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About: <p>A community is you and me. A network of social, economic, ecological and many other relationships. We all work together and live in urban, suburban and rural areas. Social sustainability is becoming increasingly important on our small planet. We define: support, quality of life, development, adaptation, rights and labour.</p> <p>We belong to a group of individuals - <a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/society">our society</a> - in which we belong geographically. Certain environmental issues play an important role in our society. Here, sustainable solutions are sought, developed and implemented. This may differ from societies in other countries, but because of our global environmental issues and&nbsp;<span lang="en" tabindex="0">dependence</span>, we must learn to work more together so that we can all benefit from sharing sustainable knowledge to tackle, for example, climate change.</p> <p><a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/green-architecture">Green architecture</a> is important. Building with local materials that can be recycled and reused brings us a big step forward to have less impact on the environment. With green architecture we can build <a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/smart-cities">smart cities</a> where resources can be used more efficiently and information can be shared, thus improving our society, your community.</p> <p><a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/lifestyle">Lifestyle</a> is the way we live, the dynamics of personality. Fashion defines our self and together with food it is getting - at present - an even more important role in our society. It's not just about taste, but especially about the burden that the fashion industry, agriculture and the meat industry have on our resources, especially water.</p> <p>If there was an urge to come up with a sustainable way of living solutions and share these topics globally it&rsquo;s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about tiny houses, your experiences and expectations for the future at home and globally.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Global Sustainability X-change, that&rsquo;s what you can do together with WhatsOrb.&nbsp;<a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/newsletter/your-shared-sustainable-ideas-make-our-earth-a-better-place">What's in for me?</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
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Solar Zero Energy Homes: Green Prefab Realty In Sweden
A set of affordable homes for growing families just popped up in Örebro, Sweden and they utilize passive building principles and photovoltaic panels to generate as much energy as they use each year. Stockholm-based Street Monkey Architects designed the zero-energy homes to be well insulated and nearly airtight, with ventilation systems that retain as much heat as possible. A row of homes facing east-west is topped with solar panels. Each home’s pitch is angled to catch as much sun as possible Solar Zero Energy Homes The homes are almost completely powered by rooftop solar panels, and on-site batteries store unused energy that can be sold back to the grid. Additionally, the buildings’ energy consumption is measured on an ongoing basis to adjust for power needs. {youtube}                                   Essential Secrets to Sustainable Net-Zero Solar Homes: Geos Neighborhood                      Geos Neighborhood in Arvada, Colorado, sustainable, net-zero, solar, fossil fuel free homes  Each two-story, 1,600-square-foot structure is composed of six factory-built modules that arrived on-site with finished interiors. Once erected, the facades were connected together to smooth over transitional moments between the homes. Four houses face east-west, while six have a north-south orientation and all of the roofs are topped with solar panels angled toward the path of the sun. The solar panel–topped roofs vary slightly in height for added visual interest. Although the development is designed as an interlocking series of homes, subtle variations give each residence its own character. Some feature white plaster facades, while the row running north to south is finished in a dark, silvery steel. Recommended:  Smart Communities: Eco-Living Through Technology A more detailed shot shows the variation  Wood slatting attached to every other house creates a visual rhythm an element that Street Monkey Architects hopes will provide a sense of individuality for prospective homeowners. Recommended:  Tiny House With Solar Panels Is Off Grid: The Netherlands Each home has a deck with an extended backyard that’s accessed via glass doors The entrance (at the back corner) leads directly into the kitchen, dining room, and living room The kitchen is designed in a U-shape to enable socializing and to optimize space flow The living room, located adjacent to the dining area, leads to the backyard. The homes’ interiors are open and airy. The ground-floor kitchen opens to the dining room, which leads to the the living area. There, two sets of glass doors provide access to a terrace, expanding available living space. Steel stairs suspended by vertical wires allow light to filter to the ground floor. The upper level holds three bedrooms, a family room, and a large bathroom. Recommended:  Off-Grid Homes And Tiny Houses: With Solar Panels And Prefab Metal stairs attached via wires allow an abundance of light to reach the first floor At the top of the stairs is a family room with natural wood floors and white walls The family room sits adjacent to the bedrooms and a large bathroom.  A master bedroom on the second floor gets natural light through glass doors.  Before you go! Recommended:  Tiny Houses Tips And Tricks: Minimalistic Living Experience Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about green architecture?  What you gain?  Extra: Global exposure, a valuable backlink!
