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About: <p>A community is you and me. A network of social, economic, ecological and many other relationships. We all work together and live in urban, suburban and rural areas. Social sustainability is becoming increasingly important on our small planet. We define: support, quality of life, development, adaptation, rights and labour.</p> <p>We belong to a group of individuals - <a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/society">our society</a> - in which we belong geographically. Certain environmental issues play an important role in our society. Here, sustainable solutions are sought, developed and implemented. This may differ from societies in other countries, but because of our global environmental issues and&nbsp;<span lang="en" tabindex="0">dependence</span>, we must learn to work more together so that we can all benefit from sharing sustainable knowledge to tackle, for example, climate change.</p> <p><a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/green-architecture">Green architecture</a> is important. Building with local materials that can be recycled and reused brings us a big step forward to have less impact on the environment. With green architecture we can build <a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/smart-cities">smart cities</a> where resources can be used more efficiently and information can be shared, thus improving our society, your community.</p> <p><a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/lifestyle">Lifestyle</a> is the way we live, the dynamics of personality. Fashion defines our self and together with food it is getting - at present - an even more important role in our society. It's not just about taste, but especially about the burden that the fashion industry, agriculture and the meat industry have on our resources, especially water.</p> <p>If there was an urge to come up with a sustainable way of living solutions and share these topics globally it&rsquo;s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about tiny houses, your experiences and expectations for the future at home and globally.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Global Sustainability X-change, that&rsquo;s what you can do together with WhatsOrb.&nbsp;<a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/newsletter/your-shared-sustainable-ideas-make-our-earth-a-better-place">What's in for me?</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
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Social Distancing: Turning Offshore Oil Rigs Into Houses
In the distant past, mankind was actually not as keen on living together as we seem today. Sure, we grouped together when it came to hunting, gathering and taking care of their families, but we tende d to avoid areas where we knew other tribes to be hanging around. Our ancestors much favoured the empty lands, as it promised them a wealth of untapped potential for food and other resources. Corona Virus Highlighting Need For Social Distancing Somehow, we evolved to the point where we became social creatures, keen on living together in tight packs. 5, 10, or even 50 or 100 story high buildings, boasting large numbers of apartments on each floor. It is the human equivalent of the ants’ nest. We are quite literally living on top of each other. Which could be great for a lot of things - and it is very convenient for those of us who need to live close to the office or to relatives. Yet in times such as these, with the Corona virus sweeping across the globe, it is starting to show why social distancing is not such a bad thing after all. While living together has offered many benefits to the growing world population, the downsides are now becoming apparent. It also means that diseases are able to spread quickly, jumping from one body to the other at breakneck speed. Recommended:  Coronavirus, COVID-19 Symptoms Flu And Global Climate Change This is why the invention of Paris-based architecture firm XTU architects is such a remarkable one. These visionary minds have come up with a project titled x_lands, that is looking to find a purpose for offshore oil rigs after the oil is depleted. Quite a large number of those bad boys have been constructed over the past century to get our hands on this natural resource, but it looks as if the age of oil is now coming to a close - with renewable and green energy taking over. Offshore Oil Platforms As Location For Prime Accommodation Now, XTU architects figured they could use the striking looking offshore platforms in order to create actual accommodations. Each community of houses will be created on the oil rig itself, futuristically shaped - like bubbles, for instance, or like containers. Sustainable and light shapes that can easily be transported to the remote location. Recommended:  Floating City: A Sci-Fi Trope Or A Salvation For Many Nations? Furthermore, to add to the sustainability, the rigs are to incorporate all kinds of greenery in the structures, making it not just industrial but also green, inviting and welcoming. There could be several rigs, interconnected using glass or wood walkways, or one single rig that quite literally rises to the sky. It is definitely the kind of material sci-fi movies are made of.   Sustainability And Renewable Energy Come First Each platform will also boast its own electricity source - primarily through windmills, although solar panels and hydroelectricity generated by water running down the structures will be used as well. The rendered images of those platforms also include a wealth of drones swarming the houses, probably for deliveries and the like. It is not just the idea of finding alternative uses for abandoned oil rigs, aiding us in getting rid of the polluting resource once and for all. It is also the idea of finding ways of living on previously inhabitable areas to provide some much-needed relief to the overpopulated areas on land. Recommended:  Geothermal Power Accessible As Wind And Solar Energy: Climeon The Strategy Of Social Distancing Towards The Future If diseases like Covid-19 are to become commonplace, we should find more ways of keeping a reasonable distance from one another - social distancing will become a term that all of us will be more than familiar with. Yet while the concept of XTU architects is admirable, I am not sure it is the type of social distancing that we should be looking for. People who work on oil rigs go through rigorous testing to ensure they are physically and mentally fit enough to do so.   Social distancing It is not like you could visit your neighbours, or pop down to the supermarket for a quick grocery run. The loneliness will be real and the solitude, out on the ocean, could turn out to be too much for some. Add to this the often unpredictable and extreme weather encountered on these locations, and it might just turn out that there is limited interest for living on an abandoned oil rig. The thought, though, is definitely something worth considering.   Before you go! Recommended:  Earth Matters. Nature And Us: What Was, What’s Left: Hope? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about nature? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
In the distant past, mankind was actually not as keen on living together as we seem today. Sure, we grouped together when it came to hunting, gathering and taking care of their families, but we tende d to avoid areas where we knew other tribes to be hanging around. Our ancestors much favoured the empty lands, as it promised them a wealth of untapped potential for food and other resources. Corona Virus Highlighting Need For Social Distancing Somehow, we evolved to the point where we became social creatures, keen on living together in tight packs. 5, 10, or even 50 or 100 story high buildings, boasting large numbers of apartments on each floor. It is the human equivalent of the ants’ nest. We are quite literally living on top of each other. Which could be great for a lot of things - and it is very convenient for those of us who need to live close to the office or to relatives. Yet in times such as these, with the Corona virus sweeping across the globe, it is starting to show why social distancing is not such a bad thing after all. While living together has offered many benefits to the growing world population, the downsides are now becoming apparent. It also means that diseases are able to spread quickly, jumping from one body to the other at breakneck speed. Recommended:  Coronavirus, COVID-19 Symptoms Flu And Global Climate Change This is why the invention of Paris-based architecture firm XTU architects is such a remarkable one. These visionary minds have come up with a project titled x_lands, that is looking to find a purpose for offshore oil rigs after the oil is depleted. Quite a large number of those bad boys have been constructed over the past century to get our hands on this natural resource, but it looks as if the age of oil is now coming to a close - with renewable and green energy taking over. Offshore Oil Platforms As Location For Prime Accommodation Now, XTU architects figured they could use the striking looking offshore platforms in order to create actual accommodations. Each community of houses will be created on the oil rig itself, futuristically shaped - like bubbles, for instance, or like containers. Sustainable and light shapes that can easily be transported to the remote location. Recommended:  Floating City: A Sci-Fi Trope Or A Salvation For Many Nations? Furthermore, to add to the sustainability, the rigs are to incorporate all kinds of greenery in the structures, making it not just industrial but also green, inviting and welcoming. There could be several rigs, interconnected using glass or wood walkways, or one single rig that quite literally rises to the sky. It is definitely the kind of material sci-fi movies are made of.   