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About: <p>A community is you and me. A network of social, economic, ecological and many other relationships. We all work together and live in urban, suburban and rural areas. Social sustainability is becoming increasingly important on our small planet. We define: support, quality of life, development, adaptation, rights and labour.</p> <p>We belong to a group of individuals - <a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/society">our society</a> - in which we belong geographically. Certain environmental issues play an important role in our society. Here, sustainable solutions are sought, developed and implemented. This may differ from societies in other countries, but because of our global environmental issues and&nbsp;<span lang="en" tabindex="0">dependence</span>, we must learn to work more together so that we can all benefit from sharing sustainable knowledge to tackle, for example, climate change.</p> <p><a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/green-architecture">Green architecture</a> is important. Building with local materials that can be recycled and reused brings us a big step forward to have less impact on the environment. With green architecture we can build <a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/smart-cities">smart cities</a> where resources can be used more efficiently and information can be shared, thus improving our society, your community.</p> <p><a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/lifestyle">Lifestyle</a> is the way we live, the dynamics of personality. Fashion defines our self and together with food it is getting - at present - an even more important role in our society. It's not just about taste, but especially about the burden that the fashion industry, agriculture and the meat industry have on our resources, especially water.</p> <p>If there was an urge to come up with a sustainable way of living solutions and share these topics globally it&rsquo;s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about tiny houses, your experiences and expectations for the future at home and globally.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Global Sustainability X-change, that&rsquo;s what you can do together with WhatsOrb.&nbsp;<a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/newsletter/your-shared-sustainable-ideas-make-our-earth-a-better-place">What's in for me?</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
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Green Urban Sustainable Project: Marine One
With a larger share of green spaces than the lot area, Marina One is a role model for megacities. In the high-rise project, homes, offices and public facilities are connected in high density, in a sustainable manner that leads to a pleasant microclimate. Green Urban Sustainable Project: Marina One Is A Role Model Photo by: Darren Soh. On the lower layers there is a publicly accessible park that gradually passes into the towers.  Marina One by Ingenhoven Architects can rightly be called an impressive project. In terms of size it looks a bit like a small city. The complex is part of the new Central Business District of Singapore and offers space for 20,000 workplaces and 3,000 residents. As a 'hub project' for green urban development, it presents a strong example of sustainable architecture. In the design not only attention was paid to the creation of sufficient commercial floor space, but also valuable green urban space was integrated. In this case, instead of four obvious separate buildings, a neighborhood that was accessible to everyone around a green heart arose here. A vertical park that extends over several floors. Is Singapore a city or country? The Republic of Singapore is a sovereign island nation located just off the southern tip of Peninsular Malaysia in Southeast Asia. Singapore is an anomaly, and they're quite proud of it. The country is currently the only city-island-nation in the world. Singapore has grown since 1990 mainly thanks to artificial land reclamation with 8.9 percent. With the development of Marina One and many other new construction projects, it is currently undergoing a radical transformation from a 'Garden City' to a 'City in a Garden'. The city state, which in the sixties was still regarded as one of the most unhealthiest places in the world, has since grown into an international economic hotspot. To ensure that Singapore remains attractive for living and working in the future, there is now also a lot of attention for improving the quality of life. Green Urban Sustainable Project: Marina Bay, West Of The Old City Center From Singapore Marina Bay is located directly to the west of the old city center and is without doubt one of the largest and most prominent new neighborhoods in the area. Where empty yards and railroads still existed in the 1990s, the new Central Business District has been realized since 2006 under the watchful eye of government agency Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA). {youtube}                                                   Green Urban Sustainable Project: Marine One In Singapore                                                                            Marina Bay, Singapore And ambitious goals are envisaged for this new business district. Strict energy guidelines and higher requirements for public and green spaces apply to all new building projects. The publicly accessible areas must occupy at least 25 percent of the plot surface, the green spaces at least one hundred percent. For the energy requirements even a national standard, the 'Green Mark Standard', has been created. With its unlimited authority, the URA is a unique planning body that investors have the opportunity to join and which, unlike many other countries, is also much more active in establishing and maintaining development goals. Recommended:  Solar Canopies Supply Shade Electricity And Filter Rainwater Marine One In Singapore: The wavy facade is continued on all sides Green Urban Sustainable Project: Rice Terraces And 'Gardens By The Bay' Here, the URA uses so-called 'studies', for which architects are asked without knowledge of the concrete location, but on the basis of very concrete planning guidelines to develop interesting ideas and to submit them to a committee. Marina One also resulted from such a study. Christoph Ingenhoven, who together with local architect Michael Ngu of architects a61 on the Robinson Road created a remarkable office building, initially received only basic information about a plot that provided space for four blocks of one hundred by one hundred meters and was split up. through two streets of twenty to twenty-five meters wide. Singapore is a great nation with some strict rules? 7 Things Tourists Should Avoid Doing in Singapore Throw Your Litter Into The Bin Avoid Chewing Gum Ask For Food Prices Before Ordering Avoid Vandalism at Any Cost Smoke Only at Designated Smoking Areas Be Sensitive to Singapore's Multi-Cultural Society Avoid Eating In Public Trains and Buses. Instead of an obvious idea with a separate building on each corner, he suggested giving up the intersection and creating a neighborhood around a vertical park. In doing so, he aroused the interest of the URA, who soon invited him to further develop his green concept in the context of a small-scale architectural competition. Recommended:  Sustainable University Hanoi: By Vo Trong Nghia Architects The plot is located northwest of the famous 'Gardens by the Bay' by architects WilkinsonEyre and directly between two small city parks. For this, the architects came up with a complex with space for offices (half) and houses (a third), which would go down in height from two hundred to 139 meters in the direction of one of the two parks. For their project, Christoph Ingenhoven and Michael Ngu took the idea of ​​park C in the middle of park A and B in 2010. Marine One In Singapore: Large frames in the façade provide shade effects in the residential towers Green Urban Sustainable Project: Green Heart Park, Singapore In order to create the large 'Green Heart Park' in the middle of the complex, all buildings have been shifted cartesian and strictly orthogonal to the outer boundaries of the plot, following the example of the New York city map. Around the green heart, for example, two blocks of two buildings were realized, with sloping galleries and vertical, step-by-step lamella constructions that do not entirely reminiscent of the well-known Southeast Asian rice terraces. Thanks to the cascading, undulating floors that come closer and closer together, natural air flows are created which ensure that even in the outdoor areas, despite the subtropical climate, it is pleasant to stay here. Recommended:  The Bicycle Metropolis: Why Still Investing In Car Parking? On the outside, highly efficient, perforated sun protection elements adorn the sleek façade. For the inside, the architects and engineers developed extensive slats with a depth of 1.2 to 2 meters, based on extensive climate and design studies. This created a unique dynamic space in the heart of the complex, which, consciously not as a European city square but as a 'city room', a Singaporean version of a city garden, should be seen as a relaxing place to relax, move and to meet each other. The British landscape architects Gustafson Porter + Bowman created here a green oasis with great biodiversity that invites haptic (soil material) as well as acoustic (birds and insects) to explore. Marine One In Singapore: Earth tones However, it did not stay with the creation of this green heart. This only covers part of the very complex building concept with a total of 175,000 square meters of gross floor area for offices, 115,000 square meters for living, 18,000 square meters for trade / gastronomy and 37,000 square meters of green space. In addition to the green heart on the first four floors, in the office buildings on floor 28 and 29 'sky gardens' are integrated, which are publicly accessible and where restaurants are located just below. The green spaces now cover up to 125 percent of the plot surface. Recommended:  Sustainable Architecture Today: How Does It Feel For You? Most are accessible to the general public - apart from the roof gardens, which serve as exclusive outdoor spaces for businesses and penthouses. The vegetation of the 'strata terraces', 'cloud garden', 'green screens' and 'rooftop gardens' varies greatly from floor to floor and with the different shades of color and plant structures it is a real enrichment of the otherwise rather strict high-tech façade. Incidentally, for the façade, Ingenhoven consciously took dark earth tones in order to contrast them nicely with the white of the former colonial buildings. Is Singapore visa free? Most visitors to Singapore can enter the country without a visa; however some visitors must first obtain a visa in advance before being allowed to enter Singapore. Citizens of almost 80% of the world's countries may travel to Singapore for a period of 30 days or 90 days without a visa, depending on their nationality. Marine One In Singapore: Hybrid Construction For Marina One, first a reinforced concrete skeleton was planned, but in the end the choice fell on a more advantageous option. In order to place the alternative hybrid construction from reinforced concrete and steel firmly on the soft surface of the newly reclaimed land, a very complex pile foundation was required. Another impressive element, both spatially and constructively, are the three 'suspended' floors of 10,000 square meters each connecting the two office buildings. And do not underestimate the great functionality of Marina One. For the mediated clientele, consisting mainly of financial companies and professionals who can pay an average of 14,762 euros per square meter, there is virtually nothing to be desired: three underground shop floors and direct access to two metro stations, a 2,400-square-meter gym with a ten-meter high climbing wall and a fifty meter long outdoor swimming pool, several 'signature' restaurants, a party zone, lounges, a 'resident clubhouse' and special teppanyaki and BBQ terraces. Marine One In Singapore: New Urban Exploration Is Singapore cheap for shopping? Situated between Little India in the north and Marina Bay in the south, the Bugis Street Market is one of the top shopping places in Singapore . It is known for being the cheapest market in the country for buying souvenirs, accessories, clothes, electronics, houseware, and cosmetics. The smart spatial and sustainable architectural solutions of Marina One can serve as a model for urban compaction projects at other locations. But the significance of this special project goes further. In Singapore, Marina One is part of a complete generation of new, green high-rise projects for an urban transformation and a change in the use wishes that they had not previously thought possible. It represents the desire for more and qualitative green spaces and outdoor spaces, the use of which actually increases despite the sometimes murderous subtropical climate. Recommended:  Climate Change And Its Effects Like Droughts: The Heat Is On Although Ingenhoven Architects and the supporting engineering firms Werner Sobek, DS-Plan and Arup Singapore with their complex design solutions managed to lower the temperature in the microclimate of Marina One compared to 'normal' with only a few degrees, the architecture entices many people to trust their familiar to leave the inner world more often. This new urban exploration is, in addition to the great energy values, the most impressive one at Marina One. Marine One In Singapore: Ground floor with park, public functions and entrances to homes, offices and parking Marine One: Microclimate In addition to the large green spaces, more surprising openings have been created, some of which are only visible from close by or even only on the floors in question. For example, vertical slits in which two air shafts are housed in different places run through different residential buildings in order to achieve a completely natural ventilation and thus a more pleasant outdoor climate. This effect is further enhanced by the smartly chosen dimensions and positioning of the slats on the park side. What is the coolest month in Singapore? Relative humidity is in the range of 70% – 80%. April is the warmest month, January is the coolest month and November is the wettest month. For the architects it still took a lot of steps to convince their client M + S, owned by the Singaporean investment company Temasek and the Malaysian state fund Khazanah, of these slots and slats. Both meant a significant investment and loss of useful floor space. Sustainability played a crucial role not only in the design of the inside, but also in the exterior of both buildings. For example, the different blocks with staggered frames and deeper loggias act as a kind of natural sunblind that helps to reduce the subtropical heat load on the 1,042 dwellings.                                                                     Multi story three demensial garden                                                     Green Urban Sustainable Project: Marine One In Singapore The fact that the plot is positioned slightly tilted in relation to the wind points was certainly also useful here. None of the facades is in fact oriented towards the very warm west. Thanks to a system for heat recovery, a rainwater collection system (for greywater and irrigation of the gardens), the greater heat tolerance to office temperatures of 24-26 degrees and the use of state-of-the-art glazing that prevents heat, the energy consumption is up to 35 percent lower than for this kind of complexes is common. This gave the project the Pre-Certification LEED Platinum and the Green Mark Platinum. Before you go! Recommended:  Greenest Buildings In The World: Sustainable Highlights Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about green sustainable architecture? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
