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About: <p>A community is you and me. A network of social, economic, ecological and many other relationships. We all work together and live in urban, suburban and rural areas. Social sustainability is becoming increasingly important on our small planet. We define: support, quality of life, development, adaptation, rights and labour.</p> <p>We belong to a group of individuals - <a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/society">our society</a> - in which we belong geographically. Certain environmental issues play an important role in our society. Here, sustainable solutions are sought, developed and implemented. This may differ from societies in other countries, but because of our global environmental issues and&nbsp;<span lang="en" tabindex="0">dependence</span>, we must learn to work more together so that we can all benefit from sharing sustainable knowledge to tackle, for example, climate change.</p> <p><a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/green-architecture">Green architecture</a> is important. Building with local materials that can be recycled and reused brings us a big step forward to have less impact on the environment. With green architecture we can build <a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/smart-cities">smart cities</a> where resources can be used more efficiently and information can be shared, thus improving our society, your community.</p> <p><a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/lifestyle">Lifestyle</a> is the way we live, the dynamics of personality. Fashion defines our self and together with food it is getting - at present - an even more important role in our society. It's not just about taste, but especially about the burden that the fashion industry, agriculture and the meat industry have on our resources, especially water.</p> <p>If there was an urge to come up with a sustainable way of living solutions and share these topics globally it&rsquo;s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about tiny houses, your experiences and expectations for the future at home and globally.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Global Sustainability X-change, that&rsquo;s what you can do together with WhatsOrb.&nbsp;<a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/newsletter/your-shared-sustainable-ideas-make-our-earth-a-better-place">What's in for me?</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
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Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say And Resale Expect?
'I won't buy any clothes from fast fashion stores for a year... and hopefully for ever more'. Could you commit to not buying a single item of clothing from fast fashion outlets for an entire year? To only buying clothes from charity shops, second hand shops, or swapping or borrowing items? Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers The seven student in this article say they love fashion and insist their boycott of fast fashion won’t be about them turning their back on clothes. Instead, it will be about getting creative and finding sustainable alternatives. Let's read their motivation to buy only vintage fashion. Recommended:  Circular Sustainable Fashion: Biggest Trend Of The Century Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Niamh Guiry Age: 22 From: Bishopstown Studying: Microbiology (fourth year) Are vintage clothes second hand? On the other hand, vintage refers to a category contained within the second hand category, which is the category of clothes that, even though have been produced a while ago, still have a good quality and can be worn. Clothing has, generally speaking, a very short life span “I’ve decided to boycott fast fashion because no one should suffer so you can look ‘trendy’. I’m always trying to think of new ways that our society can promote sustainability and the issue of fast fashion has been on my mind for a while. “I had been reading about the atrocious human rights violations that occur in this industry and the amount of pollution and waste it creates and I decided that I wanted to try to make a difference. “I thought that pledging to only buy sustainable and second hand clothes for a year could be a good way to do that. I went into one of our weekly committee meeting and asked if anyone wanted to boycott with me. I was beyond thrilled when six hands shot up in the air. {youtube}                                                     Vintage Shopping In London + Trying On What I Got                                              Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say And Resale Expect? “Over the coming year, I’m going to buy as few clothes as possible. If I want to get ‘new’ clothes I’ll go to charity shops, to swap shops, I’ll ask my friends if they have anything I can borrow. “I have plenty clothes (the same as the vast majority of people) I don’t need any more. “I will admit that I absolutely love clothes and I love expressing myself through the clothes I wear. “Over the next year, I’m going to continue doing just that. You can live and shop sustainably and look good at the same time.” Recommended:  Sustainable Fashion From Bio-Materials Good For The World Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say.Caoimhe Flynn. Age: 22 From: Carrigtwohill Studying: BA International in English and German (final year) “Reports and news coverage have exposed time and time again the human rights abuses on which the fast fashion industry is built. “In the midst of the climate crisis, the mass production of ‘disposable’ clothing is also not sustainable. It results in the use of vast quantities of water, burning of fossil fuels and strain on already limited resources. “I aim to avoid increasing the amount of clothing I currently own. I will, however, replace items which are no longer wearable, particularly those that are necessary.  “In the last two years, I had already begun to shop more in the many second hand and charity shops in Cork.  “If I still cannot find what I am looking for, I will allow myself to buy from brands and companies who are dedicated to sustainable practices. “I do not envisage encountering many difficulties along the way, though I have to change my habit of taking the easy way out when something breaks suddenly. “Not popping into fast fashion retailers to buy little things like socks will probably be more difficult than I imagine! In the end however, I know that what I own is already more than enough.” What are the best online thrift stores? 8 Amazing Online Thrift Stores for the Coolest Vintage Clothes Ever ASOS MARKETPLACE. That's right, ASOS has a vintage website too! The Vintage Twin THREDUP Tradesy Maeven Refashioner LePrix Depop Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Isobel O’Connor Sealy Age: 19 From: Tallow, Co. Waterford Studying: Arts International (first year) “I’m boycotting fast fashion because I find it sickening that people work in slave-like conditions making clothes for people like me in developed countries just so we can look fashionable. “I’ll be buying from charity shops, taking hand-me-downs from family, exchanging clothes with friends, and going to swap-shops or kilo-sales to get myself new clothes during this boycott (and hopefully forever more!). “I enjoy knitting and sewing so perhaps I’ll make a few things or spice up some old pieces I have lying around. “I’ve always loved fashion and I find it’s a way for me to express myself. “I’ve also been a big shopper but recently, as I’ve become more aware of the negative impact the fashion industry has on both people and planet, I’ve mainly stuck to charity shops or swapped clothes with friends. “I imagine the allure of online shopping will be a challenge for me, but the knowledge I have now definitely outweighs the convenience of cheap clothing. “Basics, like underwear and socks, could potentially be a challenge too, but sustainable brands do exist should I need anything like that.” Recommended:  Fashion Minimalism, A Capsule Wardrobe: Dream Or Nightmare? Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Síofra Richardson Age: 21 From: Cobh Studying: World Languages (second year). “I’ve long been aware of the ethical and environmental violations of the fast fashion industry — I started a boycott myself when I was about 15, though I have since on and off allowed myself to buy various items from high street stores for different reasons. “It felt like the right time to start a proper boycott again, as there is massive momentum for climate action at the moment, and as a group we have the opportunity to have a bigger impact, using the Environmental Society platform where we are a little more visible to our university community. “I absolutely love clothes, though for years I’ve tried not to buy fast fashion. I prefer vintage pieces. I like to think of buying clothes as investments. I use Eco Age’s & wears challenge as a kind of a decision maker as to whether or not I should invest — is it something I will wear 30 or more times? Can I dress the piece up or down, and can it be worn year round? What is difference between vintage and antique? Here is the general rule to remember: Something antique is also vintage, but something vintage isn't necessarily antique. Vintage refers to something that is from an earlier generation. Antique refers to something that is over 100 years old “For my boycott I am going to attempt to buy no new clothes for the year. If I just feel like jazzing up my wardrobe, I’ll take part in a swap shop: bring clothes along to an event where I’ll leave them for someone else to pick up and love hopefully, and find something that was pre-loved. “If it comes to it, I will buy from second hand stores or from ethical companies that are 100% transparent and traceable — this means before investing in a piece researching the company, where it’s based, their human rights record. There are plenty of ethical companies out there though, a little pricier but personally I think it’s worth it. “The challenge I predict right now is formal wear — it’s not impossible to pick out formal dresses from second hand shops but it’s a bit more of a process! “Obviously, if something doesn’t fit you can’t just move up or down a size, so it’s either start all over or if it’s not far off you can get it altered. I have a few formal occasions this year so I’m looking forward to getting creative!” Recommended:  State Of Fashion: Searching For The New Luxury Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Rebecca Doocey Age: 20 From: Conna Studying: International Development and Food Policy (second year) “Being able to express myself through what I wear is inherently important to me — but I realised I couldn’t keep doing it at the expense of the planet and the people who worked to make the clothes, so I decided to boycott fast fashion. “Personally, for the next 52 weeks, I want to challenge myself to avoid buying clothes at all, and if I do need something I will only try buying second hand or from a sustainable source (Lucy & Yak are a great online producer of sustainably made clothes in a non-exploitative way). “I used to be a blind consumer, buying whatever I wanted just for the sake of it, until I ended up with a mountain of clothes I neither liked nor needed. “Though we’ve only pledged to give up fast fashion for a year, I plan on changing my consumer habits considerably for the future, buying only the necessities as I’m becoming more interested in a minimalistic lifestyle.” What is a vintage theme? What is a vintage theme? A vintage theme is one that uses items and decor that depicts a certain period in time, or the items themselves are aged Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Asha Woodhouse Age: 22 From: Gurranabraher Studying: Environmental Science (4th year) “I’m boycotting fast fashion in solidarity with people that suffer at the hands of mass producing unnecessary clothing for Western society. “The fashion industry must switch to a circular economic model, be transparent and take responsibility in ensuring compliance with workers’ rights and in having minimal environmental impact in its production processes. “If I need to buy something, I usually shop in a second hand store first. “There are some items I prefer to buy new such as sportswear and shoes, but there are plenty of brands that are transparent and sustainable in their production processes. “However, a lot of these brands are pricey, but I think this will help me in putting more thought into it before buying something — although I know I am privileged to be able to do this. “I don’t think I’ll find it too challenging, to be honest, I’ve been conscious of this and shopping in second hand stores since I was about 15. “Most of my favourite clothing is second hand. “The majority of fast fashion items I have bought recently have been with vouchers that I was gifted for birthdays and Christmas. “I think what I will find hard is buying basic items like vest tops, underwear, socks, and clothes for work.” Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Nevena Stoya Age: 24 From: Bulgaria, grew up in Spain Studying: Nutritional and Food sciences “I’ve been invested in a fast fashion boycott for over five years now, during which time I’ve been learning how to to minimise generic consumption. “I was brought up in an entrepreneurial family, my father a carpenter and mother a tailor, so producing necessities for myself is not unfamiliar to me. “Avoiding waste is part of the Slavic culture. I always had handmade and unique designs to wear as a kid. I grew to love fashion, but endurance and quality were things I struggled to find in many brands and fashion-houses. “My advice to anyone thinking of following us would be to start from the community education perspective of re-building our habits and lifestyle: use, re-style customise and recycle. Borrow from friends and family, swap in pop-up events locally, learn to fix and sew at Vibes and Scribes workshops and lessons (not only handy but great craic as well) or find your city’s professional tailors (Zipyard, or others). If you really do need to buy something, make it a last resort and do so in a more conscious and aware manner. Buy from charity and second hand shops, donating to meaningful causes or from NGOs such as Oxfam who work preventing clothing ending up in landfill. Buy from small and local outlets, choose organic cotton or recycled and sustainable fibres. “And for more advice, follow the Society’s Instagram page where I’ll feature a Cork guide to sustainable fashion.” Recommended:  Israeli 3D Printed Fashion As Sustainable Works Of Art Vintage Fashion: What Does the Resail Market Expect Reselling platforms are having a moment. This year, Nike took a pair of Air Max 1s off shelves because the shoes showcased an embroidered Betsy Ross. Like clockwork, interest in the kicks exploded. Nike ordered a recall of its new July Fourth-themed Air Max 1 sneakers over concerns about its Betsy Ross flag logo. Prices for the shoes rocketed on the website StockX Currently, on the sneaker resale site StockX, people have bid upwards of $2,700 to nab a pair of the Air Max 1s. And high-end fashion reseller The RealReal debuted on the Nasdaq with much fanfare. StockX, which just raised $110 million in new funding, and The RealReal represent a growing group of retailers once considered niche. Over the last few years, they’ve begun garnering more mainstream attention, causing some proponents to believe resale to be the next big wave in retail. In the U.S. alone, retail sales are expected to hit $3.8 trillion, according to the National Retail Federation. These new platforms exhibit a burgeoning industry, yet challenges lay ahead before they can truly compete with big retail brands. Reselling isn’t new: For decades, people have hawked their already-bought goods via sidewalk sales and thrift and vintage stores. Sites like eBay too provided way for individual sellers to cash in on used goods. Goodwill has been around since 1902. The latest wave of startups for second hand fashion is named; ‘modernized vintage’.” Resale has had a facelift! Vintage Fashion: The State Of Resale Platforms Flashy new resell platforms are catching people’s eyes. There are more consumers who are entering the resale market—both as sellers and as buyers. It is most certainly growing at a very rapid clip. The numbers forecast that the market for resold clothing, accessories, and footwear in the U.S. will hit $51 billion in 2023, more than double what it was last year. Meanwhile, older companies are dabbling with it as well. resale site Fashionphile has begun building out a program for shoppers to sell back their old clothes. H&M is reportedly making similar moves too. Both the startups and the older players tout these programs as moves toward better sustainability; instead of buying something cheap and throwing it out some months later, people can recycle their own fashion. This is the new consumer trend. What types of trends are there? Trend analysis is based on the idea that what has happened in the past gives traders an idea of what will happen in the future. There are three main types of trends: short-, intermediate- and long-term. Beyond the RealReal and StockX there are myriad other online resellers that use a variety of models. ThredUp, for instance, offers a website quite similar to other fashion retailers and department stores. All the clothing it sells, however, is used. People can send ThredUp their own unwanted pieces, for which they can received a small amount of cash or store credit. ThredUp has raised over $130 million in funding and business intelligence platform Owler estimates that the company brings in around nearly $40 million in revenue. Poshmark uses a more direct route, having sellers take pictures and ship their own products to buyers. In 2018, the company reportedly brought in nearly $150 million, and it’s been allegedly working toward going public later this year. Poshmark said it has over 50 million users and over $100 million of inventory is uploaded to its platform every week. Thus far, the company has raised nearly $160 million in venture capital. Modern Retail reached out to Poshmark and ThredUp for comment about the reselling market and their future plans, and they both provided statistics about growth and scale. Still, the overall impact is contested. ThredUp, in fact, commissioned a study (performed by GlobalData) that said the secondhand fashion resale market will eclipse fast fashion by 2028. Vintage Fashion: Challenges Ahead It’s unclear how many people are participating in this new digital resale industry. Only 21% of consumers had ever purchased anything second-hand. While many of these businesses are reporting growing numbers, their sales have yet come close to the billions of dollars in sales that even the ailing retailers are doing. Gap, for instance, reported over $16 billion in sales in 2018. The truth is, that it is hard to believe any of these niche companies getting to that level in the near future.” Still, if ever there were a time to make a splash in the resell market, now would be it. Given the RealReal’s debut and StockX’s massive money raise it inevitable for others to go public soon. There’s growing investors interest at this current juncture. There’s a window of opportunity now. Before you go! Recommended:  Black Friday Not Sustainable At All Especially For Fashion Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about 'buying and wearing vintage fashion'? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
'I won't buy any clothes from fast fashion stores for a year... and hopefully for ever more'. Could you commit to not buying a single item of clothing from fast fashion outlets for an entire year? To only buying clothes from charity shops, second hand shops, or swapping or borrowing items? Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers The seven student in this article say they love fashion and insist their boycott of fast fashion won’t be about them turning their back on clothes. Instead, it will be about getting creative and finding sustainable alternatives. Let's read their motivation to buy only vintage fashion. Recommended:  Circular Sustainable Fashion: Biggest Trend Of The Century Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Niamh Guiry Age: 22 From: Bishopstown Studying: Microbiology (fourth year) Are vintage clothes second hand? On the other hand, vintage refers to a category contained within the second hand category, which is the category of clothes that, even though have been produced a while ago, still have a good quality and can be worn. Clothing has, generally speaking, a very short life span “I’ve decided to boycott fast fashion because no one should suffer so you can look ‘trendy’. I’m always trying to think of new ways that our society can promote sustainability and the issue of fast fashion has been on my mind for a while. “I had been reading about the atrocious human rights violations that occur in this industry and the amount of pollution and waste it creates and I decided that I wanted to try to make a difference. “I thought that pledging to only buy sustainable and second hand clothes for a year could be a good way to do that. I went into one of our weekly committee meeting and asked if anyone wanted to boycott with me. I was beyond thrilled when six hands shot up in the air. {youtube}                                                     Vintage Shopping In London + Trying On What I Got                                              Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say And Resale Expect? “Over the coming year, I’m going to buy as few clothes as possible. If I want to get ‘new’ clothes I’ll go to charity shops, to swap shops, I’ll ask my friends if they have anything I can borrow. “I have plenty clothes (the same as the vast majority of people) I don’t need any more. “I will admit that I absolutely love clothes and I love expressing myself through the clothes I wear. “Over the next year, I’m going to continue doing just that. You can live and shop sustainably and look good at the same time.” Recommended:  Sustainable Fashion From Bio-Materials Good For The World Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say.Caoimhe Flynn. Age: 22 From: Carrigtwohill Studying: BA International in English and German (final year) “Reports and news coverage have exposed time and time again the human rights abuses on which the fast fashion industry is built. “In the midst of the climate crisis, the mass production of ‘disposable’ clothing is also not sustainable. It results in the use of vast quantities of water, burning of fossil fuels and strain on already limited resources. “I aim to avoid increasing the amount of clothing I currently own. I will, however, replace items which are no longer wearable, particularly those that are necessary.  “In the last two years, I had already begun to shop more in the many second hand and charity shops in Cork.  “If I still cannot find what I am looking for, I will allow myself to buy from brands and companies who are dedicated to sustainable practices. “I do not envisage encountering many difficulties along the way, though I have to change my habit of taking the easy way out when something breaks suddenly. “Not popping into fast fashion retailers to buy little things like socks will probably be more difficult than I imagine! In the end however, I know that what I own is already more than enough.” What are the best online thrift stores? 8 Amazing Online Thrift Stores for the Coolest Vintage Clothes Ever ASOS MARKETPLACE. That's right, ASOS has a vintage website too! The Vintage Twin THREDUP Tradesy Maeven Refashioner LePrix Depop Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Isobel O’Connor Sealy Age: 19 From: Tallow, Co. Waterford Studying: Arts International (first year) “I’m boycotting fast fashion because I find it sickening that people work in slave-like conditions making clothes for people like me in developed countries just so we can look fashionable. “I’ll be buying from charity shops, taking hand-me-downs from family, exchanging clothes with friends, and going to swap-shops or kilo-sales to get myself new clothes during this boycott (and hopefully forever more!). “I enjoy knitting and sewing so perhaps I’ll make a few things or spice up some old pieces I have lying around. “I’ve always loved fashion and I find it’s a way for me to express myself. “I’ve also been a big shopper but recently, as I’ve become more aware of the negative impact the fashion industry has on both people and planet, I’ve mainly stuck to charity shops or swapped clothes with friends. “I imagine the allure of online shopping will be a challenge for me, but the knowledge I have now definitely outweighs the convenience of cheap clothing. “Basics, like underwear and socks, could potentially be a challenge too, but sustainable brands do exist should I need anything like that.” Recommended:  Fashion Minimalism, A Capsule Wardrobe: Dream Or Nightmare? Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Síofra Richardson Age: 21 From: Cobh Studying: World Languages (second year). “I’ve long been aware of the ethical and environmental violations of the fast fashion industry — I started a boycott myself when I was about 15, though I have since on and off allowed myself to buy various items from high street stores for different reasons. “It felt like the right time to start a proper boycott again, as there is massive momentum for climate action at the moment, and as a group we have the opportunity to have a bigger impact, using the Environmental Society platform where we are a little more visible to our university community. “I absolutely love clothes, though for years I’ve tried not to buy fast fashion. I prefer vintage pieces. I like to think of buying clothes as investments. I use Eco Age’s & wears challenge as a kind of a decision maker as to whether or not I should invest — is it something I will wear 30 or more times? Can I dress the piece up or down, and can it be worn year round? What is difference between vintage and antique? Here is the general rule to remember: Something antique is also vintage, but something vintage isn't necessarily antique. Vintage refers to something that is from an earlier generation. Antique refers to something that is over 100 years old “For my boycott I am going to attempt to buy no new clothes for the year. If I just feel like jazzing up my wardrobe, I’ll take part in a swap shop: bring clothes along to an event where I’ll leave them for someone else to pick up and love hopefully, and find something that was pre-loved. “If it comes to it, I will buy from second hand stores or from ethical companies that are 100% transparent and traceable — this means before investing in a piece researching the company, where it’s based, their human rights record. There are plenty of ethical companies out there though, a little pricier but personally I think it’s worth it. “The challenge I predict right now is formal wear — it’s not impossible to pick out formal dresses from second hand shops but it’s a bit more of a process! “Obviously, if something doesn’t fit you can’t just move up or down a size, so it’s either start all over or if it’s not far off you can get it altered. I have a few formal occasions this year so I’m looking forward to getting creative!” Recommended:  State Of Fashion: Searching For The New Luxury Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Rebecca Doocey Age: 20 From: Conna Studying: International Development and Food Policy (second year) “Being able to express myself through what I wear is inherently important to me — but I realised I couldn’t keep doing it at the expense of the planet and the people who worked to make the clothes, so I decided to boycott fast fashion. “Personally, for the next 52 weeks, I want to challenge myself to avoid buying clothes at all, and if I do need something I will only try buying second hand or from a sustainable source (Lucy & Yak are a great online producer of sustainably made clothes in a non-exploitative way). “I used to be a blind consumer, buying whatever I wanted just for the sake of it, until I ended up with a mountain of clothes I neither liked nor needed. “Though we’ve only pledged to give up fast fashion for a year, I plan on changing my consumer habits considerably for the future, buying only the necessities as I’m becoming more interested in a minimalistic lifestyle.” What is a vintage theme? What is a vintage theme? A vintage theme is one that uses items and decor that depicts a certain period in time, or the items themselves are aged Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Asha Woodhouse Age: 22 From: Gurranabraher Studying: Environmental Science (4th year) “I’m boycotting fast fashion in solidarity with people that suffer at the hands of mass producing unnecessary clothing for Western society. “The fashion industry must switch to a circular economic model, be transparent and take responsibility in ensuring compliance with workers’ rights and in having minimal environmental impact in its production processes. “If I need to buy something, I usually shop in a second hand store first. “There are some items I prefer to buy new such as sportswear and shoes, but there are plenty of brands that are transparent and sustainable in their production processes. “However, a lot of these brands are pricey, but I think this will help me in putting more thought into it before buying something — although I know I am privileged to be able to do this. “I don’t think I’ll find it too challenging, to be honest, I’ve been conscious of this and shopping in second hand stores since I was about 15. “Most of my favourite clothing is second hand. “The majority of fast fashion items I have bought recently have been with vouchers that I was gifted for birthdays and Christmas. “I think what I will find hard is buying basic items like vest tops, underwear, socks, and clothes for work.” Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Nevena Stoya Age: 24 From: Bulgaria, grew up in Spain Studying: Nutritional and Food sciences “I’ve been invested in a fast fashion boycott for over five years now, during which time I’ve been learning how to to minimise generic consumption. “I was brought up in an entrepreneurial family, my father a carpenter and mother a tailor, so producing necessities for myself is not unfamiliar to me. “Avoiding waste is part of the Slavic culture. I always had handmade and unique designs to wear as a kid. I grew to love fashion, but endurance and quality were things I struggled to find in many brands and fashion-houses. “My advice to anyone thinking of following us would be to start from the community education perspective of re-building our habits and lifestyle: use, re-style customise and recycle. Borrow from friends and family, swap in pop-up events locally, learn to fix and sew at Vibes and Scribes workshops and lessons (not only handy but great craic as well) or find your city’s professional tailors (Zipyard, or others). If you really do need to buy something, make it a last resort and do so in a more conscious and aware manner. Buy from charity and second hand shops, donating to meaningful causes or from NGOs such as Oxfam who work preventing clothing ending up in landfill. Buy from small and local outlets, choose organic cotton or recycled and sustainable fibres. “And for more advice, follow the Society’s Instagram page where I’ll feature a Cork guide to sustainable fashion.” Recommended:  Israeli 3D Printed Fashion As Sustainable Works Of Art Vintage Fashion: What Does the Resail Market Expect Reselling platforms are having a moment. This year, Nike took a pair of Air Max 1s off shelves because the shoes showcased an embroidered Betsy Ross. Like clockwork, interest in the kicks exploded. Nike ordered a recall of its new July Fourth-themed Air Max 1 sneakers over concerns about its Betsy Ross flag logo. Prices for the shoes rocketed on the website StockX Currently, on the sneaker resale site StockX, people have bid upwards of $2,700 to nab a pair of the Air Max 1s. And high-end fashion reseller The RealReal debuted on the Nasdaq with much fanfare. StockX, which just raised $110 million in new funding, and The RealReal represent a growing group of retailers once considered niche. Over the last few years, they’ve begun garnering more mainstream attention, causing some proponents to believe resale to be the next big wave in retail. In the U.S. alone, retail sales are expected to hit $3.8 trillion, according to the National Retail Federation. These new platforms exhibit a burgeoning industry, yet challenges lay ahead before they can truly compete with big retail brands. Reselling isn’t new: For decades, people have hawked their already-bought goods via sidewalk sales and thrift and vintage stores. Sites like eBay too provided way for individual sellers to cash in on used goods. Goodwill has been around since 1902. The latest wave of startups for second hand fashion is named; ‘modernized vintage’.” Resale has had a facelift! Vintage Fashion: The State Of Resale Platforms Flashy new resell platforms are catching people’s eyes. There are more consumers who are entering the resale market—both as sellers and as buyers. It is most certainly growing at a very rapid clip. The numbers forecast that the market for resold clothing, accessories, and footwear in the U.S. will hit $51 billion in 2023, more than double what it was last year. Meanwhile, older companies are dabbling with it as well. resale site Fashionphile has begun building out a program for shoppers to sell back their old clothes. H&M is reportedly making similar moves too. Both the startups and the older players tout these programs as moves toward better sustainability; instead of buying something cheap and throwing it out some months later, people can recycle their own fashion. This is the new consumer trend. What types of trends are there? Trend analysis is based on the idea that what has happened in the past gives traders an idea of what will happen in the future. There are three main types of trends: short-, intermediate- and long-term. Beyond the RealReal and StockX there are myriad other online resellers that use a variety of models. ThredUp, for instance, offers a website quite similar to other fashion retailers and department stores. All the clothing it sells, however, is used. People can send ThredUp their own unwanted pieces, for which they can received a small amount of cash or store credit. ThredUp has raised over $130 million in funding and business intelligence platform Owler estimates that the company brings in around nearly $40 million in revenue. Poshmark uses a more direct route, having sellers take pictures and ship their own products to buyers. In 2018, the company reportedly brought in nearly $150 million, and it’s been allegedly working toward going public later this year. Poshmark said it has over 50 million users and over $100 million of inventory is uploaded to its platform every week. Thus far, the company has raised nearly $160 million in venture capital. Modern Retail reached out to Poshmark and ThredUp for comment about the reselling market and their future plans, and they both provided statistics about growth and scale. Still, the overall impact is contested. ThredUp, in fact, commissioned a study (performed by GlobalData) that said the secondhand fashion resale market will eclipse fast fashion by 2028. Vintage Fashion: Challenges Ahead It’s unclear how many people are participating in this new digital resale industry. Only 21% of consumers had ever purchased anything second-hand. While many of these businesses are reporting growing numbers, their sales have yet come close to the billions of dollars in sales that even the ailing retailers are doing. Gap, for instance, reported over $16 billion in sales in 2018. The truth is, that it is hard to believe any of these niche companies getting to that level in the near future.” Still, if ever there were a time to make a splash in the resell market, now would be it. Given the RealReal’s debut and StockX’s massive money raise it inevitable for others to go public soon. There’s growing investors interest at this current juncture. There’s a window of opportunity now. Before you go! Recommended:  Black Friday Not Sustainable At All Especially For Fashion Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about 'buying and wearing vintage fashion'? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say And Resale Expect?
Digital Economy: Is Its Footprint Threatening Our Planet?
At a first glance, it seems as if the digital economy is benefitting our planet. After all, it does require a lot less (air) travel and production of physical goods, with meetings now being conducted in a virtual environment instead of in a remote city attendees will have to fly in to.   Digital Economy Similarly, we can now listen to our music or watch our movies online, instead of purchasing a physical object that requires a lot of energy and resources to make - not to mention the amount of plastic. We now trade, meet, consume, produce and work online, allowing us to get in touch with people across the world in near real-time. Boundaries are fading and so are restraints on time and place. Seems like a win for the environment. Unfortunately, there’s a dark side to most things - including the digital’s economy footprint on our planet.   Recommended:  Why Smart Phones Are Killing Our Planet One could look at the vehicles that we use for tuning in to the digital economy. Our smartphones, tablets and laptops are notorious sources of pollution and resource exhaustion through its production and operation processes. While rare earth elements are wasted for their manufacturing, the energy requirements of production factories, cloud computing and data centers are excessive. The world’s data centres produce about the same amount of carbon dioxide as global air travel.  Most of the energy that drives the digital economy is still generated using coal. One of the dirtiest energy generators is powering the movement that has promised to cut down on our emissions. As we stand today, this is preventing our digital economy from being compatible with the green economy the world is desperately trying to make a reality. {youtube}                                                Digital Economy: Is Its Footprint Threatening Our Planet?                                                              Datacenter, the hidden face of the web Digital Economy And Its Footprint. Coal Is Still King For The Internet So, in order to fuel the digital economy, we exploit the earth’s rare elements at an alarming rate. After all, our electric cars and iPhones 10 heavily rely on heavy metals and minerals that we are not only quickly running out of, but that are also dependant upon a very polluting production process. Add to this the disposable nature of the created goods and the lack of proper recycling, and it is not hard to see why our modern goodies have left such a dent in the earth’s wellbeing. Preliminary data (p) on the global production of rare earth elements, 1988-2018.   In China, for instance, one of the world’s largest producers of such metals and minerals, concerned voices are being raised about the effect that these heavy metals and radioactive materials have when released in water bodies, soil and air. These metals require immense amounts of energy to be processed and produced, while it leaves companies with alarming amounts of (radioactive) waste. Recommended:  Your Smartphone Is Polluting And Generating Massive Waste Satellite image of the Bayan Obo mine in China, taken on June 30, 2006. Vegetation appears in red, grassland is light brown, rocks are black and the water surfaces are green To power this production process, coal is still the preferred source. Unfortunately, this is also the largest contributor to climate change. This leads to the digital economy speeding up global warming, instead of tapping in its potential for reducing it. Digital Economy: Its Footprint Threatening Our Planet. Energy Hogs The energy hogging already starts at the production stage. From there, it keeps on going - with the immense amounts of energy required to keep our digital economy going. Just look at data centers, which are essentially warehouses for the transmitted data. These bad boys have been credited with emitting a massive 2% of the total global greenhouse gas emissions. This places them in the same league as global air travel.   So we might travel less because of the digital economy, but this alternative has an eerily similar effect on our environment. A recent report in Asia pointed out that the Chinese data centers alone have produced about 100 million tonnes of carbon dioxide in 2018. This roughly correlates with 21 million cars driven for one year. Speaking of cars versus the digital economy. Artificial intelligence is on the rise, yet at a pretty large cost. The feeding of data into a single computer and asking it to make predictions based on it requires the same amount of energy as the average American car in its lifetime.   Another popular digital trend is that of blockchain technologies, powering cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin. Unfortunately, the energy that is required to create one dollar worth of Bitcoin is about twice the amount of energy it costs to produce one dollar worth of gold, platinum of copper. Recommended:  Bitcoin Mining: Why Would You Waste Energy All of this is not to mention the so-called ‘e-waste’, or the waste generated by data centers and other products of the digital economy. Often toxic and even more often impossible to recycle, this poses yet another risk. Digital Economy: It’s Footprint Threatening Our Planet? Thinking Differently There are two major things changing in the world right now. First, the trend of sustainability and the creation of a green economy. Second, the growing digitisation. While these two are largely incompatible today, there definitely is room to marry the two and move forward towards a greener digital economy.   We will have to start thinking differently. About recycling and disposing waste. About using greener energy sources to power our data centers. About alternative metals and materials that can be used in our smart phones. The digital economy has brought us a lot, that is undeniable. Now it is time for us to figure out what we can do for the digital economy to make it healthier for all of us. Before you go! Recommended:  Digital Ecosystem For The Environment: Big Data Worldwide Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about the effect of smart phones in your neighborhood? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