A set of affordable homes for growing families just popped up in Örebro, Sweden and they utilize passive building principles and photovoltaic panels to generate as much energy as they use each year. Stockholm-based Street Monkey Architects designed the zero-energy homes to be well insulated and nearly airtight, with ventilation systems that retain as much heat as possible. A row of homes facing east-west is topped with solar panels. Each home’s pitch is angled to catch as much sun as possible Solar Zero Energy Homes The homes are almost completely powered by rooftop solar panels, and on-site batteries store unused energy that can be sold back to the grid. Additionally, the buildings’ energy consumption is measured on an ongoing basis to adjust for power needs. {youtube}                                   Essential Secrets to Sustainable Net-Zero Solar Homes: Geos Neighborhood                      Geos Neighborhood in Arvada, Colorado, sustainable, net-zero, solar, fossil fuel free homes  Each two-story, 1,600-square-foot structure is composed of six factory-built modules that arrived on-site with finished interiors. Once erected, the facades were connected together to smooth over transitional moments between the homes. Four houses face east-west, while six have a north-south orientation and all of the roofs are topped with solar panels angled toward the path of the sun. The solar panel–topped roofs vary slightly in height for added visual interest. Although the development is designed as an interlocking series of homes, subtle variations give each residence its own character. Some feature white plaster facades, while the row running north to south is finished in a dark, silvery steel. Recommended:  Smart Communities: Eco-Living Through Technology A more detailed shot shows the variation  Wood slatting attached to every other house creates a visual rhythm an element that Street Monkey Architects hopes will provide a sense of individuality for prospective homeowners. Recommended:  Tiny House With Solar Panels Is Off Grid: The Netherlands Each home has a deck with an extended backyard that’s accessed via glass doors The entrance (at the back corner) leads directly into the kitchen, dining room, and living room The kitchen is designed in a U-shape to enable socializing and to optimize space flow The living room, located adjacent to the dining area, leads to the backyard. The homes’ interiors are open and airy. The ground-floor kitchen opens to the dining room, which leads to the the living area. There, two sets of glass doors provide access to a terrace, expanding available living space. Steel stairs suspended by vertical wires allow light to filter to the ground floor. The upper level holds three bedrooms, a family room, and a large bathroom. Recommended:  Off-Grid Homes And Tiny Houses: With Solar Panels And Prefab Metal stairs attached via wires allow an abundance of light to reach the first floor At the top of the stairs is a family room with natural wood floors and white walls The family room sits adjacent to the bedrooms and a large bathroom.  A master bedroom on the second floor gets natural light through glass doors.  Before you go! Recommended:  Tiny Houses Tips And Tricks: Minimalistic Living Experience Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about green architecture?  What you gain?  Extra: Global exposure, a valuable backlink!