With a larger share of green spaces than the lot area, Marina One is a role model for megacities. In the high-rise project, homes, offices and public facilities are connected in high density, in a sustainable manner that leads to a pleasant microclimate. Green Urban Sustainable Project: Marina One Is A Role Model Photo by: Darren Soh. On the lower layers there is a publicly accessible park that gradually passes into the towers.  Marina One by Ingenhoven Architects can rightly be called an impressive project. In terms of size it looks a bit like a small city. The complex is part of the new Central Business District of Singapore and offers space for 20,000 workplaces and 3,000 residents. As a 'hub project' for green urban development, it presents a strong example of sustainable architecture. In the design not only attention was paid to the creation of sufficient commercial floor space, but also valuable green urban space was integrated. In this case, instead of four obvious separate buildings, a neighborhood that was accessible to everyone around a green heart arose here. A vertical park that extends over several floors. Is Singapore a city or country? The Republic of Singapore is a sovereign island nation located just off the southern tip of Peninsular Malaysia in Southeast Asia. Singapore is an anomaly, and they're quite proud of it. The country is currently the only city-island-nation in the world. Singapore has grown since 1990 mainly thanks to artificial land reclamation with 8.9 percent. With the development of Marina One and many other new construction projects, it is currently undergoing a radical transformation from a 'Garden City' to a 'City in a Garden'. The city state, which in the sixties was still regarded as one of the most unhealthiest places in the world, has since grown into an international economic hotspot. To ensure that Singapore remains attractive for living and working in the future, there is now also a lot of attention for improving the quality of life. Green Urban Sustainable Project: Marina Bay, West Of The Old City Center From Singapore Marina Bay is located directly to the west of the old city center and is without doubt one of the largest and most prominent new neighborhoods in the area. Where empty yards and railroads still existed in the 1990s, the new Central Business District has been realized since 2006 under the watchful eye of government agency Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA). {youtube}                                                   Green Urban Sustainable Project: Marine One In Singapore                                                                            Marina Bay, Singapore And ambitious goals are envisaged for this new business district. Strict energy guidelines and higher requirements for public and green spaces apply to all new building projects. The publicly accessible areas must occupy at least 25 percent of the plot surface, the green spaces at least one hundred percent. For the energy requirements even a national standard, the 'Green Mark Standard', has been created. With its unlimited authority, the URA is a unique planning body that investors have the opportunity to join and which, unlike many other countries, is also much more active in establishing and maintaining development goals. Recommended:  Solar Canopies Supply Shade Electricity And Filter Rainwater Marine One In Singapore: The wavy facade is continued on all sides Green Urban Sustainable Project: Rice Terraces And 'Gardens By The Bay' Here, the URA uses so-called 'studies', for which architects are asked without knowledge of the concrete location, but on the basis of very concrete planning guidelines to develop interesting ideas and to submit them to a committee. Marina One also resulted from such a study. Christoph Ingenhoven, who together with local architect Michael Ngu of architects a61 on the Robinson Road created a remarkable office building, initially received only basic information about a plot that provided space for four blocks of one hundred by one hundred meters and was split up. through two streets of twenty to twenty-five meters wide. Singapore is a great nation with some strict rules? 7 Things Tourists Should Avoid Doing in Singapore Throw Your Litter Into The Bin Avoid Chewing Gum Ask For Food Prices Before Ordering Avoid Vandalism at Any Cost Smoke Only at Designated Smoking Areas Be Sensitive to Singapore's Multi-Cultural Society Avoid Eating In Public Trains and Buses. Instead of an obvious idea with a separate building on each corner, he suggested giving up the intersection and creating a neighborhood around a vertical park. In doing so, he aroused the interest of the URA, who soon invited him to further develop his green concept in the context of a small-scale architectural competition. Recommended:  Sustainable University Hanoi: By Vo Trong Nghia Architects The plot is located northwest of the famous 'Gardens by the Bay' by architects WilkinsonEyre and directly between two small city parks. For this, the architects came up with a complex with space for offices (half) and houses (a third), which would go down in height from two hundred to 139 meters in the direction of one of the two parks. For their project, Christoph Ingenhoven and Michael Ngu took the idea of ​​park C in the middle of park A and B in 2010. Marine One In Singapore: Large frames in the façade provide shade effects in the residential towers Green Urban Sustainable Project: Green Heart Park, Singapore In order to create the large 'Green Heart Park' in the middle of the complex, all buildings have been shifted cartesian and strictly orthogonal to the outer boundaries of the plot, following the example of the New York city map. Around the green heart, for example, two blocks of two buildings were realized, with sloping galleries and vertical, step-by-step lamella constructions that do not entirely reminiscent of the well-known Southeast Asian rice terraces. Thanks to the cascading, undulating floors that come closer and closer together, natural air flows are created which ensure that even in the outdoor areas, despite the subtropical climate, it is pleasant to stay here. Recommended:  The Bicycle Metropolis: Why Still Investing In Car Parking? On the outside, highly efficient, perforated sun protection elements adorn the sleek façade. For the inside, the architects and engineers developed extensive slats with a depth of 1.2 to 2 meters, based on extensive climate and design studies. This created a unique dynamic space in the heart of the complex, which, consciously not as a European city square but as a 'city room', a Singaporean version of a city garden, should be seen as a relaxing place to relax, move and to meet each other. The British landscape architects Gustafson Porter + Bowman created here a green oasis with great biodiversity that invites haptic (soil material) as well as acoustic (birds and insects) to explore. Marine One In Singapore: Earth tones However, it did not stay with the creation of this green heart. This only covers part of the very complex building concept with a total of 175,000 square meters of gross floor area for offices, 115,000 square meters for living, 18,000 square meters for trade / gastronomy and 37,000 square meters of green space. In addition to the green heart on the first four floors, in the office buildings on floor 28 and 29 'sky gardens' are integrated, which are publicly accessible and where restaurants are located just below. The green spaces now cover up to 125 percent of the plot surface. Recommended:  Sustainable Architecture Today: How Does It Feel For You? Most are accessible to the general public - apart from the roof gardens, which serve as exclusive outdoor spaces for businesses and penthouses. The vegetation of the 'strata terraces', 'cloud garden', 'green screens' and 'rooftop gardens' varies greatly from floor to floor and with the different shades of color and plant structures it is a real enrichment of the otherwise rather strict high-tech façade. Incidentally, for the façade, Ingenhoven consciously took dark earth tones in order to contrast them nicely with the white of the former colonial buildings. Is Singapore visa free? Most visitors to Singapore can enter the country without a visa; however some visitors must first obtain a visa in advance before being allowed to enter Singapore. Citizens of almost 80% of the world's countries may travel to Singapore for a period of 30 days or 90 days without a visa, depending on their nationality. Marine One In Singapore: Hybrid Construction For Marina One, first a reinforced concrete skeleton was planned, but in the end the choice fell on a more advantageous option. In order to place the alternative hybrid construction from reinforced concrete and steel firmly on the soft surface of the newly reclaimed land, a very complex pile foundation was required. Another impressive element, both spatially and constructively, are the three 'suspended' floors of 10,000 square meters each connecting the two office buildings. And do not underestimate the great functionality of Marina One. For the mediated clientele, consisting mainly of financial companies and professionals who can pay an average of 14,762 euros per square meter, there is virtually nothing to be desired: three underground shop floors and direct access to two metro stations, a 2,400-square-meter gym with a ten-meter high climbing wall and a fifty meter long outdoor swimming pool, several 'signature' restaurants, a party zone, lounges, a 'resident clubhouse' and special teppanyaki and BBQ terraces. Marine One In Singapore: New Urban Exploration Is Singapore cheap for shopping? Situated between Little India in the north and Marina Bay in the south, the Bugis Street Market is one of the top shopping places in Singapore . It is known for being the cheapest market in the country for buying souvenirs, accessories, clothes, electronics, houseware, and cosmetics. The smart spatial and sustainable architectural solutions of Marina One can serve as a model for urban compaction projects at other locations. But the significance of this special project goes further. In Singapore, Marina One is part of a complete generation of new, green high-rise projects for an urban transformation and a change in the use wishes that they had not previously thought possible. It represents the desire for more and qualitative green spaces and outdoor spaces, the use of which actually increases despite the sometimes murderous subtropical climate. Recommended:  Climate Change And Its Effects Like Droughts: The Heat Is On Although Ingenhoven Architects and the supporting engineering firms Werner Sobek, DS-Plan and Arup Singapore with their complex design solutions managed to lower the temperature in the microclimate of Marina One compared to 'normal' with only a few degrees, the architecture entices many people to trust their familiar to leave the inner world more often. This new urban exploration is, in addition to the great energy values, the most impressive one at Marina One. Marine One In Singapore: Ground floor with park, public functions and entrances to homes, offices and parking Marine One: Microclimate In addition to the large green spaces, more surprising openings have been created, some of which are only visible from close by or even only on the floors in question. For example, vertical slits in which two air shafts are housed in different places run through different residential buildings in order to achieve a completely natural ventilation and thus a more pleasant outdoor climate. This effect is further enhanced by the smartly chosen dimensions and positioning of the slats on the park side. What is the coolest month in Singapore? Relative humidity is in the range of 70% – 80%. April is the warmest month, January is the coolest month and November is the wettest month. For the architects it still took a lot of steps to convince their client M + S, owned by the Singaporean investment company Temasek and the Malaysian state fund Khazanah, of these slots and slats. Both meant a significant investment and loss of useful floor space. Sustainability played a crucial role not only in the design of the inside, but also in the exterior of both buildings. For example, the different blocks with staggered frames and deeper loggias act as a kind of natural sunblind that helps to reduce the subtropical heat load on the 1,042 dwellings.                                                                     Multi story three demensial garden                                                     Green Urban Sustainable Project: Marine One In Singapore The fact that the plot is positioned slightly tilted in relation to the wind points was certainly also useful here. None of the facades is in fact oriented towards the very warm west. Thanks to a system for heat recovery, a rainwater collection system (for greywater and irrigation of the gardens), the greater heat tolerance to office temperatures of 24-26 degrees and the use of state-of-the-art glazing that prevents heat, the energy consumption is up to 35 percent lower than for this kind of complexes is common. This gave the project the Pre-Certification LEED Platinum and the Green Mark Platinum. Before you go! Recommended:  Greenest Buildings In The World: Sustainable Highlights Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about green sustainable architecture? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Green Urban Sustainable Project: Marine One
Green Urban Sustainable Project: Marine One
Building Hydrogen-Powered Cities: Who, Where, How?