At a first glance, it seems as if the digital economy is benefitting our planet. After all, it does require a lot less (air) travel and production of physical goods, with meetings now being conducted in a virtual environment instead of in a remote city attendees will have to fly in to.   Digital Economy Similarly, we can now listen to our music or watch our movies online, instead of purchasing a physical object that requires a lot of energy and resources to make - not to mention the amount of plastic. We now trade, meet, consume, produce and work online, allowing us to get in touch with people across the world in near real-time. Boundaries are fading and so are restraints on time and place. Seems like a win for the environment. Unfortunately, there’s a dark side to most things - including the digital’s economy footprint on our planet.   Recommended:  Why Smart Phones Are Killing Our Planet One could look at the vehicles that we use for tuning in to the digital economy. Our smartphones, tablets and laptops are notorious sources of pollution and resource exhaustion through its production and operation processes. While rare earth elements are wasted for their manufacturing, the energy requirements of production factories, cloud computing and data centers are excessive. The world’s data centres produce about the same amount of carbon dioxide as global air travel.  Most of the energy that drives the digital economy is still generated using coal. One of the dirtiest energy generators is powering the movement that has promised to cut down on our emissions. As we stand today, this is preventing our digital economy from being compatible with the green economy the world is desperately trying to make a reality. {youtube}                                                Digital Economy: Is Its Footprint Threatening Our Planet?                                                              Datacenter, the hidden face of the web Digital Economy And Its Footprint. Coal Is Still King For The Internet So, in order to fuel the digital economy, we exploit the earth’s rare elements at an alarming rate. After all, our electric cars and iPhones 10 heavily rely on heavy metals and minerals that we are not only quickly running out of, but that are also dependant upon a very polluting production process. Add to this the disposable nature of the created goods and the lack of proper recycling, and it is not hard to see why our modern goodies have left such a dent in the earth’s wellbeing. Preliminary data (p) on the global production of rare earth elements, 1988-2018.   In China, for instance, one of the world’s largest producers of such metals and minerals, concerned voices are being raised about the effect that these heavy metals and radioactive materials have when released in water bodies, soil and air. These metals require immense amounts of energy to be processed and produced, while it leaves companies with alarming amounts of (radioactive) waste. Recommended:  Your Smartphone Is Polluting And Generating Massive Waste Satellite image of the Bayan Obo mine in China, taken on June 30, 2006. Vegetation appears in red, grassland is light brown, rocks are black and the water surfaces are green To power this production process, coal is still the preferred source. Unfortunately, this is also the largest contributor to climate change. This leads to the digital economy speeding up global warming, instead of tapping in its potential for reducing it. Digital Economy: Its Footprint Threatening Our Planet. Energy Hogs The energy hogging already starts at the production stage. From there, it keeps on going - with the immense amounts of energy required to keep our digital economy going. Just look at data centers, which are essentially warehouses for the transmitted data. These bad boys have been credited with emitting a massive 2% of the total global greenhouse gas emissions. This places them in the same league as global air travel.   So we might travel less because of the digital economy, but this alternative has an eerily similar effect on our environment. A recent report in Asia pointed out that the Chinese data centers alone have produced about 100 million tonnes of carbon dioxide in 2018. This roughly correlates with 21 million cars driven for one year. Speaking of cars versus the digital economy. Artificial intelligence is on the rise, yet at a pretty large cost. The feeding of data into a single computer and asking it to make predictions based on it requires the same amount of energy as the average American car in its lifetime.   Another popular digital trend is that of blockchain technologies, powering cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin. Unfortunately, the energy that is required to create one dollar worth of Bitcoin is about twice the amount of energy it costs to produce one dollar worth of gold, platinum of copper. Recommended:  Bitcoin Mining: Why Would You Waste Energy All of this is not to mention the so-called ‘e-waste’, or the waste generated by data centers and other products of the digital economy. Often toxic and even more often impossible to recycle, this poses yet another risk. Digital Economy: It’s Footprint Threatening Our Planet? Thinking Differently There are two major things changing in the world right now. First, the trend of sustainability and the creation of a green economy. Second, the growing digitisation. While these two are largely incompatible today, there definitely is room to marry the two and move forward towards a greener digital economy.   We will have to start thinking differently. About recycling and disposing waste. About using greener energy sources to power our data centers. About alternative metals and materials that can be used in our smart phones. The digital economy has brought us a lot, that is undeniable. Now it is time for us to figure out what we can do for the digital economy to make it healthier for all of us. Before you go! Recommended:  Digital Ecosystem For The Environment: Big Data Worldwide Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about the effect of smart phones in your neighborhood? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Digital Economy: Is Its Footprint Threatening Our Planet?
Digital Economy: Is Its Footprint Threatening Our Planet?
Why Smart Phones Are Killing Our Planet
While millennials and generation Z-ers are currently letting their voices be heard in an attempt to sway world leaders to finally take real action against climate change, there is one thing that they are not really acknowledging yet. In an ironic twist, the smart phones that they are using to capture their protest attempts with, turn out to be a major contributor to the destruction of our planet. Smart Phones Excessive And Unnecessary Waste There are several reasons why our iPhones 10, Samsung Galaxies and whatnots are so harmful to the environment. These include dangerous mining practices required for its components, the use of dangerous chemicals, and the difficulty of proper recycling. Even worse? With us changing our phones more frequently than shoes, we are rapidly adding to the pile of waste. What smartphone means? A smartphone is a cellular telephone with an integrated computer and other features not originally associated with telephones, such as an operating system, web browsing and the ability to run software applications. On average, people get a new phone once every two years. It is not surprising that this often coincides with the length of phone contracts, with telecom companies vying for the attention and consideration of customers by offering more attractive deals and, of course, the latest phone fads.   This excessive consumerism of phones has led to a staggering 1.5 billion smart phones sold annually. Recommended:  Smartphones Not Sustainable: Designed To 'Downgrade Humans' Just let that number sink in for a bit, before realising that this must mean that there are just as many phones discarded. Quite a few people will simply leave them somewhere in a drawer at home, while others may choose to throw it in the trash or hand it back to the phone company in exchange for a sweet discount.   {youtube}                                                               Why Smart Phones Are Killing Our Planet                                                                          The true cost of Samsung   No matter what method you choose, chances are that it will not lead to a proper recycling process. In fact, only 15% of our e-waste is processed as it should be. Even if you choose to hand in your phone for recycling, chances are that it will end up on a pile to be recycled incorrectly. Countries like China, India and Ghana are struggling to get a grip on their largely unregulated, polluting and frankly downright dangerous recycling processes. What makes a phone a smart phone? Briefly, a smartphone is a device that lets you make telephone calls but also adds in additional features such as the ability to send and receive e-mail, edit documents, download apps, and more. Popular operating systems for smartphones are BlackBerry OS, Windows Mobile, and Android. Smart Phone Companies And Seduction Techniques It was not even that long ago that phones were considered to be a luxury. Something to be handled with great care and a product that would last for as long as long as our average car or washing machine. For years, we would cradle our Nokia, treasuring its ability to connect us with anyone else carrying one of those babies in real time.   Functionalities have expanded from the call, text and Snake-limitations back in the day. This is one of the reasons that we are so eager to keep up with the latest and change phones more frequently. Manufacturers know this and are happy to oblige, by making it easier to get a new phone at the end of your two-year contract. We are eager to stay on top of the latest trends and, out of fear of falling behind, are more than happy to join this rat race. What are disadvantages of mobile phones? Top 8 Health Disadvantages of using Mobile Phones for long hours Brain Cancer. Mobile phones emit radio frequency energy, a form of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation, which can be absorbed by tissues close to the phone Increases stress level Weakens immune system Chronic pain Eye/ vision problems Hinders sleep Germs Hampers your thinking process Another smart way of making sure that we do not hang on to our phones for too long is purposely making them break down faster, or making repairs and/or replacements unnecessarily pricey and difficult. Manufacturers are actively limiting the life span of their phones to allow them to move from a luxury, only few-in-a-lifetime good to more of a fast moving consumer good. Smart Phone Industry Uses Up Valuable And Limited Resources Creating this many new smartphones does require an excessive amount of resources. Some of those are pretty rare and valuable, such as minerals obtained from war-stricken Congo, extracted through dangerous mining procedures that harm the local environment and population. Similarly, the production of a smart phone requires quite a bit of energy, adding to climate change in the process. Recommended:  Why Is Our Renewable Technology Powered By Child Labor? Another resource that smart phones require is plastic. For the phone itself, but also for the phone case, screen protectors, and the packaging used for all of those. In a world that has vowed to cut back on its use of this non-biodegradable resource, this gives rise to another unmistakable issue. Smart Phones Are Killing Our Planet: The Toxic Chemicals It is not just plastic that is killing our planet. The toxic chemicals used in the production of electric products are not just making factory workers ill, or those living near unsanctioned e-waste recycling spots. It has an effect on the health of all of us. Only Apple and Google are complying with regulations that serve to cut down the use of those chemicals, meaning that there are still plenty of ‘bad’ smart phones going around. Recommended: Your Smartphone Is Polluting And Generating Massive Waste How You Can Stop Excessive Smart Phone Waste Depletion And Armed Conflict Is mobile a curse or blessing? Mobile phones can be seen as blessing or a curse. They can be seen as a curse by many people because of the potential health risks of being in continuous contact with them and the often large amounts of money they cost. Mobile phone emissions can be a risk to human health if in continuous contact. What chemicals are in phones? The Toxicity of Cell Phones The circuit boards in cell phones contain myriad toxins such as arsenic, antimony, beryllium, cadmium, copper, lead, nickel, and zinc Brominated flame retardants are found in the plastic housing, printed wiring board, and cables.   Okay, so despite this, you are probably not likely to give up your smartphone altogether. We have come to rely on it too much. Yet there are some things that you can do to play your part in cutting back its negative effect on the environment. Check the Guide to Greener Electronics to find out which phones rank best. Think twice before deciding to get a new smartphone. Re-use old phones, by donating them to family, friends, or those in need. Recycle through proper channels, if you are unable to give your phone away.   Select biodegradable accessoires, such as cases and screen protectors. We all want to make the world a better place. Let’s attempt to be fashionable by playing your part and making sustainable use of your smart phone, instead of by trying to get your hands on the latest one. Before you go! Recommended:  Earth Matters. Nature And Us: What Was, What’s Left: Hope? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about the effect of smart phones in your neighborhood? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
