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Winston Churchill: Serving Lab-Meat In Restaurants Reality?
If you love food, as many of us do, you must have heard of the 'farm to fork' movement. This is a social movement which promotes serving local and fresh food at restaurants. However, are you familiar with 'lab to table'? And what do you think about that? ' Lab to table' does not sound as incredible as 'farm to fork', but it might be the solution for the future: zero animals are killed, but we create a mass production of lab-grown meat that looks and tastes the same as regular meat. Besides, lab-grown meat could also help the environment, because there is way less food waste in the process. Can we produce meat in labs? Is this how our future will be? A dream from the past The idea of lab-grown meat is not something of recent events but has been around since decades. It was actually Winston Churchill, who had the idea. He took a look at the culinary prognostication. Churchill thought that, within 50 years, we do not need to grow a whole chicken to only eat the breast or wing, and that can be accomplished by growing single parts on their own. The man was right. Of course, this is not something to do quickly, but the idea has been shaped. In 2013, the Dutch pharmacologist and Professor Mark Post of Vascular Physiology showed the first lab-grown burger. In the lab, he used animal cells, without actually killing an animal, as a food source. From that moment on, clean meat has taken interest from many people and entrepreneurs. Since then, many companies copied the idea and are working on the technology to make clean meat better, so they obtain a small number of animal cells from high-quality livestock animals to duplicate the taste, the texture, and the ability to efficiently self-renew. Benefits of Lab-grown meat Not everyone is looking forward to this process but let us mention the benefits of why we should go for lab-grown meat. First of all, many animals are poorly treated, they live in unfortunate circumstances, and we eat it in spite of how it is produced. Moreover, food waste also has a prominent role in this matter. We do not use every part of an animal, so lab-grown meat could grow some elements that we do eat. Livestock animals produce 15 per cent of global gas emissions, according to the United Nations. That is not the only problem; livestock animal production uses a large amount of water, while toxic substances used in agriculture can enter natural waters, destroying habitats, animals and plants in the process. According to Post, one of the most devastating consequences of livestock farming is massive deforestation. For example, around 70 per cent of the Amazon rainforest has already been deforested for grazing. The production of farmed meat is expected to consume 99 per cent less land so that areas could be reforested again. Also, the traditional meat production is very inefficient: it is unnecessarily expensive, unnecessarily damaging to the environment, causes unnecessary animal suffering and will in its present form be challenging to meet the growing human demand for meat.   Solving problems There are still some challenges we need to overcome. On the scientific front, challenges remain around the reproductive capacity of the used cells , and there must be a reducing difference between "clean meat" and "traditional meat". Then there is the issue of large-scale production systems, which costs a lot. And of course, how do you sell this kind of meat instead of the "real" ones? A consumer might not like it, because it is produced in labs and not by an animal. Organic food is much more appealing, but what do people think about eating protein that is grown in a laboratory? And it should be as affordable and tasty as its traditional meat counterpart. Scientists are aware of this problem but are confident to solve this. "It takes time", Post said. Does it help the environment? Researchers from the University of Oxford have the idea that lab-grown meat actually could be worse for the environment than livestock farming. There are a lot of uncertainties around the large-scale meat production, what it looks like and what it tastes like. Therefore, we need to invest in the production of large-scale meat production. This means we have to deal with physical effort and energy requirements to produce this lab-grown meat. So, we are still on the journey at the start of this new kind of meat. Are we eating lab-grown meat in the future? Yes, that could be the case. But for now, it is still in the future, because we have to overcome a lot of challenges. Do not think you can buy lab-grown meat in the supermarkets any day now. For now, plant-based alternatives are substitutes for lab-grown meat or traditional meat. In this plant-based alternative, you also find protein, an impressively accurate meat-like texture and taste. Just keep hoping and waiting and in the future, we will have plant-based and/or cell-based products, because they are more sustainable, efficient and way more humane. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/lifestyle  
If you love food, as many of us do, you must have heard of the 'farm to fork' movement. This is a social movement which promotes serving local and fresh food at restaurants. However, are you familiar with 'lab to table'? And what do you think about that? ' Lab to table' does not sound as incredible as 'farm to fork', but it might be the solution for the future: zero animals are killed, but we create a mass production of lab-grown meat that looks and tastes the same as regular meat. Besides, lab-grown meat could also help the environment, because there is way less food waste in the process. Can we produce meat in labs? Is this how our future will be? A dream from the past The idea of lab-grown meat is not something of recent events but has been around since decades. It was actually Winston Churchill, who had the idea. He took a look at the culinary prognostication. Churchill thought that, within 50 years, we do not need to grow a whole chicken to only eat the breast or wing, and that can be accomplished by growing single parts on their own. The man was right. Of course, this is not something to do quickly, but the idea has been shaped. In 2013, the Dutch pharmacologist and Professor Mark Post of Vascular Physiology showed the first lab-grown burger. In the lab, he used animal cells, without actually killing an animal, as a food source. From that moment on, clean meat has taken interest from many people and entrepreneurs. Since then, many companies copied the idea and are working on the technology to make clean meat better, so they obtain a small number of animal cells from high-quality livestock animals to duplicate the taste, the texture, and the ability to efficiently self-renew. Benefits of Lab-grown meat Not everyone is looking forward to this process but let us mention the benefits of why we should go for lab-grown meat. First of all, many animals are poorly treated, they live in unfortunate circumstances, and we eat it in spite of how it is produced. Moreover, food waste also has a prominent role in this matter. We do not use every part of an animal, so lab-grown meat could grow some elements that we do eat. Livestock animals produce 15 per cent of global gas emissions, according to the United Nations. That is not the only problem; livestock animal production uses a large amount of water, while toxic substances used in agriculture can enter natural waters, destroying habitats, animals and plants in the process. According to Post, one of the most devastating consequences of livestock farming is massive deforestation. For example, around 70 per cent of the Amazon rainforest has already been deforested for grazing. The production of farmed meat is expected to consume 99 per cent less land so that areas could be reforested again. Also, the traditional meat production is very inefficient: it is unnecessarily expensive, unnecessarily damaging to the environment, causes unnecessary animal suffering and will in its present form be challenging to meet the growing human demand for meat.   Solving problems There are still some challenges we need to overcome. On the scientific front, challenges remain around the reproductive capacity of the used cells , and there must be a reducing difference between "clean meat" and "traditional meat". Then there is the issue of large-scale production systems, which costs a lot. And of course, how do you sell this kind of meat instead of the "real" ones? A consumer might not like it, because it is produced in labs and not by an animal. Organic food is much more appealing, but what do people think about eating protein that is grown in a laboratory? And it should be as affordable and tasty as its traditional meat counterpart. Scientists are aware of this problem but are confident to solve this. "It takes time", Post said. Does it help the environment? Researchers from the University of Oxford have the idea that lab-grown meat actually could be worse for the environment than livestock farming. There are a lot of uncertainties around the large-scale meat production, what it looks like and what it tastes like. Therefore, we need to invest in the production of large-scale meat production. This means we have to deal with physical effort and energy requirements to produce this lab-grown meat. So, we are still on the journey at the start of this new kind of meat. Are we eating lab-grown meat in the future? Yes, that could be the case. But for now, it is still in the future, because we have to overcome a lot of challenges. Do not think you can buy lab-grown meat in the supermarkets any day now. For now, plant-based alternatives are substitutes for lab-grown meat or traditional meat. In this plant-based alternative, you also find protein, an impressively accurate meat-like texture and taste. Just keep hoping and waiting and in the future, we will have plant-based and/or cell-based products, because they are more sustainable, efficient and way more humane. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/lifestyle  
Winston Churchill: Serving Lab-Meat In Restaurants Reality?
