Community

About: <p>A community is you and me. A network of social, economic, ecological and many other relationships. We all work together and live in urban, suburban and rural areas. Social sustainability is becoming increasingly important on our small planet. We define: support, quality of life, development, adaptation, rights and labour.</p> <p>We belong to a group of individuals - <a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/society">our society</a> - in which we belong geographically. Certain environmental issues play an important role in our society. Here, sustainable solutions are sought, developed and implemented. This may differ from societies in other countries, but because of our global environmental issues and&nbsp;<span lang="en" tabindex="0">dependence</span>, we must learn to work more together so that we can all benefit from sharing sustainable knowledge to tackle, for example, climate change.</p> <p><a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/green-architecture">Green architecture</a> is important. Building with local materials that can be recycled and reused brings us a big step forward to have less impact on the environment. With green architecture we can build <a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/smart-cities">smart cities</a> where resources can be used more efficiently and information can be shared, thus improving our society, your community.</p> <p><a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/lifestyle">Lifestyle</a> is the way we live, the dynamics of personality. Fashion defines our self and together with food it is getting - at present - an even more important role in our society. It's not just about taste, but especially about the burden that the fashion industry, agriculture and the meat industry have on our resources, especially water.</p> <p>If there was an urge to come up with a sustainable way of living solutions and share these topics globally it&rsquo;s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about tiny houses, your experiences and expectations for the future at home and globally.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Global Sustainability X-change, that&rsquo;s what you can do together with WhatsOrb.&nbsp;<a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/newsletter/your-shared-sustainable-ideas-make-our-earth-a-better-place">What's in for me?</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
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Crisis What Crisis: The World Is full Of Opportunity. Read!
The corona crisis is making the world 'small' and many people worry. For many years I - and many around me - have been tense about the future of humanity on our planet Earth. With a crisis like the drought in the Netherlands in 2018, but also in my own environment: forest fires, tornadoes and floods doesn't makes my worries less. At the same time harrowing stories of refugees on and about the sea. Crisis What Crisis! I believe we should say goodbye to our current system where the global economy is predominant. It ensures the exploitation of people, the depletion of natural resources on earth and unimaginable animal suffering. But how? The film 'Economics Of Happiness' shows it nicely. It clearly exposes how the Ladakhs in India had great wealth of their own, until roads were built and multinationals made their appearance. People mirrored a fictional ideal and became unhappy. What did the Ladakhs do before that they were doing so well together? Things we can do here too? Recommended:  Consumerism In ‘The West’: A Society Built On Exploitation Far from the heat, noise, and chaos, atop India’s snow-capped mountains, I found peace How did the Ladakhs live before the major roads, in the 1980s? They grow their food in fields with an eye for the natural functioning of those fields, with an eye for the ecosystems. Working together is binding. Several generations meet in the field. Care for each other comes up close. They make their own clothes, have their own music and dance and history. They are proud, not of themselves, but of each other. Everyone is seen. There is no competition. Our lives look very different. But what ideas can we draw from their example for our own lives? {youtube}                                                                      The Economics of Happiness  The World Is full Of Opportunity: How Would Such A Life Look? Because of this Coronavirus period, we are suddenly much more at home. I noticed by the forced sitting at home that there is more rest among the children. Finally, there is time to make the crafts from the craft book, build the hut or make the bird house. They learn fanatically in the morning and continue singing and playing throughout the day. What would it be like if the competition and performance pressure of the school system disappears and we only learn for ourselves without comparing with others? And also mainly learn other things? About ecosystems, about caring for each other, making music (own music but more than just the national anthem), about making clothes yourself, baking pots, weaving baskets? What would it be like if there was time for this? What would it be like if we produce food without loss of quality of soil and biodiversity? Wouldn't it be nice if we felt with every harvest that the soil would be better instead of worse? Isn't it useful to pay more attention to everything that happens and is possible in our immediate environment? For example, for agriculture, health care, nature and the economy within an hour's walk. Recommended:  Smart Communities: Eco-Living Through Technology Opportunities: A Lot Is Already Happening In my immediate vicinity, Eefde and Zutphen in The Neterlands, there are already many beautiful initiatives to join, that bring us closer to nature and together and reduces our footprint. Some examples: A basic income (a Zutphens initiative) would kick-start the creation of less stress from crowds. Farming together according to permaculture principles provides income and food for others / a biodiverse environment. You can harvest yourself at the permaculture market garden 'De Veldhof in Joppe'.  You can also find a lot of healthy food in nature. 'Pluk De Stad' visualized it for Zutphen, among others. In Zutphen, ' KratjeLokaal ' delivers local food to your door every week. As a self-employed person, you can work together in various contexts, such as 'The Zutphense Coopkracht'. It ensures that you do not have to do it all alone and that you are also entitled to 'work at home'. Perhaps we should replace the 'healthcare' sector with the social cohesion sector. When people feel seen, less care is proven to be needed. We are used to family living far away, having distant friends, and some close by. We are used to living in subcultures, and without much contact with neighbors. There are often great ideological differences between people on a street. That does not always make it easy. What if we meet each other automatically, for example at the community garden or 'Animal Meadow Of Eefde? If we learn together, work together, will there be more understanding and mutual respect? And if people still need help despite their social embedding, this can simply come from the neighborhood with Buurtzorg or, for example, Help just home care, a cooperative of self-employed persons. Herbert Nijkamp's flock grazing grass fields and roadsides in Eefde. Children like to watch and play around the herd Opening roadsides for adaptation is a first step in the municipality of Lochem. For example, no less than 3000 m2 of roadside was sown with flower mixture by all the neighbors of a street. In Zutphen there are also green adoption projects such as the bee garden where people do yoga together, for example. We used to burn coal and wood, then oil and gas came, now we have learned to make energy from wind and sun. Let's take advantage of this, but after we cut back to the max, otherwise there will be acres of land left. choose a non-profit local energy company. They consider energy saving of paramount importance. For example ZutphenEnergie or LochemEnergie. You are as strong as your ecosystem, so make sure it is robust. De-stone your garden, give space to flowers and insects. Participate in the construction and maintenance of nature in your area, ensure a lot of neighborhood greenery. Zutphense and Eefdese green initiatives are: Emerpark, Gorsselse heather, biodiverse roadsides. It is a lot of fun to make your own clothes. A permanent fabric shop can be found in Epse, 'Javro Fabric Market', but (eco) fabrics are also for sale at the weekly market in Zutphen. There are also several good seamstresses, such as Radijsje in the Laarstraat. In addition, there are many second-hand clothing stores in Laarstraat that reduce the pressure on raw materials. The World: Locally And With Each Other Think in connection with this. You don't have to learn and do it all alone. There are many active people in your immediate environment. There are repair cafes to go to, the Zutphense Energy Shop with energy coaches, gardens where you are welcome like on the 'Kaardebol'. There are also various active Facebook groups to join, such as: 'the Zussen van Zutphen' or 'Ruilen and Sell'. Various people are linked here. This also applies to the equally beautiful Zutphen initiative 'Buddy to Buddy', in which asylum seekers get a native buddy. This has been awarded with the 'Appeltje van Oranje'. Queen Maxima from the Netherlands and members of 'Budy to Budy' receive the 'Appeltjes van Oranje reward It is possible in Zutphen and Eefde. So it can be done anywhere! By: Tjitske Ypma (on behalf of Stichting de Lynx) Before you go! Recommended:  Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about your community life? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