While millennials and generation Z-ers are currently letting their voices be heard in an attempt to sway world leaders to finally take real action against climate change, there is one thing that they are not really acknowledging yet. In an ironic twist, the smart phones that they are using to capture their protest attempts with, turn out to be a major contributor to the destruction of our planet. Smart Phones Excessive And Unnecessary Waste There are several reasons why our iPhones 10, Samsung Galaxies and whatnots are so harmful to the environment. These include dangerous mining practices required for its components, the use of dangerous chemicals, and the difficulty of proper recycling. Even worse? With us changing our phones more frequently than shoes, we are rapidly adding to the pile of waste. What smartphone means? A smartphone is a cellular telephone with an integrated computer and other features not originally associated with telephones, such as an operating system, web browsing and the ability to run software applications. On average, people get a new phone once every two years. It is not surprising that this often coincides with the length of phone contracts, with telecom companies vying for the attention and consideration of customers by offering more attractive deals and, of course, the latest phone fads.   This excessive consumerism of phones has led to a staggering 1.5 billion smart phones sold annually. Recommended:  Smartphones Not Sustainable: Designed To 'Downgrade Humans' Just let that number sink in for a bit, before realising that this must mean that there are just as many phones discarded. Quite a few people will simply leave them somewhere in a drawer at home, while others may choose to throw it in the trash or hand it back to the phone company in exchange for a sweet discount.   {youtube}                                                               Why Smart Phones Are Killing Our Planet                                                                          The true cost of Samsung   No matter what method you choose, chances are that it will not lead to a proper recycling process. In fact, only 15% of our e-waste is processed as it should be. Even if you choose to hand in your phone for recycling, chances are that it will end up on a pile to be recycled incorrectly. Countries like China, India and Ghana are struggling to get a grip on their largely unregulated, polluting and frankly downright dangerous recycling processes. What makes a phone a smart phone? Briefly, a smartphone is a device that lets you make telephone calls but also adds in additional features such as the ability to send and receive e-mail, edit documents, download apps, and more. Popular operating systems for smartphones are BlackBerry OS, Windows Mobile, and Android. Smart Phone Companies And Seduction Techniques It was not even that long ago that phones were considered to be a luxury. Something to be handled with great care and a product that would last for as long as long as our average car or washing machine. For years, we would cradle our Nokia, treasuring its ability to connect us with anyone else carrying one of those babies in real time.   Functionalities have expanded from the call, text and Snake-limitations back in the day. This is one of the reasons that we are so eager to keep up with the latest and change phones more frequently. Manufacturers know this and are happy to oblige, by making it easier to get a new phone at the end of your two-year contract. We are eager to stay on top of the latest trends and, out of fear of falling behind, are more than happy to join this rat race. What are disadvantages of mobile phones? Top 8 Health Disadvantages of using Mobile Phones for long hours Brain Cancer. Mobile phones emit radio frequency energy, a form of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation, which can be absorbed by tissues close to the phone Increases stress level Weakens immune system Chronic pain Eye/ vision problems Hinders sleep Germs Hampers your thinking process Another smart way of making sure that we do not hang on to our phones for too long is purposely making them break down faster, or making repairs and/or replacements unnecessarily pricey and difficult. Manufacturers are actively limiting the life span of their phones to allow them to move from a luxury, only few-in-a-lifetime good to more of a fast moving consumer good. Smart Phone Industry Uses Up Valuable And Limited Resources Creating this many new smartphones does require an excessive amount of resources. Some of those are pretty rare and valuable, such as minerals obtained from war-stricken Congo, extracted through dangerous mining procedures that harm the local environment and population. Similarly, the production of a smart phone requires quite a bit of energy, adding to climate change in the process. Recommended:  Why Is Our Renewable Technology Powered By Child Labor? Another resource that smart phones require is plastic. For the phone itself, but also for the phone case, screen protectors, and the packaging used for all of those. In a world that has vowed to cut back on its use of this non-biodegradable resource, this gives rise to another unmistakable issue. Smart Phones Are Killing Our Planet: The Toxic Chemicals It is not just plastic that is killing our planet. The toxic chemicals used in the production of electric products are not just making factory workers ill, or those living near unsanctioned e-waste recycling spots. It has an effect on the health of all of us. Only Apple and Google are complying with regulations that serve to cut down the use of those chemicals, meaning that there are still plenty of ‘bad’ smart phones going around. Recommended: Your Smartphone Is Polluting And Generating Massive Waste How You Can Stop Excessive Smart Phone Waste Depletion And Armed Conflict Is mobile a curse or blessing? Mobile phones can be seen as blessing or a curse. They can be seen as a curse by many people because of the potential health risks of being in continuous contact with them and the often large amounts of money they cost. Mobile phone emissions can be a risk to human health if in continuous contact. What chemicals are in phones? The Toxicity of Cell Phones The circuit boards in cell phones contain myriad toxins such as arsenic, antimony, beryllium, cadmium, copper, lead, nickel, and zinc Brominated flame retardants are found in the plastic housing, printed wiring board, and cables.   Okay, so despite this, you are probably not likely to give up your smartphone altogether. We have come to rely on it too much. Yet there are some things that you can do to play your part in cutting back its negative effect on the environment. Check the Guide to Greener Electronics to find out which phones rank best. Think twice before deciding to get a new smartphone. Re-use old phones, by donating them to family, friends, or those in need. Recycle through proper channels, if you are unable to give your phone away.   Select biodegradable accessoires, such as cases and screen protectors. We all want to make the world a better place. Let’s attempt to be fashionable by playing your part and making sustainable use of your smart phone, instead of by trying to get your hands on the latest one. Before you go! Recommended:  Earth Matters. Nature And Us: What Was, What’s Left: Hope? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about the effect of smart phones in your neighborhood? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Why Smart Phones Are Killing Our Planet
Why Smart Phones Are Killing Our Planet
Fashion From Algae Absorbs CO2: Is It possible To Wear?
Fashion from Algae - Biogarmentry clothes - can photosynthesise like plants. Canadian-Iranian designer Roya Aghighi has created clothes made from algae that turn carbon dioxide into oxygen via photosynthesis, as a more sustainable alternative to fast fashion and it feels like linen! Fashion From Algae Absorbs CO2: Biogarmentry Named Biogarmentry, the clothes are the proof of concept for a textile made with living, photosynthetic cells. In a collaboration between the University of British Colombia (UBC) and Emily Carr Univeristy, Aghighi's biofabricated textiles are living organisms that respirate by turning carbon dioxide into oxygen. Sustainable Future With Fashion From Algae Is algae bacteria or plant? Algae are photosynthetic creatures. They are neither plant, animal or fungi. Many algae are single celled, however some species are multicellular "Biogarmentry suggests a complete overhaul rather than tinkering at the edges," said Aghighi. "The living aspect of the textile will transform users' relationship to their clothing, shifting collective behaviours around our consumption-oriented habits towards forming a sustainable future." Recommended:  CO2 Absorption: Does A Dutch Professor Have The Answer? To make the fabric for Biogarmentry, chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a type of single-cell green algae, are spun together with nano polymers. The result, which feels like linen, is "the first non woven living and photosynthetic textile" to be created. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a type of single-cell green algae Wearers would need to take care of their garment as they would a plant in order to keep them alive, rather than engaging in the environmentally destructive practice of making synthetic clothes and discarding them after a few uses. What are the characteristic of green algae? Cellular structure. Green algae have chloroplasts that contain chlorophyll a and b, giving them a bright green color, as well as the accessory pigments beta carotene and xanthophylls, in stacked thylakoids. The cell walls of green algae usually contain cellulose, and they store carbohydrate in the form of starch. Recommended:  Israeli 3D Printed Fashion As Sustainable Works Of Art                                                  Fashion From Algae Absorbs CO2: Is It possible To Wear?                                                                                  Biogarmentry Biogarmentry is activated by being exposed to sunlight. Rather than wash their clothes, the owner would just need to spray them with water once a week. "By making textiles alive, users will develop an emotional attachments to their garments," said Aghighi. Recommended:  Breaking: Did You Know, All You Read About CO2 Rise Is Half The Truth "Since the life cycle of the living photosynthetic textile is directly dependent on how it is taken care of, caring for clothes would regain ascendance as a crucial part of the system." By turning carbon dioxide into oxygen, the clothes also improve the immediate environment of the wearer, and worn en masse could help regulate carbon emissions. After the user is finished with the garment, it could be disposed of via composting. Currently the textile is expected to live for around a month, but this period can be extended if it is cared for properly. Which algae used as food? Edible seaweed, or sea vegetables, are seaweeds that can be eaten and used in the preparation of food. They typically contain high amounts of fiber. They may belong to one of several groups of multicellular algae: the red algae, green algae, and brown algae. Fashion From Algae: Biogarmentry Feasibility Biogarmentry's feasibility study was a joint undertaking by the Advanced Materials and Process Engineering Laboratory and the Botany Lab at UBC. Aghighi is currently a designer in residence at Material Experience Lab in the Netherlands. Other recent designs in the field of biofabrication include headphones made from fungus and food packaging made from algae. Headphones made from fungus EcoLogicStudio is harnessing the power of photosynthesis with an algae-filled facade covering for buildings that filters air pollution, and Dutch designer Ermi van Oers has invented a lamp that helps plants to grow indoors. Before you go! Recommended:  Algae Canopy Miracle Works Better Than A Forrest: How? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about Sustainable Fashion? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Fashion from Algae - Biogarmentry clothes - can photosynthesise like plants. Canadian-Iranian designer Roya Aghighi has created clothes made from algae that turn carbon dioxide into oxygen via photosynthesis, as a more sustainable alternative to fast fashion and it feels like linen! Fashion From Algae Absorbs CO2: Biogarmentry Named Biogarmentry, the clothes are the proof of concept for a textile made with living, photosynthetic cells. In a collaboration between the University of British Colombia (UBC) and Emily Carr Univeristy, Aghighi's biofabricated textiles are living organisms that respirate by turning carbon dioxide into oxygen. Sustainable Future With Fashion From Algae Is algae bacteria or plant? Algae are photosynthetic creatures. They are neither plant, animal or fungi. Many algae are single celled, however some species are multicellular "Biogarmentry suggests a complete overhaul rather than tinkering at the edges," said Aghighi. "The living aspect of the textile will transform users' relationship to their clothing, shifting collective behaviours around our consumption-oriented habits towards forming a sustainable future." Recommended:  CO2 Absorption: Does A Dutch Professor Have The Answer? To make the fabric for Biogarmentry, chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a type of single-cell green algae, are spun together with nano polymers. The result, which feels like linen, is "the first non woven living and photosynthetic textile" to be created. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a type of single-cell green algae Wearers would need to take care of their garment as they would a plant in order to keep them alive, rather than engaging in the environmentally destructive practice of making synthetic clothes and discarding them after a few uses. What are the characteristic of green algae? Cellular structure. Green algae have chloroplasts that contain chlorophyll a and b, giving them a bright green color, as well as the accessory pigments beta carotene and xanthophylls, in stacked thylakoids. The cell walls of green algae usually contain cellulose, and they store carbohydrate in the form of starch. Recommended:  Israeli 3D Printed Fashion As Sustainable Works Of Art                                                  Fashion From Algae Absorbs CO2: Is It possible To Wear?                                                                                  Biogarmentry Biogarmentry is activated by being exposed to sunlight. Rather than wash their clothes, the owner would just need to spray them with water once a week. "By making textiles alive, users will develop an emotional attachments to their garments," said Aghighi. Recommended:  Breaking: Did You Know, All You Read About CO2 Rise Is Half The Truth "Since the life cycle of the living photosynthetic textile is directly dependent on how it is taken care of, caring for clothes would regain ascendance as a crucial part of the system." By turning carbon dioxide into oxygen, the clothes also improve the immediate environment of the wearer, and worn en masse could help regulate carbon emissions. After the user is finished with the garment, it could be disposed of via composting. Currently the textile is expected to live for around a month, but this period can be extended if it is cared for properly. Which algae used as food? Edible seaweed, or sea vegetables, are seaweeds that can be eaten and used in the preparation of food. They typically contain high amounts of fiber. They may belong to one of several groups of multicellular algae: the red algae, green algae, and brown algae. Fashion From Algae: Biogarmentry Feasibility Biogarmentry's feasibility study was a joint undertaking by the Advanced Materials and Process Engineering Laboratory and the Botany Lab at UBC. Aghighi is currently a designer in residence at Material Experience Lab in the Netherlands. Other recent designs in the field of biofabrication include headphones made from fungus and food packaging made from algae. Headphones made from fungus EcoLogicStudio is harnessing the power of photosynthesis with an algae-filled facade covering for buildings that filters air pollution, and Dutch designer Ermi van Oers has invented a lamp that helps plants to grow indoors. Before you go! Recommended:  Algae Canopy Miracle Works Better Than A Forrest: How? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about Sustainable Fashion? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Fashion From Algae Absorbs CO2: Is It possible To Wear?