Winston Churchill: Serving Lab-Meat In Restaurants Reality?
Sustainable Great Inventions From Eco-Inventors: Worldwide
Growing environmental challenges in the world have given rise to a new crop of eco-inventors that are developing ingenious solutions to the most pressing problems of today. They are capitalizing on the new opportunities presented by the problems faced by the world today to create social businesses that focus on a triple bottom line with social responsibility at its core, rather than as just one function of the business. As consumers, it is up to us to support this new era of businesses with our wallets and social clout to join the movement for a better tomorrow. Below listed some tips on coolest inventions and apps & tricks in the space of sustainability Water you can eat, Ooho Made from seaweed-extract, this packaging is not only sustainable, but also edible. Ooho was created to stand up against the waste that is invading our land and oceans and now serves as a great alternative to plastic packaging. The Cora Ball: a device that removes microfibers from laundry One of the biggest pollution challenges the world is facing today is the microfiber that flows into the ocean every time we use a washing machine. The Cora Ball is a device that removes small plastic particles from laundry during the wash cycle to prevent them from getting into the water system. Ecobricks Ecobricks are building blocks made from plastic bottles filled and tightly packed with thin plastic waste. These bricks provide a lasting solution for the tonnes of plastic waste out there. They not only help in giving large amounts of plastic waste a useful second life, but this solution also ensures that there is almost no photo degradation and leaching of harmful chemicals. These building blocks can be used to make small structures such as garden walls, furniture such as benches and chairs and large structures such as cabins and schools as well. We too have worked with thousands of children in Mumbai to create over 7.000 Ecobricks in 2 months and are now looking to construct a public structure using these bricks. This is an extremely simple solution that can be replicated almost anywhere with no technology, no electricity and no capital. Earthships Earthships are a community of self-sustaining houses that are built keeping in mind sustainable architecture, green energy and DIY construction by inexperienced people. These completely off the grid structures are made from waste such as beer cans and tyres and use solar and wind energy. They also use advanced water treatment plants that reduce the amount of waste coming out from the homes. Although started in New Mexico in the 70’s, these structures can now be found in many parts of the world. Seed balls A unique concept started in Kenya, Seed balls, like the name suggests, are small balls within which seeds are placed. The ball is made of charcoal dust and nutrients that protect the seed in times of drought and allow it to survive till the rains arrive. It also protects the seeds from predators and insects. These seed balls are the ingenious answer to rapid deforestation and they can literally be thrown from planes to grow several trees at once with minimal effort. Soccket: a soccer ball that produces energy Soccket is a portable generator that harnesses and stores energy from play. It is used as a power source in areas where access to resources is limited. Terra Hale Gyms, clean energy gyms Imagine powering a light bulb while you pedal on a bicycle in a gym! If you have watched Black Mirror (popular show on Netflix), this might scare you, but clean energy gyms create electricity through human energy. A single hour of spin class can generate up to 3.300 watts of energy and this energy is used to power the gym. Any excess energy is supplied to the grid to power neighboring areas. Several such gyms have popped up in Hong Kong, the United States of America and the United Kingdom. Succulent Jewellry Ok, can I please have all of these? Susan McLeary is florist and jewellery designer based in Michigan who combines her passions in these amazing living accessories. Her Etsy store PassionflowerMade features everything from rings to necklaces, bracelets to statement pieces. They can be worn for up to 6 weeks before the succulents grow roots and need planting. Air Ink This one, is a homegrown innovation that we should be extremely proud of. Invented by Indians, Air Ink can be the answer to the horrible air pollution of cities such as Mumbai and Delhi. This company captures air pollution and soot (from cars) to make beautiful black ink that can be used in art. They are still testing and popularizing the concept but when scaled this invention can have far reaching impact.   Sea Bin Simply put, this is a really cool waste bin for the ocean! The sea bin uses tidal power to filter sea water as it bobs along the surface of the ocean, capturing any trash that may come its way. This amazing invention can capture almost 1.5 kgs of waste a day including microplastics . This is great for problem areas in marinas and near the coastline. Joyxee Island, recycled island Richart Sowa an eco-architect, has literally built himself an entire island using over 150000 waste plastic bottles. His first attempt at building an island failed when the nearby villagers weren’t too happy to see this island floating near their beautiful beach. His second island, was destroyed by a hurricane. Now finally his third island floats off the coast of Cancun, Mexico. The island is made from waste, has solar power and even has mangroves growing on it! Edible Six Pack Rings, ' Saltwater Brewery ' Beer six pack rings are made from plastic and can be devastating for marine and wild life. In response to this pressing issue, a small brewery based in Florida, made a sustainable alternative. Using wheat and barley they created a completely biodegradable and edible six pack ring for their beers that is harmless for wildlife. Sustainable apps to download for 2019 If you’re looking to go greener in the new year but aren’t exactly sure on where to start and maybe need some gentle reminders, these are our favourite sustainability apps to help you start making small changes to your everyday life. From finding refillable tap water stations around you, to helping fight food waste and sharing the positive changes you are making with a like-minded community, these apps will have you covered throughout the year.  OLIO OLIO is an app designed to combat food waste , so whether your neighbour or a local business is trying to get rid of perfectly ripe tomatoes, these can easily land on your plate just in time for your next meal.  Too Good To Go: End Food Waste By the same token, the Too Good To Go app helps restaurants, bakeries and supermarkets combat food waste by making meals available for €3 or 4 that would otherwise go to waste. The food is made ready for you to collect at a designated time et voilá - you've got your next meal sorted.    GoodGuide This app makes it easy for your to find ethical and environmentally-friendly products on-the-go. It provides scientific health, environmental and social ratings on a huge database of products. Browse ingredients, nutrional value, health effects of chemicals and discover alternatives with this easy tool.  Oroeco Oroeco automatically allows you to track your impact on the climate with a powerful footprint calculator. Perfect for understanding where you are already doing well and where there is room for improvement.  JouleBug  JouleBug makes it easy for you to implement more sustainable habits into your everyday life with tips and a social network to connect with a likeminded community. As if that wasn't enough, you’re awarded points with each positive action that correlates to the impact it’s had on your wallet and environment.  Tap  Find water refill stations near you anywhere in the world with Tap, so you don’t have to buy a single-use plastic bottle ever again. Just don't forget your reusable bottle at home!  HappyCow  This app helps you find veggie and vegan restaurants near you anywhere - trust us, it’s been saviour on many occasions. Basically your best friend when travelling.  A lot of these innovative solutions can create large scale impact in the years to come. It is important to support these initiatives as consumers and citizens. If you know of any other cool inventions that we can add to the list, leave a comment below. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/green-architecture