The corona crisis is making the world 'small' and many people worry. For many years I - and many around me - have been tense about the future of humanity on our planet Earth. With a crisis like the drought in the Netherlands in 2018, but also in my own environment: forest fires, tornadoes and floods doesn't makes my worries less. At the same time harrowing stories of refugees on and about the sea. Crisis What Crisis! I believe we should say goodbye to our current system where the global economy is predominant. It ensures the exploitation of people, the depletion of natural resources on earth and unimaginable animal suffering. But how? The film 'Economics Of Happiness' shows it nicely. It clearly exposes how the Ladakhs in India had great wealth of their own, until roads were built and multinationals made their appearance. People mirrored a fictional ideal and became unhappy. What did the Ladakhs do before that they were doing so well together? Things we can do here too? Recommended:  Consumerism In ‘The West’: A Society Built On Exploitation Far from the heat, noise, and chaos, atop India’s snow-capped mountains, I found peace How did the Ladakhs live before the major roads, in the 1980s? They grow their food in fields with an eye for the natural functioning of those fields, with an eye for the ecosystems. Working together is binding. Several generations meet in the field. Care for each other comes up close. They make their own clothes, have their own music and dance and history. They are proud, not of themselves, but of each other. Everyone is seen. There is no competition. Our lives look very different. But what ideas can we draw from their example for our own lives? {youtube}                                                                      The Economics of Happiness  The World Is full Of Opportunity: How Would Such A Life Look? Because of this Coronavirus period, we are suddenly much more at home. I noticed by the forced sitting at home that there is more rest among the children. Finally, there is time to make the crafts from the craft book, build the hut or make the bird house. They learn fanatically in the morning and continue singing and playing throughout the day. What would it be like if the competition and performance pressure of the school system disappears and we only learn for ourselves without comparing with others? And also mainly learn other things? About ecosystems, about caring for each other, making music (own music but more than just the national anthem), about making clothes yourself, baking pots, weaving baskets? What would it be like if there was time for this? What would it be like if we produce food without loss of quality of soil and biodiversity? Wouldn't it be nice if we felt with every harvest that the soil would be better instead of worse? Isn't it useful to pay more attention to everything that happens and is possible in our immediate environment? For example, for agriculture, health care, nature and the economy within an hour's walk. Recommended:  Smart Communities: Eco-Living Through Technology Opportunities: A Lot Is Already Happening In my immediate vicinity, Eefde and Zutphen in The Neterlands, there are already many beautiful initiatives to join, that bring us closer to nature and together and reduces our footprint. Some examples: A basic income (a Zutphens initiative) would kick-start the creation of less stress from crowds. Farming together according to permaculture principles provides income and food for others / a biodiverse environment. You can harvest yourself at the permaculture market garden 'De Veldhof in Joppe'.  You can also find a lot of healthy food in nature. 'Pluk De Stad' visualized it for Zutphen, among others. In Zutphen, ' KratjeLokaal ' delivers local food to your door every week. As a self-employed person, you can work together in various contexts, such as 'The Zutphense Coopkracht'. It ensures that you do not have to do it all alone and that you are also entitled to 'work at home'. Perhaps we should replace the 'healthcare' sector with the social cohesion sector. When people feel seen, less care is proven to be needed. We are used to family living far away, having distant friends, and some close by. We are used to living in subcultures, and without much contact with neighbors. There are often great ideological differences between people on a street. That does not always make it easy. What if we meet each other automatically, for example at the community garden or 'Animal Meadow Of Eefde? If we learn together, work together, will there be more understanding and mutual respect? And if people still need help despite their social embedding, this can simply come from the neighborhood with Buurtzorg or, for example, Help just home care, a cooperative of self-employed persons. Herbert Nijkamp's flock grazing grass fields and roadsides in Eefde. Children like to watch and play around the herd Opening roadsides for adaptation is a first step in the municipality of Lochem. For example, no less than 3000 m2 of roadside was sown with flower mixture by all the neighbors of a street. In Zutphen there are also green adoption projects such as the bee garden where people do yoga together, for example. We used to burn coal and wood, then oil and gas came, now we have learned to make energy from wind and sun. Let's take advantage of this, but after we cut back to the max, otherwise there will be acres of land left. choose a non-profit local energy company. They consider energy saving of paramount importance. For example ZutphenEnergie or LochemEnergie. You are as strong as your ecosystem, so make sure it is robust. De-stone your garden, give space to flowers and insects. Participate in the construction and maintenance of nature in your area, ensure a lot of neighborhood greenery. Zutphense and Eefdese green initiatives are: Emerpark, Gorsselse heather, biodiverse roadsides. It is a lot of fun to make your own clothes. A permanent fabric shop can be found in Epse, 'Javro Fabric Market', but (eco) fabrics are also for sale at the weekly market in Zutphen. There are also several good seamstresses, such as Radijsje in the Laarstraat. In addition, there are many second-hand clothing stores in Laarstraat that reduce the pressure on raw materials. The World: Locally And With Each Other Think in connection with this. You don't have to learn and do it all alone. There are many active people in your immediate environment. There are repair cafes to go to, the Zutphense Energy Shop with energy coaches, gardens where you are welcome like on the 'Kaardebol'. There are also various active Facebook groups to join, such as: 'the Zussen van Zutphen' or 'Ruilen and Sell'. Various people are linked here. This also applies to the equally beautiful Zutphen initiative 'Buddy to Buddy', in which asylum seekers get a native buddy. This has been awarded with the 'Appeltje van Oranje'. Queen Maxima from the Netherlands and members of 'Budy to Budy' receive the 'Appeltjes van Oranje reward It is possible in Zutphen and Eefde. So it can be done anywhere! By: Tjitske Ypma (on behalf of Stichting de Lynx) Before you go! Recommended:  Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about your community life? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Crisis What Crisis: The World Is full Of Opportunity. Read!