Fashion From Algae Absorbs CO2: Is It possible To Wear?
Is Autumn’s Wild Food Healthy And Good For The Environment?
Autumn is an exciting time. Not only for cycling, running and photo’s like we wrote in our last NewsLetter but also for food and what you can find in nature. There is plenty to find, of course depending where you live. Healthier food choices almost always benefit the environment as well. Autumn’s Wild Food Autumn is a fantastic time to forage. With the end of the summer growing season, after everything has been blasted with sunshine, there are lots of exciting options for good eats to be found without us having to cultivate a thing. We just need to get better at responsibly taking advantage of what nature has to offer. Foraging requires both a knowledge of what can be found, as well as the drive to go out and find it. For enthusiasts, there are books upon books of edible wild plants, but for novices, these can be absolutely overwhelming. The trick for getting started with foraging - and Autumn is an awesome time to do it - is to tackle only a couple of plants at a time. Before long, both forests and fields will seem like smorgasbords. For now, get together a basket or something to carry the bounty in, a sharp knife or scissors for harvesting, and some decent shoes for clambering about. Here are some great Autumn finds for getting started with foraging. Autumn’s Wild Food: Mushrooms Mushrooms are probably the most terrifying thing to forage because we all know that there are poisonous ones out there. While this is something we definitely shouldn’t forget, that isn’t to say that we shouldn’t - even as beginners - go out in search of wild mushrooms. We just need to use caution, some common sense, and readily available information. What is a mushroom considered? A mushroom is neither a fruit nor a vegetable; technically mushrooms aren't even plants. They are a special type of fungus a notion that puts some people off. If you don't mind the fungus part, though, mushrooms are a great addition to a healthy diet not to mention totally delicious. There are some great websites to help identify mushrooms, as well as become aware of what’s on the go in your area at any time of year. These can be used to spur the hunt for particular types of mushrooms, choosing ones that are easy to find and identify. Recommended:  Sustainable Fashion: Fungi, Roots From MycoWorks, Inspidere Edible Wild Mushrooms And Some Not To Touch {youtube}                                                                   Mushroom Foraging for Beginners Throughout history, people around the world have foraged wild mushrooms for food. Gathering wild mushrooms can also be an extremely rewarding and interesting hobby. However, those who do it must proceed with the utmost caution. Though many wild mushrooms are highly nutritious, delicious, and safe to consume, others pose a serious risk to your health and can even cause death if ingested. For this reason, it’s critical to only hunt mushrooms with someone who’s highly experienced at identifying both edible and poisonous mushrooms. Hen-Of-The-Woods Grifola frondosa, commonly known as hen-of-the-woods or maitake, is an edible mushroom that’s a favourite of mushroom hunters. Growth Hen-of-the-woods is a polypore a type of fungus that has small pores covering its underside. They grow on the bases of trees in shelf-like clusters, favouring hardwoods like oak. These clusters resemble the tail feathers of a sitting hen hence the name ‘hen-of-the-woods’. Several hen-of-the-woods may grow on a single tree. This mushroom is native to China but also grows in Japan and North America, especially the northeaster United States. They are not common in Europe. It’s a perennial mushroom and often grows in the same spot for many years. Identification Hen-of-the-woods are grayish-brown in colour, while the underside of the caps and branch-like stalk are white, though colouring can vary. These mushrooms are most commonly found in the Autumn, but they can be found less frequently in the summer months as well. Hen-of-the-woods can grow quite large. Some mushroom hunters have scored massive mushrooms weighing up to 50 pounds (about 23 kg), but most weigh 3–15 pounds (1.5–7 kg). A helpful clue when identifying hen-of-the-woods is that it does not have gills, and the underside of its cap has tiny pores, which are smallest at the edges. Don’t eat older specimens that are orange or reddish in color, as they may be contaminated with bacteria or mold. Hen-of-the-woods is often favoured by beginner mushroom hunters. It’s distinctive and does not have many dangerous look-alikes, making it a safe option for novices. Nutrition Hen-of-the-woods are quite nutritious and particularly high in the B vitamins folate, niacin (B3), and riboflavin (B2), all of which are involved in energy metabolism and cellular growth. This mushroom also contains powerful health-promoting compounds, including complex carbohydrates called glucans. These mushrooms may have cholesterol-reducing, and anti-inflammatory properties. Hen-of-the-woods have a savory, rich flavour and are delicious when added to stir-fries, sautés, grain dishes, and soups. What are the benefits of mushrooms? Mushrooms are packed with nutritional value. They're low in calories, are great sources of fiber and protein (good for plant-based diets). They also provide many important nutrients, including B vitamins, selenium, potassium, copper, and (particularly when exposed to the sun) vitamin D Oyster Mushroom The oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) is a delicious edible mushroom that resembles an oyster in shape and is commonly sought after by mushroom hunters. Growth Oyster mushrooms grow in forests around the world, including throughout North America. These mushrooms grow on dead or dying hardwood trees like beech and oak trees. They can sometimes be found growing on Autumnen branches and dead stumps. Oyster mushrooms decompose decaying wood and release nutrients into the soil, recycling nutrients to be used by other plants and organisms in forest ecosystems. They can be found during the spring and Autumn months in the Northern United States and year-round in warmer climates. Identification Oyster mushrooms grow in clusters resembling shelves on dead or dying hardwood trees. Depending on the time of year, the tops of the oyster-shaped caps of these mushrooms can range from white to brownish-gray and are typically 2–8 inches (5–20 cm) wide. The undersides of the caps are covered with tightly spaced gills that run down the stubby, sometimes non-existent, stem and are white or tan in colour. Oyster mushrooms can grow in large numbers, and many different clusters can be found on the same tree. Nutrition Oyster mushrooms have thick, white, mild-tasting flesh that contains a variety of nutrients. They are particularly high in B vitamins, including niacin (B3) and riboflavin (B2), as well as the minerals potassium, copper, iron, and zinc. They also contain powerful anti-inflammatory plant compounds. Oyster mushrooms are excellent sautéed with onions and garlic as a side dish. You can also add them to soups, pastas, and meat dishes. Sulphur Shelf Mushroom The sulphur shelf (Laetiporus sulphureus) mushroom is also known as chicken-of-the-woods or chicken mushroom. It’s a bright orange or yellow mushroom with a unique, meaty flavour. Growth Sulphur shelf mushrooms grow on hardwood trees in North America and Europe. These mushrooms can either act as parasites on living or dying trees, or derive nutrients from dead trees, such as rotting tree stumps. Sulphur shelf mushrooms grow on trees in shelf-like clusters. They are commonly found on large oak trees and typically harvested during the summer and Autumn months. It should be noted that sulphur shelf look-alike Laetiporus species exist. They grow on conifer trees should be avoided, as they can cause severe allergic reactions in some people. Identification Sulphur shelf mushrooms are typically orange or yellow in colour and grow in overlapping shelf-like clusters on hardwoods, such as oak, willow, and chestnut. The caps of the mushroom are fan-like or semi-circular in shape and typically 2–12 inches (5–30 cm) across and up to 8 inches (20 cm) deep. The sulphur shelf does not have gills, and the underside of the caps is covered with tiny pores. This mushroom has a smooth, suede-like texture and yellow-orange colour, which fades to a dull white when the mushroom is past maturity. Many sulphur shelf mushrooms may grow on a single tree, with individual mushrooms growing heavier than 50 pounds (23 kg). Nutrition Like most mushrooms, sulphur shelf mushrooms are low in calories and offer a good amount of nutrients, including fiber, vitamin C, potassium, zinc, phosphorus, and magnesium. They have been shown to have antifungal and antioxidant properties. Sulphur shelf mushrooms should be eaten cooked not raw. You can bring out their meaty texture and hearty flavour by sautéing them with butter, adding them to vegetable dishes, or mixing them into omelettes. How can you tell if a mushroom is safe to eat? Avoid mushrooms with white gills, a skirt or ring on the stem and a bulbous or sack like base called a volva. You may be missing out on some good edible fungi but it means you will be avoiding the deadly members of the Amanita family. Avoid mushrooms with red on the cap or stem. Recommended: Mushroom Recipes Poisonous mushrooms to avoid Though many wild mushrooms can be enjoyed safely, others pose a threat to your health. Never consume the following mushrooms: Death cap (Amanita phalloides) . Death caps are among the most poisonous of all mushrooms and responsible for the majority of mushroom-related deaths worldwide. They grow in many countries around the world. Conocybe filaris.  This mushroom grows in Europe, Asia, and North America and contains the same toxins as the Death cap. It has a smooth, cone-like cap that is brownish in color. They are highly toxic and can be fatal if ingested. Autumn skullcap (Galerina marginata) . Also known as the ‘deadly Galerina’, autumn skullcaps are among the most poisonous of mushrooms. They have small, brown caps and grow on rotting wood. Death angel (Amanita ocreata) . Related to the death cap, the death angel grows along the West Coast of the United States. This mushroom is mostly white and can cause severe illness and death if eaten. False morels (Gyromitra esculenta and Gyromitra infula).  These resemble edible true morels, making them especially dangerous. Unlike true morels, they are not completely hollow when cut. Fruits: Autumn’s Wild Food What fruits are found in the forest? The most common types of forest fruits are berries, such as blackberries, serviceberries, lignonberries, elderberries, blueberries. Wild plum, pawpaw and hardy kiwi are other forest fruits of interest. Though all of those lovely summer berries will have come and gone, lots of fruits produce their bounty in the Autumn, and depending on where we are, there is every bit of a possibility of stumbling upon wild varieties of these fruits. We just have to learn to harvest a bushel or two and make the most of the season. Apples are probably the number one Autumn time harvest, and these are often in neighbourhoods or areas where people have left a mark. Crab apples tend to be the wilder option. Persimmons and prickly pears are both reaching readiness in the autumn. In some areas, wild grapes will be producing tasty bunches, either for snacking or making jelly. Elderberries are also a possibility in Autumn. 