Growing environmental challenges in the world have given rise to a new crop of eco-inventors that are developing ingenious solutions to the most pressing problems of today. They are capitalizing on the new opportunities presented by the problems faced by the world today to create social businesses that focus on a triple bottom line with social responsibility at its core, rather than as just one function of the business. As consumers, it is up to us to support this new era of businesses with our wallets and social clout to join the movement for a better tomorrow. Below listed some tips on coolest inventions and apps & tricks in the space of sustainability Water you can eat, Ooho Made from seaweed-extract, this packaging is not only sustainable, but also edible. Ooho was created to stand up against the waste that is invading our land and oceans and now serves as a great alternative to plastic packaging. The Cora Ball: a device that removes microfibers from laundry One of the biggest pollution challenges the world is facing today is the microfiber that flows into the ocean every time we use a washing machine. The Cora Ball is a device that removes small plastic particles from laundry during the wash cycle to prevent them from getting into the water system. Ecobricks Ecobricks are building blocks made from plastic bottles filled and tightly packed with thin plastic waste. These bricks provide a lasting solution for the tonnes of plastic waste out there. They not only help in giving large amounts of plastic waste a useful second life, but this solution also ensures that there is almost no photo degradation and leaching of harmful chemicals. These building blocks can be used to make small structures such as garden walls, furniture such as benches and chairs and large structures such as cabins and schools as well. We too have worked with thousands of children in Mumbai to create over 7.000 Ecobricks in 2 months and are now looking to construct a public structure using these bricks. This is an extremely simple solution that can be replicated almost anywhere with no technology, no electricity and no capital. Earthships Earthships are a community of self-sustaining houses that are built keeping in mind sustainable architecture, green energy and DIY construction by inexperienced people. These completely off the grid structures are made from waste such as beer cans and tyres and use solar and wind energy. They also use advanced water treatment plants that reduce the amount of waste coming out from the homes. Although started in New Mexico in the 70’s, these structures can now be found in many parts of the world. Seed balls A unique concept started in Kenya, Seed balls, like the name suggests, are small balls within which seeds are placed. The ball is made of charcoal dust and nutrients that protect the seed in times of drought and allow it to survive till the rains arrive. It also protects the seeds from predators and insects. These seed balls are the ingenious answer to rapid deforestation and they can literally be thrown from planes to grow several trees at once with minimal effort. Soccket: a soccer ball that produces energy Soccket is a portable generator that harnesses and stores energy from play. It is used as a power source in areas where access to resources is limited. Terra Hale Gyms, clean energy gyms Imagine powering a light bulb while you pedal on a bicycle in a gym! If you have watched Black Mirror (popular show on Netflix), this might scare you, but clean energy gyms create electricity through human energy. A single hour of spin class can generate up to 3.300 watts of energy and this energy is used to power the gym. Any excess energy is supplied to the grid to power neighboring areas. Several such gyms have popped up in Hong Kong, the United States of America and the United Kingdom. Succulent Jewellry Ok, can I please have all of these? Susan McLeary is florist and jewellery designer based in Michigan who combines her passions in these amazing living accessories. Her Etsy store PassionflowerMade features everything from rings to necklaces, bracelets to statement pieces. They can be worn for up to 6 weeks before the succulents grow roots and need planting. Air Ink This one, is a homegrown innovation that we should be extremely proud of. Invented by Indians, Air Ink can be the answer to the horrible air pollution of cities such as Mumbai and Delhi. This company captures air pollution and soot (from cars) to make beautiful black ink that can be used in art. They are still testing and popularizing the concept but when scaled this invention can have far reaching impact.   Sea Bin Simply put, this is a really cool waste bin for the ocean! The sea bin uses tidal power to filter sea water as it bobs along the surface of the ocean, capturing any trash that may come its way. This amazing invention can capture almost 1.5 kgs of waste a day including microplastics . This is great for problem areas in marinas and near the coastline. Joyxee Island, recycled island Richart Sowa an eco-architect, has literally built himself an entire island using over 150000 waste plastic bottles. His first attempt at building an island failed when the nearby villagers weren’t too happy to see this island floating near their beautiful beach. His second island, was destroyed by a hurricane. Now finally his third island floats off the coast of Cancun, Mexico. The island is made from waste, has solar power and even has mangroves growing on it! Edible Six Pack Rings, ' Saltwater Brewery ' Beer six pack rings are made from plastic and can be devastating for marine and wild life. In response to this pressing issue, a small brewery based in Florida, made a sustainable alternative. Using wheat and barley they created a completely biodegradable and edible six pack ring for their beers that is harmless for wildlife. Sustainable apps to download for 2019 If you’re looking to go greener in the new year but aren’t exactly sure on where to start and maybe need some gentle reminders, these are our favourite sustainability apps to help you start making small changes to your everyday life. From finding refillable tap water stations around you, to helping fight food waste and sharing the positive changes you are making with a like-minded community, these apps will have you covered throughout the year.  OLIO OLIO is an app designed to combat food waste , so whether your neighbour or a local business is trying to get rid of perfectly ripe tomatoes, these can easily land on your plate just in time for your next meal.  Too Good To Go: End Food Waste By the same token, the Too Good To Go app helps restaurants, bakeries and supermarkets combat food waste by making meals available for €3 or 4 that would otherwise go to waste. The food is made ready for you to collect at a designated time et voilá - you've got your next meal sorted.    GoodGuide This app makes it easy for your to find ethical and environmentally-friendly products on-the-go. It provides scientific health, environmental and social ratings on a huge database of products. Browse ingredients, nutrional value, health effects of chemicals and discover alternatives with this easy tool.  Oroeco Oroeco automatically allows you to track your impact on the climate with a powerful footprint calculator. Perfect for understanding where you are already doing well and where there is room for improvement.  JouleBug  JouleBug makes it easy for you to implement more sustainable habits into your everyday life with tips and a social network to connect with a likeminded community. As if that wasn't enough, you’re awarded points with each positive action that correlates to the impact it’s had on your wallet and environment.  Tap  Find water refill stations near you anywhere in the world with Tap, so you don’t have to buy a single-use plastic bottle ever again. Just don't forget your reusable bottle at home!  HappyCow  This app helps you find veggie and vegan restaurants near you anywhere - trust us, it’s been saviour on many occasions. Basically your best friend when travelling.  A lot of these innovative solutions can create large scale impact in the years to come. It is important to support these initiatives as consumers and citizens. If you know of any other cool inventions that we can add to the list, leave a comment below. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/green-architecture
Sustainable Great Inventions From Eco-Inventors: Worldwide
Super Food Designed To Match Your Genome: Star Trek Reality
Let’s admit it, most of us are doing a somewhat subpar job of feeding ourselves and our dependants. We are running down the aisles of the supermarket in search of something that is relatively healthy, quick to prepare, and will not lead to too much resistance from your kids. With all the pressure that we face in our day to day lives, it is understandable that we opt for ordering in pizza or dropping by the fastfood joint down the street more than we ideally would like. Even for those self-proclaimed #foodies, occupied with preparing and photographing the most gorgeous looking new superfoods, this whole food thing can get pretty confusing. A food that is hailed as the healthier, more sustainable option one month, can easily be ostracised the next month, citing a wide range of shocking health concerns. It is just a matter of time before avocados, oat milk and acai fruit will be run over by the next big food hype. Unclear food standards A big part of the problem is that we are not sure on how to feed ourselves. Not really, anyway. How much easier would it be if we could just get an objective and decisive plan that outlines what we should and should not eat and drink? Sure, there are seemingly impartial guidelines, often sponsored by governments and health institutes. The thing is that those seem to change every so many years, including new food groups that are apparently indispensable to our health, and excluding previously commonly accepted foods as being undesirable. While some might instantly point at the lobbyists and big food corporations, and their inherent interest in getting ‘their’ foods whitelisted, no matter the cost, this is not a discussion that I would like to get into now. Instead, I’d like to focus on a potential solution that has been discussed more and more in recent years. Moving away from one-size-fits-all diets After all, some of the confusion does stem from the fact that we are all different. Some of us have food intolerances or allergies, while others have specific health concerns that require a certain diet. Sporters require different nutrients than the occupants of your local elderly home. As such, there is no ‘one size fits all’ approach when it comes to