Sustainability And Renewable Energy Come First Each platform will also boast its own electricity source - primarily through windmills, although solar panels and hydroelectricity generated by water running down the structures will be used as well. The rendered images of those platforms also include a wealth of drones swarming the houses, probably for deliveries and the like. It is not just the idea of finding alternative uses for abandoned oil rigs, aiding us in getting rid of the polluting resource once and for all. It is also the idea of finding ways of living on previously inhabitable areas to provide some much-needed relief to the overpopulated areas on land. Recommended:  Geothermal Power Accessible As Wind And Solar Energy: Climeon The Strategy Of Social Distancing Towards The Future If diseases like Covid-19 are to become commonplace, we should find more ways of keeping a reasonable distance from one another - social distancing will become a term that all of us will be more than familiar with. Yet while the concept of XTU architects is admirable, I am not sure it is the type of social distancing that we should be looking for. People who work on oil rigs go through rigorous testing to ensure they are physically and mentally fit enough to do so.   Social distancing It is not like you could visit your neighbours, or pop down to the supermarket for a quick grocery run. The loneliness will be real and the solitude, out on the ocean, could turn out to be too much for some. Add to this the often unpredictable and extreme weather encountered on these locations, and it might just turn out that there is limited interest for living on an abandoned oil rig. The thought, though, is definitely something worth considering.   Before you go! Recommended:  Earth Matters. Nature And Us: What Was, What’s Left: Hope? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about nature? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Social Distancing: Turning Offshore Oil Rigs Into Houses
Social Distancing: Turning Offshore Oil Rigs Into Houses
Pandemic and Ecological Reset: The World Green Again
The World Green Again. The aftermath of the coronavirus pandemic written by an 'observer' who lived in the Alps, France in 2024. (fiction) Pandemic and Ecological Reset Many people died of the coronavirus pandemic and this made us see the world differently – finally.  We became convinced that the coronavirus pandemic had taught us that we could not continue our consumption habits – our lifestyle - as we had done before. In May 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic reached its 'first' peak. About a billion people were infected worldwide and 40 million died. In October 2020, researchers found out that the coronavirus would come back as a 'normal' seasonal flu and wreak havoc on infected people every year. Another bad trait was that the coronavirus behaved like the Dengue virus. When people became infected for the second time, the chances of recovery were smaller than the first time. The third time people would get it, it would kill most people. In the winter of 2021, nearly 2 billion people became infected and nearly 100 million died because of the coronavirus pandemic. {youtube}                                                                   What Was the 1918 Influenza Pandemic? Ecological Reset: The Vaccin Fortunately, researchers had found a vaccine made to respond to the natural mutation (s) of the coronavirus. This meant that it worked as a smart vaccine that adapted to a potential new corona variant that was made almost 90% directly immobile by the vaccine. Photo by: Dimitri Houtteman In 2022, half a billion people had died from the new strains of the coronavirus, but new vaccines began to have a visible effect on the number of fatalities. Of course, the economy had slowed since the start of the pandemic in 2020. Air travel had almost come to a complete standstill. The export of goods was limited and social life in any form came to a 'temporary' halt (weeks to six months). Recommended:  Green Trains Or Flying High? Travel The Globe Sustainable The World Green Again All this had a remarkably positive effect on the environment. CO2 in the atmosphere went down so rapidly that it dropped from 414 ppm in 2020 to 380 ppm in 2023. Nature started to recover. People started using their ornamental gardens to grow vegetables, herbs and fruits. all over the world people started to grow their own food. Chickens and other livestock were kept on a small scale and - as in the 1960s - were fed food remnants. Due to power shortages, people used their computers and mobile phones less. Community life began to flourish again. Books were read again and children started playing outside more often. There was much less traffic. Gasoline was limited and sales of 'old-fashioned' bicycles had never been higher. Photo by: NeONBRAND Countries restarted the production of certain goods that they had stopped sometime in the 1980s of the last century because it was cheaper to outsource it to low income countries. But now it was ‘again’ to be more important to be independent from other countries. It was also about the health of the environment, of people, of animals, of ... Recommended:  Society Collapse: Climate Change, The Environment Or Us? Ecological Reset: Savior Of Humanity The coronavirus pandemic turned out to be the savior of humanity and taught us to look at nature differently. All governments worldwide no longer had economic growth as their main focus, but well-being for everyone on our planet. The effects of the coronavirus pandemic are still felt worldwide and will be felt for the next 10 years but it was necessary to save humanity from its own demise. Coverphoto by: Chromatograph Before you go! Recommended:  Coronavirus: What A Blessing For The Planet. Provocative? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about the coronavirus? Click on  'Re g ister'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
The World Green Again. The aftermath of the coronavirus pandemic written by an 'observer' who lived in the Alps, France in 2024. (fiction) Pandemic and Ecological Reset Many people died of the coronavirus pandemic and this made us see the world differently – finally.  We became convinced that the coronavirus pandemic had taught us that we could not continue our consumption habits – our lifestyle - as we had done before. In May 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic reached its 'first' peak. About a billion people were infected worldwide and 40 million died. In October 2020, researchers found out that the coronavirus would come back as a 'normal' seasonal flu and wreak havoc on infected people every year. Another bad trait was that the coronavirus behaved like the Dengue virus. When people became infected for the second time, the chances of recovery were smaller than the first time. The third time people would get it, it would kill most people. In the winter of 2021, nearly 2 billion people became infected and nearly 100 million died because of the coronavirus pandemic. {youtube}                                                                   What Was the 1918 Influenza Pandemic? Ecological Reset: The Vaccin Fortunately, researchers had found a vaccine made to respond to the natural mutation (s) of the coronavirus. This meant that it worked as a smart vaccine that adapted to a potential new corona variant that was made almost 90% directly immobile by the vaccine. Photo by: Dimitri Houtteman In 2022, half a billion people had died from the new strains of the coronavirus, but new vaccines began to have a visible effect on the number of fatalities. Of course, the economy had slowed since the start of the pandemic in 2020. Air travel had almost come to a complete standstill. The export of goods was limited and social life in any form came to a 'temporary' halt (weeks to six months). Recommended:  Green Trains Or Flying High? Travel The Globe Sustainable The World Green Again All this had a remarkably positive effect on the environment. CO2 in the atmosphere went down so rapidly that it dropped from 414 ppm in 2020 to 380 ppm in 2023. Nature started to recover. People started using their ornamental gardens to grow vegetables, herbs and fruits. all over the world people started to grow their own food. Chickens and other livestock were kept on a small scale and - as in the 1960s - were fed food remnants. Due to power shortages, people used their computers and mobile phones less. Community life began to flourish again. Books were read again and children started playing outside more often. There was much less traffic. Gasoline was limited and sales of 'old-fashioned' bicycles had never been higher. Photo by: NeONBRAND Countries restarted the production of certain goods that they had stopped sometime in the 1980s of the last century because it was cheaper to outsource it to low income countries. But now it was ‘again’ to be more important to be independent from other countries. It was also about the health of the environment, of people, of animals, of ... Recommended:  Society Collapse: Climate Change, The Environment Or Us? Ecological Reset: Savior Of Humanity The coronavirus pandemic turned out to be the savior of humanity and taught us to look at nature differently. All governments worldwide no longer had economic growth as their main focus, but well-being for everyone on our planet. The effects of the coronavirus pandemic are still felt worldwide and will be felt for the next 10 years but it was necessary to save humanity from its own demise. Coverphoto by: Chromatograph Before you go! Recommended:  Coronavirus: What A Blessing For The Planet. Provocative? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about the coronavirus? Click on  'Re g ister'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Pandemic and Ecological Reset: The World Green Again
Pandemic and Ecological Reset: The World Green Again
CO2 Footprint Food: It Is What You Eat Not If It Is Local