Sustainable Storing Of Fruit And Food: Life Without Fridge
One of the worst things that can happen to you is your fridge breaking down. Like most unfortunate events, it has a tendency of happening late at night or in the weekend. Or in the midst of the Corona-crisis lockdown, leaving you absolutely helpless. After all, what do we do without our trustworthy cooling machine in the house? Storing Food: Root Cellars And Other Ancient Methods As it turns out, it is not always a must-have. We mostly use it for storing fresh food, including fruit and vegetables. But do you know that you can easily store these products without your fridge? Saves energy and a lot of the nutritional value. Plus, it will eliminate the panic of your food wasting away as you experience a power outage. In the past, our ancestors managed perfectly fine without a fridge. Sure, they did not have cellphone service or toiletpaper either, things considered basic human needs today, but it is worth looking at the way they did things. The way in which they preserved food is not just fairly simple, it is also highly effective. They used something known as a root cellar, a cool underground space where they stored large quantities of produce. As the space stayed cool for a long period of time, they could enjoy their fresh produce for most of the year. The exact method of food preservation varied across cultures. The ‘typical’ root cellar was mostly used in the western world, with the British being the first to introduce the walk-in root cellar, while the indigenous people of Australia buried food directly in the cool ground to preserve it. The Incas froze their food in the mountains on cold nights. In Africa, ancients used to keep food in clay pots, also buried underground. Recommended:  Regenerative Agriculture: Basics For Safe Food (Part 1 of 3) Build Your Own In-Built Fridge While you might not be so keen on burying pots in your backyard, the idea of a root cellar really is not so bad. In most houses, you will have a room or area that are naturally cooler than others. Usually a storage basement, if you have got one. This is a great place to start if you are looking to create a natural cooler for your fruits and vegetables. {youtube}                                                 Cool Ideas for Inexpensive and Easy to Make Root Cellars   If you do not have such a basement, you can get creative. Think about a trash can cellar, made using a metal trash can dug underground, so that only the mouth of the can is level with the earth. Or a barrel root cellar, that uses a large plastic barrel instead of a metal trash can. Another option is to use the so-called straw storage, where you can layer straws and your potatoes or other root veggies in a large basket or barrel. This way, it will stay good for months as well. Either way, you should keep some parameters in mind when creating your root cellar: temperature, humidity, air circulation, darkness. Recommended:  Regenerative Farming: Agro-Ecology In Practice (Part 2 of 3) Storing Fruit And Vegetables: Temperature Between 0 And 10 Degrees Celsius First, you should consider temperature. The cooler the area, the slower the rate at which fruits and vegetables release ethylene gas. This means that it slows down the wasting process. Depending on the exact types of fruits or vegetables, you should be looking for a temperature between 0 and 10 degrees Celsius. Life Without Fridge. Humidity Between 85 and 95 Percent Next, the humidity plays an important role in preserving produce as well. After all, produce is best kept at high humidity, anywhere between 85 and 95 percent. Basements are usually pretty humid, particularly root cellars, which are made of earth. In order to further increase the humidity, you could include a hygrometer - a device measuring humidity. If the cellar is too dry, you can always increase the humidity by sprinkling water on the floor. Too humid is not good either, so if your cellar is too humid, you should ventilate more. Recommended:  Regenerative Agriculture: Its Full Potential (Part 3 of 3) Storing: Air Circulation Through Minimum Two Vents Air circulation is another important variable when looking to create your root cellar. Through ventilation, the number of gases produced by your fruits and vegetables can be controlled. If those gases cannot escape, they will cause the food to rot. To prevent this, you should install at least two vents in the root cellar, one high, and one low. Darkness In Order To Prevent Decomposition Finally, one important parameter is the darkness. Fruits and vegetables decompose much faster if they are exposed to light. Therefore, storing perishable items in complete darkness will ensure long-term preservation. Sustainable Storing: More Tips For Storing Fruits And Vegetables Besides following the guidelines above, there is more you can do to extend the shelf life of your fruit and vegetables. Most importantly, do not wash the produce before storing it. Washing will drastically reduce its ability to stay good for a longer period of time. Make sure there is sufficient time for the dirt to dehydrate on its own and simply brush off large chunks of dirt. Pretty much all kinds of vegetables and fruit can be stored for an extended period of time. Not just sturdy root vegetables like carrots, beets, potatoes and onions, but also the more delicate types, such as tomatoes, cucumbers and cauliflower. Each has its own list of requirements and specifications for storing them; make sure to Google this before you give it a go. Recommended:  New Foodscape Alternatives Gets Lots Of Attention In The Netherlands More Sustainable Fruit And Vegetables You might find that some products are not suitable for your root cellar, or are perhaps better off matched with one kind of product over another. Starting your own fruit and vegetable preservation might be a bit of a trial and error, but eventually you will get the hang of it. You will get used to the specifics of your own root cellar and what produce does best in it. Recommended:  Food From Nature: Is It Healthy And Good For The Environment This is not something new or groundbreaking. It is a relatively simple and inexpensive way of keeping your fridge empty(-ier), thus saving energy. At the same time, you will find that your fruits and vegetables are fresher and taste better, as more of the nutrients are saved. Or, if nothing else, it gives you a fun project to occupy yourself with while you are stuck in Corona-quarantaine mode. Before you go! Recommended:  Spider-Woman: Tarantula Staple Food Gets A Snack: Cambodia Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about storing food? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
One of the worst things that can happen to you is your fridge breaking down. Like most unfortunate events, it has a tendency of happening late at night or in the weekend. Or in the midst of the Corona-crisis lockdown, leaving you absolutely helpless. After all, what do we do without our trustworthy cooling machine in the house? Storing Food: Root Cellars And Other Ancient Methods As it turns out, it is not always a must-have. We mostly use it for storing fresh food, including fruit and vegetables. But do you know that you can easily store these products without your fridge? Saves energy and a lot of the nutritional value. Plus, it will eliminate the panic of your food wasting away as you experience a power outage. In the past, our ancestors managed perfectly fine without a fridge. Sure, they did not have cellphone service or toiletpaper either, things considered basic human needs today, but it is worth looking at the way they did things. The way in which they preserved food is not just fairly simple, it is also highly effective. They used something known as a root cellar, a cool underground space where they stored large quantities of produce. As the space stayed cool for a long period of time, they could enjoy their fresh produce for most of the year. The exact method of food preservation varied across cultures. The ‘typical’ root cellar was mostly used in the western world, with the British being the