South Korea wants to build three hydrogen-powered cities by 2022. South Korea is vying to win the race to create the first hydrogen-powered society. It wants to build three hydrogen-powered cities by 2022 as it positions itself as a leader in the green technology. Hydrogen Cities: Living, Transportation The plan will see the cities use hydrogen as the fuel for cooling, heating, electricity and transportation. Consultation on where the three cities will be located is under way. The test cities will use a hydrogen-powered transportation system, including buses and personal cars. Hydrogen charging stations will be available in bus stations and parking spaces. The strategy is part of a wider vision to power 10% of the country’s cities, counties and towns by hydrogen by 2030, growing to 30% by 2040. This includes drastic increases in the numbers of hydrogen-powered vehicles and charging points in the next three years. The government has earmarked money to subsidize these vehicles and charging infrastructure. Recommended:  Green Hydrogen Economy: The Enormous Potential Worldwide South Korea’s Hydrogen Roadmap’s Goals The goal of Korea’s hydrogen roadmap is essentially to make the country the world’s largest producer of fuel cells globally by 2030. By 2040, Korea aims to be producing over six million hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. And it wants 40,000 hydrogen-powered buses, 80,000 hydrogen taxis and 30,000 hydrogen trucks on its roads all powered by 1,200 hydrogen refuelling stations. On the stationary power side, the country wants to build on its lead in fuel cells for utility power generation, while also placing increased focus on fuel cells for residential and commercial use here. By 20 years’ time, South Korea wants to be producing 15GW of fuel cells for its domestic and export markets. And this does not just look like wishful thinking, as it’s being backed by some serious investment. Next year alone, the Korean government will invest almost half a billion dollars in the hydrogen economy of which will be spent on fuel cell vehicles and refuelling stations. That’s a ten-fold increase on its 2018 spending and represents only the public sector side. Hyundai and its suppliers alone plan to invest an additional USD $6.5 billion by 2030.  How to produce hydrogen? Natural Gas Reforming/Gasification: Synthesis gas, a mixture of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and a small amount of carbon dioxide, is created by reacting natural gas with high-temperature steam. The carbon monoxide is reacted with water to produce additional hydrogen. This method is the cheapest, most efficient, and most common. Natural gas reforming using steam accounts for the majority of hydrogen produced in the United States annually A synthesis gas can also be created by reacting coal or biomass with high-temperature steam and oxygen in a pressurized gasifier, which is converted into gaseous components—a process called gasification. The resulting synthesis gas contains hydrogen and carbon monoxide, which is reacted with steam to separate the hydrogen Electrolysis: An electric current splits water into hydrogen and oxygen. If the electricity is produced by renewable sources, such as solar or wind, the resulting hydrogen will be considered renewable as well, and has numerous emissions benefits. Power-to-hydrogen projects are taking off, where excess renewable electricity, when it's available, is used to make hydrogen through electrolysis Renewable Liquid Reforming: Renewable liquid fuels, such as ethanol, are reacted with high-temperature steam to produce hydrogen near the point of end use Fermentation: Biomass is converted into sugar-rich feedstocks that can be fermented to produce hydrogen A number of hydrogen production methods are in development: High-Temperature Water Splitting: High temperatures generated by solar concentrators or nuclear reactors drive chemical reactions that split water to produce hydrogen Photobiological Water Splitting: Microbes, such as green algae, consume water in the presence of sunlight, producing hydrogen as a byproduct Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting: Photoelectrochemical systems produce hydrogen from water using special semiconductors and energy from sunlight.                                                    South Korea build 3 hydrogen-powered cities in Future                                                     Building Hydrogen-Powered Cities: Who, Where, How? Hydrogen, The Fuel Of The Future Countries including Germany, Japan and China are also looking to a future hydrogen society, with a number of Asian car manufacturers including Hyundai, Toyota and Honda sinking resources into creating a range of hydrogen-powered cars. Recommended:  Green Sustainable Hydrogen By Hyundai, Toyota And Honda With fuel cell vehicles – or FCVs – generally offering greater range and faster refuelling times than electric vehicles, there is great hope that they will accelerate the transition to cleaner vehicles. But challenges remain with the technology. Although some FCVs are now on the market, for many the cost remains prohibitive and they have some way to go before they become mainstream. The output from hydrogen-powered cars is certainly clean – they only produce water as a by-product – at the moment they are not necessarily as clean as they may first seem. Producing the hydrogen itself from renewable energy sources like wind and solar is still a challenge. Recommended:  Hydrogen Powered Car That Emits Water No CO2: The Rasa Hydrogen, Alternative Energy In The World Moving to clean energy is key to combatting climate change, yet in the past five years, the energy transition has stagnated. Energy consumption and production contribute to two-thirds of global emissions, and 81% of the global energy system is still based on fossil fuels, the same percentage as 30 years ago. Is hydrogen better than fossil fuels? Hydrogen fuel is very efficient. More energy is extracted from this fuel source than with conventional power technologies. Fossil fuels have a high combustion rate and are capable of releasing tremendous amount of energy. Recommended:  Fossil Fuel Will Dominate Energy Use Through 2050: Globally Effective policies, private-sector action and public-private cooperation are needed to create a more inclusive, sustainable, affordable and secure global energy system. Benchmarking progress is essential to a successful transition. The World Economic Forum’s Energy Transition Index, which ranks 115 economies on how well they balance energy security and access with environmental sustainability and affordability, shows that the biggest challenge facing energy transition is the lack of readiness among the world’s largest emitters, including US, China, India and Russia. Recommended:  Zero Emission Day: No Fossil Fuel Transport Worldwide The 10 countries that score the highest in terms of readiness account for only 2.6% of global annual emissions. To future-proof the global energy system, the Forum’s Shaping the Future of Energy initiative is working with projects including the Partnering for Sustainable Energy Innovation, the Future of Electricity, the Global Battery Alliance and Scaling Renewable Energy to encourage and enable innovative energy investments, technologies and solutions. Hydrogen-Powered Cities: What About Safety? How dangerous is hydrogen? When liquid hydrogen is stored in tanks, it's relatively safe, but if it escapes there are associated hazards. Topping the list of concerns is hydrogen burns. In the presence of an oxidizer - oxygen is a good one - hydrogen can catch fire, sometimes explosively, and it burns more easily than gasoline does. The other major caveat is hydrogen’s explosive nature, which is still causing safety concerns. Earlier this year (2019) an explosion of a hydrogen storage tank at one of South Korea’s government research projects killed two people and injured others. Storage of the gas requires a lot of infrastructure, and despite government incentives to support development, until hydrogen becomes more widespread private investors can still struggle to turn a profit. Recommended:  Hydrogen Energy Storage Revolution In The Netherlands Fortunate a research team at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), South Korea, has invented a high-performance and cost-effective hydrogen sensor. Hydrogen gas is widely considered to be one of the most promising next-generation energy resources. It is also an important material for various industrial applications, such as hydrogen-cooled systems, petroleum refinement and metallurgical processes. However, hydrogen, which is highly flammable, is colourless and odourless and thus difficult to detect with human senses. Therefore, developing hydrogen gas sensors with high sensitivity, fast response, high selectivity and good stability is important for the growing hydrogen economy. Hydrogen sensor In the present study, a team of scientists led by Professors Park In-gyu and Jung Yeon-Sik from KAIST successfully fabricated a nanostructured high-performance hydrogen gas sensor. Their sensor achieved dramatically greater hydrogen gas sensitivity compared with a silicon thin film sensor without nanopatterns. The sensor device shows a fast hydrogen response (response time less than five seconds) and ten times higher selectivity for hydrogen gas than other gases. They also demonstrated that the sensor was stable and produced reliable responses in both dry and high-humidity ambient environments. Is hydrogen dangerous to breathe? Inhalation: High concentrations of this gas can cause an oxygen-deficient environment. Individuals breathing such an atmosphere may experience symptoms which include headaches, ringing in ears, dizziness, drowsiness, unconsciousness, nausea, vomiting and depression of all the senses. Hydrogen-Powered Economy South Korea underlines a great determination to shift large swathes of its economy to hydrogen energy by 2040 from power and heat generation to passenger and freight transport. This is bringing huge opportunities for western firms, particularly in the upstream hydrogen technologies Korean companies need to complement their strength in fuel cells. Recommended:  H ydrogen Car Is Extremely Fuel Efficient: 5.000 Km One Liter South Korea Bets Big On Hydrogen: Why? Korea hopes that, by becoming a leader in hydrogen energy, it can improve its terrible air quality, meet its bold emission reduction targets, strengthen its energy security and create the jobs and export industries of the future. There’s now ferocious opposition to coal in Korea due to its effect on air quality, and to nuclear power on account of safety concerns. While more solar and wind power is coming online here, few believe these will ever be adequate, reliable energy sources for the country’s dense population centres or its energy-intensive manufacturing base.  Recommended: Renewables In Danger! Solar And Wind Energy: Start Digging At the same time, Korea is now able to import large quantities of cheap natural gas from the US. As most of the hydrogen used in energy production is ‘still’ reformed from natural gas, a hydrogen economy potentially allows the country to reduce its dependence on oil from the Middle East and geopolitical chokepoints such as the Straits of Hormuz and Straits of Malacca. So, if the country is able to roll out a safe infrastructure and drive the necessary technologies down the cost curve, hydrogen fuel cells hold the promise of reliable, large-scale distributed power on a small footprint. And, if Korea can crack that nut, the global export potential for its fuel cells could be huge. South Korea’s Current Situation On Hydrogen South Korea already has strong incentives that encourage the uptake of fuel cells, such as the Renewable Portfolio Standard, mandatory renewable energy in public buildings and subsidies for fuel cell vehicles. The new hydrogen roadmap builds on these measures.                                          