You can hardly set foot in a restaurant these days without being bombarded with the ‘local’ signs. Locally brewed beers, locally caught fish. Dishes with ingredients that are locally grown. It is being hailed as a stamp of (local) approval, something that is organic, something that helps the local entrepreneurs. CO2 Footprint Food: Environmental Impacts Oftentimes, these are not wrong. By buying locally sourced produce, you do support your local community. Yet the organic element is often inferred but not always correctly so: small local producers often rely on inorganic processes, as the scale advantages are not present. Nonetheless, the benefits of eating local are overstated and not necessarily more sustainable. While people often look at the transportation and energy industries as the largest CO2 emitters, there is in fact another large polluter. More than 25% of the world’s emissions are resulting from the production of food. As there are more than 7 billion of us who want to eat, preferably on a daily basis, it is not surprising that this takes up a lot of our resources. Recommended:  Vegan Food You Need To Develop Your Muscles: Protein Power The exact amount of resources used for our food production does, however, depend on what we eat. Our diet and eating habits are determinant of the exact size of our carbon footprint. This means that by making different food choices for our breakfast, lunch and dinner, we can do our part in combatting climate change.                                                                 The diet that helps fight climate change This does not always mean that we have to eat local. Intuitively, it seems to make more sense to do so - transportation is another big polluter, so avoiding it seems a big help. Only partly true - the share of transportation in the total food footprint is relatively minor, so it should not be the most important determinant. This means that what you eat is more important than where it came from. CO2 Footprint Food: Where Do The Emissions Come From? Looking at a piechart of greenhouse gas emissions for a wide range of food stuffs, we can start drawing some meaningful comparisons and come up with a truly sustainable diet. Emissions from food production roughly fall in four categories: land use, processing, transport and packaging. According to the world’s largest analysis of global food systems, there are massive differences in the greenhouse gas emissions for different food groups. One of the largest polluters? Your steak or hamburger, at 60 kilograms of greenhouse gases per kilogram of beef. This stands in stark contrast to the good ol’ peas, which only emit one kilogram per kilogram. Recommended:  Climate Change Stop, Store CO2, Add Phytoplankton By Whales? 'Your steak on the road' This seems indicative of a trend, where animal-based foods are generally emitting more than plant-based products. Being vegan would therefore be a more sustainable choice than going for the paleo-diet. And it is not just beef, but products like lamb and cheese are pretty polluting as well (both produce over 20 kilogram of greenhouse gasses per kilogram of product). Other animal-based products, including poultry, eggs, and pork, are more sustainable choices (6 kilograms per kilogram), but still more polluting than most plant-based options. Recommended:  Blue Planet Earth: The Amount Of Water You Use More significantly, though, the data allows us to observe where the emissions come from. As it turns out, the use of land and the processing of products at the farm stage are most polluting - coming in at 80% of the total food footprint. As mentioned before, transport is only a small part, coming in at less than 10% for most products - going as low as 0.5% for beef products. Other parts of the supply chain are similarly low on their emissions. This includes retail and packaging, making that very sustainable cardboard packaging for your local fruit largely irrelevant. Recommended:  Are Bio Based Bottles Good For The Environment? CO2 Footprint Food: Eating Local Only Slightly Reduces Your Emissions If you are going to a local farmer for his beef or lamb, you might think that you are doing well for the environment - while you are actually increasing your food footprint far more than if you opted for some far-away grown produce. If you opted instead for eating New-Zealand lamb in Europe or Scottish beef in the States, you would hardly be causing any additional pollution. Once again, it goes to show that eating local has very little effect on the total food emissions. This especially holds true for beef, one of the largest polluters in and of itself. Opting for beef from local cows does not do anything towards making you a more sustainable person. Not eating beef does. A study of Weber and Matthews (2008) found that if an average family were to substitute their hamburger and ice-cream (so their beef and dairy products) for poultry, pork, fish, eggs or plant-products, for just one single day per week, this would effectively do more to reduce their emissions than buying all their products locally. How? Estimates have shown that even if you are to purchase all of your food locally, you would at the most reduce your carbon footprint by 5%. And this number is probably already too high, as it does not take into account the emissions associated with getting the food from the producers to your home. Not eating beef just one day per week already almost completely offsets this amount (which reduces your carbon footprint by 4%). Recommended:  We Created The Coronavirus: A Milieu Flaw That Will Kill Us In extreme cases, eating locally might actually increase your carbon footprint. Most countries have a climate that is such that certain food stuffs cannot be produced all year round. Strawberries, for instance, or apples. Yet consumers want to enjoy these all year round. This means that we either have to import them from other countries where they are in-season, use refrigeration and preservation methods to store them after harvesting, or use artificial methods to produce them, such as greenhouses. The latter two are very energy-intensive, which makes importing - unsurprisingly - the best option. CO2 Footprint Food: Avoid Air-Freighted Food The message thus far has been pretty depressing: eating locally will not help you do well for the environment. Then what will? For starters, avoiding beef, dairy and lamb will go a long way. Then, there is one notable exception to the transportation rule that you should be aware of. Transportation might not be a major polluter in and of itself, but air transportation definitely is. Air-freight food is rare - much rarer than you would expect, at about 0,16% of the total - but has a pretty big footprint nonetheless: about 50 times more than other transportation methods, such as the far more common boat, that hauls our precious avocados and almonds. Recommended:  Wine Unplugged: The Age Of the Bordeaux Wine Snob Is Dead Identifying food that has been brought to you by plane is pretty hard. It is time to start being suspicious when you notice a far-away country on the label of a very perishable product, like berries, beans and asparagus. These have a short shelf-life, too short to be transported by boat - and require a certain freshness. Those characteristics should get some alarm bells ringing in your head. So, if you are insistent on eating locally for the environments’ sake, you will find yourself disillusioned. Avoiding air-freighted food will have a minimal impact as well. Your best bet is to stick with foods that are in-season and avoid dairy and beef products as much as you can - this is where you’ll really start to make a difference. It is all about what you eat, not where it came from. Cover photo by: Pablo Merchán Montes Before you go! Recommended:  Getting Healthier By Eating Sustainable Food And Taking Exercise Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about vegan food? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
You can hardly set foot in a restaurant these days without being bombarded with the ‘local’ signs. Locally brewed beers, locally caught fish. Dishes with ingredients that are locally grown. It is being hailed as a stamp of (local) approval, something that is organic, something that helps the local entrepreneurs. CO2 Footprint Food: Environmental Impacts Oftentimes, these are not wrong. By buying locally sourced produce, you do support your local community. Yet the organic element is often inferred but not always correctly so: small local producers often rely on inorganic processes, as the scale advantages are not present. Nonetheless, the benefits of eating local are overstated and not necessarily more sustainable. While people often look at the transportation and energy industries as the largest CO2 emitters, there is in fact another large polluter. More than 25% of the world’s emissions are resulting from the production of food. As there are more than 7 billion of us who want to eat, preferably on a daily basis, it is not surprising that this takes up a lot of our resources. Recommended:  Vegan Food You Need To Develop Your Muscles: Protein Power The exact amount of resources used for our food production does, however, depend on what we eat. Our diet and eating habits are determinant of the exact size of our carbon footprint. This means that by making different food choices for our breakfast, lunch and dinner, we can do our part in combatting climate change.                                                                 The diet that helps fight climate change This does not always mean that we have to eat local. Intuitively, it seems to make more sense to do so - transportation is another big polluter, so avoiding it seems a big help. Only partly true - the share of transportation in the total food footprint is relatively minor, so it should not be the most important determinant. This means that what you eat is more important than where it came from. CO2 Footprint Food: Where Do The Emissions Come From? Looking at a piechart of greenhouse gas emissions for a wide range of food stuffs, we can start drawing some meaningful comparisons and come up with a truly sustainable diet. Emissions from food production roughly fall in four categories: land use, processing, transport and packaging. According to the world’s largest analysis of global food systems, there are massive differences in the greenhouse gas emissions for different food groups. One of the largest polluters? Your steak or hamburger, at 60 kilograms of greenhouse gases per kilogram of beef. This stands in stark contrast to the good ol’ peas, which only emit one kilogram per kilogram. Recommended:  Climate Change Stop, Store CO2, Add Phytoplankton By Whales? 