we should say goodbye to our current system, where the global economy is predominant. It ensures the exploitation of people, the depletion of natural resources on earth, and unimaginable animal suffering. But how? The film 'Economics Of Happiness' shows it nicely. It exposes how the Ladakhs in India had a great wealth of their own until roads were built and multinationals made their appearance. People mirrored a fictional ideal and became unhappy. What did the Ladakhs do before that they were doing so well together? Things we can do here too? Recommended:  Consumerism In ‘The West’: A Society Built On Exploitation Far from the heat, noise, and chaos, atop India’s snow-capped mountains, I found peace. How did the Ladakhs live before the major roads in the 1980s? They grow their food in fields with an eye for the natural functioning of those fields, and for the ecosystems. Working together is binding. Several generations meet in the area. Care for each other comes up close. They make their clothes, have their music and dance and history. They are proud, not of themselves, but each other. Everyone is seen. There is no competition. Our lives look very different. But what ideas can we draw from their example for our own lives? {youtube}                                                                      The Economics of Happiness  The World Is Full Of Opportunity: How Would Such A Life Look? Because of this Coronavirus period, we are suddenly much more at home. I noticed by the forced sitting at home that there is more rest among the children. Finally, there is time to make the crafts from the craft book, build the hut, or make the birdhouse. They learn fanatically in the morning and continue singing and playing throughout the day. What would it be like if the competition and performance pressure of the school system disappears, and we only learn for ourselves without comparing it with others? And also mainly learn other things? About ecosystems, about caring for each other, making music (own music but more than just the national anthem), about making clothes yourself, baking pots, weaving baskets? What would it be like if there was time for this? What would it be like if we produce food without loss of quality of soil and biodiversity? Wouldn't it be nice if we felt with every harvest that the earth would be better instead of worse? Isn't it useful to pay more attention to everything that happens and is possible in our immediate environment? For example, for agriculture, health care, nature, and the economy within an hour's walk. Recommended:  Smart Communities: Eco-Living Through Technology Opportunities: A Lot Is Already Happening In my immediate vicinity, Eefde and Zutphen, in The Netherlands, there are already many beautiful initiatives to join, which bring us closer to nature and together and reduces our footprint. Some examples: A basic income (a Zutphens initiative) would kick-start the creation of less stress from crowds. Farming together according to permaculture principles, provides income and food for others / a biodiverse environment. You can harvest yourself at the permaculture market garden 'De Veldhof in Joppe.'  You can also find a lot of healthy food in nature. 'Pluk De Stad' visualized it for Zutphen, among others. In Zutphen, ' KratjeLokaal ' delivers local food to your door every week. As a self-employed person, you can work together in various contexts, such as 'The Zutphense Coopkracht.' It ensures that you do not have to do it all alone and that you are also entitled to 'work at home.' Perhaps we should replace the 'healthcare' sector with the social cohesion sector. When people feel seen, less care is proven to be needed. We are used to family living far away, having distant friends, and some closey. We are used to living in subcultures and without much contact with neighbors. There are often significant ideological differences between people on the street. That does not always make it easy. What if we meet each other automatically, for example, at the community garden or 'Animal Meadow Of Eefde? If we learn together, work together, will there be more understanding and mutual respect? And if people still need help despite their social embedding, this can simply come from the neighborhood with Buurtzorg or, for example, Help just home care, a cooperative of self-employed persons. Herbert Nijkamp's flock grazing grass fields and roadsides in Eefde. Children like to watch and play around the herd. Opening roadsides for adaptation is a first step in the municipality of Lochem. For example, no less than 3000 m2 of roadside was sown with flour mixture by all the neighbors of a street. In Zutphen there are also green adoption projects such as the bee garden where people do yoga together, for example. We used to burn coal and wood, then oil and gas came, now we have learned to make energy from wind and sun. Let's take advantage of this, but after we cut back to the max, otherwise, there will be acres of land left. Choose a non-profit, local energy company. They consider energy saving of paramount importance—for example, ZutphenEnergie or LochemEnergie. You are as strong as your ecosystem, so make sure it is robust. De-stone, your garden, give space to flowers and insects. Participate in the construction and maintenance of nature in your area, ensure a lot of neighborhood greenery. Zutphen and Eefdese green initiatives are Emerpark, Gorsselse heather, biodiverse roadsides. It is a lot of fun to make your clothes. A permanent fabric shop can be found in Epse, 'Javro Fabric Market,' but (eco) fabrics are also for sale at the weekly market in Zutphen. There are also several good seamstresses, such as Radijsje in the Laarstraat. Besides, there are many second-hand clothing stores in Laarstraat that reduce the pressure on raw materials. The World: Locally And With Each Other Think in connection with this. You don't have to learn and do it all alone. There are many active people in your immediate environment. There are repair cafes to go to, the Zutphense Energy Shop with energy coaches, gardens where you are welcome on the 'Kaardebol.' There are also various active Facebook groups to join, such as: 'the Zussen van Zutphen' or 'Ruilen and Sell.' Various people are linked here. This also applies to the equally beautiful Zutphen initiative 'Buddy to Buddy', in which asylum seekers get a native buddy. They have been awarded the 'Appeltje van Oranje.' Queen Maxima from the Netherlands and members of 'Budy to Budy' receive the 'Appeltjes van Oranje reward It is possible in Zutphen and Eefde. So it can be done anywhere! By: Tjitske Ypma (on behalf of Stichting de Lynx) Before you go! Recommended:  Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about your community life? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
The corona crisis is making the world 'small,', and many people worry. For many years I - and many around me - have been tense about the future of humanity on our planet Earth. With a crisis like a drought in the Netherlands in 2018, but also in my environment: forest fires, tornadoes, and floods doesn't make my worries less. At the same time harrowing stories of refugees on and about the sea. Crisis What Crisis! I believe we should say goodbye to our current system, where the global economy is predominant. It ensures the exploitation of people, the depletion of natural resources on earth, and unimaginable animal suffering. But how? The film 'Economics Of Happiness' shows it nicely. It exposes how the Ladakhs in India had a great wealth of their own until roads were built and multinationals made their appearance. People mirrored a fictional ideal and became unhappy. What did the Ladakhs do before that they were doing so well together? Things we can do here too? Recommended:  Consumerism In ‘The West’: A Society Built On Exploitation Far from the heat, noise, and chaos, atop India’s snow-capped mountains, I found peace. How did the Ladakhs live before the major roads in the 1980s? They grow their food in fields with an eye for the natural functioning of those fields, and for the ecosystems. Working together is binding. Several generations meet in the area. Care for each other comes up close. They make their clothes, have their music and dance and history. They are proud, not of themselves, but each other. Everyone is seen. There is no competition. Our lives look very different. But what ideas can we draw from their example for our own lives? {youtube}                                                                      The Economics of Happiness  The World Is Full Of Opportunity: How Would Such A Life Look? Because of this Coronavirus period, we are suddenly much more at home. I noticed by the forced sitting at home that there is more rest among the children. Finally, there is time to make the crafts from the craft book, build the hut, or make the birdhouse. They learn fanatically in the morning and continue singing and playing throughout the day. What would it be like if the competition and performance pressure of the school system disappears, and we only learn for ourselves without comparing it with others? And also mainly learn other things? About ecosystems, about caring for each other, making music (own music but more than just the national anthem), about making clothes yourself, baking pots, weaving baskets? What would it be like if there was time for this? What would it be like if we produce food without loss of quality of soil and biodiversity? Wouldn't it be nice if we felt with every harvest that the earth would be better instead of worse? Isn't it useful to pay more attention to everything that happens and is possible in our immediate environment? For example, for agriculture, health care, nature, and the economy within an hour's walk. Recommended:  Smart Communities: Eco-Living Through Technology Opportunities: A Lot Is Already Happening In my immediate vicinity, Eefde and Zutphen, in The Netherlands, there are already many beautiful initiatives to join, which bring us closer to nature and together and reduces our footprint. Some examples: A basic income (a Zutphens initiative) would kick-start the creation of less stress from crowds. Farming together according to permaculture principles, provides income and food for others / a biodiverse environment. You can harvest yourself at the permaculture market garden 'De Veldhof in Joppe.'  You can also find a lot of healthy food in nature. 