Solar Zero Energy Homes: Green Prefab Realty In Sweden
Solar Zero Energy Homes: Green Prefab Realty In Sweden
CO2 Footprint Reduction: 5 Innovative Solutions
For decades, scientists have been warning us about global warming, and the consequences of human actions on the planet in the form of environmental disasters. The construction sector is today one of the major contributors to global warming and the climate crisis. CO2 Footprint Reduction According to data of the United Nations (UN), currently, 36% of the global energy is dedicated to buildings and 7 to 8% of all pollutant emissions are caused by the production of concrete alone. Therefore, the architectural community is directly related to climate change, through the energy wasted on buildings and material production for the construction sector. Reflecting on this, we have compiled a set of five projects from different parts of the world that offer solutions to aid the fight against the climate crisis.  Recommended:  CO2 Absorption: Does A Dutch Professor Have The Answer? {youtube}                                                   Using concrete to trap greenhouse gasses | The Fix CO2 Footprint Reduction: Rotterdam Climate Initiative In order to address the challenges of global climate change, and aiming to be the world capital of reduction of CO2 by reducing 50% of its carbon emissions, Rotterdam developed a set of self-sustainable floating structures, with ambitious plans to adapt to rising sea levels. What is the meaning of green architecture? Green architecture, or green design, is an approach to building that minimizes the harmful effects of construction projects on human health and the environment. The "green" architect or designer attempts to safeguard air, water, and earth by choosing eco-friendly building materials and construction practices The project is a catalyst for combating climate change, operating from three connected domes anchored within the Dutch city’s old harbor. The pavilion was designed by DeltaSync and Publicdomain Architects and is an unprecedented example of innovative, sustainable and climate-proof architecture. The idea is that the structures host different uses, but above all a community of floating houses. The translucent shelter relies on solar energy and its structure is made of anti-corrosive plastic ETFE, which is 100 times lighter than glass and therefore ideal for a floating structure. Recommended:  Smart Cities Or Dumb Cities? Let’s Embrace Low Tech CO2 Footprint Reduction: Innovative Solution Humanscapes Habitat Built in India, this housing project is an applied research and demonstration project of Sustainable and Integrated Urban Living Project, used for benchmarking in housing. Appropriated due to the present global crisis of energy and climate change, it presents solutions in order to achieve a sustainable development, seeking to upgrade the capability of the currently unorganized construction sector of India, encouraging the transition of buildings with high embodied energy materials to technology and building materials that may reduce the carbon footprint.  What are the main goals of green architecture? Green architecture, philosophy of architecture that advocates sustainable energy sources, the conservation of energy, the reuse and safety of building materials, and the siting of a building with consideration of its impact on the environment. Using local building materials and skills, the residences become a net energy-positive habitat by generating their own renewable energy. Some crucial items of the project are: zero-discharge of water, reduction and recycling of solid waste, local endemic species landscaping, and growing organic food. In addition, some natural consequences of the campus set-up are the reduction of journeys by integrating work and living spaces, coordinating community and infrastructure, as well as the adoption of clean mobility options like e-vehicles for external contact. Recommended:  New Foodscape Alternatives Gets Attention In The Netherlands CO2 Footprint Reduction: Innovative Solution From NLÉ Architects The Makoko, floating school Taking into account the impact of climate change and sea-level rise in the last few years, and the coastal erosion and tropical rains that have overloaded the current system, NLÉ Architects developed this project for Makoko school. It was designed as a floating prototype to encourage architecture and urbanism of the coastal cities of Africa, creating houses, community centers and playgrounds with the same system. How can we reduce CO2 in construction? 