Hydrogen Fuel Cells Overview - 1 (HYDROGEN FUEL CELL DRONE)                                                     Building Hydrogen-Powered Cities: Who, Where, How? In terms of the primary players, Doosan dominates the stationary fuel cell market here with three technologies. The latest of these - an SOFC (solid oxide fuel cell) product. Doosan’s PAFC (phosphoric acid fuel cell) product is the first viable utility-scale fuel cell in the Korean market albeit still supported by state subsidies. Doosan’s PAFC division topped USD $1 billion in 2018, with most coming from the domestic market. The company has now modified its product so it’s able to run directly on hydrogen (rather than natural gas) and recently won a contract for the largest such fuel cell installation in the world. What is a fuel cell? A fuel cell is an electrochemical cell that converts the chemical energy of a fuel (often hydrogen) and an oxidizing agent (often oxygen) into electricity through a pair of redox reactions. Fuel cells can produce electricity continuously for as long as fuel and oxygen are supplied. Doosan employee Ben Yoon with an individual cell stack. Four stacks are combined in a fuel cell unit Doosan also became the first company in the world to commercialise hydrogen-powered drones when it launched its DS30 drone system this month. The drone is able to stay airborne for two hours and is aimed primarily at global infrastructure and logistics markets. Hydrogen Transport: What About Fuel Cell Cars? What are types of fuel cells? Types of Fuel Cells Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells Direct methanol fuel cells Alkaline fuel cells Phosphoric acid fuel cells Molten carbonate fuel cells Solid oxide fuel cells Reversible fuel cells Korea’s Hyundai, meanwhile, leads the global pack in fuel cell cars, alongside Japan’s Toyota.  Recommended:  Hydrogen Transport Wins It From The Electric Battery Car Hyundai wants to drive the uptake of fuel cells on a worldwide scale and recently announced it will sell its PEM (proton-exchange membrane) fuel cell drive system to other OEMs. This month, the company also signed an MOU with American engine manufacturer Cummins, aiming to replace diesel trucks with fuel cell trucks in the US commercial vehicle market. So, Doosan and Hyundai dominate in Korea, but there are plenty of other strong local players here, too.                                            Hyundai Hydrogen Powered Autonomous Self Driving Semi Truck                                                     Building Hydrogen-Powered Cities: Who, Where, How? International entrants are also looking to exploit the market and signing licensing or distribution agreements with well-placed Korean firms. US firm Bloom Energy, for example, signed a distribution agreement with SK D&D this year and, just this month, announced a collaboration with Samsung Heavy Industries to develop fuel cell-powered cargo ships.  Recommended: Solar, Hydrogen And Wind Power Makes The Current Sail Cargo Ship South Korea’s Hydrogen: Emerging Opportunities Hydrogen storage, distribution and production, though currently a developed area, represent significant potential for heavy industrial companies to capture new business opportunities. What they need to do is to move away from the status quo: Steel and petrochemical companies. Upgrade their existing facilities to produce more hydrogen for future use Shipbuilders. New business from liquefied natural gas (LNG) carriers and build hydrogen powered vessels to replace diesel vessels in the future Gasoline companies. Leverage the existing storage and distribution network to tap into the hydrogen fuelling station infrastructure development. On balance, there is a strong incentive for these industrial players to participate in the hydrogen infrastructure investments, given the potential to generate sustainable earnings. Hydrogen: The Dawn Of The Shifting Trend That said, there must be systematic research and development, together with a clear governmental policy framework and funding mechanisms to incentivise private companies to participate. State-funded think tank H2Korea was set up to bridge the gap between the government and private sectors on hydrogen technologies. In addition, the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy (MOTIE) has earmarked an investment outlay of USD2.23 billion for a joint venture with private sector companies to speed up the development of the hydrogen infrastructure. Such partnerships between government and business are powerful because they increase the amount of funding and result in better vetting of the projects, thereby yielding greater economic benefits. In view of this, the outlook for Korea’s hydrogen industry and the associated responsible investment opportunities should remain positive. Only asset managers who can understand the implications of this shifting trend and identify emerging leaders within this space can fully tap into the potential of South Korea’s emerging hydrogen industry. Before you go! Recommended:  Hydrogen Is The Fuel Of The Future: Questions & Answers Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about Hydrogen and Architecture? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
South Korea wants to build three hydrogen-powered cities by 2022. South Korea is vying to win the race to create the first hydrogen-powered society. It wants to build three hydrogen-powered cities by 2022 as it positions itself as a leader in the green technology. Hydrogen Cities: Living, Transportation The plan will see the cities use hydrogen as the fuel for cooling, heating, electricity and transportation. Consultation on where the three cities will be located is under way. The test cities will use a hydrogen-powered transportation system, including buses and personal cars. Hydrogen charging stations will be available in bus stations and parking spaces. The strategy is part of a wider vision to power 10% of the country’s cities, counties and towns by hydrogen by 2030, growing to 30% by 2040. This includes drastic increases in the numbers of hydrogen-powered vehicles and charging points in the next three years. The government has earmarked money to subsidize these vehicles and charging infrastructure. Recommended:  Green Hydrogen Economy: The Enormous Potential Worldwide South Korea’s Hydrogen Roadmap’s Goals The goal of Korea’s hydrogen roadmap is essentially to make the country the world’s largest producer of fuel cells globally by 2030. By 2040, Korea aims to be producing over six million hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. And it wants 40,000 hydrogen-powered buses, 80,000 hydrogen taxis and 30,000 hydrogen trucks on its roads all powered by 1,200 hydrogen refuelling stations. On the stationary power side, the country wants to build on its lead in fuel cells for utility power generation, while also placing increased focus on fuel cells for residential and commercial use here. By 20 years’ time, South Korea wants to be producing 15GW of fuel cells for its domestic and export markets. And this does not just look like wishful thinking, as it’s being backed by some serious investment. Next year alone, the Korean government will invest almost half a billion dollars in the hydrogen economy of which will be spent on fuel cell vehicles and refuelling stations. That’s a ten-fold increase on its 2018 spending and represents only the public sector side. Hyundai and its suppliers alone plan to invest an additional USD $6.5 billion by 2030.  How to produce hydrogen? Natural Gas Reforming/Gasification: Synthesis gas, a mixture of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and a small amount of carbon dioxide, is created by reacting natural gas with high-temperature steam. The carbon monoxide is reacted with water to produce additional hydrogen. This method is the cheapest, most efficient, and most common. Natural gas reforming using steam accounts for the majority of hydrogen produced in the United States annually A synthesis gas can also be created by reacting coal or biomass with high-temperature steam and oxygen in a pressurized gasifier, which is converted into gaseous components—a process called gasification. The resulting synthesis gas contains hydrogen and carbon monoxide, which is reacted with steam to separate the hydrogen Electrolysis: An electric current splits water into hydrogen and oxygen. If the electricity is produced by renewable sources, such as solar or wind, the resulting hydrogen will be considered renewable as well, and has numerous emissions benefits. Power-to-hydrogen projects are taking off, where excess renewable electricity, when it's available, is used to make hydrogen through electrolysis Renewable Liquid Reforming: Renewable liquid fuels, such as ethanol, are reacted with high-temperature steam to produce hydrogen near the point of end use Fermentation: Biomass is converted into sugar-rich feedstocks that can be fermented to produce hydrogen A number of hydrogen production methods are in development: High-Temperature Water Splitting: High temperatures generated by solar concentrators or nuclear reactors drive chemical reactions that split water to produce hydrogen Photobiological Water Splitting: Microbes, such as green algae, consume water in the presence of sunlight, producing hydrogen as a byproduct Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting: Photoelectrochemical systems produce hydrogen from water using special semiconductors and energy from sunlight.                                                    