'Pluk De Stad' visualized it for Zutphen, among others. In Zutphen, ' KratjeLokaal ' delivers local food to your door every week. As a self-employed person, you can work together in various contexts, such as 'The Zutphense Coopkracht.' It ensures that you do not have to do it all alone and that you are also entitled to 'work at home.' Perhaps we should replace the 'healthcare' sector with the social cohesion sector. When people feel seen, less care is proven to be needed. We are used to family living far away, having distant friends, and some closey. We are used to living in subcultures and without much contact with neighbors. There are often significant ideological differences between people on the street. That does not always make it easy. What if we meet each other automatically, for example, at the community garden or 'Animal Meadow Of Eefde? If we learn together, work together, will there be more understanding and mutual respect? And if people still need help despite their social embedding, this can simply come from the neighborhood with Buurtzorg or, for example, Help just home care, a cooperative of self-employed persons. Herbert Nijkamp's flock grazing grass fields and roadsides in Eefde. Children like to watch and play around the herd. Opening roadsides for adaptation is a first step in the municipality of Lochem. For example, no less than 3000 m2 of roadside was sown with flour mixture by all the neighbors of a street. In Zutphen there are also green adoption projects such as the bee garden where people do yoga together, for example. We used to burn coal and wood, then oil and gas came, now we have learned to make energy from wind and sun. Let's take advantage of this, but after we cut back to the max, otherwise, there will be acres of land left. Choose a non-profit, local energy company. They consider energy saving of paramount importance—for example, ZutphenEnergie or LochemEnergie. You are as strong as your ecosystem, so make sure it is robust. De-stone, your garden, give space to flowers and insects. Participate in the construction and maintenance of nature in your area, ensure a lot of neighborhood greenery. Zutphen and Eefdese green initiatives are Emerpark, Gorsselse heather, biodiverse roadsides. It is a lot of fun to make your clothes. A permanent fabric shop can be found in Epse, 'Javro Fabric Market,' but (eco) fabrics are also for sale at the weekly market in Zutphen. There are also several good seamstresses, such as Radijsje in the Laarstraat. Besides, there are many second-hand clothing stores in Laarstraat that reduce the pressure on raw materials. The World: Locally And With Each Other Think in connection with this. You don't have to learn and do it all alone. There are many active people in your immediate environment. There are repair cafes to go to, the Zutphense Energy Shop with energy coaches, gardens where you are welcome on the 'Kaardebol.' There are also various active Facebook groups to join, such as: 'the Zussen van Zutphen' or 'Ruilen and Sell.' Various people are linked here. This also applies to the equally beautiful Zutphen initiative 'Buddy to Buddy', in which asylum seekers get a native buddy. They have been awarded the 'Appeltje van Oranje.' Queen Maxima from the Netherlands and members of 'Budy to Budy' receive the 'Appeltjes van Oranje reward It is possible in Zutphen and Eefde. So it can be done anywhere! By: Tjitske Ypma (on behalf of Stichting de Lynx) Before you go! Recommended:  Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about your community life? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Crisis What Crisis: The World Is full Of Opportunities
Coronavirus: Real-Time Laboratory For Urban Life
A pause has been forced on urban life. Quiet roads, empty skies, deserted high streets and parks, closed cinemas, cafés and museums—a break in the spending and work frenzy so familiar to us all. The reality of lockdown is making ghost towns of the places we once knew. Everything we know about our urban world has come to a shuddering halt. For now. Coronavirus Real-Time LaboratoryLife: Lockdown The lockdown will, at some point, end. Urban life will begin to hum again to the familiar rhythms of work, leisure and shopping. This will be a huge relief for us all. Yet our towns and cities will never be the same. Indeed, things might get worse before they get better. Photo by: Jorge Ramirez But it's also the case that other crises haven't gone away. Our relatively brief lockdown won't solve longer-term urban problems: dependence on fossil fuels, rising carbon emissions, poor air quality, dysfunctional housing markets, loss of biodiversity, divisions between the rich and the poor, low paid work. These are going to need our attention again. Coronavirus: Limits Of Society The coronavirus crisis has offered a new perspective on these problems and the limits of the way we have run our urban world over the last few decades. Cities are key nodes in our complex and highly connected global society, facilitating the rapid flow of people, goods and money, the rise of corporate wealth and the privatisation of land, assets and basic services. This has brought gains for some through foreign travel, an abundance of consumer products, inward investment and steady economic growth. {youtube}                                          Before and after coronavirus - scenes from the world's biggest cities But we are now seeing a flip side to this globalised urban world. A densely connected world can quickly turn a localised disease into a pandemic; large areas of the economy are run by large corporates who don't always meet basic public needs; land and resources can lie empty for years; and low paid workers in the informal or gig economy can be left exposed with little protection. This model has the perfect conditions for creating a crisis like coronavirus. It's also really bad at dealing with it. So something else is required to guide us into the future. The old story—in which cities compete against one another to improve their place in the global pecking order—was never great at meeting everyone's needs. But now it's looking very risky, given the need for increased cooperation and local resilience. After coronavirus, a key question emerges: what in essence, is a city for? Is it to pursue growth, attract inward investment and compete against global rivals? Or is it to maximise quality of life for all, build local resilience and sustainability? These are not always mutually exclusive, but it's a question of regaining balance. Beyond politics and ideology, most people simply want to be safe and healthy, especially faced by future threats, be they climate, weather or virus related. Real-Time Laboratory For Urban Life: Sustainable, Green Over the last 20 years we have been learning what needs to change to make cities more sustainable, green, fair and accessible. Now, the lockdown has thrown us all into a real-time laboratory full of living examples of what a more sustainable future might look like. We have a perfect opportunity to study and explore which of these could be locked in to build sustainable, and safer, cities. Recommended:  Smart Cities, Safe And Efficient, But Are We Being Watched? This has already started. Many things have become possible in the last few weeks. In many places, rapid changes have been unleashed to control the economy, health, transport and food. We are surrounded by fragments of progressive urban policy: eviction cancellations, nationalised services, free transport and healthcare, sick pay and wage guarantees. There is also a flourishing of community-based mutual aid networks as people volunteer to help the most vulnerable with daily tasks. Yesterday's radical ideas are becoming today's pragmatic choices. We can learn a lot from these crisis-led innovations as we create more permanent urban policy choices to make life more pleasant and safer for all. Below a few key areas of city life that are currently providing some options. Urban Life: Breaking Car Dependency Many people around the world are currently surrounded by much quieter streets. This presents us with a huge opportunity to re-imagine and lock in a different kind of urban mobility. Some cities are already doing so: Milan, for example, has announced that it will turn 35km of streets over to cyclists and pedestrians after the crisis. Recommended:  Urban Mobility: The 15 Friendliest Bike Cities In the World Streets with fewer cars have shown people what more liveable, walkable neighbourhoods would look like. When lockdown is over and society returns to the huge task of reducing transport emissions and improving air quality, we need to remember that lower car use quickly became the new normal. This is important. Reducing traffic levels, some say by up to 60% between now and 2030, may be key to avoiding dangerous levels of global warming. As previously outlined, this reduction would address many longstanding urban policy concerns—the erosion of public space, debt, the shift to out of town retail centres and the decline of local high streets, road deaths and casualties, poor air quality and growing carbon emissions. Accessible, affordable, zero-carbon, public transport is key to supporting a less car dependent urban future. This crisis has revealed the significant inequalities in people's ability to move about cities. In many countries, including the UK, deregulation and privatisation has facilitated corporate operators to run bits of the transport system in the interest of shareholders rather than users. Millions face transport poverty, where they can't afford to own and run a car, and lack access to affordable mass transit options. This has taken a new twist during this crisis. For many vulnerable people, whether there is a transit system to access hospitals, food and other essential services can be a matter of life or death. Recommended:  Green Trains Or Flying High? Travel The Globe Sustainable COVID-19 has also highlighted how key workers underpin our daily lives. Creating good quality affordable transport for them is therefore crucial. Some awareness of this existed before coronavirus: in 2018 one French city introduced free buses, while Luxembourg made all its public transport free. But in the wake of the current crisis places across the world have been creating free transit, especially to key workers and for vulnerable people. Photo by: Viktor Forgacs To meet ambitious targets for emission reductions, there needs to be a significant shift away from personal car use within a decade or so. The pandemic has offered insights into how this could be achieved through limiting car use for essential uses and those with mobility issues, with affordable public transport becoming the new norm for most people in cities. Recommended:  Urban Car With Zero Emission, The Air-Powered Car AIRPod 2.0 Building active travel networks across regions also makes more sense than ever. Bikes have been seen by many places as better options for getting around. Walking and cycling infrastructure can play a huge role in getting people around effectively and also making them healthier. The inadequacies of pedestrian space have also been revealed, especially for effective social distancing. To build in future resilience, there's a strong rationale for creating generous pavements and sidewalks that take space from motor vehicles. And, given there are around 6,000 pedestrians killed or seriously injured in road accidents every year in the UK, a roll out of lower speed limits could help reduce hospital admissions and make a contribution in future epidemic management. The lockdown has also brought about significant reductions in air pollution. One study estimated that the lockdown in China saved 77,000 lives just by reducing this pollution. Such reductions are particularly key given that worse air quality could increase the risk of death from COVID-19. Given the health and social care costs associated with dealing with poor air quality, current increases in cleaner air need to be locked in to reduce the burden on health services for the future. Recommended:  India’s CO2, Pollution, Artificial Rain: How To Survive? Aviation has taken a hit, with total flights declining by more than half during the crisis. This offers a glimpse of the types and volumes of flying that might feel surplus to requirements in the future. Cities