'Go Nuts' Nuts are a great find on a forage because we can usually identify them without much trouble, and they are fairly common in the wild. Unlike any other foraged food, these will bring a good helping of calories and healthy fats to the bounty, which is a welcome thing for a plant-based, foraged feast. Autumn is the best time to find nuts. What are nuts considered? A nut is a fruit composed of an inedible hard shell and a seed, which is generally edible. In general usage, a wide variety of dried seeds are called nuts, but in a botanical context ‘nut’ implies that the shell does not open to release the seed (indehiscent). There are lots of options to keep an eye out for, and some of these will definitely depend on location. Walnuts start in late summer and can be found into the middle of Autumn, at which time chestnuts are coming on in abundance. Pecans are late Autumn additions, and gingko nuts are available throughout the autumn. Acorns are usually present around October, and they’ll require some processing. Tree nuts are tasty, healthy and can be obtained for free. If you are willing to forage, then a bounty of food awaits you in the trees. Harvesting nuts does require patience. You need to identify the best trees, wait for the nuts to drop and check for ripeness. Once you have tapped your inner squirrel and gathered your nuts, they will need to be cleaned, dried, or husked (or all three) before they are ready to eat. Though it is not the easiest task, nut harvests are rewarding in the end. It is a fun project for the family. Black Walnuts Black walnuts are housed inside yellowish-green and brown husks (similar in colour to pears) that are about two inches in diameter. They are further housed inside a tough shell that is dark black. Harvest Time   September and October Harvesting   Allow walnut husks to Autumn from the tree. Remove the husks and cure the nuts before storing. Black walnut produces a mild toxin and husks should not be disposed of in your yard, garden or compost. Chestnuts Chestnuts are dark brown in colour, smooth in texture, are pointed at one end and have an oblong spot on the opposite end that is light brown. They are housed inside a spiny burr, which turns yellowish-brown and opens when the chestnuts are ready for harvest. Harvest Time September through December Harvesting Allow chestnuts to Autumn from the tree. Gather nuts with open burrs and remove burrs. Wear gloves to protect yourself from the spines. English Walnuts English walnuts are housed inside a greenish-black hull. They are further housed inside a tan shell. The nut itself is light brown to golden-brown. Harvest Time Late August through October Harvesting Allow nuts to Autumn to the ground or lay out a blanket and shake the tree. Check a few nuts for ripeness first. Remove husks with gloved hands, or they will stain. Rinse, inspect and dry the nuts Pecans Pecans are housed in a brown oval to an oblong shaped shell. The meat itself is brown in colour and possess two-lobes. Harvest Time Mid-October through November Harvesting Allow nuts to Autumn to the ground or shake the tree. Inspect pecans for damage or worms. Air dry for two weeks before Acorns In Autumn Become The Next ‘Superfood’ The humble acorn has long been ignored. That could all be about to change. In South Korea, acorns have achieved ‘superfood’ status, with people devouring ‘acorn noodles, jelly and powder’. Native Americans relied on acorns – rich in nutrients – as a staple part of their diet. They are farmed in China and South Korea, and often ground into flour. Many cultures make acorn ‘coffee’. They are rich in protein, fats, fibre and essential minerals. Recommended: Acorn Recipes For some people life revolves around acorns. These people produce cookies made from acorn flour. Protecting oak trees, and planting more, could help tackle the climate crisis and that acorns are good for food security because they can be stored, squirrel-like, long-term. Now is the perfect season. You might think to head off to the woods, but go to parks, gardens and golf courses. The acorns Autumn on to clean, short grass, which makes them easier to collect than rooting through leaf litter. Getting them ready to eat, takes a little bit of work. You need to shell them first. If you’re working small-scale, you could just slit them with a knife and pop them out of their shell. With bigger harvests (remembering to leave enough for wildlife), Drennan likes to dry them – you can do it on a radiator or spread out in a warm room – before sandwiching them between two sheets and getting some friends round to dance and stamp on them. Then you should leach them to get the bitter tannins out. Put them in a porous sack and stick them in a toilet cistern. That can take between two and six weeks, as the quantity of tannin can be variable. Don’t mix batches from different trees, even if they’re the same variety because they can have different tannin levels. Then they can be roasted, or ground for coffee or flour. You can make an acorn chocolate cake. More commonly, put it in bread, or tagliatelle with it. They taste, nutty, a bit earthy. There’s a kind of density to it. Leaves Foraging wild greens is amazing because they are crazy abundant and can be used in just about every meal. No surprise, the springtime is usually more revered for foraging greens, but that isn’t to say that autumn doesn’t have any to offer. In fact, as the summer heat dissipates, there are some herbs that are ready to leaf out again. Greens, like mushrooms, do require a bit of caution, as there are some toxic possibilities that are better left unexplored. Part of playing it safe is not harvesting from polluted areas, such as alongside highways or dumping sites. The other part is researching a little and double-checking once a potentially tasty leaf has been found. Again, go for the easy-to-identify stuff first. Here are five easy Autumn finds:  chickweed dandelion plantain sheep sorre wild mustard greens With just a few of these, it’s possible to forage a lot of food for free. Wild foods tend to have stronger flavours and be packed with nutrients. Foraging is a fun thing to do, another reason to get outdoors, enjoy nature, see the Autumn foliage, and make the most of what’s around us. In other words, Autumn is here, and it’s time to get started! Before you go! Recommended:  Spider-Woman: Tarantula Staple Food Gets A Snack: Cambodia Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Autumn is an exciting time. Not only for cycling, running and photo’s like we wrote in our last NewsLetter but also for food and what you can find in nature. There is plenty to find, of course depending where you live. Healthier food choices almost always benefit the environment as well. Autumn’s Wild Food Autumn is a fantastic time to forage. With the end of the summer growing season, after everything has been blasted with sunshine, there are lots of exciting options for good eats to be found without us having to cultivate a thing. We just need to get better at responsibly taking advantage of what nature has to offer. Foraging requires both a knowledge of what can be found, as well as the drive to go out and find it. For enthusiasts, there are books upon books of edible wild plants, but for novices, these can be absolutely overwhelming. The trick for getting started with foraging - and Autumn is an awesome time to do it - is to tackle only a couple of plants at a time. Before long, both forests and fields will seem like smorgasbords. For now, get together a basket or something to carry the bounty in, a sharp knife or scissors for harvesting, and some decent shoes for clambering about. Here are some great Autumn finds for getting started with foraging. Autumn’s Wild Food: Mushrooms Mushrooms are probably the most terrifying thing to forage because we all know that there are poisonous ones out there. While this is something we definitely shouldn’t forget, that isn’t to say that we shouldn’t - even as beginners - go out in search of wild mushrooms. We just need to use caution, some common sense, and readily available information. What is a mushroom considered? A mushroom is neither a fruit nor a vegetable; technically mushrooms aren't even plants. They are a special type of fungus a notion that puts some people off. If you don't mind the fungus part, though, mushrooms are a great addition to a healthy diet not to mention totally delicious. There are some great websites to help identify mushrooms, as well as become aware of what’s on the go in your area at any time of year. These can be used to spur the hunt for particular types of mushrooms, choosing ones that are easy to find and identify. Recommended:  Sustainable Fashion: Fungi, Roots From MycoWorks, Inspidere Edible Wild Mushrooms And Some Not To Touch {youtube}                                                                   Mushroom Foraging for Beginners Throughout history, people around the world have foraged wild mushrooms for food. Gathering wild mushrooms can also be an extremely rewarding and interesting hobby. However, those who do it must proceed with the utmost caution. Though many wild mushrooms are highly nutritious, delicious, and safe to consume, others pose a serious risk to your health and can even cause death if ingested. For this reason, it’s critical to only hunt mushrooms with someone who’s highly experienced at identifying both edible and poisonous mushrooms. Hen-Of-The-Woods Grifola frondosa, commonly known as hen-of-the-woods or maitake, is an edible mushroom that’s a favourite of mushroom hunters. Growth Hen-of-the-woods is a polypore a type of fungus that has small pores covering its underside. They grow on the bases of trees in shelf-like clusters, favouring hardwoods like oak. These clusters resemble the tail feathers of a sitting hen hence the name ‘hen-of-the-woods’. Several hen-of-the-woods may grow on a single tree. This mushroom is native to China but also grows in Japan and North America, especially the northeaster United States. They are not common in Europe. It’s a perennial mushroom and often grows in the same spot for many years. Identification Hen-of-the-woods are grayish-brown in colour, while the underside of the caps and branch-like stalk are white, though colouring can vary. These mushrooms are most commonly found in the Autumn, but they can be found less frequently in the summer months as well. Hen-of-the-woods can grow quite large. Some mushroom hunters have scored massive mushrooms weighing up to 50 pounds (about 23 kg), but most weigh 3–15 pounds (1.5–7 kg). A helpful clue when identifying hen-of-the-woods is that it does not have gills, and the underside of its cap has tiny pores, which are smallest at the edges. Don’t eat older specimens that are orange or reddish in color, as they may be contaminated with bacteria or mold. Hen-of-the-woods is often favoured by beginner mushroom hunters. It’s distinctive and does not have many dangerous look-alikes, making it a safe option for novices. Nutrition Hen-of-the-woods are quite nutritious and particularly high in the B vitamins folate, niacin (B3), and riboflavin (B2), all of which are involved in energy metabolism and cellular growth. This mushroom also contains powerful health-promoting compounds, including complex carbohydrates called glucans. These mushrooms may have cholesterol-reducing, and anti-inflammatory properties. Hen-of-the-woods have a savory, rich flavour and are delicious when added to stir-fries, sautés, grain dishes, and soups. What are the benefits of mushrooms? Mushrooms are packed with nutritional value. They're low in calories, are great sources of fiber and protein (good for plant-based diets). They also provide many important nutrients, including B vitamins, selenium, potassium, copper, and (particularly when exposed to the sun) vitamin D Oyster Mushroom The oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) is a delicious edible mushroom that resembles an oyster in shape and is commonly sought after by mushroom hunters. Growth Oyster mushrooms grow in forests around the world, including throughout North America. These mushrooms grow on dead or dying hardwood trees like beech and oak trees. They can sometimes be found growing on Autumnen branches and dead stumps. Oyster mushrooms decompose decaying wood and release nutrients into the soil, recycling nutrients to be used by other plants and organisms in forest ecosystems. They can be found during