food. This makes it harder to draw a hard line separating ‘the bad’ from ‘the good’ and everything in-between. As such, the ideal solution that has been proposed is a rather futuristic and Star Trek-esque one. Its basic premise is that food can be specifically engineered to match your personal genome. Our personal diet will be customised to ensure that it best suits us. As such, it might include ingredients that would absolutely bloat your neighbour if he were to eat it; while simultaneously his diet will have you running for the loo several times per day. Personalised nutrition This whole idea of personalised nutrition can bring much needed clarity in this food world of hazy intolerances and limits. We are not meant to be eating the same thing - all of us require different nutrients in varying quantities. Research has shown that our innate biological response to certain food items can vary wildly. For instance, in a study performed by Israeli researchers in 2015, people were presented with a brand of sugary ice cream. Their glucose levels were carefully monitored - only to find that while some showed a definite blood glucose ‘spike’, it barely registered for others. A groundbreaking finding, that paved the way for personalised nutrition enthusiasts. Genetic testing Up to now, much nutritional research assumed that all human beings were the same and would therefore react to similar food groups in a similar fashion. However, much of how we ‘handle’ food is determined by our genetics, specific microbes in our gut, as well as some distinct variations in our organs’ internal physiology. This could mean that by performing genetic testing, you can come up with a personalised diet that best suits someone’s physiology as a whole.   Today, various companies and dozens of researchers around the world are rallying around this idea and performing exhaustive genetic DNA testing to figure out exactly which genes correlate with which innate food preferences. According to Jeffrey Blumberg, who serves as a professor of nutrition science and policy at Tufts University in Massachusetts, DNA testing is not just the key to a better understanding of our bodies - it is also key to developing personalised nutrition: “ I’ll be able to tell you what kinds of fruits, what kinds of vegetables and what kinds of wholegrains you should be choosing, or exactly how often .” Cooking in the future And yes, some of you might already cry fowl at the thought of having to prepare individual meals for each member of your family - let alone go through the shopping process, equipped with an exhaustive list of do’s and don’ts for every member.   Thankfully, this is something that is worked on as well - for instance through engineered food products. Many scientists are hoping that by 2028, we will be able to ‘create’ our own superfoods. Chef robots are already being developed, who will have a nutritious, delicious meal waiting for you once you get home. He won’t mind having to tend to everyone’s individual wishes: his robotic arms are happy to cut, chop and stir away. Robots and 3D printers Besides this sous-chef robot, more kitchen innovations are coming up to make your life easier - including smart appliances and digital kitchen assistants. The shopping part will be significantly easier as well: what to think about smart fridges, capable of analysing and predicting? They will automatically place an order at your supermarket when you are out of eggs, and while it’s on it, order the ingredients for the dishes that your smart oven picked out for you tonight.   Or, perhaps there won’t even be supermarkets in 2028 - much like Star Trek’s replicators, 3D printers are slowly but steadily moving into the food space. 3D printers can be equipped with various ingredient capsules, that can be used to quite literally ‘print’ your lunch or dinner - using the exact nutrients and ingredients that suit your personal palette. Naturally enhanced foods Still clinging on to the idea of ‘natural’ foods? Well, then rest assured that those will certainly be able to live up to your personal genome as well. Through the engineering of food, certain food stuffs can be made to be more nutritious - like provitamin A-infused bananas -, or even healthier - like re-engineered junk food that uses only a fraction of the sugars and fats that are required today. All of this is achieved through genetics and bimolecular science, where DNA from one organism can be inserted into another - enriching the receiving organism with… well, quite literally any characteristic you would like it to have. Food purists will once again cry fowl at the idea: engineered food isn’t natural, they claim. Food is something that should not be experimented with. Those arguments are easy to counter, though, as nature has been performing this kind of engineering for centuries.   Evolution on steroids Genetic engineering is basically evolution on steroids, that uses interspecies breeding to come up with new and improved species. Without this process, we wouldn’t have our orange carrots (they were originally white), or our firm, sweet peaches (which used to be the size of cherries and very salty), or even our favourite summer snack of watermelons, that used to be small, round, hard and bitter. Nutritionally enhanced crops are all around us - and its benefits have been all too clear. Even more promising, now that genetics is moving into the area of DNA-editing, the genetic code of species can be cracked. A huge opportunity to alter the genetic codes of plants to better suit our personal genomes - and eventually improve our health tremendously.   Good food, happy people Good food makes everyone happy. This is why it is in your interest as well as mine to continue this groundbreaking research in ways of both understanding our own personal food genomes; as well as catering to it using enhanced, engineered food, specifically designed to fit you personally.   Still doubting whether this is the right way to go? Well, with almost 40 percent of all adults overweight or (morbidly) obese - a number that is growing steadily -, and obesity-related illnesses on the rise with no possible cure for this ‘obesity-epidemic’ in sight, it seems to me that we’ve got little to lose. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/lifestyle
Let’s admit it, most of us are doing a somewhat subpar job of feeding ourselves and our dependants. We are running down the aisles of the supermarket in search of something that is relatively healthy, quick to prepare, and will not lead to too much resistance from your kids. With all the pressure that we face in our day to day lives, it is understandable that we opt for ordering in pizza or dropping by the fastfood joint down the street more than we ideally would like. Even for those self-proclaimed #foodies, occupied with preparing and photographing the most gorgeous looking new superfoods, this whole food thing can get pretty confusing. A food that is hailed as the healthier, more sustainable option one month, can easily be ostracised the next month, citing a wide range of shocking health concerns. It is just a matter of time before avocados, oat milk and acai fruit will be run over by the next big food hype. Unclear food standards A big part of the problem is that we are not sure on how to feed ourselves. Not really, anyway. How much easier would it be if we could just get an objective and decisive plan that outlines what we should and should not eat and drink? Sure, there are seemingly impartial guidelines, often sponsored by governments and health institutes. The thing is that those seem to change every so many years, including new food groups that are apparently indispensable to our health, and excluding previously commonly accepted foods as being undesirable. While some might instantly point at the lobbyists and big food corporations, and their inherent interest in getting ‘their’ foods whitelisted, no matter the cost, this is not a discussion that I would like to get into now. Instead, I’d like to focus on a potential solution that has been discussed more and more in recent years. Moving away from one-size-fits-all diets After all, some of the confusion does stem from the fact that we are all different. Some of us have food intolerances or allergies, while others have specific health concerns that require a certain diet. Sporters require different nutrients than the occupants of your local elderly home. As such, there is no ‘one size fits all’ approach when it comes to food. This makes it harder to draw a hard line separating ‘the bad’ from ‘the good’ and everything in-between. As such, the ideal solution that has been proposed is a rather futuristic and Star Trek-esque one. Its basic premise is that food can be specifically engineered to match your personal genome. Our personal diet will be customised to ensure that it best suits us. As such, it might include ingredients that would absolutely bloat your neighbour if he were to eat it; while simultaneously his diet will have you running for the loo several times per day. Personalised nutrition This whole idea of personalised nutrition can bring much needed clarity in this food world of hazy intolerances and limits. We are not meant to be eating the same thing - all of us require different nutrients in varying quantities. Research has shown that our innate biological response to certain food items can vary wildly. For instance, in a study performed by Israeli researchers in 2015, people were presented with a brand of sugary ice cream. Their glucose levels were carefully monitored - only to find that while some showed a definite blood glucose ‘spike’, it barely registered for others. A groundbreaking finding, that paved the way for personalised nutrition enthusiasts. Genetic testing Up to now, much nutritional research assumed that all human beings were the same and would therefore react to similar food groups in a similar fashion. However, much of how we ‘handle’ food is determined by our genetics, specific microbes in our gut, as well as some distinct variations in our organs’ internal physiology. This could mean that by performing genetic testing, you can come up with a personalised diet that best suits someone’s physiology as a whole.   