'Your steak on the road' This seems indicative of a trend, where animal-based foods are generally emitting more than plant-based products. Being vegan would therefore be a more sustainable choice than going for the paleo-diet. And it is not just beef, but products like lamb and cheese are pretty polluting as well (both produce over 20 kilogram of greenhouse gasses per kilogram of product). Other animal-based products, including poultry, eggs, and pork, are more sustainable choices (6 kilograms per kilogram), but still more polluting than most plant-based options. Recommended:  Blue Planet Earth: The Amount Of Water You Use More significantly, though, the data allows us to observe where the emissions come from. As it turns out, the use of land and the processing of products at the farm stage are most polluting - coming in at 80% of the total food footprint. As mentioned before, transport is only a small part, coming in at less than 10% for most products - going as low as 0.5% for beef products. Other parts of the supply chain are similarly low on their emissions. This includes retail and packaging, making that very sustainable cardboard packaging for your local fruit largely irrelevant. Recommended:  Are Bio Based Bottles Good For The Environment? CO2 Footprint Food: Eating Local Only Slightly Reduces Your Emissions If you are going to a local farmer for his beef or lamb, you might think that you are doing well for the environment - while you are actually increasing your food footprint far more than if you opted for some far-away grown produce. If you opted instead for eating New-Zealand lamb in Europe or Scottish beef in the States, you would hardly be causing any additional pollution. Once again, it goes to show that eating local has very little effect on the total food emissions. This especially holds true for beef, one of the largest polluters in and of itself. Opting for beef from local cows does not do anything towards making you a more sustainable person. Not eating beef does. A study of Weber and Matthews (2008) found that if an average family were to substitute their hamburger and ice-cream (so their beef and dairy products) for poultry, pork, fish, eggs or plant-products, for just one single day per week, this would effectively do more to reduce their emissions than buying all their products locally. How? Estimates have shown that even if you are to purchase all of your food locally, you would at the most reduce your carbon footprint by 5%. And this number is probably already too high, as it does not take into account the emissions associated with getting the food from the producers to your home. Not eating beef just one day per week already almost completely offsets this amount (which reduces your carbon footprint by 4%). Recommended:  We Created The Coronavirus: A Milieu Flaw That Will Kill Us In extreme cases, eating locally might actually increase your carbon footprint. Most countries have a climate that is such that certain food stuffs cannot be produced all year round. Strawberries, for instance, or apples. Yet consumers want to enjoy these all year round. This means that we either have to import them from other countries where they are in-season, use refrigeration and preservation methods to store them after harvesting, or use artificial methods to produce them, such as greenhouses. The latter two are very energy-intensive, which makes importing - unsurprisingly - the best option. CO2 Footprint Food: Avoid Air-Freighted Food The message thus far has been pretty depressing: eating locally will not help you do well for the environment. Then what will? For starters, avoiding beef, dairy and lamb will go a long way. Then, there is one notable exception to the transportation rule that you should be aware of. Transportation might not be a major polluter in and of itself, but air transportation definitely is. Air-freight food is rare - much rarer than you would expect, at about 0,16% of the total - but has a pretty big footprint nonetheless: about 50 times more than other transportation methods, such as the far more common boat, that hauls our precious avocados and almonds. Recommended:  Wine Unplugged: The Age Of the Bordeaux Wine Snob Is Dead Identifying food that has been brought to you by plane is pretty hard. It is time to start being suspicious when you notice a far-away country on the label of a very perishable product, like berries, beans and asparagus. These have a short shelf-life, too short to be transported by boat - and require a certain freshness. Those characteristics should get some alarm bells ringing in your head. So, if you are insistent on eating locally for the environments’ sake, you will find yourself disillusioned. Avoiding air-freighted food will have a minimal impact as well. Your best bet is to stick with foods that are in-season and avoid dairy and beef products as much as you can - this is where you’ll really start to make a difference. It is all about what you eat, not where it came from. Cover photo by: Pablo Merchán Montes Before you go! Recommended:  Getting Healthier By Eating Sustainable Food And Taking Exercise Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about vegan food? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
CO2 Footprint Food: It Is What You Eat Not If It Is Local
Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say And Resale Expect?
'I won't buy any clothes from fast fashion stores for a year... and hopefully for ever more'. Could you commit to not buying a single item of clothing from fast fashion outlets for an entire year? To only buying clothes from charity shops, second hand shops, or swapping or borrowing items? Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers The seven student in this article say they love fashion and insist their boycott of fast fashion won’t be about them turning their back on clothes. Instead, it will be about getting creative and finding sustainable alternatives. Let's read their motivation to buy only vintage fashion. Recommended:  Circular Sustainable Fashion: Biggest Trend Of The Century Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Niamh Guiry Age: 22 From: Bishopstown Studying: Microbiology (fourth year) Are vintage clothes second hand? On the other hand, vintage refers to a category contained within the second hand category, which is the category of clothes that, even though have been produced a while ago, still have a good quality and can be worn. Clothing has, generally speaking, a very short life span “I’ve decided to boycott fast fashion because no one should suffer so you can look ‘trendy’. I’m always trying to think of new ways that our society can promote sustainability and the issue of fast fashion has been on my mind for a while. “I had been reading about the atrocious human rights violations that occur in this industry and the amount of pollution and waste it creates and I decided that I wanted to try to make a difference. “I thought that pledging to only buy sustainable and second hand clothes for a year could be a good way to do that. I went into one of our weekly committee meeting and asked if anyone wanted to boycott with me. I was beyond thrilled when six hands shot up in the air. {youtube}                                                     Vintage Shopping In London + Trying On What I Got                                              Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say And Resale Expect? “Over the coming year, I’m going to buy as few clothes as possible. If I want to get ‘new’ clothes I’ll go to charity shops, to swap shops, I’ll ask my friends if they have anything I can borrow. “I have plenty clothes (the same as the vast majority of people) I don’t need any more. “I will admit that I absolutely love clothes and I love expressing myself through the clothes I wear. “Over the next year, I’m going to continue doing just that. You can live and shop sustainably and look good at the same time.” Recommended:  Sustainable Fashion From Bio-Materials Good For The World Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say.Caoimhe Flynn. Age: 22 From: Carrigtwohill Studying: BA International in English and German (final year) “Reports and news coverage have exposed time and time again the human rights abuses on which the fast fashion industry is built. “In the midst of the climate crisis, the mass production of ‘disposable’ clothing is also not sustainable. It results in the use of vast quantities of water, burning of fossil fuels and strain on already limited resources. “I aim to avoid increasing the amount of clothing I currently own. I will, however, replace items which are no longer wearable, particularly those that are necessary.  “In the last two years, I had already begun to shop more in the many second hand and charity shops in Cork.  “If I still cannot find what I am looking for, I will allow myself to buy from brands and companies who are dedicated to sustainable practices. “I do not envisage encountering many difficulties along the way, though I have to change my habit of taking the easy way out when something breaks suddenly. “Not popping into fast fashion retailers to buy little things like socks will probably be more difficult than I imagine! In the end however, I know that what I own is already more than enough.” What are the best online thrift stores? 