first to introduce the walk-in root cellar, while the indigenous people of Australia buried food directly in the cool ground to preserve it. The Incas froze their food in the mountains on cold nights. In Africa, ancients used to keep food in clay pots, also buried underground. Recommended:  Regenerative Agriculture: Basics For Safe Food (Part 1 of 3) Build Your Own In-Built Fridge While you might not be so keen on burying pots in your backyard, the idea of a root cellar really is not so bad. In most houses, you will have a room or area that are naturally cooler than others. Usually a storage basement, if you have got one. This is a great place to start if you are looking to create a natural cooler for your fruits and vegetables. {youtube}                                                 Cool Ideas for Inexpensive and Easy to Make Root Cellars   If you do not have such a basement, you can get creative. Think about a trash can cellar, made using a metal trash can dug underground, so that only the mouth of the can is level with the earth. Or a barrel root cellar, that uses a large plastic barrel instead of a metal trash can. Another option is to use the so-called straw storage, where you can layer straws and your potatoes or other root veggies in a large basket or barrel. This way, it will stay good for months as well. Either way, you should keep some parameters in mind when creating your root cellar: temperature, humidity, air circulation, darkness. Recommended:  Regenerative Farming: Agro-Ecology In Practice (Part 2 of 3) Storing Fruit And Vegetables: Temperature Between 0 And 10 Degrees Celsius First, you should consider temperature. The cooler the area, the slower the rate at which fruits and vegetables release ethylene gas. This means that it slows down the wasting process. Depending on the exact types of fruits or vegetables, you should be looking for a temperature between 0 and 10 degrees Celsius. Life Without Fridge. Humidity Between 85 and 95 Percent Next, the humidity plays an important role in preserving produce as well. After all, produce is best kept at high humidity, anywhere between 85 and 95 percent. Basements are usually pretty humid, particularly root cellars, which are made of earth. In order to further increase the humidity, you could include a hygrometer - a device measuring humidity. If the cellar is too dry, you can always increase the humidity by sprinkling water on the floor. Too humid is not good either, so if your cellar is too humid, you should ventilate more. Recommended:  Regenerative Agriculture: Its Full Potential (Part 3 of 3) Storing: Air Circulation Through Minimum Two Vents Air circulation is another important variable when looking to create your root cellar. Through ventilation, the number of gases produced by your fruits and vegetables can be controlled. If those gases cannot escape, they will cause the food to rot. To prevent this, you should install at least two vents in the root cellar, one high, and one low. Darkness In Order To Prevent Decomposition Finally, one important parameter is the darkness. Fruits and vegetables decompose much faster if they are exposed to light. Therefore, storing perishable items in complete darkness will ensure long-term preservation. Sustainable Storing: More Tips For Storing Fruits And Vegetables Besides following the guidelines above, there is more you can do to extend the shelf life of your fruit and vegetables. Most importantly, do not wash the produce before storing it. Washing will drastically reduce its ability to stay good for a longer period of time. Make sure there is sufficient time for the dirt to dehydrate on its own and simply brush off large chunks of dirt. Pretty much all kinds of vegetables and fruit can be stored for an extended period of time. Not just sturdy root vegetables like carrots, beets, potatoes and onions, but also the more delicate types, such as tomatoes, cucumbers and cauliflower. Each has its own list of requirements and specifications for storing them; make sure to Google this before you give it a go. Recommended:  New Foodscape Alternatives Gets Lots Of Attention In The Netherlands More Sustainable Fruit And Vegetables You might find that some products are not suitable for your root cellar, or are perhaps better off matched with one kind of product over another. Starting your own fruit and vegetable preservation might be a bit of a trial and error, but eventually you will get the hang of it. You will get used to the specifics of your own root cellar and what produce does best in it. Recommended:  Food From Nature: Is It Healthy And Good For The Environment This is not something new or groundbreaking. It is a relatively simple and inexpensive way of keeping your fridge empty(-ier), thus saving energy. At the same time, you will find that your fruits and vegetables are fresher and taste better, as more of the nutrients are saved. Or, if nothing else, it gives you a fun project to occupy yourself with while you are stuck in Corona-quarantaine mode. Before you go! Recommended:  Spider-Woman: Tarantula Staple Food Gets A Snack: Cambodia Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about storing food? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Sustainable Storing Of Fruit And Food: Life Without Fridge
Social Distancing: Turning Offshore Oil Rigs Into Houses
In the distant past, mankind was actually not as keen on living together as we seem today. Sure, we grouped together when it came to hunting, gathering and taking care of their families, but we tende d to avoid areas where we knew other tribes to be hanging around. Our ancestors much favoured the empty lands, as it promised them a wealth of untapped potential for food and other resources. Corona Virus Highlighting Need For Social Distancing Somehow, we evolved to the point where we became social creatures, keen on living together in tight packs. 5, 10, or even 50 or 100 story high buildings, boasting large numbers of apartments on each floor. It is the human equivalent of the ants’ nest. We are quite literally living on top of each other. Which could be great for a lot of things - and it is very convenient for those of us who need to live close to the office or to relatives. Yet in times such as these, with the Corona virus sweeping across the globe, it is starting to show why social distancing is not such a bad thing after all. While living together has offered many benefits to the growing world population, the downsides are now becoming apparent. It also means that diseases are able to spread quickly, jumping from one body to the other at breakneck speed. Recommended:  Coronavirus, COVID-19 Symptoms Flu And Global Climate Change This is why the invention of Paris-based architecture firm XTU architects is such a remarkable one. These visionary minds have come up with a project titled x_lands, that is looking to find a purpose for offshore oil rigs after the oil is depleted. Quite a large number of those bad boys have been constructed over the past century to get our hands on this natural resource, but it looks as if the age of oil is now coming to a close - with renewable and green energy taking over. Offshore Oil Platforms As Location For Prime Accommodation Now, XTU architects figured they could use the striking looking offshore platforms in order to create actual accommodations. Each community of houses will be created on the oil rig itself, futuristically shaped - like bubbles, for instance, or like containers. Sustainable and light shapes that can easily be transported to the remote location. Recommended:  Floating City: A Sci-Fi Trope Or A Salvation For Many Nations? Furthermore, to add to the sustainability, the rigs are to incorporate all kinds of greenery in the structures, making it not just industrial but also green, inviting and welcoming. There could be several rigs, interconnected using glass or wood walkways, or one single rig that quite literally rises to the sky. It is definitely the kind of material sci-fi movies are made of.   