will need to move quickly to lock in these lower mobility expectations, especially low car volumes, less aviation, quality affordable mass transit and active travel. We are all living the reality of simply travelling less, and shifting activity online. This is a huge opportunity to review working practices, leisure and retail habits, and argue for spending to support affordable and sustainable travel for all. R ecommended:  ‘Flygskam’: The Trend Of Scandinavian Shame Of Flying Coronavirus Real-Time Laboratory: The Socially Useful City We have become used to the shortcomings of the modern city economy—low paid and precarious jobs, independent businesses squeezed out by large corporations, land and resources shifting from private to public hands, growing divisions between rich and poor neighbourhoods. Coronavirus has thrown many of these into stark relief. Recommended:  Pandemic and Ecological Reset: The World Green Again Low earning workers, especially women, have few options but to continue working and be exposed to infection, hospitals struggle for basic equipment, those in higher income neighbourhoods have better spaces for exercise and leisure. But what has been most staggering about the response to the crisis is the rapid uptake of measures that only days ago would have been unthinkable: mortgage and rent holidays, statutory sick pay, shifts to nationalise services especially health and transport, wage guarantees, suspending evictions, and debt cancellations. The current crisis has started to rip up ideas led by the free market. We now seem to be reveling what matters. Rather than being considered low skilled extras on the fringes of the economy, key workers, especially in health and food, are being revered for the role they play in supporting our wellbeing. Local shops are experiencing renewed support as they offer stronger personal connections and commitment to their community. These tendencies are an opportunity to restructure high streets and create diverse local markets which can meet community needs and build resilience to weather future crises. Recommended:  Consumerism In ‘The West’: A Society Built On Exploitation This crisis has also highlighted who has enough money to live on. Beyond government job retention and self-employed income schemes, more radical propositions are emerging that are changing people's relationship to work. A universal basic income is an idea that has come of age during this crisis—an unconditional, automatic non-means tested payment to every individual as a right of citizenship. The Spanish government has agreed to roll out such a scheme nationally as soon as possible, and there is sustained interest in many other places. The idea of a minimum income guarantee is also gaining momentum; a renewed interest in the idea of a universal and unconditional safety net that can offer dignity and safety and offer options for more sustainable living. The social economy can provide further insights for refocusing city economies after coronavirus. Made up of community businesses, co-operatives and voluntary organisations, this social economy creates goods, services and employment that are more locally based, and community grounded in a range of areas: renewable energy, sustainable housing, food and micro finance. They build in benefits including local employment and procurement, fairer pay, better conditions, sustainable resource use, democratic accountability, and a commitment to social justice. Derelict buildings and land banked by large scale developers could be redeployed by community organisations to build local resilience through community farms, renewables and housing, as well as leisure, local biodiversity and carbon storage. Recommended:  Smart Communities: Eco-Living Through Technology It's also clear that parts of the economy, such as gambling and advertising corporations, bailiffs and corporate lobbyists, are less socially useful than others. There are signs of how the economy can change in positive directions. Many firms are temporarily shifting to more socially useful production, making, for example, hand sanitiser, ventilators and medical wear. These short term glimpses of a more socially useful economy should provide inspiration when considering future urban economic planning. Factories might transition to manufacturing wind turbines, e-bikes, insulation panels and heat pumps. And excess downtown corporate office space or luxury apartments could be retrofitted to support socially useful activities—key worker accommodation, libraries, creches, day centres, colleges for transition skills, and co-working spaces. Real-Time Laboratory: Green Urban Commons Further greening of cities after coronavirus would offer real and widespread benefits. During lockdown, many people are more aware how little green space they have access to on their doorsteps. Many are also stuck in cramped conditions with little or no access to outdoor spaces. Recommended:  Green Urban Sustainable Project: Marine One In Singapore Quality public and green places need to be radically expanded so people can gather and heal after the trauma of this experience. Now is a good time to supercharge such plans. Diverse green spaces directly underpin our emotional and psychological wellbeing and offer a range of positive effects on carbon sequestration, air purification and wildlife preservation. Neighbourhood design inspired by nature can support this. Interweaving the places we live with extensive natural spaces linked to active travel opportunities can reduce car dependency, increase biodiversity and create options for meaningful leisure on our doorsteps. They can also incorporate local food production and features to cope with flooding, such as sustainable urban drainage and water gardens, further increasing future crisis resilience. There's also a strong rationale for prioritising street-by-street retrofit. In the event of future lockdowns during cold months, warm, low energy and well insulated homes can help reduce other problems around fuel poverty and excess winter deaths. This moment offers a real opportunity to lay the foundations for a new deal for nature and animals. This is more important now than ever. Animals and wildlife, normally in rapid decline, are finding ways to regain a foothold in this respite of human activity—but they may be further threatened when lockdown comes to an end. Ways to create a more equal balance with our fellow species include expanding habitats for wildlife, restoring damaged natural areas, reducing dependency on intensive animal farming as well as meat-based diets. In addition, researchers are starting to understand how zoonotic diseases (those transferred from animals to humans) like COVID-19 may be a hidden outcome of the global scale of human development. A recent report by the UN Environment Programme explored how the rapid growth of urban populations across the world along with reductions in pristine ecosystems, are creating opportunities for pathogens to pass between animals and people. Regenerating and protecting natural spaces could be a key part of future disease resilience. Coronavirus: What Next? COVID-19 clearly presents a significant juncture. There is still trauma and loss ahead. There may be market collapse and a prolonged depression. There are also tendencies towards political and corporate bodies exploiting this crisis for their own ends. Empty restaurant during the coronavirus Recommended:  Climate Change: Cause Of The Next Global Economic Collapse For our urban world this could mean more of the negatives discussed earlier—insecurity, privatisation, division and authoritarianism. And as lockdown ends, there may be a rebound effect, as people understandably rush to embrace travel, work and consumerism, creating a significant emissions and pollution surge. No particular urban future is inevitable. The future story, and reality, of our towns and cities is up for grabs. The positives that are glimpsed during this crisis could feasibly be locked in and scaled up to create a fairer, greener, safer urban future. We can all live well, and even flourish, in cities even if we have and do a little bit less of the things we have become used to. Revaluing what's important—community, friendship, family life—allows us to see how much we already have that can improve our wellbeing. Recommended:  Earth Matters. Nature And Us: What Was, What’s Left: Hope? Often ideas start to converge under a single banner. Many in this article can be understood through the idea of the Green New Deal – a proposed set of policies to tackle climate change and inequality, create good jobs and protect nature. It's an approach which has a lot to offer cities after this coronavirus crisis. It points to an urban economy based on key foundations of public services, an economy operating within the ecological limits of our precious biosphere, with a social safety net for all. These ideas are now being seriously considered by some cities, such as Amsterdam, as they think about how to rebuild their economies. How city governance responds in this crisis and afterwards will be key. There will certainly be a much bigger role for the state, and this might be more authoritarian as recent emergency powers over border controls, surveillance and enforced quarantines attest. But there is a way of countering these tendencies—by creating an enabling, responsive, participatory state where solutions are reached with citizens, rather than imposed on them. A meaningful state-civil society contract means the state can act powerfully but also take the side of citizens, through, for example shifting assets, resources, taxes and welfare in their favour. We are seeing glimpses of this already through a new municiaplism, with Barcelona as one of the leading examples. It's difficult to predict how things will actually turn out in such a fast moving environment. What I have presented here are some glimpses of doable, commonsense actions that could be used to build sustainable cities out of the coronavirus crisis. Real-Time Laboratory For Urban Life: Ten Ideas To Improve Cities These can be summed up in ten ideas that cities could implement after this crisis: Reallocate road space for daily exercise and active travel Subsidise free buses for key workers, and re-regulate public transport to create affordable, zero-carbon mass transit Trial wage guarantee or basic income schemes to make sure no one is left behind Shift subsidies to promote socially useful production Plan to ensure homes are warm and comfortable for any future crises Allocate unused land for exercise, leisure, wildlife and biodiversity Support community businesses and provide land to increase the supply of local food Commit to speed reductions to reduce deaths and ease the strain on health services Create more support for local businesses and invest in local shops and high streets Use indicators to count the things that matter, especially unpaid care work, key workers, quality of life, and environmental protection. Before you go! Recommended:  Rooftop Garden: Sustainable Urban Agriculture Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about life after the cronavirus? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