8 Amazing Online Thrift Stores for the Coolest Vintage Clothes Ever ASOS MARKETPLACE. That's right, ASOS has a vintage website too! The Vintage Twin THREDUP Tradesy Maeven Refashioner LePrix Depop Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Isobel O’Connor Sealy Age: 19 From: Tallow, Co. Waterford Studying: Arts International (first year) “I’m boycotting fast fashion because I find it sickening that people work in slave-like conditions making clothes for people like me in developed countries just so we can look fashionable. “I’ll be buying from charity shops, taking hand-me-downs from family, exchanging clothes with friends, and going to swap-shops or kilo-sales to get myself new clothes during this boycott (and hopefully forever more!). “I enjoy knitting and sewing so perhaps I’ll make a few things or spice up some old pieces I have lying around. “I’ve always loved fashion and I find it’s a way for me to express myself. “I’ve also been a big shopper but recently, as I’ve become more aware of the negative impact the fashion industry has on both people and planet, I’ve mainly stuck to charity shops or swapped clothes with friends. “I imagine the allure of online shopping will be a challenge for me, but the knowledge I have now definitely outweighs the convenience of cheap clothing. “Basics, like underwear and socks, could potentially be a challenge too, but sustainable brands do exist should I need anything like that.” Recommended:  Fashion Minimalism, A Capsule Wardrobe: Dream Or Nightmare? Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Síofra Richardson Age: 21 From: Cobh Studying: World Languages (second year). “I’ve long been aware of the ethical and environmental violations of the fast fashion industry — I started a boycott myself when I was about 15, though I have since on and off allowed myself to buy various items from high street stores for different reasons. “It felt like the right time to start a proper boycott again, as there is massive momentum for climate action at the moment, and as a group we have the opportunity to have a bigger impact, using the Environmental Society platform where we are a little more visible to our university community. “I absolutely love clothes, though for years I’ve tried not to buy fast fashion. I prefer vintage pieces. I like to think of buying clothes as investments. I use Eco Age’s & wears challenge as a kind of a decision maker as to whether or not I should invest — is it something I will wear 30 or more times? Can I dress the piece up or down, and can it be worn year round? What is difference between vintage and antique? Here is the general rule to remember: Something antique is also vintage, but something vintage isn't necessarily antique. Vintage refers to something that is from an earlier generation. Antique refers to something that is over 100 years old “For my boycott I am going to attempt to buy no new clothes for the year. If I just feel like jazzing up my wardrobe, I’ll take part in a swap shop: bring clothes along to an event where I’ll leave them for someone else to pick up and love hopefully, and find something that was pre-loved. “If it comes to it, I will buy from second hand stores or from ethical companies that are 100% transparent and traceable — this means before investing in a piece researching the company, where it’s based, their human rights record. There are plenty of ethical companies out there though, a little pricier but personally I think it’s worth it. “The challenge I predict right now is formal wear — it’s not impossible to pick out formal dresses from second hand shops but it’s a bit more of a process! “Obviously, if something doesn’t fit you can’t just move up or down a size, so it’s either start all over or if it’s not far off you can get it altered. I have a few formal occasions this year so I’m looking forward to getting creative!” Recommended:  State Of Fashion: Searching For The New Luxury Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Rebecca Doocey Age: 20 From: Conna Studying: International Development and Food Policy (second year) “Being able to express myself through what I wear is inherently important to me — but I realised I couldn’t keep doing it at the expense of the planet and the people who worked to make the clothes, so I decided to boycott fast fashion. “Personally, for the next 52 weeks, I want to challenge myself to avoid buying clothes at all, and if I do need something I will only try buying second hand or from a sustainable source (Lucy & Yak are a great online producer of sustainably made clothes in a non-exploitative way). “I used to be a blind consumer, buying whatever I wanted just for the sake of it, until I ended up with a mountain of clothes I neither liked nor needed. “Though we’ve only pledged to give up fast fashion for a year, I plan on changing my consumer habits considerably for the future, buying only the necessities as I’m becoming more interested in a minimalistic lifestyle.” What is a vintage theme? What is a vintage theme? A vintage theme is one that uses items and decor that depicts a certain period in time, or the items themselves are aged Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Asha Woodhouse Age: 22 From: Gurranabraher Studying: Environmental Science (4th year) “I’m boycotting fast fashion in solidarity with people that suffer at the hands of mass producing unnecessary clothing for Western society. “The fashion industry must switch to a circular economic model, be transparent and take responsibility in ensuring compliance with workers’ rights and in having minimal environmental impact in its production processes. “If I need to buy something, I usually shop in a second hand store first. “There are some items I prefer to buy new such as sportswear and shoes, but there are plenty of brands that are transparent and sustainable in their production processes. “However, a lot of these brands are pricey, but I think this will help me in putting more thought into it before buying something — although I know I am privileged to be able to do this. “I don’t think I’ll find it too challenging, to be honest, I’ve been conscious of this and shopping in second hand stores since I was about 15. “Most of my favourite clothing is second hand. “The majority of fast fashion items I have bought recently have been with vouchers that I was gifted for birthdays and Christmas. “I think what I will find hard is buying basic items like vest tops, underwear, socks, and clothes for work.” Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Nevena Stoya Age: 24 From: Bulgaria, grew up in Spain Studying: Nutritional and Food sciences “I’ve been invested in a fast fashion boycott for over five years now, during which time I’ve been learning how to to minimise generic consumption. “I was brought up in an entrepreneurial family, my father a carpenter and mother a tailor, so producing necessities for myself is not unfamiliar to me. “Avoiding waste is part of the Slavic culture. I always had handmade and unique designs to wear as a kid. I grew to love fashion, but endurance and quality were things I struggled to find in many brands and fashion-houses. “My advice to anyone thinking of following us would be to start from the community education perspective of re-building our habits and lifestyle: use, re-style customise and recycle. Borrow from friends and family, swap in pop-up events locally, learn to fix and sew at Vibes and Scribes workshops and lessons (not only handy but great craic as well) or find your city’s professional tailors (Zipyard, or others). If you really do need to buy something, make it a last resort and do so in a more conscious and aware manner. Buy from charity and second hand shops, donating to meaningful causes or from NGOs such as Oxfam who work preventing clothing ending up in landfill. Buy from small and local outlets, choose organic cotton or recycled and sustainable fibres. “And for more advice, follow the Society’s Instagram page where I’ll feature a Cork guide to sustainable fashion.” Recommended:  Israeli 3D Printed Fashion As Sustainable Works Of Art Vintage Fashion: What Does the Resail Market Expect Reselling platforms are having a moment. This year, Nike took a pair of Air Max 1s off shelves because the shoes showcased an embroidered Betsy Ross. Like clockwork, interest in the kicks exploded. Nike ordered a recall of its new July Fourth-themed Air Max 1 sneakers over concerns about its Betsy Ross flag logo. Prices for the shoes rocketed on the website StockX Currently, on the sneaker resale site StockX, people have bid upwards of $2,700 to nab a pair of the Air Max 1s. And high-end fashion reseller The RealReal debuted on the Nasdaq with much fanfare. StockX, which just raised $110 million in new funding, and The RealReal represent a growing group of retailers once considered niche. Over the last few years, they’ve begun garnering more mainstream attention, causing some proponents to believe resale to be the next big wave in retail. In the U.S. alone, retail sales are expected to hit $3.8 trillion, according to the National Retail Federation. These new platforms exhibit a burgeoning industry, yet challenges lay ahead before they can truly compete with big retail brands. Reselling isn’t new: For decades, people have hawked their already-bought goods via sidewalk sales and thrift and vintage stores. Sites like eBay too provided way for individual sellers to cash in on used goods. Goodwill has been around since 1902. The latest wave of startups for second hand fashion is named; ‘modernized vintage’.” Resale has had a facelift! Vintage Fashion: The State Of Resale Platforms Flashy new resell platforms are catching people’s eyes. There are more consumers who are entering the resale market—both as sellers and as buyers. It is most certainly growing at a very rapid clip. The numbers forecast that the market for resold clothing, accessories, and footwear in the U.S. will hit $51 billion in 2023, more than double what it was last year. Meanwhile, older companies are dabbling with it as well. resale site Fashionphile has begun