South Korea build 3 hydrogen-powered cities in Future                                                     Building Hydrogen-Powered Cities: Who, Where, How? Hydrogen, The Fuel Of The Future Countries including Germany, Japan and China are also looking to a future hydrogen society, with a number of Asian car manufacturers including Hyundai, Toyota and Honda sinking resources into creating a range of hydrogen-powered cars. Recommended:  Green Sustainable Hydrogen By Hyundai, Toyota And Honda With fuel cell vehicles – or FCVs – generally offering greater range and faster refuelling times than electric vehicles, there is great hope that they will accelerate the transition to cleaner vehicles. But challenges remain with the technology. Although some FCVs are now on the market, for many the cost remains prohibitive and they have some way to go before they become mainstream. The output from hydrogen-powered cars is certainly clean – they only produce water as a by-product – at the moment they are not necessarily as clean as they may first seem. Producing the hydrogen itself from renewable energy sources like wind and solar is still a challenge. Recommended:  Hydrogen Powered Car That Emits Water No CO2: The Rasa Hydrogen, Alternative Energy In The World Moving to clean energy is key to combatting climate change, yet in the past five years, the energy transition has stagnated. Energy consumption and production contribute to two-thirds of global emissions, and 81% of the global energy system is still based on fossil fuels, the same percentage as 30 years ago. Is hydrogen better than fossil fuels? Hydrogen fuel is very efficient. More energy is extracted from this fuel source than with conventional power technologies. Fossil fuels have a high combustion rate and are capable of releasing tremendous amount of energy. Recommended:  Fossil Fuel Will Dominate Energy Use Through 2050: Globally Effective policies, private-sector action and public-private cooperation are needed to create a more inclusive, sustainable, affordable and secure global energy system. Benchmarking progress is essential to a successful transition. The World Economic Forum’s Energy Transition Index, which ranks 115 economies on how well they balance energy security and access with environmental sustainability and affordability, shows that the biggest challenge facing energy transition is the lack of readiness among the world’s largest emitters, including US, China, India and Russia. Recommended:  Zero Emission Day: No Fossil Fuel Transport Worldwide The 10 countries that score the highest in terms of readiness account for only 2.6% of global annual emissions. To future-proof the global energy system, the Forum’s Shaping the Future of Energy initiative is working with projects including the Partnering for Sustainable Energy Innovation, the Future of Electricity, the Global Battery Alliance and Scaling Renewable Energy to encourage and enable innovative energy investments, technologies and solutions. Hydrogen-Powered Cities: What About Safety? How dangerous is hydrogen? When liquid hydrogen is stored in tanks, it's relatively safe, but if it escapes there are associated hazards. Topping the list of concerns is hydrogen burns. In the presence of an oxidizer - oxygen is a good one - hydrogen can catch fire, sometimes explosively, and it burns more easily than gasoline does. The other major caveat is hydrogen’s explosive nature, which is still causing safety concerns. Earlier this year (2019) an explosion of a hydrogen storage tank at one of South Korea’s government research projects killed two people and injured others. Storage of the gas requires a lot of infrastructure, and despite government incentives to support development, until hydrogen becomes more widespread private investors can still struggle to turn a profit. Recommended:  Hydrogen Energy Storage Revolution In The Netherlands Fortunate a research team at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), South Korea, has invented a high-performance and cost-effective hydrogen sensor. Hydrogen gas is widely considered to be one of the most promising next-generation energy resources. It is also an important material for various industrial applications, such as hydrogen-cooled systems, petroleum refinement and metallurgical processes. However, hydrogen, which is highly flammable, is colourless and odourless and thus difficult to detect with human senses. Therefore, developing hydrogen gas sensors with high sensitivity, fast response, high selectivity and good stability is important for the growing hydrogen economy. Hydrogen sensor In the present study, a team of scientists led by Professors Park In-gyu and Jung Yeon-Sik from KAIST successfully fabricated a nanostructured high-performance hydrogen gas sensor. Their sensor achieved dramatically greater hydrogen gas sensitivity compared with a silicon thin film sensor without nanopatterns. The sensor device shows a fast hydrogen response (response time less than five seconds) and ten times higher selectivity for hydrogen gas than other gases. They also demonstrated that the sensor was stable and produced reliable responses in both dry and high-humidity ambient environments. Is hydrogen dangerous to breathe? Inhalation: High concentrations of this gas can cause an oxygen-deficient environment. Individuals breathing such an atmosphere may experience symptoms which include headaches, ringing in ears, dizziness, drowsiness, unconsciousness, nausea, vomiting and depression of all the senses. Hydrogen-Powered Economy South Korea underlines a great determination to shift large swathes of its economy to hydrogen energy by 2040 from power and heat generation to passenger and freight transport. This is bringing huge opportunities for western firms, particularly in the upstream hydrogen technologies Korean companies need to complement their strength in fuel cells. Recommended:  H ydrogen Car Is Extremely Fuel Efficient: 5.000 Km One Liter South Korea Bets Big On Hydrogen: Why? Korea hopes that, by becoming a leader in hydrogen energy, it can improve its terrible air quality, meet its bold emission reduction targets, strengthen its energy security and create the jobs and export industries of the future. There’s now ferocious opposition to coal in Korea due to its effect on air quality, and to nuclear power on account of safety concerns. While more solar and wind power is coming online here, few believe these will ever be adequate, reliable energy sources for the country’s dense population centres or its energy-intensive manufacturing base.  Recommended: Renewables In Danger! Solar And Wind Energy: Start Digging At the same time, Korea is now able to import large quantities of cheap natural gas from the US. As most of the hydrogen used in energy production is ‘still’ reformed from natural gas, a hydrogen economy potentially allows the country to reduce its dependence on oil from the Middle East and geopolitical chokepoints such as the Straits of Hormuz and Straits of Malacca. So, if the country is able to roll out a safe infrastructure and drive the necessary technologies down the cost curve, hydrogen fuel cells hold the promise of reliable, large-scale distributed power on a small footprint. And, if Korea can crack that nut, the global export potential for its fuel cells could be huge. South Korea’s Current Situation On Hydrogen South Korea already has strong incentives that encourage the uptake of fuel cells, such as the Renewable Portfolio Standard, mandatory renewable energy in public buildings and subsidies for fuel cell vehicles. The new hydrogen roadmap builds on these measures.                                          Hydrogen Fuel Cells Overview - 1 (HYDROGEN FUEL CELL DRONE)                                                     Building Hydrogen-Powered Cities: Who, Where, How? In terms of the primary players, Doosan dominates the stationary fuel cell market here with three technologies. The latest of these - an SOFC (solid oxide fuel cell) product. Doosan’s PAFC (phosphoric acid fuel cell) product is the first viable utility-scale fuel cell in the Korean market albeit still supported by state subsidies. Doosan’s PAFC division topped USD $1 billion in 2018, with most coming from the domestic market. The company has now modified its product so it’s able to run directly on hydrogen (rather than natural gas) and recently won a contract for the largest such fuel cell installation in the world. What is a fuel cell? A fuel cell is an electrochemical cell that converts the chemical energy of a fuel (often hydrogen) and an oxidizing agent (often oxygen) into electricity through a pair of redox reactions. Fuel cells can produce electricity continuously for as long as fuel and oxygen are supplied. Doosan employee Ben Yoon with an individual cell stack. Four stacks are combined in a fuel cell unit Doosan also became the first company in the world to commercialise hydrogen-powered drones when it launched its DS30 drone system this month. The drone is able to stay airborne for two hours and is aimed primarily at global infrastructure and logistics markets. Hydrogen Transport: What About Fuel Cell Cars? What are types of fuel cells? Types of Fuel Cells Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells Direct methanol fuel cells Alkaline fuel cells Phosphoric acid fuel cells Molten carbonate fuel cells Solid oxide fuel cells Reversible fuel cells Korea’s Hyundai, meanwhile, leads the global pack in fuel cell cars, alongside Japan’s Toyota.  Recommended:  Hydrogen Transport Wins It From The Electric Battery Car Hyundai wants to drive the uptake of fuel cells on a worldwide scale and recently announced it will sell its PEM (proton-exchange membrane) fuel cell drive system to other OEMs. This month, the company also signed an MOU with American engine manufacturer Cummins, aiming to replace diesel trucks with fuel cell trucks in the US commercial vehicle market. So, Doosan and Hyundai dominate in Korea, but there are plenty of other strong local players here, too.                                            Hyundai Hydrogen Powered Autonomous Self Driving Semi Truck                                                     Building Hydrogen-Powered Cities: Who, Where, How? International entrants are also looking to exploit the market and signing licensing or distribution agreements with well-placed Korean firms. US firm Bloom Energy, for example, signed a distribution agreement with SK D&D this year and, just this month, announced a collaboration with Samsung Heavy Industries to develop fuel cell-powered cargo ships.  Recommended: Solar, Hydrogen And Wind Power Makes The Current Sail Cargo Ship South Korea’s Hydrogen: Emerging Opportunities Hydrogen storage, distribution and production, though currently a developed area, represent significant potential for heavy industrial companies to capture new business opportunities. What they need to do is to move away from the status quo: Steel and petrochemical companies. Upgrade their existing facilities to produce more hydrogen for future use Shipbuilders. New business from liquefied natural gas (LNG) carriers and build hydrogen powered vessels to replace diesel vessels in the future Gasoline companies. Leverage the existing storage and distribution network to tap into the hydrogen fuelling station infrastructure development. On balance, there is a strong incentive for these industrial players to participate in the hydrogen infrastructure investments, given the potential to generate sustainable earnings. Hydrogen: The Dawn Of The Shifting Trend That said, there must be systematic research and development, together with a clear governmental policy framework and funding mechanisms to incentivise private companies to participate. State-funded think tank H2Korea was set up to bridge the gap between the government and private sectors on hydrogen technologies. In addition, the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy (MOTIE) has earmarked an investment outlay of USD2.23 billion for a joint venture with private sector companies to speed up the development of the hydrogen infrastructure. Such partnerships between government and business are powerful because they increase the amount of funding and result in better vetting of the projects, thereby yielding greater economic benefits. In view of this, the outlook for Korea’s hydrogen industry and the associated responsible investment opportunities should remain positive. Only asset managers who can understand the implications of this shifting trend and identify emerging leaders within this space can fully tap into the potential of South Korea’s emerging hydrogen industry. Before you go! Recommended:  Hydrogen Is The Fuel Of The Future: Questions & Answers Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about Hydrogen and Architecture? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Building Hydrogen-Powered Cities: Who, Where, How?
Building Hydrogen-Powered Cities: Who, Where, How?