Sustainability And Renewable Energy Come First Each platform will also boast its own electricity source - primarily through windmills, although solar panels and hydroelectricity generated by water running down the structures will be used as well. The rendered images of those platforms also include a wealth of drones swarming the houses, probably for deliveries and the like. It is not just the idea of finding alternative uses for abandoned oil rigs, aiding us in getting rid of the polluting resource once and for all. It is also the idea of finding ways of living on previously inhabitable areas to provide some much-needed relief to the overpopulated areas on land. Recommended:  Geothermal Power Accessible As Wind And Solar Energy: Climeon The Strategy Of Social Distancing Towards The Future If diseases like Covid-19 are to become commonplace, we should find more ways of keeping a reasonable distance from one another - social distancing will become a term that all of us will be more than familiar with. Yet while the concept of XTU architects is admirable, I am not sure it is the type of social distancing that we should be looking for. People who work on oil rigs go through rigorous testing to ensure they are physically and mentally fit enough to do so.   Social distancing It is not like you could visit your neighbours, or pop down to the supermarket for a quick grocery run. The loneliness will be real and the solitude, out on the ocean, could turn out to be too much for some. Add to this the often unpredictable and extreme weather encountered on these locations, and it might just turn out that there is limited interest for living on an abandoned oil rig. The thought, though, is definitely something worth considering.   Before you go! Recommended:  Earth Matters. Nature And Us: What Was, What’s Left: Hope? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about nature? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
In the distant past, mankind was actually not as keen on living together as we seem today. Sure, we grouped together when it came to hunting, gathering and taking care of their families, but we tende d to avoid areas where we knew other tribes to be hanging around. Our ancestors much favoured the empty lands, as it promised them a wealth of untapped potential for food and other resources. Corona Virus Highlighting Need For Social Distancing Somehow, we evolved to the point where we became social creatures, keen on living together in tight packs. 5, 10, or even 50 or 100 story high buildings, boasting large numbers of apartments on each floor. It is the human equivalent of the ants’ nest. We are quite literally living on top of each other. Which could be great for a lot of things - and it is very convenient for those of us who need to live close to the office or to relatives. Yet in times such as these, with the Corona virus sweeping across the globe, it is starting to show why social distancing is not such a bad thing after all. While living together has offered many benefits to the growing world population, the downsides are now becoming apparent. It also means that diseases are able to spread quickly, jumping from one body to the other at breakneck speed. Recommended:  Coronavirus, COVID-19 Symptoms Flu And Global Climate Change This is why the invention of Paris-based architecture firm XTU architects is such a remarkable one. These visionary minds have come up with a project titled x_lands, that is looking to find a purpose for offshore oil rigs after the oil is depleted. Quite a large number of those bad boys have been constructed over the past century to get our hands on this natural resource, but it looks as if the age of oil is now coming to a close - with renewable and green energy taking over. Offshore Oil Platforms As Location For Prime Accommodation Now, XTU architects figured they could use the striking looking offshore platforms in order to create actual accommodations. Each community of houses will be created on the oil rig itself, futuristically shaped - like bubbles, for instance, or like containers. Sustainable and light shapes that can easily be transported to the remote location. Recommended:  Floating City: A Sci-Fi Trope Or A Salvation For Many Nations? Furthermore, to add to the sustainability, the rigs are to incorporate all kinds of greenery in the structures, making it not just industrial but also green, inviting and welcoming. There could be several rigs, interconnected using glass or wood walkways, or one single rig that quite literally rises to the sky. It is definitely the kind of material sci-fi movies are made of.   Sustainability And Renewable Energy Come First Each platform will also boast its own electricity source - primarily through windmills, although solar panels and hydroelectricity generated by water running down the structures will be used as well. The rendered images of those platforms also include a wealth of drones swarming the houses, probably for deliveries and the like. It is not just the idea of finding alternative uses for abandoned oil rigs, aiding us in getting rid of the polluting resource once and for all. It is also the idea of finding ways of living on previously inhabitable areas to provide some much-needed relief to the overpopulated areas on land. Recommended:  Geothermal Power Accessible As Wind And Solar Energy: Climeon The Strategy Of Social Distancing Towards The Future If diseases like Covid-19 are to become commonplace, we should find more ways of keeping a reasonable distance from one another - social distancing will become a term that all of us will be more than familiar with. Yet while the concept of XTU architects is admirable, I am not sure it is the type of social distancing that we should be looking for. People who work on oil rigs go through rigorous testing to ensure they are physically and mentally fit enough to do so.   Social distancing It is not like you could visit your neighbours, or pop down to the supermarket for a quick grocery run. The loneliness will be real and the solitude, out on the ocean, could turn out to be too much for some. Add to this the often unpredictable and extreme weather encountered on these locations, and it might just turn out that there is limited interest for living on an abandoned oil rig. The thought, though, is definitely something worth considering.   Before you go! Recommended:  Earth Matters. Nature And Us: What Was, What’s Left: Hope? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about nature? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Social Distancing: Turning Offshore Oil Rigs Into Houses
Social Distancing: Turning Offshore Oil Rigs Into Houses
Pandemic and Ecological Reset: The World Green Again
The World Green Again. The aftermath of the coronavirus pandemic written by an 'observer' who lived in the Alps, France in 2024. (fiction) Pandemic and Ecological Reset Many people died of the coronavirus pandemic and this made us see the world differently – finally.  