A pause has been forced on urban life. Quiet roads, empty skies, deserted high streets and parks, closed cinemas, cafés and museums—a break in the spending and work frenzy so familiar to us all. The reality of lockdown is making ghost towns of the places we once knew. Everything we know about our urban world has come to a shuddering halt. For now. Coronavirus Real-Time LaboratoryLife: Lockdown The lockdown will, at some point, end. Urban life will begin to hum again to the familiar rhythms of work, leisure and shopping. This will be a huge relief for us all. Yet our towns and cities will never be the same. Indeed, things might get worse before they get better. Photo by: Jorge Ramirez But it's also the case that other crises haven't gone away. Our relatively brief lockdown won't solve longer-term urban problems: dependence on fossil fuels, rising carbon emissions, poor air quality, dysfunctional housing markets, loss of biodiversity, divisions between the rich and the poor, low paid work. These are going to need our attention again. Coronavirus: Limits Of Society The coronavirus crisis has offered a new perspective on these problems and the limits of the way we have run our urban world over the last few decades. Cities are key nodes in our complex and highly connected global society, facilitating the rapid flow of people, goods and money, the rise of corporate wealth and the privatisation of land, assets and basic services. This has brought gains for some through foreign travel, an abundance of consumer products, inward investment and steady economic growth. {youtube}                                          Before and after coronavirus - scenes from the world's biggest cities But we are now seeing a flip side to this globalised urban world. A densely connected world can quickly turn a localised disease into a pandemic; large areas of the economy are run by large corporates who don't always meet basic public needs; land and resources can lie empty for years; and low paid workers in the informal or gig economy can be left exposed with little protection. This model has the perfect conditions for creating a crisis like coronavirus. It's also really bad at dealing with it. So something else is required to guide us into the future. The old story—in which cities compete against one another to improve their place in the global pecking order—was never great at meeting everyone's needs. But now it's looking very risky, given the need for increased cooperation and local resilience. After coronavirus, a key question emerges: what in essence, is a city for? Is it to pursue growth, attract inward investment and compete against global rivals? Or is it to maximise quality of life for all, build local resilience and sustainability? These are not always mutually exclusive, but it's a question of regaining balance. Beyond politics and ideology, most people simply want to be safe and healthy, especially faced by future threats, be they climate, weather or virus related. Real-Time Laboratory For Urban Life: Sustainable, Green Over the last 20 years we have been learning what needs to change to make cities more sustainable, green, fair and accessible. Now, the lockdown has thrown us all into a real-time laboratory full of living examples of what a more sustainable future might look like. We have a perfect opportunity to study and explore which of these could be locked in to build sustainable, and safer, cities. Recommended:  Smart Cities, Safe And Efficient, But Are We Being Watched? This has already started. Many things have become possible in the last few weeks. In many places, rapid changes have been unleashed to control the economy, health, transport and food. We are surrounded by fragments of progressive urban policy: eviction cancellations, nationalised services, free transport and healthcare, sick pay and wage guarantees. There is also a flourishing of community-based mutual aid networks as people volunteer to help the most vulnerable with daily tasks. Yesterday's radical ideas are becoming today's pragmatic choices. We can learn a lot from these crisis-led innovations as we create more permanent urban policy choices to make life more pleasant and safer for all. Below a few key areas of city life that are currently providing some options. Urban Life: Breaking Car Dependency Many people around the world are currently surrounded by much quieter streets. This presents us with a huge opportunity to re-imagine and lock in a different kind of urban mobility. Some cities are already doing so: Milan, for example, has announced that it will turn 35km of streets over to cyclists and pedestrians after the crisis. Recommended:  Urban Mobility: The 15 Friendliest Bike Cities In the World Streets with fewer cars have shown people what more liveable, walkable neighbourhoods would look like. When lockdown is over and society returns to the huge task of reducing transport emissions and improving air quality, we need to remember that lower car use quickly became the new normal. This is important. Reducing traffic levels, some say by up to 60% between now and 2030, may be key to avoiding dangerous levels of global warming. As previously outlined, this reduction would address many longstanding urban policy concerns—the erosion of public space, debt, the shift to out of town retail centres and the decline of local high streets, road deaths and casualties, poor air quality and growing carbon emissions. Accessible, affordable, zero-carbon, public transport is key to supporting a less car dependent urban future. This crisis has revealed the significant inequalities in people's ability to move about cities. In many countries, including the UK, deregulation and privatisation has facilitated corporate operators to run bits of the transport system in the interest of shareholders rather than users. Millions face transport poverty, where they can't afford to own and run a car, and lack access to affordable mass transit options. This has taken a new twist during this crisis. For many vulnerable people, whether there is a transit system to access hospitals, food and other essential services can be a matter of life or death. Recommended:  Green Trains Or Flying High? Travel The Globe Sustainable COVID-19 has also highlighted how key workers underpin our daily lives. Creating good quality affordable transport for them is therefore crucial. Some awareness of this existed before coronavirus: in 2018 one French city introduced free buses, while Luxembourg made all its public transport free. But in the wake of the current crisis places across the world have been creating free transit, especially to key workers and for vulnerable people. Photo by: Viktor Forgacs To meet ambitious targets for emission reductions, there needs to be a significant shift away from personal car use within a decade or so. The pandemic has offered insights into how this could be achieved through limiting car use for essential uses and those with mobility issues, with affordable public transport becoming the new norm for most people in cities. Recommended:  Urban Car With Zero Emission, The Air-Powered Car AIRPod 2.0 Building active travel networks across regions also makes more sense than ever. Bikes have been seen by many places as better options for getting around. Walking and cycling infrastructure can play a huge role in getting people around effectively and also making them healthier. The inadequacies of pedestrian space have also been revealed, especially for effective social distancing. To build in future resilience, there's a strong rationale for creating generous pavements and sidewalks that take space from motor vehicles. And, given there are around 6,000 pedestrians killed or seriously injured in road accidents every year in the UK, a roll out of lower speed limits could help reduce hospital admissions and make a contribution in future epidemic management. The lockdown has also brought about significant reductions in air pollution. One study estimated that the lockdown in China saved 77,000 lives just by reducing this pollution. Such reductions are particularly key given that worse air quality could increase the risk of death from COVID-19. Given the health and social care costs associated with dealing with poor air quality, current increases in cleaner air need to be locked in to reduce the burden on health services for the future. Recommended:  India’s CO2, Pollution, Artificial Rain: How To Survive? Aviation has taken a hit, with total flights declining by more than half during the crisis. This offers a glimpse of the types and volumes of flying that might feel surplus to requirements in the future. Cities will need to move quickly to lock in these lower mobility expectations, especially low car volumes, less aviation, quality affordable mass transit and active travel. We are all living the reality of simply travelling less, and shifting activity online. This is a huge opportunity to review working practices, leisure and retail habits, and argue for spending to support affordable and sustainable travel for all. R ecommended:  ‘Flygskam’: The Trend Of Scandinavian Shame Of Flying Coronavirus Real-Time Laboratory: The Socially Useful City We have become used to the shortcomings of the modern city economy—low paid and precarious jobs, independent businesses squeezed out by large corporations, land and resources shifting from private to public hands, growing divisions between rich and poor neighbourhoods. Coronavirus has thrown many of these into stark relief. Recommended:  Pandemic and Ecological Reset: The World Green Again Low earning workers, especially women, have few options but to continue working and be exposed to infection, hospitals struggle for basic equipment, those in higher income neighbourhoods have better spaces for exercise and leisure. But what has been most staggering about the response to the crisis is the rapid uptake of measures that only days ago would have been unthinkable: mortgage and rent holidays, statutory sick pay, shifts to nationalise services especially health and transport, wage guarantees, suspending evictions, and debt cancellations. The current crisis has started to rip up ideas led by the free market. We now seem to be reveling what matters. Rather than being considered low skilled extras on the fringes of the economy, key workers, especially in health and food, are being revered for the role they play in supporting our wellbeing. Local shops are experiencing renewed support as they offer stronger personal connections and commitment to their community. These tendencies are an opportunity to restructure high streets and create diverse local markets which can meet community needs and build resilience to weather future crises. Recommended:  Consumerism In ‘The West’: A Society Built On Exploitation This crisis has also highlighted who has enough money to live on. Beyond government job retention and self-employed income schemes, more radical propositions are emerging that are changing people's relationship to work. A universal basic income is an idea that has come of age during this crisis—an unconditional, automatic non-means tested payment to every individual as a right of citizenship. The Spanish government has agreed to roll out such a scheme nationally as soon as possible, and there is sustained interest in many other places. The idea of a minimum income guarantee is also gaining momentum; a renewed interest in the idea of a universal and unconditional safety net that can offer dignity and safety and offer options for more sustainable living. The social economy can provide