Smart Or Low Tech Cities? Let’s Keep It Simple
Cities are increasingly focusing on becoming smarter. With the ever-continuing urbanization and the wave of digitization sweeping across the globe, governments are seeking ways of living up to the extra demand for residential, commercial, and industrial areas. At the same time, they are under intense scrutiny for their use of scarce resources and CO2 emissions.   Smart Cities: Cameras, Trackers, And Sensors? The puzzle of having to expand cities while becoming greener and more sustainable seems to have been solved by technology. Creating so-called smart cities, governed by the internet and connected devices, has long thought to be the answer. Unfortunately, if you are looking beyond the flashiness and sophistication of smart trashcans and autonomous people movers, there is a dark side to the smart city movement as well. Are there any smart cities? Examples of Smart city technologies and programs have been implemented in Singapore, Dubai, Milton Keynes, Southampton, Amsterdam, Barcelona, Madrid, Stockholm, Copenhagen, China and New York. There is a certain appeal to being dubbed a ‘smart city,’ or so most governments seem to think. It appears to be the latest fad amongst mayors and city managers, with start-ups eager to present their latest brainchild that promises to improve city life drastically. Not only does it hit the sweet spot of everyone’s futuristic city dreams, but it also solves quite a few notorious headache files. More straightforward solutions for trash collection and traffic congestion, anyone? Recommended:  Smart Cities, Safe, And Efficient, But Are We Being Watched? While there is no consensus yet as to what makes a city smart, there are commonalities. For instance, they extensively use cameras, trackers, and sensors to monitor whatever is happening in the city closely - be it on the roads, in the city center, or in hospitals and schools. The generated data is used to not only act on problems but also to help make predictions about when similar issues are expected to occur in the future and to come up with the best course of action to either prevent or remedy them as soon as possible. The benefits of smart cities are clear. But there is a downside as well. Who owns this data? Who has a right to use and possibly exploit it? What are your rights, as a private citizen, in the light of the privacy vs. safety debate? Eventually, the only party that will stand to lose is us, those living in the 'smart' cities. What is smart city concept? A smart city is a designation given to a city that incorporates information and communication technologies (ICT) to enhance the quality and performance of urban services such as energy, transportation and utilities in order to reduce resource consumption, wastage and overall costs. Smart Cities, Or Low Tech Cities? Let’s Keep It Simple The opposite of smart is simple. Does this make a city that refuses to incorporate smart technologies into a low tech city? Not! At least, not in the meaning most commonly associated with simple. For most issues that are faced by governmental bodies, there are ‘low tech’ solutions available that will do the job just as well. {youtube}                                                     Smart Cities Or Low tech Cities? Let’s Keep It Simple                     Life on the Mekong River in Cambodia. The floating village inhabited by fishermen and fish farmers. While smart cities are becoming huge breathing, living machines that rely on sensors and other input devices - not to mention its reliance on the internet -,, they are also becoming vulnerable. When everything is connected to the internet, it could theoretically be accessed by anyone, anywhere. Those with bad intentions will be able to take over control of a city - and it will not be hard to picture what could happen next. Smart Cities Or Low tech Cities? Those with bad intentions will be able to take over control of a smart city. Slightly less dramatic, but still relevant. Technology can break down; sensors can fail. Its operating, updating, and maintenance requires a whole new team of, often expensive personnel. It also involves a lot of energy, meaning that smart cities will initially have a larger carbon footprint. And this extra energy goes to issues that could be solved using low-tech measures as well. What are the features of smart cities? Features of Smart Cities: Adequate water supply Assured electricity supply Sanitation, including solid waste management Efficient urban mobility and public transport Affordable housing, especially for the poor Robust IT connectivity and digitalization Good governance, especially e-Governance and citizen participation, Recommended:  Eco-friendly Sustainable Megacities Clean By Trees: Globally Looking back in history and figuring out how our ancestors used to deal with the issues that we are facing today would be a great start. Progress for the sake of growth is an invalid argument when dismissing ancient methods of keeping our cities clean, dry, and safe. And yes, this is probably a controversial claim, and I do not advocate going back to the dirty medieval towns, but there are some things to be learned from ‘how we used to do it.’ Items that are not attached to a cable or dependent upon the IT helpdesk. Low Tech Cities Are Not Simple At All In the past, we managed to live together with nature in a harmonious and mutually beneficial relationship. The advance of technology is one of the primary reasons why this fragile balance has been broken, with us now taking Mother Nature to the edge of destruction. Going back to a pre-technological age and finding ways of living together with nature, even in cities, does not make a city ‘simple.’ Instead, it makes it more resilient and sustainable. Green urban spaces or urban agriculture are some examples of what low tech cities invest in. They take know-how from the local population, based on tradition and history, and incorporate this in today’s world. Why build a fancy bridge if you can just as quickly make one using trees and wood, that better withstands humidity and harsh weather elements, as experienced by the people in Northern India? What are 'low tech' solutions? Congestion can be tackled with autonomous cars, right; it can also be addressed with better railways, bus rapid transit, and bike lanes. Houses can be covered in sensors to control an automated heating and cooling system; they can also be built with operable windows and high-quality insulation. Why not use green roofs, permeable pavements, and terraced wetland parks in areas frequently stricken by monsoons - allowing for better absorption of rainwater, hence preventing floods in a more natural way than expensive pumps? The Chinese already do this, as they have seen the benefits and enjoy the extra nature it brings to their overcrowded cities. Recommended:  Architecture Designs: Green White Roofs To Cool Urban Area's Low Tech City: Green And Blue Denmark has implemented a similar project in her capital city Copenhagen. Their ‘low tech’ solution for preventing floods is green and blue. They created several parks that can, during storms, become lakes. This allows for nature and animal species to thrive, while people enjoy the nature reserve it has created. Low Tech City: Green And Blue Copenhagen Similar wetlands have been introduced in India, where the areas also function as cleaners of wastewater. This has proven to be more effective than high-tech sewage treatment, absorbing a bunch of pollution while fostering a lively fishing industry. Florida, Gainsville’s Sweetwater Wetland park Low Tech Cities: On Stilts And Floating Makoko, the remarkable town in the African country of Lagos, is taking a different approach to battling rising sea levels. The city, which is home to 80,000 people, is sustainable, solar-fuelled - and on stilts. Rotterdam is working on a similar concept, planning a sustainable floating city. Recommended:  A Floating Airport Cutting Edge Madness Or Visionary? Low Tech Cities On Stilts And Floating: Makoko Low Tech Cities Have Simple Airconditioning How to build excellent ‘low tech’ cities? Rather than chasing the newest shiny smart-city technology, we should redirect some of that energy toward building excellent ‘low tech’ cities Cities planned and built with best-in-class, durable approaches to infrastructure, and the public realm. For many of our challenges, we don’t need new technologies or new ideas; we need the will, foresight, and courage to use the best of the old ideas Another surprising idea that can be found in nature is the alternative it offers for airconditioning, a notorious polluter. Plants are the solution for cooling down on a hot summer day. With more tree cover, temperatures will be considerably lower. Also, green roofs are great for cooling down the buildings they cover.   Frankfurt was named the European City of Trees and had approximately 200,000 of them in public spaces around the city. Low Tech Cities Are Smart Cities Are smart cities are making us shallow? Embracing evidence-based, data-driven decision-making, and using technology to capture that data is a laudable goal. The problem with the idea is that it’s often presented as a panacea There is an underlying assumption that technology is the key to unlocking the smart solutions our cities most desperately need. To believe this is to miss the plot completely The ‘low tech’ solutions to things that we are trying to make smarter are endless. This goes for virtually anything. Transportation, with the old bike or walking shoes being superior low-emission solutions. Or airconditioning and heating, where plant cover can prove highly efficient. With a little effort, it is not hard to find alternatives for sensors, cameras, and trackers.   Recommended:  Bicycles Without Battery: We Just Forgot They Are Cleanest Low Tech Cities, Smart Cities: A Root Hangbridge We can make the world a better place if we would try a little harder to go back to the methods that worked in the distant past. Suppose we would move beyond our current issues to a point where they did not exist yet. After all, if generations before us were able to make do without the internet and ‘smart’ solutions, why can’t we? Before you go! Recommended:  Greenest Buildings In The World: Sustainable Highlights Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about green sustainable architecture? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Cities are increasingly focusing on becoming smarter. With the ever-continuing urbanization and the wave of digitization sweeping across the globe, governments are seeking ways of living up to the extra demand for residential, commercial, and industrial areas. At the same time, they are under intense scrutiny for their use of scarce resources and CO2 emissions.   Smart Cities: Cameras, Trackers, And Sensors? The puzzle of having to expand cities while becoming greener and more sustainable seems to have been solved by technology. Creating so-called smart cities, governed by the internet and connected devices, has long thought to be the answer. Unfortunately, if you are looking beyond the flashiness and sophistication of smart trashcans and autonomous people movers, there is a dark side to the smart city movement as well. Are there any smart cities? Examples of Smart city technologies and programs have been implemented in Singapore, Dubai, Milton Keynes, Southampton, Amsterdam, Barcelona, Madrid, Stockholm, Copenhagen, China and New York. There is a certain appeal to being dubbed a ‘smart city,’ or so most governments seem to think. It appears to be the latest fad amongst mayors and city managers, with start-ups eager to present their latest brainchild that promises to improve city life drastically. Not only does it hit the sweet spot of everyone’s futuristic city dreams, but it also solves quite a few notorious headache files. More straightforward solutions for trash collection and traffic congestion, anyone? Recommended:  Smart Cities, Safe, And Efficient, But Are We Being Watched? While there is no consensus yet as to what makes a city smart, there are commonalities. For instance, they extensively use cameras, trackers, and sensors to monitor whatever is happening in the city closely - be it on the roads, in the city center, or in hospitals and schools. The generated data is used to not only act on problems but also to help make predictions about when similar issues are expected to occur in the future and to come up with the best course of action to either prevent or remedy them as soon as possible. The benefits of smart cities are clear. But there is a downside as well. Who owns this data? Who has a right to use and possibly exploit it? What are your rights, as a private citizen, in the light of the privacy vs. safety debate? Eventually, the only party that will stand to lose is us, those living in the 'smart' cities. What is smart city concept? A smart city is a designation given to a city that incorporates information and communication technologies (ICT) to enhance the quality and performance of urban services such as energy, transportation and utilities in order to reduce resource consumption, wastage and overall costs. Smart Cities, Or Low Tech Cities? Let’s Keep It Simple The opposite of smart is simple. Does this make a city that refuses to incorporate smart technologies into a low tech city? Not! At least, not in the meaning most commonly associated with simple. For most issues that are faced by governmental bodies, there are ‘low tech’ solutions available that will do the job just as well. {youtube}                                                     Smart Cities Or Low tech Cities? Let’s Keep It Simple                     Life on the Mekong River in Cambodia. The floating village inhabited by fishermen and fish farmers. While smart cities are becoming huge breathing, living machines that rely on sensors and other input devices - not to mention its reliance on the internet -,, they are also becoming vulnerable. When everything is connected to the internet, it could theoretically be accessed by anyone, anywhere. Those with bad intentions will be able to take over control of a city - and it will not be hard to picture what could happen next. Smart Cities Or Low tech Cities? Those with bad intentions will be able to take over control of a smart city. Slightly less dramatic, but still relevant. Technology can break down; sensors can fail. Its operating, updating, and maintenance requires a whole new team of, often expensive personnel. It also involves a lot of energy, meaning that smart cities will initially have a larger carbon footprint. And this extra energy goes to issues that could be solved using low-tech measures as well. What are the features of smart cities? Features of Smart Cities: Adequate water supply Assured electricity supply Sanitation, including solid waste management Efficient urban mobility and public transport Affordable housing, especially for the poor Robust IT connectivity and digitalization Good governance, especially e-Governance and citizen participation, Recommended:  Eco-friendly Sustainable Megacities Clean By Trees: Globally Looking back in history and figuring out how our ancestors used to deal with the issues that we are facing today would be a great start. Progress for the sake of growth is an invalid argument when dismissing ancient methods of keeping our cities clean, dry, and safe. And yes, this is probably a controversial claim, and I do not advocate going back to the dirty medieval towns, but there are some things to be learned from ‘how we used to do it.’ Items that are not attached to a cable or dependent upon the IT helpdesk. Low Tech Cities Are Not Simple At All In the past, we managed to live together with nature in a harmonious and mutually beneficial relationship. The advance of technology is one of the primary reasons why this fragile balance has been broken, with us now taking Mother Nature to the edge of destruction. Going back to a pre-technological age and finding ways of living together with nature, even in cities, does not make a city ‘simple.’ Instead, it makes it more resilient and sustainable. Green urban spaces or urban agriculture are some examples of what low tech cities invest in. They take know-how from the local population, based on tradition and history, and incorporate this in today’s world. Why build a fancy bridge if you can just as quickly make one using trees and wood, that better withstands humidity and harsh weather elements, as experienced by the people in Northern India? What are 'low tech' solutions? Congestion can be tackled with autonomous cars, right; it can also be addressed with better railways, bus rapid transit, and bike lanes. Houses can be covered in sensors to control an automated heating and cooling system; they can also be built with operable windows and high-quality insulation. Why not use green roofs, permeable pavements, and terraced wetland parks in areas frequently stricken by monsoons - allowing for better absorption of rainwater, hence preventing floods in a more natural way than expensive pumps? The Chinese already do this, as they have seen the benefits and enjoy the extra nature it brings to their overcrowded cities. Recommended:  Architecture Designs: Green White Roofs To Cool Urban Area's Low Tech City: Green And Blue Denmark has implemented a similar project in her capital city Copenhagen. Their ‘low tech’ solution for preventing floods is green and blue. They created several parks that can, during storms, become lakes. This allows for nature and animal species to thrive, while people enjoy the nature reserve it has created. Low Tech City: Green And Blue Copenhagen Similar wetlands have been introduced in India, where the areas also function as cleaners of wastewater. This has proven to be more effective than high-tech sewage treatment, absorbing a bunch of pollution while fostering a lively fishing industry. Florida, Gainsville’s Sweetwater Wetland park Low Tech Cities: On Stilts And Floating Makoko, the remarkable town in the African country of Lagos, is taking a different approach to battling rising sea levels. The city, which is home to 80,000 people, is sustainable, solar-fuelled - and on stilts. Rotterdam is working on a similar concept, planning a sustainable floating city. Recommended:  A Floating Airport Cutting Edge Madness Or Visionary? Low Tech Cities On Stilts And Floating: Makoko Low Tech Cities Have Simple Airconditioning How to build excellent ‘low tech’ cities? Rather than chasing the newest shiny smart-city technology, we should redirect some of that energy toward building excellent ‘low tech’ cities Cities planned and built with best-in-class, durable approaches to infrastructure, and the public realm. For many of our challenges, we don’t need new technologies or new ideas; we need the will, foresight, and courage to use the best of the old ideas Another surprising idea that can be found in nature is the alternative it offers for airconditioning, a notorious polluter. Plants are the solution for cooling down on a hot summer day. With more tree cover, temperatures will be considerably lower. Also, green roofs are great for cooling down the buildings they cover.   Frankfurt was named the European City of Trees and had approximately 200,000 of them in public spaces around the city. Low Tech Cities Are Smart Cities Are smart cities are making us shallow? Embracing evidence-based, data-driven decision-making, and using technology to capture that data is a laudable goal. The problem with the idea is that it’s often presented as a panacea There is an underlying assumption that technology is the key to unlocking the smart solutions our cities most desperately need. To believe this is to miss the plot completely The ‘low tech’ solutions to things that we are trying to make smarter are endless. This goes for virtually anything. Transportation, with the old bike or walking shoes being superior low-emission solutions. Or airconditioning and heating, where plant cover can prove highly efficient. With a little effort, it is not hard to find alternatives for sensors, cameras, and trackers.   Recommended:  Bicycles Without Battery: We Just Forgot They Are Cleanest Low Tech Cities, Smart Cities: A Root Hangbridge We can make the world a better place if we would try a little harder to go back to the methods that worked in the distant past. Suppose we would move beyond our current issues to a point where they did not exist yet. After all, if generations before us were able to make do without the internet and ‘smart’ solutions, why can’t we? Before you go! Recommended:  Greenest Buildings In The World: Sustainable Highlights Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about green sustainable architecture? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Smart Or Low Tech Cities? Let’s Keep It Simple
Smart Or Low Tech Cities? Let’s Keep It Simple
Smart Cities, Safe And Efficient, But Are We Being Watched?
Information from a library, hospital or public transport exposed? More sustainability, improved mobility, efficiency and safety? Where can you find all of the above in one place? The answer is a smart city. Its purpose is to improve the quality of life by making the town more efficient and by reducing the distance between the citizens and the government. In this article you will read more about the smart city and what it means for our privacy.  Smart: Improved technologies Technology is moving forward, devices are becoming smarter, so it is inevitable that in the future we will use electronic devices much more than we do now. To keep the city up and running, the existing technologies need to be upgraded. Otherwise, they cannot meet the specifications and demands of the current system. But what do we want? Investigation shows that we wish for smart transportation, where machines and devices communicate with each other. We want smart buildings, where the windows can open automatically, where there is always a connection with the Internet. That is our future. Smart Technology: Are We Being Watched? Cameras are hanging everywhere to guarantee our safety. But do we feel safe by it? We could get the feeling that we are being watched, every step we take is registered by authorities. Besides cameras, all data is collected. This way, authorities know for example the number of visitors at a certain event or they possess information about citizens for commercial purposes. They may sell this information to third parties.   {youtube}              Smart City: How do you live in a Smart City? | Future Smart City Projects | Surveillance or Utopia?   Safe And Efficient: Privacy In A Smart City Like mentioned before, cameras are everywhere, and data is collected. What does that mean for our privacy? Who is the gatekeeper to our data? And what if the information is hacked? The more internet data there is, the more fragile we become. Fortunately, with the arrival of the GDPR in May 2018, the rules on the subject are becoming more strict. The citizen must be informed in understandable language, especially when it comes to data traffic in a smart city. Smart Cities: Costs Savings Or Costs Loss? All these new technologies cost money. To upgrade the existing technologies, we (governments, state or country) need to invest vast amounts of money. However, due to these smart cities, there could be economic benefits coming from the transition towards a smart city, for example when it comes to real estate. Buildings have to deal with endless energy, such as heating and cooling installations, lighting, electrical wiring, communication, lifts, electrical appliances, etcetera. A computer-controlled system regulates, monitors and controls all of this. But this can be done by automated systems. Automated systems can be used for this purpose, and therefore energy consumption can be reduced. For example, the light is turned off at a fixed time, or when nobody is present in the room, ventilation can be regulated on the number of people in the room. This can improve air quality, and will lead to user satisfaction. So yes, at first it will cost money, but in the end, it will save a lot as well. Recommended:  Sustainability And Higher Efficiency: Smart Cities Globally Smart Cities: Reducing Damages In Case Of A Disaster  Smart cities use sensors that are suitable for detecting abnormalities in a town or during an event. In this way, the sensors can inform the authorities if a measurement differs from the limited safety features in a city. This helps the city effectively track everything, and if there is a discrepancy, the authorities are able to act quickly and put an end to the situation so that it does not escalate. Recommended:  Five Minutes To Midnight: Climate Change Action Fighting The Clock Sustainability In A Smart City Smart cities pay extra attention to sustainability, and this is reflected in the fact that they focus on renewable energy sources. Recommended:  Vortex Wind Turbine: Energy Generator Without Blades If everyone uses a solar-powered system, carbon emissions will be reduced. We can recycle garbage and use the thrown away materials again. Or we may use free rainwater to flush our toilets. We can also apply durability to traffic by using smart transport. For example, to see where there is congestion and possibly change to a better route. We could also use smart traffic lights. All of this will contribute to a better quality of life. That is the ultimate purpose of a smart city: the best possible living circumstances for everybody, to provide a way of life that is the best combination of technology and comfort. Before you go! Recommended:  Hydrogen Is The Fuel Of The Future: Questions & Answers Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about Hydrogen and Architecture? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'  
Information from a library, hospital or public transport exposed? More sustainability, improved mobility, efficiency and safety? Where can you find all of the above in one place? The answer is a smart city. Its purpose is to improve the quality of life by making the town more efficient and by reducing the distance between the citizens and the government. In this article you will read more about the smart city and what it means for our privacy.  Smart: Improved technologies Technology is moving forward, devices are becoming smarter, so it is inevitable that in the future we will use electronic devices much more than we do now. To keep the city up and running, the existing technologies need to be upgraded. Otherwise, they cannot meet the specifications and demands of the current system. But what do we want? Investigation shows that we wish for smart transportation, where machines and devices communicate with each other. We want smart buildings, where the windows can open automatically, where there is always a connection with the Internet. That is our future. Smart Technology: Are We Being Watched? Cameras are hanging everywhere to guarantee our safety. But do we feel safe by it? We could get the feeling that we are being watched, every step we take is registered by authorities. Besides cameras, all data is collected. This way, authorities know for example the number of visitors at a certain event or they possess information about citizens for commercial purposes. They may sell this information to third parties.   {youtube}              Smart City: How do you live in a Smart City? | Future Smart City Projects | Surveillance or Utopia?   Safe And Efficient: Privacy In A Smart City Like mentioned before, cameras are everywhere, and data is collected. What does that mean for our privacy? Who is the gatekeeper to our data? And what if the information is hacked? The more internet data there is, the more fragile we become. Fortunately, with the arrival of the GDPR in May 2018, the rules on the subject are becoming more strict. The citizen must be informed in understandable language, especially when it comes to data traffic in a smart city. Smart Cities: Costs Savings Or Costs Loss? All these new technologies cost money. To upgrade the existing technologies, we (governments, state or country) need to invest vast amounts of money. However, due to these smart cities, there could be economic benefits coming from the transition towards a smart city, for example when it comes to real estate. Buildings have to deal with endless energy, such as heating and cooling installations, lighting, electrical wiring, communication, lifts, electrical appliances, etcetera. A computer-controlled system regulates, monitors and controls all of this. But this can be done by automated systems. Automated systems can be used for this purpose, and therefore energy consumption can be reduced. For example, the light is turned off at a fixed time, or when nobody is present in the room, ventilation can be regulated on the number of people in the room. This can improve air quality, and will lead to user satisfaction. So yes, at first it will cost money, but in the end, it will save a lot as well. Recommended:  Sustainability And Higher Efficiency: Smart Cities Globally Smart Cities: Reducing Damages In Case Of A Disaster  Smart cities use sensors that are suitable for detecting abnormalities in a town or during an event. In this way, the sensors can inform the authorities if a measurement differs from the limited safety features in a city. This helps the city effectively track everything, and if there is a discrepancy, the authorities are able to act quickly and put an end to the situation so that it does not escalate. Recommended:  Five Minutes To Midnight: Climate Change Action Fighting The Clock Sustainability In A Smart City Smart cities pay extra attention to sustainability, and this is reflected in the fact that they focus on renewable energy sources. Recommended:  Vortex Wind Turbine: Energy Generator Without Blades If everyone uses a solar-powered system, carbon emissions will be reduced. We can recycle garbage and use the thrown away materials again. Or we may use free rainwater to flush our toilets. We can also apply durability to traffic by using smart transport. For example, to see where there is congestion and possibly change to a better route. We could also use smart traffic lights. All of this will contribute to a better quality of life. That is the ultimate purpose of a smart city: the best possible living circumstances for everybody, to provide a way of life that is the best combination of technology and comfort. Before you go! Recommended:  Hydrogen Is The Fuel Of The Future: Questions & Answers Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about Hydrogen and Architecture? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'  
Smart Cities, Safe And Efficient, But Are We Being Watched?