8 steps to reduce embodied carbon in construction lifecycle Reuse buildings instead of constructing new ones Specify low-carbon concrete mixes Limit carbon-intensive materials Choose lower carbon alternatives Choose carbon sequestering materials Reuse materials Use high-recycled content materials Maximize structural efficiency Recommended:  A Floating Airport Cutting Edge Madness Or Visionary? Designed for 100 students and their teachers, the school offers 100m² of area and 10 meters of ceiling height. The project uses around 256 recycled plastic barrels to float on the water and reused wood structure. The electricity relies on solar panels, while the rainwater collection facilitates the use of odorless composting, installed as a solution for the nonexistent sewer system, making it self-sustainable. Recommended:  Floating Cities: A Sustainable Concept For Future Communities CO2 Reduction: Innovative Solution Archifest Zero Waste Pavilion Using zero waste as a constructive strategy, this project was developed around two highly rapidly deployable and reusable systems. The zero-waste strategy considered time, materials, costs and the afterlife of the elements. How do you become carbon neutral? Carbon-neutral status can be achieved in two ways: Balancing carbon dioxide emissions with carbon removal beyond natural processes, often through carbon offsetting, or the process of removing or sequestering carbon dioxide from the atmosphere to make up for emissions elsewhere The box-truss system, including the roof, takes a maximum of approximately 7 days to deploy The membrane takes a maximum of approximately 3 days to install Overall, the time frame to complete WonderWall would be of about 10-15 days The cellular membrane once taken down can be reused for other functions.Thanks to WOW Architects Recommended:  How An Artificial Leaf Sucks CO2 And Makes Fuel. Amazing! Innovative Solution 5: Oceanix City, Bjarke Ingels Group As part of UN-Habitat’s New Urban Agenda, this project developed by Bjarke Ingels Group seeks to respond to the imminent threat of climate change, proposing the creation of the world’s first resilient and sustainable floating community, designed to accommodate 10.000 people. “Oceanix City” is a response to the prediction that by 2050, 90% of the world’s largest cities will be exposed to rising seas, resulting in mass displacement, and the destruction of homes and infrastructure. The scheme is anchored in the UN Sustainable Development Goals, enacting circular flows of food, energy, water, and waste, becoming self-sustainable. According to Ingels, "The only constant in the universe is change. Our world is always changing, and right now, our climate is changing. No matter how critical the crisis is, and it is, this is also our collective human superpower. That we have the power to adapt to change and we have the power to give form to our future". Before you go! Recommended:  Regenerative Agriculture: Its Full Potential (Part 3 of 3) Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about green architecture? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
For decades, scientists have been warning us about global warming, and the consequences of human actions on the planet in the form of environmental disasters. The construction sector is today one of the major contributors to global warming and the climate crisis. CO2 Footprint Reduction According to data of the United Nations (UN), currently, 36% of the global energy is dedicated to buildings and 7 to 8% of all pollutant emissions are caused by the production of concrete alone. Therefore, the architectural community is directly related to climate change, through the energy wasted on buildings and material production for the construction sector. Reflecting on this, we have compiled a set of five projects from different parts of the world that offer solutions to aid the fight against the climate crisis.  Recommended:  CO2 Absorption: Does A Dutch Professor Have The Answer? {youtube}                                                   Using concrete to trap greenhouse gasses | The Fix CO2 Footprint Reduction: Rotterdam Climate Initiative In order to address the challenges of global climate change, and aiming to be the world capital of reduction of CO2 by reducing 50% of its carbon emissions, Rotterdam developed a set of self-sustainable floating structures, with ambitious plans to adapt to rising sea levels. What is the meaning of green architecture? Green architecture, or green design, is an approach to building that minimizes the harmful effects of construction projects on human health and the environment. The "green" architect or designer attempts to safeguard air, water, and earth by choosing eco-friendly building materials and construction practices The project is a catalyst for combating climate change, operating from three connected domes anchored within the Dutch city’s old harbor. The pavilion was designed by DeltaSync and Publicdomain Architects and is an unprecedented example of innovative, sustainable and climate-proof architecture. The idea is that the structures host different uses, but above all a community of floating houses. The translucent shelter relies on solar energy and its structure is made of anti-corrosive plastic ETFE, which is 100 times lighter than glass and therefore ideal for a floating structure. Recommended:  Smart Cities Or Dumb Cities? Let’s Embrace Low Tech CO2 Footprint Reduction: Innovative Solution Humanscapes Habitat Built in India, this housing project is an applied research and demonstration project of Sustainable and Integrated Urban Living Project, used for benchmarking in housing. Appropriated due to the present global crisis of energy and climate change, it presents solutions in order to achieve a sustainable development, seeking to upgrade the capability of the currently unorganized construction sector of India, encouraging the transition of buildings with high embodied energy materials to technology and building materials that may reduce the carbon footprint.  