further insights for refocusing city economies after coronavirus. Made up of community businesses, co-operatives and voluntary organisations, this social economy creates goods, services and employment that are more locally based, and community grounded in a range of areas: renewable energy, sustainable housing, food and micro finance. They build in benefits including local employment and procurement, fairer pay, better conditions, sustainable resource use, democratic accountability, and a commitment to social justice. Derelict buildings and land banked by large scale developers could be redeployed by community organisations to build local resilience through community farms, renewables and housing, as well as leisure, local biodiversity and carbon storage. Recommended:  Smart Communities: Eco-Living Through Technology It's also clear that parts of the economy, such as gambling and advertising corporations, bailiffs and corporate lobbyists, are less socially useful than others. There are signs of how the economy can change in positive directions. Many firms are temporarily shifting to more socially useful production, making, for example, hand sanitiser, ventilators and medical wear. These short term glimpses of a more socially useful economy should provide inspiration when considering future urban economic planning. Factories might transition to manufacturing wind turbines, e-bikes, insulation panels and heat pumps. And excess downtown corporate office space or luxury apartments could be retrofitted to support socially useful activities—key worker accommodation, libraries, creches, day centres, colleges for transition skills, and co-working spaces. Real-Time Laboratory: Green Urban Commons Further greening of cities after coronavirus would offer real and widespread benefits. During lockdown, many people are more aware how little green space they have access to on their doorsteps. Many are also stuck in cramped conditions with little or no access to outdoor spaces. Recommended:  Green Urban Sustainable Project: Marine One In Singapore Quality public and green places need to be radically expanded so people can gather and heal after the trauma of this experience. Now is a good time to supercharge such plans. Diverse green spaces directly underpin our emotional and psychological wellbeing and offer a range of positive effects on carbon sequestration, air purification and wildlife preservation. Neighbourhood design inspired by nature can support this. Interweaving the places we live with extensive natural spaces linked to active travel opportunities can reduce car dependency, increase biodiversity and create options for meaningful leisure on our doorsteps. They can also incorporate local food production and features to cope with flooding, such as sustainable urban drainage and water gardens, further increasing future crisis resilience. There's also a strong rationale for prioritising street-by-street retrofit. In the event of future lockdowns during cold months, warm, low energy and well insulated homes can help reduce other problems around fuel poverty and excess winter deaths. This moment offers a real opportunity to lay the foundations for a new deal for nature and animals. This is more important now than ever. Animals and wildlife, normally in rapid decline, are finding ways to regain a foothold in this respite of human activity—but they may be further threatened when lockdown comes to an end. Ways to create a more equal balance with our fellow species include expanding habitats for wildlife, restoring damaged natural areas, reducing dependency on intensive animal farming as well as meat-based diets. In addition, researchers are starting to understand how zoonotic diseases (those transferred from animals to humans) like COVID-19 may be a hidden outcome of the global scale of human development. A recent report by the UN Environment Programme explored how the rapid growth of urban populations across the world along with reductions in pristine ecosystems, are creating opportunities for pathogens to pass between animals and people. Regenerating and protecting natural spaces could be a key part of future disease resilience. Coronavirus: What Next? COVID-19 clearly presents a significant juncture. There is still trauma and loss ahead. There may be market collapse and a prolonged depression. There are also tendencies towards political and corporate bodies exploiting this crisis for their own ends. Empty restaurant during the coronavirus Recommended:  Climate Change: Cause Of The Next Global Economic Collapse For our urban world this could mean more of the negatives discussed earlier—insecurity, privatisation, division and authoritarianism. And as lockdown ends, there may be a rebound effect, as people understandably rush to embrace travel, work and consumerism, creating a significant emissions and pollution surge. No particular urban future is inevitable. The future story, and reality, of our towns and cities is up for grabs. The positives that are glimpsed during this crisis could feasibly be locked in and scaled up to create a fairer, greener, safer urban future. We can all live well, and even flourish, in cities even if we have and do a little bit less of the things we have become used to. Revaluing what's important—community, friendship, family life—allows us to see how much we already have that can improve our wellbeing. Recommended:  Earth Matters. Nature And Us: What Was, What’s Left: Hope? Often ideas start to converge under a single banner. Many in this article can be understood through the idea of the Green New Deal – a proposed set of policies to tackle climate change and inequality, create good jobs and protect nature. It's an approach which has a lot to offer cities after this coronavirus crisis. It points to an urban economy based on key foundations of public services, an economy operating within the ecological limits of our precious biosphere, with a social safety net for all. These ideas are now being seriously considered by some cities, such as Amsterdam, as they think about how to rebuild their economies. How city governance responds in this crisis and afterwards will be key. There will certainly be a much bigger role for the state, and this might be more authoritarian as recent emergency powers over border controls, surveillance and enforced quarantines attest. But there is a way of countering these tendencies—by creating an enabling, responsive, participatory state where solutions are reached with citizens, rather than imposed on them. A meaningful state-civil society contract means the state can act powerfully but also take the side of citizens, through, for example shifting assets, resources, taxes and welfare in their favour. We are seeing glimpses of this already through a new municiaplism, with Barcelona as one of the leading examples. It's difficult to predict how things will actually turn out in such a fast moving environment. What I have presented here are some glimpses of doable, commonsense actions that could be used to build sustainable cities out of the coronavirus crisis. Real-Time Laboratory For Urban Life: Ten Ideas To Improve Cities These can be summed up in ten ideas that cities could implement after this crisis: Reallocate road space for daily exercise and active travel Subsidise free buses for key workers, and re-regulate public transport to create affordable, zero-carbon mass transit Trial wage guarantee or basic income schemes to make sure no one is left behind Shift subsidies to promote socially useful production Plan to ensure homes are warm and comfortable for any future crises Allocate unused land for exercise, leisure, wildlife and biodiversity Support community businesses and provide land to increase the supply of local food Commit to speed reductions to reduce deaths and ease the strain on health services Create more support for local businesses and invest in local shops and high streets Use indicators to count the things that matter, especially unpaid care work, key workers, quality of life, and environmental protection. Before you go! Recommended:  Rooftop Garden: Sustainable Urban Agriculture Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about life after the cronavirus? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Coronavirus: Real-Time Laboratory For Urban Life
Coronavirus: Real-Time Laboratory For Urban Life
Coronavirus 2020: Best Photo
First of all, I want to wish you all the very best in these difficult times. Humanity has entered unknown territory. Only by working together and exchanging information in the field of research into the origin and control of the coronavurus we can find a solution. Best Photos 2020: Coronavirus Images From Around The Globe Below is a selection of images from the media globally to show that we are 'for the first time' together in a struggle against a common 'opponent'.  Coronavirus 2020: Best Photo's At A Glance   Coronavirus 2020: Best Photo's At A Glance Coronavirus 2020: Best Photo's At A Glance   {youtube}                                                              Coronavirus Message From Around The Globe Coronavirus 2020: Best Photo's At A Glance   Coronavirus 2020: Best Photo's At A Glance   Coronavirus 2020: Best Photo's At A Glance     Coronavirus 2020: Best Photo's At A Glance   Coronavirus 2020: Best Photo's At A Glance   Coronavirus 2020: Best Photo's At A Glance   Coronavirus 2020: Best Photo's At A Glance   Coronavirus 2020: Best Photo's At A Glance           Coronavirus 2020: Best Photo's At A Glance                                                     All photos: The Guardian Before you go! Recommended:  Virus, Bacteria, Fungi: Tiny Organisms Will Save Us Globally Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about the coronavirus? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
First of all, I want to wish you all the very best in these difficult times. Humanity has entered unknown territory. Only by working together and exchanging information in the field of research into the origin and control of the coronavurus we can find a solution. Best Photos 2020: Coronavirus Images From Around The Globe Below is a selection of images from the media globally to show that we are 'for the first time' together in a struggle against a common 'opponent'.  Coronavirus 2020: Best Photo's At A Glance   Coronavirus 2020: Best Photo's At A Glance Coronavirus 2020: Best Photo's At A Glance   {youtube}                                                              Coronavirus Message From Around The Globe Coronavirus 2020: Best Photo's At A Glance   Coronavirus 2020: Best Photo's At A Glance   Coronavirus 2020: Best Photo's At A Glance     Coronavirus 2020: Best Photo's At A Glance   Coronavirus 2020: Best Photo's At A Glance   Coronavirus 2020: Best Photo's At A Glance   Coronavirus 2020: Best Photo's At A Glance   Coronavirus 2020: Best Photo's At A Glance           Coronavirus 2020: Best Photo's At A Glance                                                     All photos: The Guardian Before you go! Recommended:  Virus, Bacteria, Fungi: Tiny Organisms Will Save Us Globally Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about the coronavirus? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Coronavirus 2020: Best Photo
Coronavirus 2020: Best Photo's At A Glance
Innovations By COVID-19: Corona Unleashes Creative Thinking