Today, various companies and dozens of researchers around the world are rallying around this idea and performing exhaustive genetic DNA testing to figure out exactly which genes correlate with which innate food preferences. According to Jeffrey Blumberg, who serves as a professor of nutrition science and policy at Tufts University in Massachusetts, DNA testing is not just the key to a better understanding of our bodies - it is also key to developing personalised nutrition: “ I’ll be able to tell you what kinds of fruits, what kinds of vegetables and what kinds of wholegrains you should be choosing, or exactly how often .” Cooking in the future And yes, some of you might already cry fowl at the thought of having to prepare individual meals for each member of your family - let alone go through the shopping process, equipped with an exhaustive list of do’s and don’ts for every member.   Thankfully, this is something that is worked on as well - for instance through engineered food products. Many scientists are hoping that by 2028, we will be able to ‘create’ our own superfoods. Chef robots are already being developed, who will have a nutritious, delicious meal waiting for you once you get home. He won’t mind having to tend to everyone’s individual wishes: his robotic arms are happy to cut, chop and stir away. Robots and 3D printers Besides this sous-chef robot, more kitchen innovations are coming up to make your life easier - including smart appliances and digital kitchen assistants. The shopping part will be significantly easier as well: what to think about smart fridges, capable of analysing and predicting? They will automatically place an order at your supermarket when you are out of eggs, and while it’s on it, order the ingredients for the dishes that your smart oven picked out for you tonight.   Or, perhaps there won’t even be supermarkets in 2028 - much like Star Trek’s replicators, 3D printers are slowly but steadily moving into the food space. 3D printers can be equipped with various ingredient capsules, that can be used to quite literally ‘print’ your lunch or dinner - using the exact nutrients and ingredients that suit your personal palette. Naturally enhanced foods Still clinging on to the idea of ‘natural’ foods? Well, then rest assured that those will certainly be able to live up to your personal genome as well. Through the engineering of food, certain food stuffs can be made to be more nutritious - like provitamin A-infused bananas -, or even healthier - like re-engineered junk food that uses only a fraction of the sugars and fats that are required today. All of this is achieved through genetics and bimolecular science, where DNA from one organism can be inserted into another - enriching the receiving organism with… well, quite literally any characteristic you would like it to have. Food purists will once again cry fowl at the idea: engineered food isn’t natural, they claim. Food is something that should not be experimented with. Those arguments are easy to counter, though, as nature has been performing this kind of engineering for centuries.   Evolution on steroids Genetic engineering is basically evolution on steroids, that uses interspecies breeding to come up with new and improved species. Without this process, we wouldn’t have our orange carrots (they were originally white), or our firm, sweet peaches (which used to be the size of cherries and very salty), or even our favourite summer snack of watermelons, that used to be small, round, hard and bitter. Nutritionally enhanced crops are all around us - and its benefits have been all too clear. Even more promising, now that genetics is moving into the area of DNA-editing, the genetic code of species can be cracked. A huge opportunity to alter the genetic codes of plants to better suit our personal genomes - and eventually improve our health tremendously.   Good food, happy people Good food makes everyone happy. This is why it is in your interest as well as mine to continue this groundbreaking research in ways of both understanding our own personal food genomes; as well as catering to it using enhanced, engineered food, specifically designed to fit you personally.   Still doubting whether this is the right way to go? Well, with almost 40 percent of all adults overweight or (morbidly) obese - a number that is growing steadily -, and obesity-related illnesses on the rise with no possible cure for this ‘obesity-epidemic’ in sight, it seems to me that we’ve got little to lose. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/lifestyle
Super Food Designed To Match Your Genome: Star Trek Reality
Super Food Designed To Match Your Genome: Star Trek Reality
Blue Planet Earth: The Amount Of Water You Use
When looking at our planet from space, there is one thing that is sure to stand out: the gorgeous blue colour. We are not called the Blue Planet for nothing, as over 75% of our surface area is covered by bodies of water. Our oceans, seas, lakes, rivers - all serving as the lifeblood of, well - life. Much of our flora and fauna depends on water, as illustrated by the widespread devastation caused by draughts. Not having enough water will cause crops to fail, plants to die, and animals and humans to flee the affected area. Illnesses and pests are unavoidable, as is loss of land and livelihood altogether. Yet with the majority of our planet covered by bodies of water, one can assume that this is one resource that we will surely not run out of. Unfortunately, you could not be more wrong. About 97.5% of that water is actually salt water - which is great for dipping your toes into on your beach holiday, but utterly useless for drinking, hydration or irrigation purposes.  This leaves us with 2.5% of freshwater that is available for us to quench our thirst, so to speak. Now, you have to realise that we use about 10 billion m³ per day. A m³ equals 1.000 liters. So altogether, we consume 10 trilion liters - every single day! Scientists have been warning us that this is in excess of current supplies, meaning that supply is dwindling steadily. We are faced with a dripping faucet that we just do not care enough about to find a plumber for. What is our average daily water usage? When estimating how much water you use on average, you will not only have to consider the amount that we use to drink, shower, or wash our clothes - but also the amount ‘wasted’ on or in the products that we consume. If you are living in a moderate climate and are not overly active, you might be able to make do with about 5 liters of water each day.  Keeping this in mind, you might be shocked to find out that the average American uses between 380 to 660 liters of water per day. A number that should not be hard to cut back on, as it is so, so much . Just imagine logging 660 liter bottles of water from your local supermarket home - every single day . Chances are that there will not even be enough inventory to meet your needs.   What do we do with this water, you might ask? Well, simply brushing your teeth with the water running or washing your hands can cost 5 liters. Flushing the toilet will add 11 liters to your tally, while taking a bath accounts for 120 liters. Opting for the shower instead? Then you will be consuming about 20 liters per minute. Doing laundry can easily use up 150 liters of water per load.   You ‘eat’ water every day Still, we are not the ‘main’ problem. Agriculture alone can consume 72 to 90% of a region’s available freshwater. The production of 1 ton of grain requires 1.000 tons of water, while a single serving of steak costs about 4,600 liters to produce. How about that?   Of course, you never actually get to see any water while consuming those products. This is why it is often referred to as virtual water. This is water that is required to produce items that we use on an everyday basis, such as paper, clothes and food items. When including this in the equation, it can add up to about 3,500 liters of water per person per day. Thus, we might do well to understand how we can reduce our consumption of this virtual water.   Water needed for the products you eat? Food: Quantity Water consumption, litres       Chocolate 1 kg 24.000 Beef 1 kg 15.500 Sheep meat 1 kg 10.500 Pork 1 kg 4.800 Butter 1 kg 5.500 Olives 1 kg 4.400 Chicken Meat 1 kg 3.900 Cheese 1 kg 3.200 Rice 1 kg 2.500 Cotton 250 gram 2.500 Pasta (dry) 1 kg 1.800 Bread 1 kg 1.600 Pizza 1 unit 1.200 Banana 1 kg 800 Potatoes 1 kg 300 Milk 1 glass, 250 ml 250 Cabbage 1 kg 240 Tomato 1 kg 210 Egg 1 200 Wine 1 glass, 250 ml 110 Beer 1 glass, 250 ml 75 Tea 1 cup, 250 ml 30       Common Consumer Items:           Car 1 52.000/83.000 Leather Shoes Pair 13.700 Smart Phone (Mobile) 1 12.000 Bed Sheet (Cotton) 1 11.000 Jeans (Cotton) 1 8.000 T-Shirt (Cotton) 1 2.500 What is virtual water? So, virtual water is not directly visible to you like tap water or your sprinkler system is. Instead, it is water contained in the products that you consume.  