What are the main goals of green architecture? Green architecture, philosophy of architecture that advocates sustainable energy sources, the conservation of energy, the reuse and safety of building materials, and the siting of a building with consideration of its impact on the environment. Using local building materials and skills, the residences become a net energy-positive habitat by generating their own renewable energy. Some crucial items of the project are: zero-discharge of water, reduction and recycling of solid waste, local endemic species landscaping, and growing organic food. In addition, some natural consequences of the campus set-up are the reduction of journeys by integrating work and living spaces, coordinating community and infrastructure, as well as the adoption of clean mobility options like e-vehicles for external contact. Recommended:  New Foodscape Alternatives Gets Attention In The Netherlands CO2 Footprint Reduction: Innovative Solution From NLÉ Architects The Makoko, floating school Taking into account the impact of climate change and sea-level rise in the last few years, and the coastal erosion and tropical rains that have overloaded the current system, NLÉ Architects developed this project for Makoko school. It was designed as a floating prototype to encourage architecture and urbanism of the coastal cities of Africa, creating houses, community centers and playgrounds with the same system. How can we reduce CO2 in construction? 8 steps to reduce embodied carbon in construction lifecycle Reuse buildings instead of constructing new ones Specify low-carbon concrete mixes Limit carbon-intensive materials Choose lower carbon alternatives Choose carbon sequestering materials Reuse materials Use high-recycled content materials Maximize structural efficiency Recommended:  A Floating Airport Cutting Edge Madness Or Visionary? Designed for 100 students and their teachers, the school offers 100m² of area and 10 meters of ceiling height. The project uses around 256 recycled plastic barrels to float on the water and reused wood structure. The electricity relies on solar panels, while the rainwater collection facilitates the use of odorless composting, installed as a solution for the nonexistent sewer system, making it self-sustainable. Recommended:  Floating Cities: A Sustainable Concept For Future Communities CO2 Reduction: Innovative Solution Archifest Zero Waste Pavilion Using zero waste as a constructive strategy, this project was developed around two highly rapidly deployable and reusable systems. The zero-waste strategy considered time, materials, costs and the afterlife of the elements. How do you become carbon neutral? Carbon-neutral status can be achieved in two ways: Balancing carbon dioxide emissions with carbon removal beyond natural processes, often through carbon offsetting, or the process of removing or sequestering carbon dioxide from the atmosphere to make up for emissions elsewhere The box-truss system, including the roof, takes a maximum of approximately 7 days to deploy The membrane takes a maximum of approximately 3 days to install Overall, the time frame to complete WonderWall would be of about 10-15 days The cellular membrane once taken down can be reused for other functions.Thanks to WOW Architects Recommended:  How An Artificial Leaf Sucks CO2 And Makes Fuel. Amazing! Innovative Solution 5: Oceanix City, Bjarke Ingels Group As part of UN-Habitat’s New Urban Agenda, this project developed by Bjarke Ingels Group seeks to respond to the imminent threat of climate change, proposing the creation of the world’s first resilient and sustainable floating community, designed to accommodate 10.000 people. “Oceanix City” is a response to the prediction that by 2050, 90% of the world’s largest cities will be exposed to rising seas, resulting in mass displacement, and the destruction of homes and infrastructure. The scheme is anchored in the UN Sustainable Development Goals, enacting circular flows of food, energy, water, and waste, becoming self-sustainable. According to Ingels, "The only constant in the universe is change. Our world is always changing, and right now, our climate is changing. No matter how critical the crisis is, and it is, this is also our collective human superpower. That we have the power to adapt to change and we have the power to give form to our future". Before you go! Recommended:  Regenerative Agriculture: Its Full Potential (Part 3 of 3) Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about green architecture? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
CO2 Footprint Reduction: 5 Innovative Solutions
A Floating Airport Cutting Edge Madness Or Visionary?