building out a program for shoppers to sell back their old clothes. H&M is reportedly making similar moves too. Both the startups and the older players tout these programs as moves toward better sustainability; instead of buying something cheap and throwing it out some months later, people can recycle their own fashion. This is the new consumer trend. What types of trends are there? Trend analysis is based on the idea that what has happened in the past gives traders an idea of what will happen in the future. There are three main types of trends: short-, intermediate- and long-term. Beyond the RealReal and StockX there are myriad other online resellers that use a variety of models. ThredUp, for instance, offers a website quite similar to other fashion retailers and department stores. All the clothing it sells, however, is used. People can send ThredUp their own unwanted pieces, for which they can received a small amount of cash or store credit. ThredUp has raised over $130 million in funding and business intelligence platform Owler estimates that the company brings in around nearly $40 million in revenue. Poshmark uses a more direct route, having sellers take pictures and ship their own products to buyers. In 2018, the company reportedly brought in nearly $150 million, and it’s been allegedly working toward going public later this year. Poshmark said it has over 50 million users and over $100 million of inventory is uploaded to its platform every week. Thus far, the company has raised nearly $160 million in venture capital. Modern Retail reached out to Poshmark and ThredUp for comment about the reselling market and their future plans, and they both provided statistics about growth and scale. Still, the overall impact is contested. ThredUp, in fact, commissioned a study (performed by GlobalData) that said the secondhand fashion resale market will eclipse fast fashion by 2028. Vintage Fashion: Challenges Ahead It’s unclear how many people are participating in this new digital resale industry. Only 21% of consumers had ever purchased anything second-hand. While many of these businesses are reporting growing numbers, their sales have yet come close to the billions of dollars in sales that even the ailing retailers are doing. Gap, for instance, reported over $16 billion in sales in 2018. The truth is, that it is hard to believe any of these niche companies getting to that level in the near future.” Still, if ever there were a time to make a splash in the resell market, now would be it. Given the RealReal’s debut and StockX’s massive money raise it inevitable for others to go public soon. There’s growing investors interest at this current juncture. There’s a window of opportunity now. Before you go! Recommended:  Black Friday Not Sustainable At All Especially For Fashion Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about 'buying and wearing vintage fashion'? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
'I won't buy any clothes from fast fashion stores for a year... and hopefully for ever more'. Could you commit to not buying a single item of clothing from fast fashion outlets for an entire year? To only buying clothes from charity shops, second hand shops, or swapping or borrowing items? Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers The seven student in this article say they love fashion and insist their boycott of fast fashion won’t be about them turning their back on clothes. Instead, it will be about getting creative and finding sustainable alternatives. Let's read their motivation to buy only vintage fashion. Recommended:  Circular Sustainable Fashion: Biggest Trend Of The Century Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Niamh Guiry Age: 22 From: Bishopstown Studying: Microbiology (fourth year) Are vintage clothes second hand? On the other hand, vintage refers to a category contained within the second hand category, which is the category of clothes that, even though have been produced a while ago, still have a good quality and can be worn. Clothing has, generally speaking, a very short life span “I’ve decided to boycott fast fashion because no one should suffer so you can look ‘trendy’. I’m always trying to think of new ways that our society can promote sustainability and the issue of fast fashion has been on my mind for a while. “I had been reading about the atrocious human rights violations that occur in this industry and the amount of pollution and waste it creates and I decided that I wanted to try to make a difference. “I thought that pledging to only buy sustainable and second hand clothes for a year could be a good way to do that. I went into one of our weekly committee meeting and asked if anyone wanted to boycott with me. I was beyond thrilled when six hands shot up in the air. {youtube}                                                     Vintage Shopping In London + Trying On What I Got                                              Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say And Resale Expect? “Over the coming year, I’m going to buy as few clothes as possible. If I want to get ‘new’ clothes I’ll go to charity shops, to swap shops, I’ll ask my friends if they have anything I can borrow. “I have plenty clothes (the same as the vast majority of people) I don’t need any more. “I will admit that I absolutely love clothes and I love expressing myself through the clothes I wear. “Over the next year, I’m going to continue doing just that. You can live and shop sustainably and look good at the same time.” Recommended:  Sustainable Fashion From Bio-Materials Good For The World Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say.Caoimhe Flynn. Age: 22 From: Carrigtwohill Studying: BA International in English and German (final year) “Reports and news coverage have exposed time and time again the human rights abuses on which the fast fashion industry is built. “In the midst of the climate crisis, the mass production of ‘disposable’ clothing is also not sustainable. It results in the use of vast quantities of water, burning of fossil fuels and strain on already limited resources. “I aim to avoid increasing the amount of clothing I currently own. I will, however, replace items which are no longer wearable, particularly those that are necessary.  “In the last two years, I had already begun to shop more in the many second hand and charity shops in Cork.  “If I still cannot find what I am looking for, I will allow myself to buy from brands and companies who are dedicated to sustainable practices. “I do not envisage encountering many difficulties along the way, though I have to change my habit of taking the easy way out when something breaks suddenly. “Not popping into fast fashion retailers to buy little things like socks will probably be more difficult than I imagine! In the end however, I know that what I own is already more than enough.” What are the best online thrift stores? 8 Amazing Online Thrift Stores for the Coolest Vintage Clothes Ever ASOS MARKETPLACE. That's right, ASOS has a vintage website too! The Vintage Twin THREDUP Tradesy Maeven Refashioner LePrix Depop Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Isobel O’Connor Sealy Age: 19 From: Tallow, Co. Waterford Studying: Arts International (first year) “I’m boycotting fast fashion because I find it sickening that people work in slave-like conditions making clothes for people like me in developed countries just so we can look fashionable. “I’ll be buying from charity shops, taking hand-me-downs from family, exchanging clothes with friends, and going to swap-shops or kilo-sales to get myself new clothes during this boycott (and hopefully forever more!). “I enjoy knitting and sewing so perhaps I’ll make a few things or spice up some old pieces I have lying around. “I’ve always loved fashion and I find it’s a way for me to express myself. “I’ve also been a big shopper but recently, as I’ve become more aware of the negative impact the fashion industry has on both people and planet, I’ve mainly stuck to charity shops or swapped clothes with friends. “I imagine the allure of online shopping will be a challenge for me, but the knowledge I have now definitely outweighs the convenience of cheap clothing. “Basics, like underwear and socks, could potentially be a challenge too, but sustainable brands do exist should I need anything like that.” Recommended:  Fashion Minimalism, A Capsule Wardrobe: Dream Or Nightmare? Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Síofra Richardson Age: 21 From: Cobh Studying: World Languages (second year). “I’ve long been aware of the ethical and environmental violations of the fast fashion industry — I started a boycott myself when I was about 15, though I have since on and off allowed myself to buy various items from high street stores for different reasons. “It felt like the right time to start a proper boycott again, as there is massive momentum for climate action at the moment, and as a group we have the opportunity to have a bigger impact, using the Environmental Society platform where we are a little more visible to our university community. “I absolutely love clothes, though for years I’ve tried not to buy fast fashion. I prefer vintage pieces. I like to think of buying clothes as investments. I use Eco Age’s & wears challenge as a kind of a decision maker as to whether or not I should invest — is it something I will wear 30 or more times? Can I dress the piece up or down, and can it be worn year round? What is difference between vintage and antique? Here is the general rule to remember: Something antique is also vintage, but something vintage isn't necessarily antique. Vintage refers to something that is from an earlier generation. Antique refers to something that is over 100 years old “For my boycott I am going to attempt to buy no new clothes for the year. If I just feel like jazzing up my wardrobe, I’ll take part in a swap shop: bring clothes along to an event where I’ll leave them for someone else to pick up and love hopefully, and find