Remember the steak I mentioned before? Did you not believe the math? Well, then consider that a cow has to eat 1,300 kilograms of grains for 3 years before it can be slaughtered. Upon being slaughtered, it delivers roughly 200 kilograms of beef. The sum of water required by these grains and the amount of water consumed by the cow adds up to 3 million liters of water - or about 4,600 liters for each serving of approximately 300 grams. Did you print out some documents at work today? Then know that it costs 10 liters of water per sheet of paper. Did you grab a bottle of water to hydrate yourself? This did not only cost you half a liter of water for the actual liquid, but also another 5 liters just to produce the bottle. Crazy, when you think of it! Click on:  WaterFootprint Water use by country There are quite significant differences between the water use of specific countries. The average amount of water as consumed by American citizens, for instance, represents the highest end of the spectrum. This is largely the result of the United States’ beef-eating habit, with quite the consumption number of meat per capita. One of the country’s favourite comfort foods - hamburgers - already require 2,400 liters per piece! Furthermore, there are a lot of industrial products operational in the country, that are notorious for their excessive water consumption.   Another ‘big user’ is Italy. Although it is a pretty small country, it still rakes up an impressive water bill. On average, Italians use 380 liters of water per day. A large portion of this is once again related to the local foods eaten - when taking the water footprint of pizza and pasta into account, this average consumption will increase by a factor 17. For instance, making a ‘regular’ pizza margarita requires some 1,200 liters of water; while a kilo of pasta requires 1,900 liters of water. Getting rid of those national foods seem to be a sure way of saving water.   India and China might boast a lower per capita consumption, at 98 liters and 90 liters per day respectively, they do however suffer from severe overpopulation. As there are simply so many of them, these countries have a massive water footprint. Enter the large agricultural and industrial sectors in this equation, and it is not hard to see why these countries both hold a share of 12% in the total global water consumption. Water shortages are hardly uncommon in these regions, making it important for them to guarantee a steady supply of fresh water. What can you do? While conserving water in everything that you do might already help - be it taking a shorter shower, turning off the tap while brushing your teeth, or not watering your garden every single day -, it is more effective to become a conscious shopper. Focus on purchasing products that require less water to produce, which, coincidentally, also happen to be the healthier options - such as grains, fruits and vegetables .   Eating meat will already add 5.000 liters to your personal water footprint every single day. Just imagine the savings if you were to reduce this in your diet . And once manufacturers start to notice that consumers care more about products that save water, they will inevitably start looking at ways of reducing their own consumption.   While it may sometimes feel like the literal drop in an ocean, it is important to realise that water is a precious resource and that even the smallest action you take to waste less of it will ultimately matter. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/lifestyle
When looking at our planet from space, there is one thing that is sure to stand out: the gorgeous blue colour. We are not called the Blue Planet for nothing, as over 75% of our surface area is covered by bodies of water. Our oceans, seas, lakes, rivers - all serving as the lifeblood of, well - life. Much of our flora and fauna depends on water, as illustrated by the widespread devastation caused by draughts. Not having enough water will cause crops to fail, plants to die, and animals and humans to flee the affected area. Illnesses and pests are unavoidable, as is loss of land and livelihood altogether. Yet with the majority of our planet covered by bodies of water, one can assume that this is one resource that we will surely not run out of. Unfortunately, you could not be more wrong. About 97.5% of that water is actually salt water - which is great for dipping your toes into on your beach holiday, but utterly useless for drinking, hydration or irrigation purposes.  This leaves us with 2.5% of freshwater that is available for us to quench our thirst, so to speak. Now, you have to realise that we use about 10 billion m³ per day. A m³ equals 1.000 liters. So altogether, we consume 10 trilion liters - every single day! Scientists have been warning us that this is in excess of current supplies, meaning that supply is dwindling steadily. We are faced with a dripping faucet that we just do not care enough about to find a plumber for. What is our average daily water usage? When estimating how much water you use on average, you will not only have to consider the amount that we use to drink, shower, or wash our clothes - but also the amount ‘wasted’ on or in the products that we consume. If you are living in a moderate climate and are not overly active, you might be able to make do with about 5 liters of water each day.  Keeping this in mind, you might be shocked to find out that the average American uses between 380 to 660 liters of water per day. A number that should not be hard to cut back on, as it is so, so much . Just imagine logging 660 liter bottles of water from your local supermarket home - every single day . Chances are that there will not even be enough inventory to meet your needs.   What do we do with this water, you might ask? Well, simply brushing your teeth with the water running or washing your hands can cost 5 liters. Flushing the toilet will add 11 liters to your tally, while taking a bath accounts for 120 liters. Opting for the shower instead? Then you will be consuming about 20 liters per minute. Doing laundry can easily use up 150 liters of water per load.   You ‘eat’ water every day Still, we are not the ‘main’ problem. Agriculture alone can consume 72 to 90% of a region’s available freshwater. The production of 1 ton of grain requires 1.000 tons of water, while a single serving of steak costs about 4,600 liters to produce. How about that?   Of course, you never actually get to see any water while consuming those products. This is why it is often referred to as virtual water. This is water that is required to produce items that we use on an everyday basis, such as paper, clothes and food items. When including this in the equation, it can add up to about 3,500 liters of water per person per day. Thus, we might do well to understand how we can reduce our consumption of this virtual water.   Water needed for the products you eat? Food: Quantity Water consumption, litres       Chocolate 1 kg 24.000 Beef 1 kg 15.500 Sheep meat 1 kg 10.500 Pork 1 kg 4.800 Butter 1 kg 5.500 Olives 1 kg 4.400 Chicken Meat 1 kg 3.900 Cheese 1 kg 3.200 Rice 1 kg 2.500 Cotton 250 gram 2.500 Pasta (dry) 1 kg 1.800 Bread 1 kg 1.600 Pizza 1 unit 1.200 Banana 1 kg 800 Potatoes 1 kg 300 Milk 1 glass, 250 ml 250 Cabbage 1 kg 240 Tomato 1 kg 210 Egg 1 200 Wine 1 glass, 250 ml 110 Beer 1 glass, 250 ml 75 Tea 1 cup, 250 ml 30       Common Consumer Items:           Car 1 52.000/83.000 Leather Shoes Pair 13.700 Smart Phone (Mobile) 1 12.000 Bed Sheet (Cotton) 1 11.000 Jeans (Cotton) 1 8.000 T-Shirt (Cotton) 1 2.500 What is virtual water? So, virtual water is not directly visible to you like tap water or your sprinkler system is. Instead, it is water contained in the products that you consume.  Remember the steak I mentioned before? Did you not believe the math? Well, then consider that a cow has to eat 1,300 kilograms of grains for 3 years before it can be slaughtered. Upon being slaughtered, it delivers roughly 200 kilograms of beef. The sum of water required by these grains and the amount of water consumed by the cow adds up to 3 million liters of water - or about 4,600 liters for each serving of approximately 300 grams. Did you print out some documents at work today? Then know that it costs 10 liters of water per sheet of paper. Did you grab a bottle of water to hydrate yourself? This did not only cost you half a liter of water for the actual liquid, but also another 5 liters just to produce the bottle. Crazy, when you think of it! Click on:  WaterFootprint Water use by country There are quite significant differences between the water use of specific countries. The average amount of water as consumed by American citizens, for instance, represents the highest end of the spectrum. This is largely the result of the United States’ beef-eating habit, with quite the consumption number of meat per capita. One of the country’s favourite comfort foods - hamburgers - already require 2,400 liters per piece! Furthermore, there are a lot of industrial products operational in the country, that are notorious for their excessive water consumption.   Another ‘big user’ is Italy. Although it is a pretty small country, it still rakes up an impressive water bill. On average, Italians use 380 liters of water per day. A large portion of this is once again related to the local foods eaten - when taking the water footprint of pizza and pasta into account, this average consumption will increase by a factor 17. For instance, making a ‘regular’ pizza margarita requires some 1,200 liters of water; while a kilo of pasta requires 1,900 liters of water. Getting rid of those national foods seem to be a sure way of saving water.   