It has already been said by many. COVID-19, better known as the Corona virus, has a seriously impressive track record. Not only for its speed in trapping the world in a pandemic modern times have never seen, but also for its impact on society. In only a few short months, the virus has managed to do exactly that what threats of climate change and whatnot have failed to do. Innovations By COVID-19: Corona Unleashes Creative Thinking The world has ground to a halt, with air quality having significantly improved in many countries and water cleaner than it has been in our lifetime. Once Venetians start seeing fish in the crystal-clear canals and Chinese children experience the joy of crisp, fresh air for the first time, it becomes clear that COVID-19 has done more than just unleash horror and death on the world. Recommended:  Lockdown Caused By The Coronavirus: A Relieve For Our Planet No, we are not trying to imply that COVID-19 is a good thing. We are just as worried about the death toll and implications for our society and our economy as the next person. However, it is undeniable that there are some rather unexpected side-effects. Not just the fact that nature and the environment is thriving, but also the innovation that it has unleashed. It has shown that mankind is remarkably resilient and able to make lemonade out of lemons. So, perhaps it is worth celebrating some of those innovations we have seen over the past weeks. Anti-virus snood One of the main messages that is put out is that sneezing or coughing should be covered up as much as possible, as this allows the virus to get airborne and affect others. This is why some clever minds from Manchesters came up with their snood (the lovechild of a scarf and a hat) that is able to trap germs. Photo by: Virustatic Shield. The Virustatic Shield snood  The fabric coating is similar to the carbohydrate structures on the surfaces of the cells covering the oesophagus. Or, put simply, the material functions like a germ-trap the same way flies might get stuck in a fly-trap. As the snood covers not just your mouth and nose but the majority of your face, it catches some 96% of all germs flying around. Recommended:  We Created The Coronavirus: A Milieu Flaw That Will Kill Us Fever-detecting helmets Now, let’s turn from the fashionable to the somewhat creepy. Chinese police agents have been equipped with pretty impressive fever-detecting smart helmets. These helmets feature an infrared temperature detector, coupled with an augmented-reality visor. This means that you are able to look through it at a crowd of people and detect people with a fever, sounding an alarm if one is spotted. Photo by: China News Service. Police officers in Chengdu, China, wearing smart helmets fitted with infrared cameras to detect citizens with high body temperatures It works for people who are up to 5 meters away, allowing officers to scout a pretty large crowd in a relatively short period of time. And, for the creepy part, the augmented reality part and Wi-Fi connection will allow for facial recognition, pulling up the name and relevant medical details for each subject observed. 3D-printed ventilator valves With the virus sweeping across the globe, medical professionals are stressing the importance of ventilators. With only a limited number available and many more people needing them, it is time to start getting creative. The Italian company Isinnova came to the rescue when a hospital sent out a cry for help as they ran out of Venturi valves, used to connect the ventilator to a face mask. Photo by: Filippo Venezia/EPAD. Printed valves help hospitals in Italy keep up with demand.  They decided to reverse engineer the valves before churning it out on a 3D-printer. The prototype was ready within 6 hours, with 100 working valves printed and supplied the following day. After their success, the company went on to 3D-printed adapters that can turn a snorkelling mask into a non-invasive ventilator, to aid in the shortage of oxygen masks. 3D-printed isolation cubes Speaking of shortages, the capacity of most hospitals is close to being exceeded - if it isn’t so already. Patients need to be isolated for long periods of time, slowing patient turnover. In order to come up with more wards for Corona-stricken patients, the Chinese company Winsun turned to its architectural scale 3D-printers to print 15 isolation cubes in a day. Originally designed as holiday homes, the company decided to share them with hospitals to give them some breathing room. The buildings come complete with showers and eco-toilets and are made of recycled materials. Recommended:  Tiny House With Solar Panels Is Off Grid: The Netherlands Photo by: Winsun. 3D-printed isolation wards have been put into use at Xianning Central Hospital, China  Virus testing booths South Korea has become the world’s poster child for Corona virus testing, as it has the highest percentage of tests performed on its population. The way they have done so is remarkable as well: one hospital in Seoul came up with fancy-looking testing booths, allowing medical staff to examine potential patients from behind a plastic panel. These booths resemble phone boxes, which can be pressurised to prevent any particles from escaping. {youtube}                                    Coronavirus: South Korea dials up testing with hospital 'phone booth' | AFP After getting in, patients will be granted a quick consult via intercom, after which a nose and throat swab will be taken using large arm-length rubber gloves built in the panel. After performing the tests, the entire booth can be disinfected and ventilated. Arm door opener As data seems to indicate that the virus can survive on metal surfaces for quite a long period of time, it was only a matter of time before a smart company came up with a way of preventing hand-to-door-opener contact. Belgian company Materialise came up with a hands-free door handle attachment, that can be downloaded for free on their website. Two simple parts can be screwed to the side of the handle, making it easy to open the door using your arm or elbow. Recommended:  Sustainable Great Inventions From Eco-Inventors: Worldwide Photo by: Paolo Vergalito. Materialise Armed and less dangerous … Materialise’s door opener  Virus fighting drones China has finally found a use for its drone army that could be considered innovative. In order to fight the spread of the disease, the tiny flying choppers were equipped with anything from fever-detecting sensors to disinfectant sprayers to loudspeakers to talk to large groups of people. Or they were employed as messengers, to deliver supplies to those in isolation or take test samples to and from the lab as soon as possible. They were combatting the virus faster and more efficient than a person could, while not running the risk of being infected. Recommended:  Drones Safeguarding Your Food: Future Farming Worldwide Photo by: China Daily. Airborne response … a drone sprays disinfectant on streets in China’s Hebei province Before you go! Recommended:  Smart Sustainable Lifestyle Changing Tips & Tricks For 2019 Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about innovations? Click on  'Re g ister'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
It has already been said by many. COVID-19, better known as the Corona virus, has a seriously impressive track record. Not only for its speed in trapping the world in a pandemic modern times have never seen, but also for its impact on society. In only a few short months, the virus has managed to do exactly that what threats of climate change and whatnot have failed to do. Innovations By COVID-19: Corona Unleashes Creative Thinking The world has ground to a halt, with air quality having significantly improved in many countries and water cleaner than it has been in our lifetime. Once Venetians start seeing fish in the crystal-clear canals and Chinese children experience the joy of crisp, fresh air for the first time, it becomes clear that COVID-19 has done more than just unleash horror and death on the world. Recommended:  Lockdown Caused By The Coronavirus: A Relieve For Our Planet No, we are not trying to imply that COVID-19 is a good thing. We are just as worried about the death toll and implications for our society and our economy as the next person. However, it is undeniable that there are some rather unexpected side-effects. Not just the fact that nature and the environment is thriving, but also the innovation that it has unleashed. It has shown that mankind is remarkably resilient and able to make lemonade out of lemons. So, perhaps it is worth celebrating some of those innovations we have seen over the past weeks. Anti-virus snood One of the main messages that is put out is that sneezing or coughing should be covered up as much as possible, as this allows the virus to get airborne and affect others. This is why some clever minds from Manchesters came up with their snood (the lovechild of a scarf and a hat) that is able to trap germs. Photo by: Virustatic Shield. The Virustatic Shield snood  The fabric coating is similar to the carbohydrate structures on the surfaces of the cells covering the oesophagus. Or, put simply, the material functions like a germ-trap the same way flies might get stuck in a fly-trap. As the snood covers not just your mouth and nose but the majority of your face, it catches some 96% of all germs flying around. Recommended:  We Created The Coronavirus: A Milieu Flaw That Will Kill Us Fever-detecting helmets Now, let’s turn from the fashionable to the somewhat creepy. Chinese police agents have been equipped with pretty impressive fever-detecting smart helmets. These helmets feature an infrared temperature detector, coupled with an augmented-reality visor. This means that you are able to look through it at a crowd of people and detect people with a fever, sounding an alarm if one is spotted. Photo by: China News Service. Police officers in Chengdu, China, wearing smart helmets fitted with infrared cameras to detect citizens with high body temperatures It works for people who are up to 5 meters away, allowing officers to scout a pretty large crowd in a relatively short period of time. And, for the creepy part, the augmented reality part and Wi-Fi connection will allow for facial recognition, pulling up the name and relevant medical details for each subject observed. 3D-printed ventilator valves With the virus sweeping across the globe, medical professionals are stressing the importance of ventilators. With only a limited number available and many more people needing them, it is time to start getting creative. The Italian company Isinnova came to the rescue when a hospital sent out a cry for help as they ran out of Venturi valves, used to connect the ventilator to a face mask. Photo by: Filippo Venezia/EPAD. Printed valves help hospitals in Italy keep up with demand.  They decided to reverse engineer the valves before churning it out on a 3D-printer. The prototype was ready within 6 hours, with 100 working valves printed and supplied the following day. After their success, the company went on to 3D-printed adapters that can turn a snorkelling mask into a non-invasive ventilator, to aid in the shortage of oxygen masks. 