Schiphol Airport (Netherlands) at sea is slowly but surely coming into the picture again as a future perspective for aviation. The public debate about the future of Schiphol has completely erupted again. Local residents’ associations and D66 (political party) suggest that Schiphol at sea is a solution for stranded Schiphol. Schiphol Airport Cutting Edge As a vital hub in international aviation, Schiphol Airport has offered excellent accessibility to business people and tourists over the years, steadily benefiting the employment and economic growth of the Netherlands. However, it is predicted that the number of air travellers will continue to grow in the near future. In order to maintain Schiphol’s current ‘hub position’, the airport will have to increase its capacity to cater for the needs of travellers. In addition to improving service systems inside the airport, infrastructure surrounding the airport such as stations, parking spaces and roads must also be enlarged. For this to happen, space is needed, but where to find the space? How about space on water? What does Schiphol mean? There are several legends about the name 'Schiphol' Consequently, this place became known as: 'Schip Holl' or 'Scheepshol'. 'Schip' and 'Scheep' meaning 'ship', and 'hol' meaning 'grave' in this context. Another explanation is that the name comes from the word 'scheepshaal'. Schiphol's name is derived from a former fortification named Fort Schiphol, which was part of theStelling van Amsterdam defence works. Before 1852, theHaarlemmermeer polder in which the airport lies was a large lake with some shallow areas. There are multiple stories of how the place got its name. A Floating Airport: Radical Solutions Technically, socially and legally, it is possible. The integral social cost-benefit analysis will be beneficial.  Is Schiphol airport below sea level? -3 m                                                                  World's First Floating City Documentary                                                    A Floating Airport Cutting Edge Madness Or Visionary? On May 25, 1961, John F. Kennedy gave his famous Moon Shot Speech: "First, I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the earth." The rest is history and the U.S.A. is still revelling in its accomplishment. Recommended:  Climate Change Dodgy Politicians And Lobbyists Match Badly Google successfully uses the moon-shot strategy. The core of this strategy and its operations is simple: think of a major problem in the medium-long term, think of radical solutions and use ground-breaking knowledge. Reasoned attempts is about trial and error. We do not solve new problems with conventional solutions. Based on a growth strategy, maintaining Schiphol Airport in the Haarlemmermeer (municipality in the south of the Dutch province of Noord-Holland) is not an option in the longer term. Noise pollution, fuel tanks, congestion and so on lead to public uproar and riots. ‘It is the economy, stupid’ will not always apply. Slowing down is an expensive economic and political cost. The growth of the national aviation sector is only possible if a radically innovative solution is chosen. Aviation must be CO2 neutral and not cause any inconvenience. The water offers unprecedented opportunities for this. Recommended:  CO2 Absorption: Does A Dutch Professor Have The Answer? By placing an airport at sea, the flight paths can also largely take place over the sea and do not cause any inconvenience. Around the floating airport, enough biofuels can be produced by means of floating algae and seaweed plantations to fuel the Schiphol fleet. Recommended: Algae-Based Bioreactor Swallows  CO2  Faster Than Trees! How? Why float and not land reclamation? Research with underwater drones shows that ecology remains under floating platforms and sometimes even strengthened. In the case of land reclamation, the aquatic ecology disappears. With a floating airport you also retain the flexibility to move further in the future. After all, Schiphol Airport was once also a sea, so who knows what needs will exist in future? Finally, a floating airport adapts to rising sea levels and is therefore a climate-adaptive solution. Recommended:  Agriculture Under Water: Farming Deep At Sea In Italy Floating Schiphol can be connected to Amsterdam and Rotterdam with lightning fast connections with a travel time of less than 20 minutes. An example of such a connection based on vacuum tubes is the Hyperloop system. This is an initiative of Tesla boss Elon Musk, where TU Delft is working on. Recommended:  Sustainable Travel With Elon Musk’s Hyperloop The Boring Company Around Schiphol, other functions can be added such as artificial reefs, energy storage and logistics. This creates an iconic project in which the Netherlands can put itself on the map internationally as a water and innovation country. The Netherlands: Testbed For Floating Developments In the Netherlands we realized already floating projects, the most iconic example is the floating pavilion in Rotterdam. The floating pavilion is a pilot for building on water as a first step towards floating urbanization. What are dikes and polders? A polder (Dutch pronunciation: (ˈpɔldər) is a low-lying tract of land that forms an artificial hydrological entity, enclosed by embankments