India and China might boast a lower per capita consumption, at 98 liters and 90 liters per day respectively, they do however suffer from severe overpopulation. As there are simply so many of them, these countries have a massive water footprint. Enter the large agricultural and industrial sectors in this equation, and it is not hard to see why these countries both hold a share of 12% in the total global water consumption. Water shortages are hardly uncommon in these regions, making it important for them to guarantee a steady supply of fresh water. What can you do? While conserving water in everything that you do might already help - be it taking a shorter shower, turning off the tap while brushing your teeth, or not watering your garden every single day -, it is more effective to become a conscious shopper. Focus on purchasing products that require less water to produce, which, coincidentally, also happen to be the healthier options - such as grains, fruits and vegetables .   Eating meat will already add 5.000 liters to your personal water footprint every single day. Just imagine the savings if you were to reduce this in your diet . And once manufacturers start to notice that consumers care more about products that save water, they will inevitably start looking at ways of reducing their own consumption.   While it may sometimes feel like the literal drop in an ocean, it is important to realise that water is a precious resource and that even the smallest action you take to waste less of it will ultimately matter. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/lifestyle
Blue Planet Earth: The Amount Of Water You Use
Climate Change And Allergies A Bad Match: Tips & Tricks
Springtime is great, especially now that the weather is taking a turn for the better. Flowers are blossoming, birds are chirping, the sun is shining. Even people out on the street seem happier. That is, most do. Those unlucky ones who are suffering from hay fever or related allergies might not be as smiley. Pollen floating around freely in the spring air are quite literally making their life a living hell, sneezing and huffing away while others enjoy the first BBQ of the season instead. Attacking the pollen How this works? Well, it is basically the story of the birds and the bees. The story of what happens after one tree meets another tree that he likes very much. The one tree releases pollen to fertilise the other tree - as well as any other trees that may just happen to be in the figurative line of fire. Now, if it happens to be windy, these pollen can be blown all over. We will then no longer be talking about tree procreation, but shifting our focus to allergies instead. Thankfully, not all of us are susceptible to those pollen. Some will breeze through it without breaking a sweat - or a sneeze. For others, however, it may pose much greater problems. Their immune systems do not recognize it as being as harmless as it actually is. Instead, it will attack the pollen ferociously, as our bodies think that it is actually dealing with some kind of parasite. All of the symptoms that rapidly develop when faced with allergies are meant to propel the foreign and seemingly dangerous entity out of our bodies. Through excessive sneezing, a runny nose, and all the other symptoms, we do what we can to get rid of what is, essentially, just the male reproduction product of trees. This excessive attack of a perceived threat to our health is what is referred to as an allergy. A recent 'hype' Funnily enough, this thing that we refer to as an allergy has not always been around. It is actually a recent 'hype', so to speak. One that seems to have been born around the time of the industrial revolution. Whether this was in any way caused by the increased pollution, a change in our diet, or the heightened hygiene, we cannot be sure. One element can be pointed out as a proven culprit, though. And this is climate change. Plants grow more quickly as a result of warmer temperatures and the accompanying higher levels of CO2. That is a fact. This also means that they are increasing the speed with which they procreate - or, specifically, produce and release pollen. Simultaneously, the periods during which the plants release pollen will be extended. In a warmer climate and in an atmosphere with more CO2 , the pollen will have free reign. And with a higher pollen count in the air, people who are sensitive to it will suffer even more. Hay fever is on the rise Are you starting to feel relieved that you have never shown any signs of allergies in the past? Well, then keep reading, as this may ultimately be bad news for you, too. If you are exposed to an allergen for an extended period of time, you are more likely to become sensitized to it as well. This means that you may start to experience symptoms, even if you have not done so in the past. And for those who are already too familiar with allergies - well, your symptoms are likely to intensify even more as a result. As such, it will come as no surprise that the prevalence of hay fever is on the rise. You may already be one of its victims - or soon, too, fall prey to its sniffing and sneezing. So, the next best thing would be to find ways of alleviating its annoying symptoms. That is, the next best thing to solving climate change as a whole and reversing at least some of this pollen epidemic. The golden liquid or... Some are absolutely convinced of the benefits of a 100% natural reliever - honey. Although it may sound counterintuitive - after all, isn’t honey a product that only came to exist because of pollen and plant reproduction? Well, yes, but this might be why it is such a great way of building up your pollen-resistance. Unfortunately it isn’t quite that simple. This theory has been largely debunked, in particular because the pollen that will actually ‘wake up’ your immune system and invoke an allergic response do not come from flowers. Depending on the season, we will find ourselves sneezing exclusively as the result of pollen from trees (spring), grass (summer) and weeds (end of summer/beginning of fall). None of those include pollen that bees are attracted to. Hence, there is no way for any allergy-related pollen to wind up in that delicious spoonful of honey. So unfortunately this golden liquid will probably not be your magic cure. Experts are no closer to finding a cure either, although they agree that it is best to simply stay clean. That is to say, to avoid pollen at all costs when their concentration in the air is high. This means keeping doors and windows closed and not go outside. Your best option is to go for a walk right after a rainstorm, when the air is cleaner. Avoid any exposure to outside air when the pollen counts are high - meaning, in warm and dry circumstances. Tips & Tricks which make you feel better There is some over-the-counter medication available that will at least alleviate some of the symptoms, if they really hinder you in your day to day life. Yet if you are not a fan of taking pills and are forced - either by work or personal disposition - to spent at least some of your time outdoors, there are some other things you can do to feel better. Get your hands on some Vaseline and rub it around the nostrils. This will ‘trap’ the pollen and prevent it from getting into your nose, where it will get stuck to the lining. Avoid particularly grassy areas. So stay away from that meadow or public park with a freshly mown lawn in the summer. Plan your outside activities in the late morning or early afternoon. Pollen count is usually the highest between 8am and 10am; and then again between 5pm and 7pm. Try to stay off the street - and in particular out of the park - between those hours. Frequently hit the gym. Although it is not quite clear why this is the case, it is a fact that people who exercise more exhibit milder symptoms than those who don’t. In the same category as point 4, we-don’t-know-why-but-it-works: try to keep the stress at bay. Studies have shown that hay fever symptoms are worse for those who report higher stress levels. Look into houseplants that provide hay fever relief. Some specific species, like peace lilies, have been found to take the edge of the symptoms. Plus, they will brighten up your home as well. Limit your alcohol intake. Alcoholic drinks contain histamine, a chemical that is known to start allergic reactions and increase your susceptibility to pollen. Get your hands on chamomile tea. Contrary to alcoholic drinks, you will find that chamomile is a natural antihistamine substance, known to be an effective means to combat allergic reactions. Food-wise, check out the darker colored berries in the supermarket - blackberries, red grapes and currants are great options. These are rich in antioxidants, a great natural inflammation reducer. The same goes for omega-3 rich foods, such as oily fish, nuts and seeds. Even if you are feeling worse for the wear and tired after a long day, get out that vacuum cleaner and dust and wipe down surfaces regularly. This will help to reduce the pollen count in your living area. Avoid hanging and/or drying your laundry outside. They will quite easily catch pollen, which you will then get in contact with as soon as you put your clothes on. While these tips will admittedly not cure your hay fever or allergies, it may just be enough to keep the symptoms manageable. In the meantime, we will work on kicking climate change to the curb and hopefully call a halt to the related pollen-infestation. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/climate