3D-printed isolation cubes Speaking of shortages, the capacity of most hospitals is close to being exceeded - if it isn’t so already. Patients need to be isolated for long periods of time, slowing patient turnover. In order to come up with more wards for Corona-stricken patients, the Chinese company Winsun turned to its architectural scale 3D-printers to print 15 isolation cubes in a day. Originally designed as holiday homes, the company decided to share them with hospitals to give them some breathing room. The buildings come complete with showers and eco-toilets and are made of recycled materials. Recommended:  Tiny House With Solar Panels Is Off Grid: The Netherlands Photo by: Winsun. 3D-printed isolation wards have been put into use at Xianning Central Hospital, China  Virus testing booths South Korea has become the world’s poster child for Corona virus testing, as it has the highest percentage of tests performed on its population. The way they have done so is remarkable as well: one hospital in Seoul came up with fancy-looking testing booths, allowing medical staff to examine potential patients from behind a plastic panel. These booths resemble phone boxes, which can be pressurised to prevent any particles from escaping. {youtube}                                    Coronavirus: South Korea dials up testing with hospital 'phone booth' | AFP After getting in, patients will be granted a quick consult via intercom, after which a nose and throat swab will be taken using large arm-length rubber gloves built in the panel. After performing the tests, the entire booth can be disinfected and ventilated. Arm door opener As data seems to indicate that the virus can survive on metal surfaces for quite a long period of time, it was only a matter of time before a smart company came up with a way of preventing hand-to-door-opener contact. Belgian company Materialise came up with a hands-free door handle attachment, that can be downloaded for free on their website. Two simple parts can be screwed to the side of the handle, making it easy to open the door using your arm or elbow. Recommended:  Sustainable Great Inventions From Eco-Inventors: Worldwide Photo by: Paolo Vergalito. Materialise Armed and less dangerous … Materialise’s door opener  Virus fighting drones China has finally found a use for its drone army that could be considered innovative. In order to fight the spread of the disease, the tiny flying choppers were equipped with anything from fever-detecting sensors to disinfectant sprayers to loudspeakers to talk to large groups of people. Or they were employed as messengers, to deliver supplies to those in isolation or take test samples to and from the lab as soon as possible. They were combatting the virus faster and more efficient than a person could, while not running the risk of being infected. Recommended:  Drones Safeguarding Your Food: Future Farming Worldwide Photo by: China Daily. Airborne response … a drone sprays disinfectant on streets in China’s Hebei province Before you go! Recommended:  Smart Sustainable Lifestyle Changing Tips & Tricks For 2019 Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about innovations? Click on  'Re g ister'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Innovations By COVID-19: Corona Unleashes Creative Thinking
Mankind Could Disappear Globally But The Earth Will Survive
Mother Nature is one tough cookie. It is one element often overlooked in the current debate on climate change. We all seem so concerned with ‘saving the planet’ and ‘preserving our world for future generations’, that we forget how resilient this very planet might be. The Earth Will Survive In our eagerness to ensure her survival, we somehow convinced ourselves that we are the one thing keeping the planet going. Unfortunately, it is more likely that we need Earth a great deal more than she needs us. Let’s face it, we cannot credit the continued existence of our planet on our valiant efforts to keep her healthy and well. In fact, if we would have accidentally destroyed (parts of) her in the process if it weren’t for a bizarre combination of luck and resilience. Similarly, movies like The Day After Tomorrow have adequately picked up on another not-so-far-from-the-truth sentiment: the planet is actually trying to get rid of us, in a perfectly acceptable example of evolution and survival of the fittest. What is the biggest threat to humanity today? The Cambridge Project at Cambridge University states that the ‘greatest threats’ to the human species are man-made; they are artificial intelligence, global warming, nuclear war, and rogue biotechnology. Recommended:  Climate Change Makes Animals Adapt To Environmental Changes Nature has always recovered remarkably well after being hit hard. Survive and adapt seems to be her motto. Even the events that caused the dinosaurs and all living things on earth to go extinct did not alter her to the point of absolute destruction. Instead, nature picked up the pieces and glued them back together, bouncing back slowly by re-creating life and adapting to altered circumstances. {youtube}                                       What Would Happen If Humans Suddenly Disappeared? | Unveiled Nuclear Disasters: Earth Will Survive, Chernobyl As A Wildlife Refuge Take Chernobyl. An example of one of the worst things that could happen to any world - nuclear impact. Yet when looking at pictures from the exclusion zone, the only thing that can be said is that nature sure seems to be thriving in the absence of human activity. It has only been thirty-some years, making it remarkable how fast nature seems to have bounced back. After a short ten years, surveys demonstrated the existence of nearly identical ecosystems within and outside of the exclusion zone. The animals and plants seemingly adjusted to the radiation levels, quickly adapting to the changing circumstances. When was the last global catastrophe? The most recent and arguably best-known, the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event, which occurred approximately 66 million years ago (Ma), was a large-scale mass extinction of animal and plant species in a geologically short period of time. Recommended:  India’s CO2, Pollution, Artificial Rain: How To Survive? It has spurred research that has since shown that the amount of radiation required to actually damage or alter animal or plant reproduction is quite large - larger than the amount emitted by the Chernobyl disaster. Quite remarkable, considering the ill-effects it has conclusively shown on human beings. The forests in the area have recovered fast and are now thriving with wildlife, while lakes and other bodies of water are filled with healthy fish and insects. Towns have been taken back by nature, leading to surreal post-apocalyptic images of buildings overrun by plants. Recommended:  Regenerative Agriculture: Basics For Safe Food (Part 1 of 3) Thriving Nature After Nuclear Disaster: The earth Will Survive Of course, there are voices claiming that it isn’t all as rosy as some have made it out to be. That the animals are in fact suffering from genetic alterations that will ultimately lead to their demise. Yet the numbers seem to work against them, with the ecosystem within the fallout zone appearing way more robust than most would think. Being hailed as a ‘wildlife heaven’ and an ‘animal refuge’, nature is decidedly thriving. Will the world population decline? The UN as of 2017 predicts a decline of global population growth rate from +1.0% in 2020 to +0.5% in 2050 and to +0.1% in 2100. Randers' 'most likely scenario' predicts a peak in the world population in the early 2040s at about 8.1 billion people, followed by decline. The same could be said for Fukushima, a similarly deserted post-nuclear disaster zone. Even less than a decade after the events that drastically changed the fate of the area, it can be seen how nature thrives. Beautiful forests and grasslands have taken over and have transformed the place, making it seem almost surreal in its pristine beauty. Recommended:  Society Collapse: Climate Change, The Environment Or Us? Wildfires, Drought And Floods: Nature Regulates Itself Nuclear accidents are not the only way in which we accidentally gravely harmed our planet. Other careless forms of behaviour and reckless use of land have teamed up with climate change to present us with a range of challenging natural disasters. Over the past few years, the most notable ones have been wildfires, droughts and floods. Recommended:  Climate Extremes Australia Floods, Wildfires And Destruction We only just recovered from the devastating wildfires in California in the summer of 2018, when something started to burn Down Under. Both events have in common that they combined extreme weather and droughts with human-caused whoopsies. Burning cigarettes being thrown on dry leaves, farmers burning some of their waste, or arsonists deliberately starting bush fires - they have all led to the disastrous fires that destroyed millions of acres of land and ruthlessly killed ecosystems and its inhabitants. What was the worst earthquake in history? The 1960 Valdivia earthquake (Spanish: Terremoto de Valdivia) or the Great Chilean earthquake (Gran terremoto de Chile) on 22 May 1960 is the most powerful earthquake ever recorded. Various studies have placed it at 9.4–9.6 on the moment magnitude scale. Often, the land was already excessively dry from prolonged droughts, which can be blamed on global warming. Similarly, now that vegetation has been burned to the ground, people living in affected areas fear floods. The ground is ‘dead’, thus no longer able to absorb water like it used to, giving free rein to water flows once the rain starts. Earth Will Survive:  Nature Comes Back Stronger These fires seem like a surefire way of wiping out nature (pun fully intended). Yet once again, most will be surprised to find that nature, in a rather cruel twist, will eventually benefit from these disasters. For once, it will allow for a ‘reboot’ of areas that were made vulnerable by overpopulation (of both animals and humans) or artificial land use. Secondly, there is a reason why many farmers burned their land to the ground before using it: it is a proven way of fertilising the lands. Recommended:  Regenerative Farming: Agro-Ecology In Practice (Part 2 of 3) Wildfires are actually a natural occurrence, as they clear the forest floor of dead litter. This allows important nutrients to make their way back into the soil, encouraging new vegetation to grow. There are even some plants that require the fire in order to reproduce: seeds in some pinecones, for instance, are sealed with some kind of resin that melts in a fire. What causes destruction of nature? Habitat destruction by human activity is mainly for the purpose of harvesting natural resources for industrial production and urbanization. Clearing habitats for agriculture is the principal cause of habitat destruction. Other important causes of habitat destruction include mining, logging, trawling, and urban sprawl. There is a caveat, though. There always is. If the fire burns too long and becomes too intense, they will damage the ecosystem beyond repair. This is something that is exclusively caused by human actions, as nature will stop fires once they served their purpose. This means that fires - as well as radiation and pretty much all other damage that we have done to our planet - will only, and only, irreparably impact ecosystems beyond a certain point. Recommended:  Regenerative Agriculture: Its Full Potential (Part 3 of 3) Threshold For Irreparable Damage Is High And even those thresholds, including those ones stipulating the maximum rise in sea level or degrees Celsius allowed if we are to avert the worst consequences of global warming, are more for our sake than for nature’s. We might not survive in the new ecosystem, but fact is that new ecosystems will be created, adapting to the changed circumstances. Nature has a funny way of bouncing back. It’s just the question whether we will be in it. Before you go! Recommended:  Earth Matters. Nature And Us: What Was, What’s Left: Hope? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about nature? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Mother Nature is one tough cookie. It is one element often overlooked in the current debate on climate change. We all seem so concerned with ‘saving the planet’ and ‘preserving our world for future generations’, that we forget how resilient this very planet might be. The Earth Will Survive In our eagerness to ensure her survival, we somehow convinced ourselves that we are the one thing keeping the planet going. Unfortunately, it is more likely that we need Earth a great deal more than she needs us. Let’s face it, we cannot credit the continued existence of our planet on our valiant efforts to keep her healthy and well. In fact, if we would have accidentally destroyed (parts of) her in the process if it weren’t for a bizarre combination of luck and resilience. Similarly, movies like The Day After Tomorrow have adequately picked up on another not-so-far-from-the-truth sentiment: the planet is actually trying to get rid of us, in a perfectly acceptable example of evolution and survival of the fittest. What is the biggest threat to humanity today? The Cambridge Project at Cambridge University states that the ‘greatest threats’ to the human species are man-made; they are artificial intelligence, global warming, nuclear war, and rogue biotechnology. Recommended:  Climate Change Makes Animals Adapt To Environmental Changes Nature has always recovered remarkably well after being hit hard. Survive and adapt seems to be her motto. Even the events that caused the dinosaurs and all living things on earth to go extinct did not alter her to the point of absolute destruction. Instead, nature picked up the pieces and glued them back together, bouncing back slowly by re-creating life and adapting to altered circumstances. {youtube}                                       What Would Happen If Humans Suddenly Disappeared? | Unveiled Nuclear Disasters: Earth Will Survive, Chernobyl As A Wildlife Refuge Take Chernobyl. An example of one of the worst things that could happen to any world - nuclear impact. Yet when looking at pictures from the exclusion zone, the only thing that can be said is that nature sure seems to be thriving in the absence of human activity. It has only been thirty-some years, making it remarkable how fast nature seems to have bounced back. After a short ten years, surveys demonstrated the existence of nearly identical ecosystems within and outside of the exclusion zone. The animals and plants seemingly adjusted to the radiation levels, quickly adapting to the changing circumstances. When was the last global catastrophe? The most recent and arguably best-known, the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event, which occurred approximately 66 million years ago (Ma), was a large-scale mass extinction of animal and plant species in a geologically short period of time. Recommended:  India’s CO2, Pollution, Artificial Rain: How To Survive? It has spurred research that has since shown that the amount of radiation required to actually damage or alter animal or plant reproduction is quite large - larger than the amount emitted by the Chernobyl disaster. Quite remarkable, considering the ill-effects it has conclusively shown on human beings. The forests in the area have recovered fast and are now thriving with wildlife, while lakes and other bodies of water are filled with healthy fish and insects. Towns have been taken back by nature, leading to surreal post-apocalyptic images of buildings overrun by plants. Recommended:  Regenerative Agriculture: Basics For Safe Food (Part 1 of 3) Thriving Nature After Nuclear Disaster: The earth Will Survive Of course, there are voices claiming that it isn’t all as rosy as some have made it out to be. That the animals are in fact suffering from genetic alterations that will ultimately lead to their demise. Yet the numbers seem to work against them, with the ecosystem within the fallout zone appearing way more robust than most would think. Being hailed as a ‘wildlife heaven’ and an ‘animal refuge’, nature is decidedly thriving. Will the world population decline? The UN as of 2017 predicts a decline of global population growth rate from +1.0% in 2020 to +0.5% in 2050 and to +0.1% in 2100. Randers' 'most likely scenario' predicts a peak in the world population in the early 2040s at about 8.1 billion people, followed by decline. The same could be said for Fukushima, a similarly deserted post-nuclear disaster zone. Even less than a decade after the events that drastically changed the fate of the area, it can be seen how nature thrives. Beautiful forests and grasslands have taken over and have transformed the place, making it seem almost surreal in its pristine beauty. Recommended:  Society Collapse: Climate Change, The Environment Or Us? Wildfires, Drought And Floods: Nature Regulates Itself Nuclear accidents are not the only way in which we accidentally gravely harmed our planet. Other careless forms of behaviour and reckless use of land have teamed up with climate change to present us with a range of challenging natural disasters. Over the past few years, the most notable ones have been wildfires, droughts and floods. Recommended:  Climate Extremes Australia Floods, Wildfires And Destruction We only just recovered from the devastating wildfires in California in the summer of 2018, when something started to burn Down Under. Both events have in common that they combined extreme weather and droughts with human-caused whoopsies. Burning cigarettes being thrown on dry leaves, farmers burning some of their waste, or arsonists deliberately starting bush fires - they have all led to the disastrous fires that destroyed millions of acres of land and ruthlessly killed ecosystems and its inhabitants. What was the worst earthquake in history? The 1960 Valdivia earthquake (Spanish: Terremoto de Valdivia) or the Great Chilean earthquake (Gran terremoto de Chile) on 22 May 1960 is the most powerful earthquake ever recorded. Various studies have placed it at 9.4–9.6 on the moment magnitude scale. Often, the land was already excessively dry from prolonged droughts, which can be blamed on global warming. Similarly, now that vegetation has been burned to the ground, people living in affected areas fear floods. The ground is ‘dead’, thus no longer able to absorb water like it used to, giving free rein to water flows once the rain starts. Earth Will Survive:  Nature Comes Back Stronger These fires seem like a surefire way of wiping out nature (pun fully intended). Yet once again, most will be surprised to find that nature, in a rather cruel twist, will eventually benefit from these disasters. For once, it will allow for a ‘reboot’ of areas that were made vulnerable by overpopulation (of both animals and humans) or artificial land use. Secondly, there is a reason why many farmers burned their land to the ground before using it: it is a proven way of fertilising the lands. Recommended:  Regenerative Farming: Agro-Ecology In Practice (Part 2 of 3) Wildfires are actually a natural occurrence, as they clear the forest floor of dead litter. This allows important nutrients to make their way back into the soil, encouraging new vegetation to grow. There are even some plants that require the fire in order to reproduce: seeds in some pinecones, for instance, are sealed with some kind of resin that melts in a fire. What causes destruction of nature? Habitat destruction by human activity is mainly for the purpose of harvesting natural resources for industrial production and urbanization. Clearing habitats for agriculture is the principal cause of habitat destruction. Other important causes of habitat destruction include mining, logging, trawling, and urban sprawl. There is a caveat, though. There always is. If the fire burns too long and becomes too intense, they will damage the ecosystem beyond repair. This is something that is exclusively caused by human actions, as nature will stop fires once they served their purpose. This means that fires - as well as radiation and pretty much all other damage that we have done to our planet - will only, and only, irreparably impact ecosystems beyond a certain point. Recommended:  Regenerative Agriculture: Its Full Potential (Part 3 of 3) Threshold For Irreparable Damage Is High And even those thresholds, including those ones stipulating the maximum rise in sea level or degrees Celsius allowed if we are to avert the worst consequences of global warming, are more for our sake than for nature’s. We might not survive in the new ecosystem, but fact is that new ecosystems will be created, adapting to the changed circumstances. Nature has a funny way of bouncing back. It’s just the question whether we will be in it. Before you go! Recommended:  Earth Matters. Nature And Us: What Was, What’s Left: Hope? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about nature? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Mankind Could Disappear Globally But The Earth Will Survive
Community

A community is you and me. A network of social, economic, ecological and many other relationships. We all work together and live in urban, suburban and rural areas. Social sustainability is becoming increasingly important on our small planet. We define: support, quality of life, development, adaptation, rights and labour.

We belong to a group of individuals - our society - in which we belong geographically. Certain environmental issues play an important role in our society. Here, sustainable solutions are sought, developed and implemented. This may differ from societies in other countries, but because of our global environmental issues and dependence, we must learn to work more together so that we can all benefit from sharing sustainable knowledge to tackle, for example, climate change.

Green architecture is important. Building with local materials that can be recycled and reused brings us a big step forward to have less impact on the environment. With green architecture we can build smart cities where resources can be used more efficiently and information can be shared, thus improving our society, your community.

Lifestyle is the way we live, the dynamics of personality. Fashion defines our self and together with food it is getting - at present - an even more important role in our society. It's not just about taste, but especially about the burden that the fashion industry, agriculture and the meat industry have on our resources, especially water.

If there was an urge to come up with a sustainable way of living solutions and share these topics globally it’s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about tiny houses, your experiences and expectations for the future at home and globally. 

Global Sustainability X-change, that’s what you can do together with WhatsOrb. What's in for me?

 

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