something that was pre-loved. “If it comes to it, I will buy from second hand stores or from ethical companies that are 100% transparent and traceable — this means before investing in a piece researching the company, where it’s based, their human rights record. There are plenty of ethical companies out there though, a little pricier but personally I think it’s worth it. “The challenge I predict right now is formal wear — it’s not impossible to pick out formal dresses from second hand shops but it’s a bit more of a process! “Obviously, if something doesn’t fit you can’t just move up or down a size, so it’s either start all over or if it’s not far off you can get it altered. I have a few formal occasions this year so I’m looking forward to getting creative!” Recommended:  State Of Fashion: Searching For The New Luxury Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Rebecca Doocey Age: 20 From: Conna Studying: International Development and Food Policy (second year) “Being able to express myself through what I wear is inherently important to me — but I realised I couldn’t keep doing it at the expense of the planet and the people who worked to make the clothes, so I decided to boycott fast fashion. “Personally, for the next 52 weeks, I want to challenge myself to avoid buying clothes at all, and if I do need something I will only try buying second hand or from a sustainable source (Lucy & Yak are a great online producer of sustainably made clothes in a non-exploitative way). “I used to be a blind consumer, buying whatever I wanted just for the sake of it, until I ended up with a mountain of clothes I neither liked nor needed. “Though we’ve only pledged to give up fast fashion for a year, I plan on changing my consumer habits considerably for the future, buying only the necessities as I’m becoming more interested in a minimalistic lifestyle.” What is a vintage theme? What is a vintage theme? A vintage theme is one that uses items and decor that depicts a certain period in time, or the items themselves are aged Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Asha Woodhouse Age: 22 From: Gurranabraher Studying: Environmental Science (4th year) “I’m boycotting fast fashion in solidarity with people that suffer at the hands of mass producing unnecessary clothing for Western society. “The fashion industry must switch to a circular economic model, be transparent and take responsibility in ensuring compliance with workers’ rights and in having minimal environmental impact in its production processes. “If I need to buy something, I usually shop in a second hand store first. “There are some items I prefer to buy new such as sportswear and shoes, but there are plenty of brands that are transparent and sustainable in their production processes. “However, a lot of these brands are pricey, but I think this will help me in putting more thought into it before buying something — although I know I am privileged to be able to do this. “I don’t think I’ll find it too challenging, to be honest, I’ve been conscious of this and shopping in second hand stores since I was about 15. “Most of my favourite clothing is second hand. “The majority of fast fashion items I have bought recently have been with vouchers that I was gifted for birthdays and Christmas. “I think what I will find hard is buying basic items like vest tops, underwear, socks, and clothes for work.” Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Nevena Stoya Age: 24 From: Bulgaria, grew up in Spain Studying: Nutritional and Food sciences “I’ve been invested in a fast fashion boycott for over five years now, during which time I’ve been learning how to to minimise generic consumption. “I was brought up in an entrepreneurial family, my father a carpenter and mother a tailor, so producing necessities for myself is not unfamiliar to me. “Avoiding waste is part of the Slavic culture. I always had handmade and unique designs to wear as a kid. I grew to love fashion, but endurance and quality were things I struggled to find in many brands and fashion-houses. “My advice to anyone thinking of following us would be to start from the community education perspective of re-building our habits and lifestyle: use, re-style customise and recycle. Borrow from friends and family, swap in pop-up events locally, learn to fix and sew at Vibes and Scribes workshops and lessons (not only handy but great craic as well) or find your city’s professional tailors (Zipyard, or others). If you really do need to buy something, make it a last resort and do so in a more conscious and aware manner. Buy from charity and second hand shops, donating to meaningful causes or from NGOs such as Oxfam who work preventing clothing ending up in landfill. Buy from small and local outlets, choose organic cotton or recycled and sustainable fibres. “And for more advice, follow the Society’s Instagram page where I’ll feature a Cork guide to sustainable fashion.” Recommended:  Israeli 3D Printed Fashion As Sustainable Works Of Art Vintage Fashion: What Does the Resail Market Expect Reselling platforms are having a moment. This year, Nike took a pair of Air Max 1s off shelves because the shoes showcased an embroidered Betsy Ross. Like clockwork, interest in the kicks exploded. Nike ordered a recall of its new July Fourth-themed Air Max 1 sneakers over concerns about its Betsy Ross flag logo. Prices for the shoes rocketed on the website StockX Currently, on the sneaker resale site StockX, people have bid upwards of $2,700 to nab a pair of the Air Max 1s. And high-end fashion reseller The RealReal debuted on the Nasdaq with much fanfare. StockX, which just raised $110 million in new funding, and The RealReal represent a growing group of retailers once considered niche. Over the last few years, they’ve begun garnering more mainstream attention, causing some proponents to believe resale to be the next big wave in retail. In the U.S. alone, retail sales are expected to hit $3.8 trillion, according to the National Retail Federation. These new platforms exhibit a burgeoning industry, yet challenges lay ahead before they can truly compete with big retail brands. Reselling isn’t new: For decades, people have hawked their already-bought goods via sidewalk sales and thrift and vintage stores. Sites like eBay too provided way for individual sellers to cash in on used goods. Goodwill has been around since 1902. The latest wave of startups for second hand fashion is named; ‘modernized vintage’.” Resale has had a facelift! Vintage Fashion: The State Of Resale Platforms Flashy new resell platforms are catching people’s eyes. There are more consumers who are entering the resale market—both as sellers and as buyers. It is most certainly growing at a very rapid clip. The numbers forecast that the market for resold clothing, accessories, and footwear in the U.S. will hit $51 billion in 2023, more than double what it was last year. Meanwhile, older companies are dabbling with it as well. resale site Fashionphile has begun building out a program for shoppers to sell back their old clothes. H&M is reportedly making similar moves too. Both the startups and the older players tout these programs as moves toward better sustainability; instead of buying something cheap and throwing it out some months later, people can recycle their own fashion. This is the new consumer trend. What types of trends are there? Trend analysis is based on the idea that what has happened in the past gives traders an idea of what will happen in the future. There are three main types of trends: short-, intermediate- and long-term. Beyond the RealReal and StockX there are myriad other online resellers that use a variety of models. ThredUp, for instance, offers a website quite similar to other fashion retailers and department stores. All the clothing it sells, however, is used. People can send ThredUp their own unwanted pieces, for which they can received a small amount of cash or store credit. ThredUp has raised over $130 million in funding and business intelligence platform Owler estimates that the company brings in around nearly $40 million in revenue. Poshmark uses a more direct route, having sellers take pictures and ship their own products to buyers. In 2018, the company reportedly brought in nearly $150 million, and it’s been allegedly working toward going public later this year. Poshmark said it has over 50 million users and over $100 million of inventory is uploaded to its platform every week. Thus far, the company has raised nearly $160 million in venture capital. Modern Retail reached out to Poshmark and ThredUp for comment about the reselling market and their future plans, and they both provided statistics about growth and scale. Still, the overall impact is contested. ThredUp, in fact, commissioned a study (performed by GlobalData) that said the secondhand fashion resale market will eclipse fast fashion by 2028. Vintage Fashion: Challenges Ahead It’s unclear how many people are participating in this new digital resale industry. Only 21% of consumers had ever purchased anything second-hand. While many of these businesses are reporting growing numbers, their sales have yet come close to the billions of dollars in sales that even the ailing retailers are doing. Gap, for instance, reported over $16 billion in sales in 2018. The truth is, that it is hard to believe any of these niche companies getting to that level in the near future.” Still, if ever there were a time to make a splash in the resell market, now would be it. Given the RealReal’s debut and StockX’s massive money raise it inevitable for others to go public soon. There’s growing investors interest at this current juncture. There’s a window of opportunity now. Before you go! Recommended:  Black Friday Not Sustainable At All Especially For Fashion Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about 'buying and wearing vintage fashion'? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say And Resale Expect?
Digital Economy: Is Its Footprint Threatening Our Planet?