Springtime is great, especially now that the weather is taking a turn for the better. Flowers are blossoming, birds are chirping, the sun is shining. Even people out on the street seem happier. That is, most do. Those unlucky ones who are suffering from hay fever or related allergies might not be as smiley. Pollen floating around freely in the spring air are quite literally making their life a living hell, sneezing and huffing away while others enjoy the first BBQ of the season instead. Attacking the pollen How this works? Well, it is basically the story of the birds and the bees. The story of what happens after one tree meets another tree that he likes very much. The one tree releases pollen to fertilise the other tree - as well as any other trees that may just happen to be in the figurative line of fire. Now, if it happens to be windy, these pollen can be blown all over. We will then no longer be talking about tree procreation, but shifting our focus to allergies instead. Thankfully, not all of us are susceptible to those pollen. Some will breeze through it without breaking a sweat - or a sneeze. For others, however, it may pose much greater problems. Their immune systems do not recognize it as being as harmless as it actually is. Instead, it will attack the pollen ferociously, as our bodies think that it is actually dealing with some kind of parasite. All of the symptoms that rapidly develop when faced with allergies are meant to propel the foreign and seemingly dangerous entity out of our bodies. Through excessive sneezing, a runny nose, and all the other symptoms, we do what we can to get rid of what is, essentially, just the male reproduction product of trees. This excessive attack of a perceived threat to our health is what is referred to as an allergy. A recent 'hype' Funnily enough, this thing that we refer to as an allergy has not always been around. It is actually a recent 'hype', so to speak. One that seems to have been born around the time of the industrial revolution. Whether this was in any way caused by the increased pollution, a change in our diet, or the heightened hygiene, we cannot be sure. One element can be pointed out as a proven culprit, though. And this is climate change. Plants grow more quickly as a result of warmer temperatures and the accompanying higher levels of CO2. That is a fact. This also means that they are increasing the speed with which they procreate - or, specifically, produce and release pollen. Simultaneously, the periods during which the plants release pollen will be extended. In a warmer climate and in an atmosphere with more CO2 , the pollen will have free reign. And with a higher pollen count in the air, people who are sensitive to it will suffer even more. Hay fever is on the rise Are you starting to feel relieved that you have never shown any signs of allergies in the past? Well, then keep reading, as this may ultimately be bad news for you, too. If you are exposed to an allergen for an extended period of time, you are more likely to become sensitized to it as well. This means that you may start to experience symptoms, even if you have not done so in the past. And for those who are already too familiar with allergies - well, your symptoms are likely to intensify even more as a result. As such, it will come as no surprise that the prevalence of hay fever is on the rise. You may already be one of its victims - or soon, too, fall prey to its sniffing and sneezing. So, the next best thing would be to find ways of alleviating its annoying symptoms. That is, the next best thing to solving climate change as a whole and reversing at least some of this pollen epidemic. The golden liquid or... Some are absolutely convinced of the benefits of a 100% natural reliever - honey. Although it may sound counterintuitive - after all, isn’t honey a product that only came to exist because of pollen and plant reproduction? Well, yes, but this might be why it is such a great way of building up your pollen-resistance. Unfortunately it isn’t quite that simple. This theory has been largely debunked, in particular because the pollen that will actually ‘wake up’ your immune system and invoke an allergic response do not come from flowers. Depending on the season, we will find ourselves sneezing exclusively as the result of pollen from trees (spring), grass (summer) and weeds (end of summer/beginning of fall). None of those include pollen that bees are attracted to. Hence, there is no way for any allergy-related pollen to wind up in that delicious spoonful of honey. So unfortunately this golden liquid will probably not be your magic cure. Experts are no closer to finding a cure either, although they agree that it is best to simply stay clean. That is to say, to avoid pollen at all costs when their concentration in the air is high. This means keeping doors and windows closed and not go outside. Your best option is to go for a walk right after a rainstorm, when the air is cleaner. Avoid any exposure to outside air when the pollen counts are high - meaning, in warm and dry circumstances. Tips & Tricks which make you feel better There is some over-the-counter medication available that will at least alleviate some of the symptoms, if they really hinder you in your day to day life. Yet if you are not a fan of taking pills and are forced - either by work or personal disposition - to spent at least some of your time outdoors, there are some other things you can do to feel better. Get your hands on some Vaseline and rub it around the nostrils. This will ‘trap’ the pollen and prevent it from getting into your nose, where it will get stuck to the lining. Avoid particularly grassy areas. So stay away from that meadow or public park with a freshly mown lawn in the summer. Plan your outside activities in the late morning or early afternoon. Pollen count is usually the highest between 8am and 10am; and then again between 5pm and 7pm. Try to stay off the street - and in particular out of the park - between those hours. Frequently hit the gym. Although it is not quite clear why this is the case, it is a fact that people who exercise more exhibit milder symptoms than those who don’t. In the same category as point 4, we-don’t-know-why-but-it-works: try to keep the stress at bay. Studies have shown that hay fever symptoms are worse for those who report higher stress levels. Look into houseplants that provide hay fever relief. Some specific species, like peace lilies, have been found to take the edge of the symptoms. Plus, they will brighten up your home as well. Limit your alcohol intake. Alcoholic drinks contain histamine, a chemical that is known to start allergic reactions and increase your susceptibility to pollen. Get your hands on chamomile tea. Contrary to alcoholic drinks, you will find that chamomile is a natural antihistamine substance, known to be an effective means to combat allergic reactions. Food-wise, check out the darker colored berries in the supermarket - blackberries, red grapes and currants are great options. These are rich in antioxidants, a great natural inflammation reducer. The same goes for omega-3 rich foods, such as oily fish, nuts and seeds. Even if you are feeling worse for the wear and tired after a long day, get out that vacuum cleaner and dust and wipe down surfaces regularly. This will help to reduce the pollen count in your living area. Avoid hanging and/or drying your laundry outside. They will quite easily catch pollen, which you will then get in contact with as soon as you put your clothes on. While these tips will admittedly not cure your hay fever or allergies, it may just be enough to keep the symptoms manageable. In the meantime, we will work on kicking climate change to the curb and hopefully call a halt to the related pollen-infestation. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/climate
Climate Change And Allergies A Bad Match: Tips & Tricks
Community

A community is you and me. A network of social, economic, ecological and many other relationships. We all work together and live in urban, suburban and rural areas. Social sustainability is becoming increasingly important on our small planet. We define: support, quality of life, development, adaptation, rights and labour.

We belong to a group of individuals - our society - in which we belong geographically. Certain environmental issues play an important role in our society. Here, sustainable solutions are sought, developed and implemented. This may differ from societies in other countries, but because of our global environmental issues and dependence, we must learn to work more together so that we can all benefit from sharing sustainable knowledge to tackle, for example, climate change.

Green architecture is important. Building with local materials that can be recycled and reused brings us a big step forward to have less impact on the environment. With green architecture we can build smart cities where resources can be used more efficiently and information can be shared, thus improving our society, your community.

Lifestyle is the way we live, the dynamics of personality. Fashion defines our self and together with food it is getting - at present - an even more important role in our society. It's not just about taste, but especially about the burden that the fashion industry, agriculture and the meat industry have on our resources, especially water.

If there was an urge to come up with a sustainable way of living solutions and share these topics globally it’s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about tiny houses, your experiences and expectations for the future at home and globally. 

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