the spring and Autumn months in the Northern United States and year-round in warmer climates. Identification Oyster mushrooms grow in clusters resembling shelves on dead or dying hardwood trees. Depending on the time of year, the tops of the oyster-shaped caps of these mushrooms can range from white to brownish-gray and are typically 2–8 inches (5–20 cm) wide. The undersides of the caps are covered with tightly spaced gills that run down the stubby, sometimes non-existent, stem and are white or tan in colour. Oyster mushrooms can grow in large numbers, and many different clusters can be found on the same tree. Nutrition Oyster mushrooms have thick, white, mild-tasting flesh that contains a variety of nutrients. They are particularly high in B vitamins, including niacin (B3) and riboflavin (B2), as well as the minerals potassium, copper, iron, and zinc. They also contain powerful anti-inflammatory plant compounds. Oyster mushrooms are excellent sautéed with onions and garlic as a side dish. You can also add them to soups, pastas, and meat dishes. Sulphur Shelf Mushroom The sulphur shelf (Laetiporus sulphureus) mushroom is also known as chicken-of-the-woods or chicken mushroom. It’s a bright orange or yellow mushroom with a unique, meaty flavour. Growth Sulphur shelf mushrooms grow on hardwood trees in North America and Europe. These mushrooms can either act as parasites on living or dying trees, or derive nutrients from dead trees, such as rotting tree stumps. Sulphur shelf mushrooms grow on trees in shelf-like clusters. They are commonly found on large oak trees and typically harvested during the summer and Autumn months. It should be noted that sulphur shelf look-alike Laetiporus species exist. They grow on conifer trees should be avoided, as they can cause severe allergic reactions in some people. Identification Sulphur shelf mushrooms are typically orange or yellow in colour and grow in overlapping shelf-like clusters on hardwoods, such as oak, willow, and chestnut. The caps of the mushroom are fan-like or semi-circular in shape and typically 2–12 inches (5–30 cm) across and up to 8 inches (20 cm) deep. The sulphur shelf does not have gills, and the underside of the caps is covered with tiny pores. This mushroom has a smooth, suede-like texture and yellow-orange colour, which fades to a dull white when the mushroom is past maturity. Many sulphur shelf mushrooms may grow on a single tree, with individual mushrooms growing heavier than 50 pounds (23 kg). Nutrition Like most mushrooms, sulphur shelf mushrooms are low in calories and offer a good amount of nutrients, including fiber, vitamin C, potassium, zinc, phosphorus, and magnesium. They have been shown to have antifungal and antioxidant properties. Sulphur shelf mushrooms should be eaten cooked not raw. You can bring out their meaty texture and hearty flavour by sautéing them with butter, adding them to vegetable dishes, or mixing them into omelettes. How can you tell if a mushroom is safe to eat? Avoid mushrooms with white gills, a skirt or ring on the stem and a bulbous or sack like base called a volva. You may be missing out on some good edible fungi but it means you will be avoiding the deadly members of the Amanita family. Avoid mushrooms with red on the cap or stem. Recommended: Mushroom Recipes Poisonous mushrooms to avoid Though many wild mushrooms can be enjoyed safely, others pose a threat to your health. Never consume the following mushrooms: Death cap (Amanita phalloides) . Death caps are among the most poisonous of all mushrooms and responsible for the majority of mushroom-related deaths worldwide. They grow in many countries around the world. Conocybe filaris.  This mushroom grows in Europe, Asia, and North America and contains the same toxins as the Death cap. It has a smooth, cone-like cap that is brownish in color. They are highly toxic and can be fatal if ingested. Autumn skullcap (Galerina marginata) . Also known as the ‘deadly Galerina’, autumn skullcaps are among the most poisonous of mushrooms. They have small, brown caps and grow on rotting wood. Death angel (Amanita ocreata) . Related to the death cap, the death angel grows along the West Coast of the United States. This mushroom is mostly white and can cause severe illness and death if eaten. False morels (Gyromitra esculenta and Gyromitra infula).  These resemble edible true morels, making them especially dangerous. Unlike true morels, they are not completely hollow when cut. Fruits: Autumn’s Wild Food What fruits are found in the forest? The most common types of forest fruits are berries, such as blackberries, serviceberries, lignonberries, elderberries, blueberries. Wild plum, pawpaw and hardy kiwi are other forest fruits of interest. Though all of those lovely summer berries will have come and gone, lots of fruits produce their bounty in the Autumn, and depending on where we are, there is every bit of a possibility of stumbling upon wild varieties of these fruits. We just have to learn to harvest a bushel or two and make the most of the season. Apples are probably the number one Autumn time harvest, and these are often in neighbourhoods or areas where people have left a mark. Crab apples tend to be the wilder option. Persimmons and prickly pears are both reaching readiness in the autumn. In some areas, wild grapes will be producing tasty bunches, either for snacking or making jelly. Elderberries are also a possibility in Autumn. 'Go Nuts' Nuts are a great find on a forage because we can usually identify them without much trouble, and they are fairly common in the wild. Unlike any other foraged food, these will bring a good helping of calories and healthy fats to the bounty, which is a welcome thing for a plant-based, foraged feast. Autumn is the best time to find nuts. What are nuts considered? A nut is a fruit composed of an inedible hard shell and a seed, which is generally edible. In general usage, a wide variety of dried seeds are called nuts, but in a botanical context ‘nut’ implies that the shell does not open to release the seed (indehiscent). There are lots of options to keep an eye out for, and some of these will definitely depend on location. Walnuts start in late summer and can be found into the middle of Autumn, at which time chestnuts are coming on in abundance. Pecans are late Autumn additions, and gingko nuts are available throughout the autumn. Acorns are usually present around October, and they’ll require some processing. Tree nuts are tasty, healthy and can be obtained for free. If you are willing to forage, then a bounty of food awaits you in the trees. Harvesting nuts does require patience. You need to identify the best trees, wait for the nuts to drop and check for ripeness. Once you have tapped your inner squirrel and gathered your nuts, they will need to be cleaned, dried, or husked (or all three) before they are ready to eat. Though it is not the easiest task, nut harvests are rewarding in the end. It is a fun project for the family. Black Walnuts Black walnuts are housed inside yellowish-green and brown husks (similar in colour to pears) that are about two inches in diameter. They are further housed inside a tough shell that is dark black. Harvest Time   September and October Harvesting   Allow walnut husks to Autumn from the tree. Remove the husks and cure the nuts before storing. Black walnut produces a mild toxin and husks should not be disposed of in your yard, garden or compost. Chestnuts Chestnuts are dark brown in colour, smooth in texture, are pointed at one end and have an oblong spot on the opposite end that is light brown. They are housed inside a spiny burr, which turns yellowish-brown and opens when the chestnuts are ready for harvest. Harvest Time September through December Harvesting Allow chestnuts to Autumn from the tree. Gather nuts with open burrs and remove burrs. Wear gloves to protect yourself from the spines. English Walnuts English walnuts are housed inside a greenish-black hull. They are further housed inside a tan shell. The nut itself is light brown to golden-brown. Harvest Time Late August through October Harvesting Allow nuts to Autumn to the ground or lay out a blanket and shake the tree. Check a few nuts for ripeness first. Remove husks with gloved hands, or they will stain. Rinse, inspect and dry the nuts Pecans Pecans are housed in a brown oval to an oblong shaped shell. The meat itself is brown in colour and possess two-lobes. Harvest Time Mid-October through November Harvesting Allow nuts to Autumn to the ground or shake the tree. Inspect pecans for damage or worms. Air dry for two weeks before Acorns In Autumn Become The Next ‘Superfood’ The humble acorn has long been ignored. That could all be about to change. In South Korea, acorns have achieved ‘superfood’ status, with people devouring ‘acorn noodles, jelly and powder’. Native Americans relied on acorns – rich in nutrients – as a staple part of their diet. They are farmed in China and South Korea, and often ground into flour. Many cultures make acorn ‘coffee’. They are rich in protein, fats, fibre and essential minerals. Recommended: Acorn Recipes For some people life revolves around acorns. These people produce cookies made from acorn flour. Protecting oak trees, and planting more, could help tackle the climate crisis and that acorns are good for food security because they can be stored, squirrel-like, long-term. Now is the perfect season. You might think to head off to the woods, but go to parks, gardens and golf courses. The acorns Autumn on to clean, short grass, which makes them easier to collect than rooting through leaf litter. Getting them ready to eat, takes a little bit of work. You need to shell them first. If you’re working small-scale, you could just slit them with a knife and pop them out of their shell. With bigger harvests (remembering to leave enough for wildlife), Drennan likes to dry them – you can do it on a radiator or spread out in a warm room – before sandwiching them between two sheets and getting some friends round to dance and stamp on them. Then you should leach them to get the bitter tannins out. Put them in a porous sack and stick them in a toilet cistern. That can take between two and six weeks, as the quantity of tannin can be variable. Don’t mix batches from different trees, even if they’re the same variety because they can have different tannin levels. Then they can be roasted, or ground for coffee or flour. You can make an acorn chocolate cake. More commonly, put it in bread, or tagliatelle with it. They taste, nutty, a bit earthy. There’s a kind of density to it. Leaves Foraging wild greens is amazing because they are crazy abundant and can be used in just about every meal. No surprise, the springtime is usually more revered for foraging greens, but that isn’t to say that autumn doesn’t have any to offer. In fact, as the summer heat dissipates, there are some herbs that are ready to leaf out again. Greens, like mushrooms, do require a bit of caution, as there are some toxic possibilities that are better left unexplored. Part of playing it safe is not harvesting from polluted areas, such as alongside highways or dumping sites. The other part is researching a little and double-checking once a potentially tasty leaf has been found. Again, go for the easy-to-identify stuff first. Here are five easy Autumn finds:  chickweed dandelion plantain sheep sorre wild mustard greens With just a few of these, it’s possible to forage a lot of food for free. Wild foods tend to have stronger flavours and be packed with nutrients. Foraging is a fun thing to do, another reason to get outdoors, enjoy nature, see the Autumn foliage, and make the most of what’s around us. In other words, Autumn is here, and it’s time to get started! Before you go! Recommended:  Spider-Woman: Tarantula Staple Food Gets A Snack: Cambodia Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Is Autumn’s Wild Food Healthy And Good For The Environment?
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