At a first glance, it seems as if the digital economy is benefitting our planet. After all, it does require a lot less (air) travel and production of physical goods, with meetings now being conducted in a virtual environment instead of in a remote city attendees will have to fly in to.   Digital Economy Similarly, we can now listen to our music or watch our movies online, instead of purchasing a physical object that requires a lot of energy and resources to make - not to mention the amount of plastic. We now trade, meet, consume, produce and work online, allowing us to get in touch with people across the world in near real-time. Boundaries are fading and so are restraints on time and place. Seems like a win for the environment. Unfortunately, there’s a dark side to most things - including the digital’s economy footprint on our planet.   Recommended:  Why Smart Phones Are Killing Our Planet One could look at the vehicles that we use for tuning in to the digital economy. Our smartphones, tablets and laptops are notorious sources of pollution and resource exhaustion through its production and operation processes. While rare earth elements are wasted for their manufacturing, the energy requirements of production factories, cloud computing and data centers are excessive. The world’s data centres produce about the same amount of carbon dioxide as global air travel.  Most of the energy that drives the digital economy is still generated using coal. One of the dirtiest energy generators is powering the movement that has promised to cut down on our emissions. As we stand today, this is preventing our digital economy from being compatible with the green economy the world is desperately trying to make a reality. {youtube}                                                Digital Economy: Is Its Footprint Threatening Our Planet?                                                              Datacenter, the hidden face of the web Digital Economy And Its Footprint. Coal Is Still King For The Internet So, in order to fuel the digital economy, we exploit the earth’s rare elements at an alarming rate. After all, our electric cars and iPhones 10 heavily rely on heavy metals and minerals that we are not only quickly running out of, but that are also dependant upon a very polluting production process. Add to this the disposable nature of the created goods and the lack of proper recycling, and it is not hard to see why our modern goodies have left such a dent in the earth’s wellbeing. Preliminary data (p) on the global production of rare earth elements, 1988-2018.   In China, for instance, one of the world’s largest producers of such metals and minerals, concerned voices are being raised about the effect that these heavy metals and radioactive materials have when released in water bodies, soil and air. These metals require immense amounts of energy to be processed and produced, while it leaves companies with alarming amounts of (radioactive) waste. Recommended:  Your Smartphone Is Polluting And Generating Massive Waste Satellite image of the Bayan Obo mine in China, taken on June 30, 2006. Vegetation appears in red, grassland is light brown, rocks are black and the water surfaces are green To power this production process, coal is still the preferred source. Unfortunately, this is also the largest contributor to climate change. This leads to the digital economy speeding up global warming, instead of tapping in its potential for reducing it. Digital Economy: Its Footprint Threatening Our Planet. Energy Hogs The energy hogging already starts at the production stage. From there, it keeps on going - with the immense amounts of energy required to keep our digital economy going. Just look at data centers, which are essentially warehouses for the transmitted data. These bad boys have been credited with emitting a massive 2% of the total global greenhouse gas emissions. This places them in the same league as global air travel.   So we might travel less because of the digital economy, but this alternative has an eerily similar effect on our environment. A recent report in Asia pointed out that the Chinese data centers alone have produced about 100 million tonnes of carbon dioxide in 2018. This roughly correlates with 21 million cars driven for one year. Speaking of cars versus the digital economy. Artificial intelligence is on the rise, yet at a pretty large cost. The feeding of data into a single computer and asking it to make predictions based on it requires the same amount of energy as the average American car in its lifetime.   Another popular digital trend is that of blockchain technologies, powering cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin. Unfortunately, the energy that is required to create one dollar worth of Bitcoin is about twice the amount of energy it costs to produce one dollar worth of gold, platinum of copper. Recommended:  Bitcoin Mining: Why Would You Waste Energy All of this is not to mention the so-called ‘e-waste’, or the waste generated by data centers and other products of the digital economy. Often toxic and even more often impossible to recycle, this poses yet another risk. Digital Economy: It’s Footprint Threatening Our Planet? Thinking Differently There are two major things changing in the world right now. First, the trend of sustainability and the creation of a green economy. Second, the growing digitisation. While these two are largely incompatible today, there definitely is room to marry the two and move forward towards a greener digital economy.   We will have to start thinking differently. About recycling and disposing waste. About using greener energy sources to power our data centers. About alternative metals and materials that can be used in our smart phones. The digital economy has brought us a lot, that is undeniable. Now it is time for us to figure out what we can do for the digital economy to make it healthier for all of us. Before you go! Recommended:  Digital Ecosystem For The Environment: Big Data Worldwide Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about the effect of smart phones in your neighborhood? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
At a first glance, it seems as if the digital economy is benefitting our planet. After all, it does require a lot less (air) travel and production of physical goods, with meetings now being conducted in a virtual environment instead of in a remote city attendees will have to fly in to.   Digital Economy Similarly, we can now listen to our music or watch our movies online, instead of purchasing a physical object that requires a lot of energy and resources to make - not to mention the amount of plastic. We now trade, meet, consume, produce and work online, allowing us to get in touch with people across the world in near real-time. Boundaries are fading and so are restraints on time and place. Seems like a win for the environment. Unfortunately, there’s a dark side to most things - including the digital’s economy footprint on our planet.   Recommended:  Why Smart Phones Are Killing Our Planet One could look at the vehicles that we use for tuning in to the digital economy. Our smartphones, tablets and laptops are notorious sources of pollution and resource exhaustion through its production and operation processes. While rare earth elements are wasted for their manufacturing, the energy requirements of production factories, cloud computing and data centers are excessive. The world’s data centres produce about the same amount of carbon dioxide as global air travel.  Most of the energy that drives the digital economy is still generated using coal. One of the dirtiest energy generators is powering the movement that has promised to cut down on our emissions. As we stand today, this is preventing our digital economy from being compatible with the green economy the world is desperately trying to make a reality. {youtube}                                                Digital Economy: Is Its Footprint Threatening Our Planet?                                                              Datacenter, the hidden face of the web Digital Economy And Its Footprint. Coal Is Still King For The Internet So, in order to fuel the digital economy, we exploit the earth’s rare elements at an alarming rate. After all, our electric cars and iPhones 10 heavily rely on heavy metals and minerals that we are not only quickly running out of, but that are also dependant upon a very polluting production process. Add to this the disposable nature of the created goods and the lack of proper recycling, and it is not hard to see why our modern goodies have left such a dent in the earth’s wellbeing. Preliminary data (p) on the global production of rare earth elements, 1988-2018.   In China, for instance, one of the world’s largest producers of such metals and minerals, concerned voices are being raised about the effect that these heavy metals and radioactive materials have when released in water bodies, soil and air. These metals require immense amounts of energy to be processed and produced, while it leaves companies with alarming amounts of (radioactive) waste. Recommended:  Your Smartphone Is Polluting And Generating Massive Waste Satellite image of the Bayan Obo mine in China, taken on June 30, 2006. Vegetation appears in red, grassland is light brown, rocks are black and the water surfaces are green To power this production process, coal is still the preferred source. Unfortunately, this is also the largest contributor to climate change. This leads to the digital economy speeding up global warming, instead of tapping in its potential for reducing it. Digital Economy: Its Footprint Threatening Our Planet. Energy Hogs The energy hogging already starts at the production stage. From there, it keeps on going - with the immense amounts of energy required to keep our digital economy going. Just look at data centers, which are essentially warehouses for the transmitted data. These bad boys have been credited with emitting a massive 2% of the total global greenhouse gas emissions. This places them in the same league as global air travel.   So we might travel less because of the digital economy, but this alternative has an eerily similar effect on our environment. A recent report in Asia pointed out that the Chinese data centers alone have produced about 100 million tonnes of carbon dioxide in 2018. This roughly correlates with 21 million cars driven for one year. Speaking of cars versus the digital economy. Artificial intelligence is on the rise, yet at a pretty large cost. The feeding of data into a single computer and asking it to make predictions based on it requires the same amount of energy as the average American car in its lifetime.   Another popular digital trend is that of blockchain technologies, powering cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin. Unfortunately, the energy that is required to create one dollar worth of Bitcoin is about twice the amount of energy it costs to produce one dollar worth of gold, platinum of copper. Recommended:  Bitcoin Mining: Why Would You Waste Energy All of this is not to mention the so-called ‘e-waste’, or the waste generated by data centers and other products of the digital economy. Often toxic and even more often impossible to recycle, this poses yet another risk. Digital Economy: It’s Footprint Threatening Our Planet? Thinking Differently There are two major things changing in the world right now. First, the trend of sustainability and the creation of a green economy. Second, the growing digitisation. While these two are largely incompatible today, there definitely is room to marry the two and move forward towards a greener digital economy.   We will have to start thinking differently. About recycling and disposing waste. About using greener energy sources to power our data centers. About alternative metals and materials that can be used in our smart phones. The digital economy has brought us a lot, that is undeniable. Now it is time for us to figure out what we can do for the digital economy to make it healthier for all of us. Before you go! Recommended:  Digital Ecosystem For The Environment: Big Data Worldwide Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about the effect of smart phones in your neighborhood? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Digital Economy: Is Its Footprint Threatening Our Planet?
Digital Economy: Is Its Footprint Threatening Our Planet?
Community

A community is you and me. A network of social, economic, ecological and many other relationships. We all work together and live in urban, suburban and rural areas. Social sustainability is becoming increasingly important on our small planet. We define: support, quality of life, development, adaptation, rights and labour.

We belong to a group of individuals - our society - in which we belong geographically. Certain environmental issues play an important role in our society. Here, sustainable solutions are sought, developed and implemented. This may differ from societies in other countries, but because of our global environmental issues and dependence, we must learn to work more together so that we can all benefit from sharing sustainable knowledge to tackle, for example, climate change.

Green architecture is important. Building with local materials that can be recycled and reused brings us a big step forward to have less impact on the environment. With green architecture we can build smart cities where resources can be used more efficiently and information can be shared, thus improving our society, your community.

Lifestyle is the way we live, the dynamics of personality. Fashion defines our self and together with food it is getting - at present - an even more important role in our society. It's not just about taste, but especially about the burden that the fashion industry, agriculture and the meat industry have on our resources, especially water.

If there was an urge to come up with a sustainable way of living solutions and share these topics globally it’s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about tiny houses, your experiences and expectations for the future at home and globally. 

Global Sustainability X-change, that’s what you can do together with WhatsOrb. What's in for me?

 

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