We became convinced that the coronavirus pandemic had taught us that we could not continue our consumption habits – our lifestyle - as we had done before. In May 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic reached its 'first' peak. About a billion people were infected worldwide and 40 million died. In October 2020, researchers found out that the coronavirus would come back as a 'normal' seasonal flu and wreak havoc on infected people every year. Another bad trait was that the coronavirus behaved like the Dengue virus. When people became infected for the second time, the chances of recovery were smaller than the first time. The third time people would get it, it would kill most people. In the winter of 2021, nearly 2 billion people became infected and nearly 100 million died because of the coronavirus pandemic. {youtube}                                                                   What Was the 1918 Influenza Pandemic? Ecological Reset: The Vaccin Fortunately, researchers had found a vaccine made to respond to the natural mutation (s) of the coronavirus. This meant that it worked as a smart vaccine that adapted to a potential new corona variant that was made almost 90% directly immobile by the vaccine. Photo by: Dimitri Houtteman In 2022, half a billion people had died from the new strains of the coronavirus, but new vaccines began to have a visible effect on the number of fatalities. Of course, the economy had slowed since the start of the pandemic in 2020. Air travel had almost come to a complete standstill. The export of goods was limited and social life in any form came to a 'temporary' halt (weeks to six months). Recommended:  Green Trains Or Flying High? Travel The Globe Sustainable The World Green Again All this had a remarkably positive effect on the environment. CO2 in the atmosphere went down so rapidly that it dropped from 414 ppm in 2020 to 380 ppm in 2023. Nature started to recover. People started using their ornamental gardens to grow vegetables, herbs and fruits. all over the world people started to grow their own food. Chickens and other livestock were kept on a small scale and - as in the 1960s - were fed food remnants. Due to power shortages, people used their computers and mobile phones less. Community life began to flourish again. Books were read again and children started playing outside more often. There was much less traffic. Gasoline was limited and sales of 'old-fashioned' bicycles had never been higher. Photo by: NeONBRAND Countries restarted the production of certain goods that they had stopped sometime in the 1980s of the last century because it was cheaper to outsource it to low income countries. But now it was ‘again’ to be more important to be independent from other countries. It was also about the health of the environment, of people, of animals, of ... Recommended:  Society Collapse: Climate Change, The Environment Or Us? Ecological Reset: Savior Of Humanity The coronavirus pandemic turned out to be the savior of humanity and taught us to look at nature differently. All governments worldwide no longer had economic growth as their main focus, but well-being for everyone on our planet. The effects of the coronavirus pandemic are still felt worldwide and will be felt for the next 10 years but it was necessary to save humanity from its own demise. Coverphoto by: Chromatograph Before you go! Recommended:  Coronavirus: What A Blessing For The Planet. Provocative? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about the coronavirus? Click on  'Re g ister'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
The World Green Again. The aftermath of the coronavirus pandemic written by an 'observer' who lived in the Alps, France in 2024. (fiction) Pandemic and Ecological Reset Many people died of the coronavirus pandemic and this made us see the world differently – finally.  We became convinced that the coronavirus pandemic had taught us that we could not continue our consumption habits – our lifestyle - as we had done before. In May 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic reached its 'first' peak. About a billion people were infected worldwide and 40 million died. In October 2020, researchers found out that the coronavirus would come back as a 'normal' seasonal flu and wreak havoc on infected people every year. Another bad trait was that the coronavirus behaved like the Dengue virus. When people became infected for the second time, the chances of recovery were smaller than the first time. The third time people would get it, it would kill most people. In the winter of 2021, nearly 2 billion people became infected and nearly 100 million died because of the coronavirus pandemic. {youtube}                                                                   What Was the 1918 Influenza Pandemic? Ecological Reset: The Vaccin Fortunately, researchers had found a vaccine made to respond to the natural mutation (s) of the coronavirus. This meant that it worked as a smart vaccine that adapted to a potential new corona variant that was made almost 90% directly immobile by the vaccine. Photo by: Dimitri Houtteman In 2022, half a billion people had died from the new strains of the coronavirus, but new vaccines began to have a visible effect on the number of fatalities. Of course, the economy had slowed since the start of the pandemic in 2020. Air travel had almost come to a complete standstill. The export of goods was limited and social life in any form came to a 'temporary' halt (weeks to six months). Recommended:  Green Trains Or Flying High? Travel The Globe Sustainable The World Green Again All this had a remarkably positive effect on the environment. CO2 in the atmosphere went down so rapidly that it dropped from 414 ppm in 2020 to 380 ppm in 2023. Nature started to recover. People started using their ornamental gardens to grow vegetables, herbs and fruits. all over the world people started to grow their own food. Chickens and other livestock were kept on a small scale and - as in the 1960s - were fed food remnants. Due to power shortages, people used their computers and mobile phones less. Community life began to flourish again. Books were read again and children started playing outside more often. There was much less traffic. Gasoline was limited and sales of 'old-fashioned' bicycles had never been higher. Photo by: NeONBRAND Countries restarted the production of certain goods that they had stopped sometime in the 1980s of the last century because it was cheaper to outsource it to low income countries. But now it was ‘again’ to be more important to be independent from other countries. It was also about the health of the environment, of people, of animals, of ... Recommended:  Society Collapse: Climate Change, The Environment Or Us? Ecological Reset: Savior Of Humanity The coronavirus pandemic turned out to be the savior of humanity and taught us to look at nature differently. All governments worldwide no longer had economic growth as their main focus, but well-being for everyone on our planet. The effects of the coronavirus pandemic are still felt worldwide and will be felt for the next 10 years but it was necessary to save humanity from its own demise. Coverphoto by: Chromatograph Before you go! Recommended:  Coronavirus: What A Blessing For The Planet. Provocative? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about the coronavirus? Click on  'Re g ister'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Pandemic and Ecological Reset: The World Green Again
Pandemic and Ecological Reset: The World Green Again
CO2 Footprint Food: It Is What You Eat Not If It Is Local
You can hardly set foot in a restaurant these days without being bombarded with the ‘local’ signs. Locally brewed beers, locally caught fish. Dishes with ingredients that are locally grown. It is being hailed as a stamp of (local) approval, something that is organic, something that helps the local entrepreneurs. CO2 Footprint Food: Environmental Impacts Oftentimes, these are not wrong. By buying locally sourced produce, you do support your local community. Yet the organic element is often inferred but not always correctly so: small local producers often rely on inorganic processes, as the scale advantages are not present. Nonetheless, the benefits of eating local are overstated and not necessarily more sustainable. While people often look at the transportation and energy industries as the largest CO2 emitters, there is in fact another large polluter. More than 25% of the world’s emissions are resulting from the production of food. As there are more than 7 billion of us who want to eat, preferably on a daily basis, it is not surprising that this takes up a lot of our resources. Recommended:  Vegan Food You Need To Develop Your Muscles: Protein Power The exact amount of resources used for our food production does, however, depend on what we eat. Our diet and eating habits are determinant of the exact size of our carbon footprint. This means that by making different food choices for our breakfast, lunch and dinner, we can do our part in combatting climate change.                                                                 