Smart Cities, Safe And Efficient, But Are We Being Watched?
Floating City: A Sci-Fi Trope Or A Salvation?
In 1995, Universal Studios released a movie called 'Waterworld.' It takes place in a distant future, where polar ice caps have completely melted, and the sea consumed nearly all of the land, forcing remaining humans to live on floating communities. At the time, this was the most expensive movie ever made – and it wasn’t exactly a box office hit. But would it be possible to successfully recreate the futuristic communities from the film in real life? The Seasteading Institute answers this question with a resounding “yes!” Floating City: Solution To Rising Sea Levels Seasteading Institute is a non-profit organization that was founded in 2008, and its mission is 'to enable seasteading communities – floating cities – which will allow the next generation of pioneers to test new ideas for government peacefully.' They have partnered up with many companies, academics, architects, and governments, and they are aiming to build the prototype off the coast of Tahiti by 2020. At first glance, the idea seems very appealing. Rising sea levels and populism are putting pressure on many communities, and the founders of the Seasteading Institute are hoping to give people a chance to redesign society and experiment with new forms of government. According to Joe Quirk, the current president of the institute, existing governments don’t get better because “land incentivizes a violent monopoly to control it.” Thus, according to him, “no land means no problem,” but this isn’t a view that’s shared by everyone. Photo: The Seasteading Institute. Bart Roeffen. Polynesian flower island concept for the Seasteading Institute. Many experts have criticized the plan, calling it impractical and elitist. Professor Peter Newman from Curtin University described the idea as “apartheid of the worst kind.” He argues that only the wealthy will be able to afford to live on these islands and to allow them to set their own rules will only further the divide between the wealthy and the rest of the world. He also doubts that this is something that will be possible to sustain long-term in most places from a societal point of view. After all, healthcare, education, and various forms of entertainment are vital to societies, yet hard to deliver in such small, isolated communities. However, Professor Newman did agree that we have the technology to create such eco-friendly, self-sustaining cities. Neil Davies, the executive director of the University of California, agrees with him – it is possible to build floating cities that wouldn’t have a negative impact, as long as you respect certain conditions about shading and location. A precedent was set by the Barrier Reef Resort, which was located about 70km(or 43,5 miles) off the Queensland coast. It withstood a cyclone and water quality, and noise monitoring has shown that it had no significant effect on the surroundings.  Floating City: A Way To Solve Environmental Issues Mr. Quirk’s plans are genuinely ambitious when it comes to making these islands self-sufficient and sustainable. The islands will be built on floating panels that will help regenerate coral reefs and reverse coral bleaching. This will be made possible by positioning them in such a way that a perfect balance of light and shadow will be created to allow for photosynthesis, while at the same time lowering the temperatures enough to achieve a restorative effect. In addition to this, the floating panels will have a plethora of solar panels integrated into them to power the islands. Recommended:  Reduce Your Environmental Impact: Tips and Tricks Regenerating coral reefs isn’t the only positive impact on the environment Mr. Quirk is hoping his seasteads can achieve. The Institute is hoping to harness ocean aquaculture as a way to meet food, energy, and nutritional supplement demands. Rutger de Graaf and Karina Czapiewska are aquatic engineers from the Netherlands that have partnered up with the Seasteading Institute to create algae farms. Micro- and macroalgae (better known as plankton and seaweed) have an essential role in regulating the earth’s atmosphere, absorbing waste such as oil spills and providing food for fish, as well as being a valuable crop on their own. When seaweed is mass-produced, it can also be converted into biofuel. This way, the islands can not only be self-sufficient but also provide communities on land with more eco-friendly energy and food sources – all while helping create new, complex ecosystems that will be able to sustain thousands of species. Recommended:  Combing Plastic Waste Out Oceans: Competition For Boyan Slat {youtube}                                                                               Worlds first floating city. Another technology that Mr. Quirk is hoping to see implemented in their seasteads is drifter pens made by Velella Mariculture Research Project. These pens will allow farming fish in conditions that are closest to their natural habitats but are better. The fish are well-fed, they have no parasites, don’t get exposed to mercury and pesticides, all while being able to school like they would in the wild. This technology is a sustainable food source, and it is set to help repopulate oceans with healthier, happier fish. The founder of Velella Mariculture Research Project, Neil Anthony Sims, says “We need to bring together the environmental motive, the humanitarian motive, the profit motive, so they are not at odds with each other, but aligned with each other.” Indeed, these plans sound incredibly ambitious – but if realized, these floating cities can transform many nations and have a positive impact on the environment, economies, and societies around the globe. Do you think that Seastead Institute will be able to make these floating communities? Are there similar projects that you think could become more successful? Let us know in the comments below!                              Before you go! Recommended:  Smart Communities: Eco-Living Through Technology Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about green architecture?  Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
In 1995, Universal Studios released a movie called 'Waterworld.' It takes place in a distant future, where polar ice caps have completely melted, and the sea consumed nearly all of the land, forcing remaining humans to live on floating communities. At the time, this was the most expensive movie ever made – and it wasn’t exactly a box office hit. But would it be possible to successfully recreate the futuristic communities from the film in real life? The Seasteading Institute answers this question with a resounding “yes!” Floating City: Solution To Rising Sea Levels Seasteading Institute is a non-profit organization that was founded in 2008, and its mission is 'to enable seasteading communities – floating cities – which will allow the next generation of pioneers to test new ideas for government peacefully.' They have partnered up with many companies, academics, architects, and governments, and they are aiming to build the prototype off the coast of Tahiti by 2020. At first glance, the idea seems very appealing. Rising sea levels and populism are putting pressure on many communities, and the founders of the Seasteading Institute are hoping to give people a chance to redesign society and experiment with new forms of government. According to Joe Quirk, the current president of the institute, existing governments don’t get better because “land incentivizes a violent monopoly to control it.” Thus, according to him, “no land means no problem,” but this isn’t a view that’s shared by everyone. Photo: The Seasteading Institute. Bart Roeffen. Polynesian flower island concept for the Seasteading Institute. Many experts have criticized the plan, calling it impractical and elitist. Professor Peter Newman from Curtin University described the idea as “apartheid of the worst kind.” He argues that only the wealthy will be able to afford to live on these islands and to allow them to set their own rules will only further the divide between the wealthy and the rest of the world. He also doubts that this is something that will be possible to sustain long-term in most places from a societal point of view. After all, healthcare, education, and various forms of entertainment are vital to societies, yet hard to deliver in such small, isolated communities. However, Professor Newman did agree that we have the technology to create such eco-friendly, self-sustaining cities. Neil Davies, the executive director of the University of California, agrees with him – it is possible to build floating cities that wouldn’t have a negative impact, as long as you respect certain conditions about shading and location. A precedent was set by the Barrier Reef Resort, which was located about 70km(or 43,5 miles) off the Queensland coast. It withstood a cyclone and water quality, and noise monitoring has shown that it had no significant effect on the surroundings.  Floating City: A Way To Solve Environmental Issues Mr. Quirk’s plans are genuinely ambitious when it comes to making these islands self-sufficient and sustainable. The islands will be built on floating panels that will help regenerate coral reefs and reverse coral bleaching. This will be made possible by positioning them in such a way that a perfect balance of light and shadow will be created to allow for photosynthesis, while at the same time lowering the temperatures enough to achieve a restorative effect. In addition to this, the floating panels will have a plethora of solar panels integrated into them to power the islands. Recommended:  Reduce Your Environmental Impact: Tips and Tricks Regenerating coral reefs isn’t the only positive impact on the environment Mr. Quirk is hoping his seasteads can achieve. The Institute is hoping to harness ocean aquaculture as a way to meet food, energy, and nutritional supplement demands. Rutger de Graaf and Karina Czapiewska are aquatic engineers from the Netherlands that have partnered up with the Seasteading Institute to create algae farms. Micro- and macroalgae (better known as plankton and seaweed) have an essential role in regulating the earth’s atmosphere, absorbing waste such as oil spills and providing food for fish, as well as being a valuable crop on their own. When seaweed is mass-produced, it can also be converted into biofuel. This way, the islands can not only be self-sufficient but also provide communities on land with more eco-friendly energy and food sources – all while helping create new, complex ecosystems that will be able to sustain thousands of species. Recommended:  Combing Plastic Waste Out Oceans: Competition For Boyan Slat {youtube}                                                                               Worlds first floating city. Another technology that Mr. Quirk is hoping to see implemented in their seasteads is drifter pens made by Velella Mariculture Research Project. These pens will allow farming fish in conditions that are closest to their natural habitats but are better. The fish are well-fed, they have no parasites, don’t get exposed to mercury and pesticides, all while being able to school like they would in the wild. This technology is a sustainable food source, and it is set to help repopulate oceans with healthier, happier fish. The founder of Velella Mariculture Research Project, Neil Anthony Sims, says “We need to bring together the environmental motive, the humanitarian motive, the profit motive, so they are not at odds with each other, but aligned with each other.” Indeed, these plans sound incredibly ambitious – but if realized, these floating cities can transform many nations and have a positive impact on the environment, economies, and societies around the globe. Do you think that Seastead Institute will be able to make these floating communities? Are there similar projects that you think could become more successful? Let us know in the comments below!                              Before you go! Recommended:  Smart Communities: Eco-Living Through Technology Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about green architecture?  Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Floating City: A Sci-Fi Trope Or A Salvation?
Floating City: A Sci-Fi Trope Or A Salvation?
Community

A community is you and me. A network of social, economic, ecological and many other relationships. We all work together and live in urban, suburban and rural areas. Social sustainability is becoming increasingly important on our small planet. We define: support, quality of life, development, adaptation, rights and labour.

We belong to a group of individuals - our society - in which we belong geographically. Certain environmental issues play an important role in our society. Here, sustainable solutions are sought, developed and implemented. This may differ from societies in other countries, but because of our global environmental issues and dependence, we must learn to work more together so that we can all benefit from sharing sustainable knowledge to tackle, for example, climate change.

Green architecture is important. Building with local materials that can be recycled and reused brings us a big step forward to have less impact on the environment. With green architecture we can build smart cities where resources can be used more efficiently and information can be shared, thus improving our society, your community.

Lifestyle is the way we live, the dynamics of personality. Fashion defines our self and together with food it is getting - at present - an even more important role in our society. It's not just about taste, but especially about the burden that the fashion industry, agriculture and the meat industry have on our resources, especially water.

If there was an urge to come up with a sustainable way of living solutions and share these topics globally it’s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about tiny houses, your experiences and expectations for the future at home and globally. 

Global Sustainability X-change, that’s what you can do together with WhatsOrb. What's in for me?

 

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