The diet that helps fight climate change This does not always mean that we have to eat local. Intuitively, it seems to make more sense to do so - transportation is another big polluter, so avoiding it seems a big help. Only partly true - the share of transportation in the total food footprint is relatively minor, so it should not be the most important determinant. This means that what you eat is more important than where it came from. CO2 Footprint Food: Where Do The Emissions Come From? Looking at a piechart of greenhouse gas emissions for a wide range of food stuffs, we can start drawing some meaningful comparisons and come up with a truly sustainable diet. Emissions from food production roughly fall in four categories: land use, processing, transport and packaging. According to the world’s largest analysis of global food systems, there are massive differences in the greenhouse gas emissions for different food groups. One of the largest polluters? Your steak or hamburger, at 60 kilograms of greenhouse gases per kilogram of beef. This stands in stark contrast to the good ol’ peas, which only emit one kilogram per kilogram. Recommended:  Climate Change Stop, Store CO2, Add Phytoplankton By Whales? 'Your steak on the road' This seems indicative of a trend, where animal-based foods are generally emitting more than plant-based products. Being vegan would therefore be a more sustainable choice than going for the paleo-diet. And it is not just beef, but products like lamb and cheese are pretty polluting as well (both produce over 20 kilogram of greenhouse gasses per kilogram of product). Other animal-based products, including poultry, eggs, and pork, are more sustainable choices (6 kilograms per kilogram), but still more polluting than most plant-based options. Recommended:  Blue Planet Earth: The Amount Of Water You Use More significantly, though, the data allows us to observe where the emissions come from. As it turns out, the use of land and the processing of products at the farm stage are most polluting - coming in at 80% of the total food footprint. As mentioned before, transport is only a small part, coming in at less than 10% for most products - going as low as 0.5% for beef products. Other parts of the supply chain are similarly low on their emissions. This includes retail and packaging, making that very sustainable cardboard packaging for your local fruit largely irrelevant. Recommended:  Are Bio Based Bottles Good For The Environment? CO2 Footprint Food: Eating Local Only Slightly Reduces Your Emissions If you are going to a local farmer for his beef or lamb, you might think that you are doing well for the environment - while you are actually increasing your food footprint far more than if you opted for some far-away grown produce. If you opted instead for eating New-Zealand lamb in Europe or Scottish beef in the States, you would hardly be causing any additional pollution. Once again, it goes to show that eating local has very little effect on the total food emissions. This especially holds true for beef, one of the largest polluters in and of itself. Opting for beef from local cows does not do anything towards making you a more sustainable person. Not eating beef does. A study of Weber and Matthews (2008) found that if an average family were to substitute their hamburger and ice-cream (so their beef and dairy products) for poultry, pork, fish, eggs or plant-products, for just one single day per week, this would effectively do more to reduce their emissions than buying all their products locally. How? Estimates have shown that even if you are to purchase all of your food locally, you would at the most reduce your carbon footprint by 5%. And this number is probably already too high, as it does not take into account the emissions associated with getting the food from the producers to your home. Not eating beef just one day per week already almost completely offsets this amount (which reduces your carbon footprint by 4%). Recommended:  We Created The Coronavirus: A Milieu Flaw That Will Kill Us In extreme cases, eating locally might actually increase your carbon footprint. Most countries have a climate that is such that certain food stuffs cannot be produced all year round. Strawberries, for instance, or apples. Yet consumers want to enjoy these all year round. This means that we either have to import them from other countries where they are in-season, use refrigeration and preservation methods to store them after harvesting, or use artificial methods to produce them, such as greenhouses. The latter two are very energy-intensive, which makes importing - unsurprisingly - the best option. CO2 Footprint Food: Avoid Air-Freighted Food The message thus far has been pretty depressing: eating locally will not help you do well for the environment. Then what will? For starters, avoiding beef, dairy and lamb will go a long way. Then, there is one notable exception to the transportation rule that you should be aware of. Transportation might not be a major polluter in and of itself, but air transportation definitely is. Air-freight food is rare - much rarer than you would expect, at about 0,16% of the total - but has a pretty big footprint nonetheless: about 50 times more than other transportation methods, such as the far more common boat, that hauls our precious avocados and almonds. Recommended:  Wine Unplugged: The Age Of the Bordeaux Wine Snob Is Dead Identifying food that has been brought to you by plane is pretty hard. It is time to start being suspicious when you notice a far-away country on the label of a very perishable product, like berries, beans and asparagus. These have a short shelf-life, too short to be transported by boat - and require a certain freshness. Those characteristics should get some alarm bells ringing in your head. So, if you are insistent on eating locally for the environments’ sake, you will find yourself disillusioned. Avoiding air-freighted food will have a minimal impact as well. Your best bet is to stick with foods that are in-season and avoid dairy and beef products as much as you can - this is where you’ll really start to make a difference. It is all about what you eat, not where it came from. Cover photo by: Pablo Merchán Montes Before you go! Recommended:  Getting Healthier By Eating Sustainable Food And Taking Exercise Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about vegan food? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
You can hardly set foot in a restaurant these days without being bombarded with the ‘local’ signs. Locally brewed beers, locally caught fish. Dishes with ingredients that are locally grown. It is being hailed as a stamp of (local) approval, something that is organic, something that helps the local entrepreneurs. CO2 Footprint Food: Environmental Impacts Oftentimes, these are not wrong. By buying locally sourced produce, you do support your local community. Yet the organic element is often inferred but not always correctly so: small local producers often rely on inorganic processes, as the scale advantages are not present. Nonetheless, the benefits of eating local are overstated and not necessarily more sustainable. While people often look at the transportation and energy industries as the largest CO2 emitters, there is in fact another large polluter. More than 25% of the world’s emissions are resulting from the production of food. As there are more than 7 billion of us who want to eat, preferably on a daily basis, it is not surprising that this takes up a lot of our resources. Recommended:  Vegan Food You Need To Develop Your Muscles: Protein Power The exact amount of resources used for our food production does, however, depend on what we eat. Our diet and eating habits are determinant of the exact size of our carbon footprint. This means that by making different food choices for our breakfast, lunch and dinner, we can do our part in combatting climate change.                                                                 The diet that helps fight climate change This does not always mean that we have to eat local. Intuitively, it seems to make more sense to do so - transportation is another big polluter, so avoiding it seems a big help. Only partly true - the share of transportation in the total food footprint is relatively minor, so it should not be the most important determinant. This means that what you eat is more important than where it came from. CO2 Footprint Food: Where Do The Emissions Come From? Looking at a piechart of greenhouse gas emissions for a wide range of food stuffs, we can start drawing some meaningful comparisons and come up with a truly sustainable diet. Emissions from food production roughly fall in four categories: land use, processing, transport and packaging. According to the world’s largest analysis of global food systems, there are massive differences in the greenhouse gas emissions for different food groups. One of the largest polluters? Your steak or hamburger, at 60 kilograms of greenhouse gases per kilogram of beef. This stands in stark contrast to the good ol’ peas, which only emit one kilogram per kilogram. Recommended:  Climate Change Stop, Store CO2, Add Phytoplankton By Whales? 'Your steak on the road' This seems indicative of a trend, where animal-based foods are generally emitting more than plant-based products. Being vegan would therefore be a more sustainable choice than going for the paleo-diet. And it is not just beef, but products like lamb and cheese are pretty polluting as well (both produce over 20 kilogram of greenhouse gasses per kilogram of product). Other animal-based products, including poultry, eggs, and pork, are more sustainable choices (6 kilograms per kilogram), but still more polluting than most plant-based options. Recommended:  Blue Planet Earth: The Amount Of Water You Use More significantly, though, the data allows us to observe where the emissions come from. As it turns out, the use of land and the processing of products at the farm stage are most polluting - coming in at 80% of the total food footprint. As mentioned before, transport is only a small part, coming in at less than 10% for most products - going as low as 0.5% for beef products. Other parts of the supply chain are similarly low on their emissions. This includes retail and packaging, making that very sustainable cardboard packaging for your local fruit largely irrelevant. Recommended:  Are Bio Based Bottles Good For The Environment? CO2 Footprint Food: Eating Local Only Slightly Reduces Your Emissions If you are going to a local farmer for his beef or lamb, you might think that you are doing well for the environment - while you are actually increasing your food footprint far more than if you opted for some far-away grown produce. If you opted instead for eating New-Zealand lamb in Europe or Scottish beef in the States, you would hardly be causing any additional pollution. Once again, it goes to show that eating local has very little effect on the total food emissions. This especially holds true for beef, one of the largest polluters in and of itself. Opting for beef from local cows does not do anything towards making you a more sustainable person. Not eating beef does. A study of Weber and Matthews (2008) found that if an average family were to substitute their hamburger and ice-cream (so their beef and dairy products) for poultry, pork, fish, eggs or plant-products, for just one single day per week, this would effectively do more to reduce their emissions than buying all their products locally. How? Estimates have shown that even if you are to purchase all of your food locally, you would at the most reduce your carbon footprint by 5%. And this number is probably already too high, as it does not take into account the emissions associated with getting the food from the producers to your home. Not eating beef just one day per week already almost completely offsets this amount (which reduces your carbon footprint by 4%). Recommended:  We Created The Coronavirus: A Milieu Flaw That Will Kill Us In extreme cases, eating locally might actually increase your carbon footprint. Most countries have a climate that is such that certain food stuffs cannot be produced all year round. Strawberries, for instance, or apples. Yet consumers want to enjoy these all year round. This means that we either have to import them from other countries where they are in-season, use refrigeration and preservation methods to store them after harvesting, or use artificial methods to produce them, such as greenhouses. The latter two are very energy-intensive, which makes importing - unsurprisingly - the best option. CO2 Footprint Food: Avoid Air-Freighted Food The message thus far has been pretty depressing: eating locally will not help you do well for the environment. Then what will? For starters, avoiding beef, dairy and lamb will go a long way. Then, there is one notable exception to the transportation rule that you should be aware of. Transportation might not be a major polluter in and of itself, but air transportation definitely is. Air-freight food is rare - much rarer than you would expect, at about 0,16% of the total - but has a pretty big footprint nonetheless: about 50 times more than other transportation methods, such as the far more common boat, that hauls our precious avocados and almonds. Recommended:  Wine Unplugged: The Age Of the Bordeaux Wine Snob Is Dead Identifying food that has been brought to you by plane is pretty hard. It is time to start being suspicious when you notice a far-away country on the label of a very perishable product, like berries, beans and asparagus. These have a short shelf-life, too short to be transported by boat - and require a certain freshness. Those characteristics should get some alarm bells ringing in your head. So, if you are insistent on eating locally for the environments’ sake, you will find yourself disillusioned. Avoiding air-freighted food will have a minimal impact as well. Your best bet is to stick with foods that are in-season and avoid dairy and beef products as much as you can - this is where you’ll really start to make a difference. It is all about what you eat, not where it came from. Cover photo by: Pablo Merchán Montes Before you go! Recommended:  Getting Healthier By Eating Sustainable Food And Taking Exercise Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about vegan food? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
CO2 Footprint Food: It Is What You Eat Not If It Is Local
Community

A community is you and me. A network of social, economic, ecological and many other relationships. We all work together and live in urban, suburban and rural areas. Social sustainability is becoming increasingly important on our small planet. We define: support, quality of life, development, adaptation, rights and labour.

We belong to a group of individuals - our society - in which we belong geographically. Certain environmental issues play an important role in our society. Here, sustainable solutions are sought, developed and implemented. This may differ from societies in other countries, but because of our global environmental issues and dependence, we must learn to work more together so that we can all benefit from sharing sustainable knowledge to tackle, for example, climate change.

Green architecture is important. Building with local materials that can be recycled and reused brings us a big step forward to have less impact on the environment. With green architecture we can build smart cities where resources can be used more efficiently and information can be shared, thus improving our society, your community.

Lifestyle is the way we live, the dynamics of personality. Fashion defines our self and together with food it is getting - at present - an even more important role in our society. It's not just about taste, but especially about the burden that the fashion industry, agriculture and the meat industry have on our resources, especially water.

If there was an urge to come up with a sustainable way of living solutions and share these topics globally it’s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about tiny houses, your experiences and expectations for the future at home and globally. 

Global Sustainability X-change, that’s what you can do together with WhatsOrb. What's in for me?

 

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