known as dikes. Flood plains separated from the sea or river by a dike. The urban development in unprotected areas outside the dikes is of major importance to cities like Rotterdam (largest harbour in Europe). With this project the municipality of Rotterdam took a pioneering role in climate adaption and delta technology. The floating pavilion demonstrates how cities can pro-actively adapt to the effects of climate change. In cooperation with InHolland University of Applied Sciences, Blue21 (global leading expert in floating architecture and urban development) developed a masterplan for redevelopment of the Rijnhaven harbor. It combines many floating building blocks that already exist. Like floating houses, floating wetlands, breakwaters and roads. The Rijnhaven is an ideal playground for floating. Floating trees Rijnhaven Harbour Rotterdam, Netherlands At the moment the redevelopment of the Rijnhaven is just a plan. But if we take climate change serious and care about the wellbeing of people and our planet, then we need to take action now. Plans like these are a stepping stone for floating urbanization and sustainable projects to save our oceans, the planet and the lives of people. New developments and initiatives that improve the quality of life can be commercially attractive at the same time! Floating Cutting Edge Madness Or Visionary Urbanization 2030 - 2050 What does it mean to be a visionary? A visionary is someone with a strong vision of the future. Since such visions aren't always accurate, a visionary's ideas may either work brilliantly or fail miserably. The word is also an adjective; thus, for example, we may speak of a visionary project, a visionary leader, a visionary painter, or a visionary company. Development of floating neighbourhoods and floating cities are a unique opportunity for the Netherlands to become a world leader in floating developments. As an early adapter we can create a competitive advantage over other countries and companies in the world. Dutch floating developments can become an export product by which we are going to write history and save people, our oceans and our planet at the same time. Although it is technically feasible to build large floating structures on the sea, it is commercially more attractive to expand the land to floating islands in densely populated areas.                                 Seasteading: Floating libertarian city coming soon to French Polynesia - TomoNews                                                       A Floating Airport Cutting Edge Madness Or Visionary? Once we have realized floating neighbourhoods in sheltered areas and near high value locations like large cities, it is our ambition to build the first environmentally friendly floating city on the sea. In 2050 the world will look completely different than today. By then, the first floating city in the ocean may have been built and could look like this:  We can save our oceans, we can save our planet and we can improve our quality of live, all at the same time. These floating developments are not science fiction, it is technically feasible and it is already happening. However, to meet the global challenges we are currently facing we don’t have a lot of time… 2050 is closer than we think. Floating city: Plan for 40,000 people to live on the high seas. A Florida-based firm wants to create a 'community on the sea' which would circle the globe every two years Floating developments could save the lives of people in low lying areas like coastal cities and island communities. It provides space for the growing world population. And at the same time, it can produce food and energy in a renewable and sustainable way. References: Jan van Kessel, Barbara, Vicky, David, Harriet, Bart, Karina and Rutger at Blue21 Richard Gray, How can we manage Earth’s land? BBC, 29 June 2017 Joe McCarthy, The Planet Will Face Major Water Shortages by 2050, UN Chief Warns. Global Citizen, 8 June 2017 NU / AT5, Nog ruim 42.000 woningen tekort in regio Amsterdam. 11 February 2019 Joe Quirk, The future of floating cities. World’s Fair Nano Future Festival, 29 March 2018 Before you go! Recommended:  Floating Cities: A Sustainable Concept For Future Communities Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about Floating Cities, Architecture or Future Buildings? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Schiphol Airport (Netherlands) at sea is slowly but surely coming into the picture again as a future perspective for aviation. The public debate about the future of Schiphol has completely erupted again. Local residents’ associations and D66 (political party) suggest that Schiphol at sea is a solution for stranded Schiphol. Schiphol Airport Cutting Edge As a vital hub in international aviation, Schiphol Airport has offered excellent accessibility to business people and tourists over the years, steadily benefiting the employment and economic growth of the Netherlands. However, it is predicted that the number of air travellers will continue to grow in the near future. In order to maintain Schiphol’s current ‘hub position’, the airport will have to increase its capacity to cater for the needs of travellers. In addition to improving service systems inside the airport, infrastructure surrounding the airport such as stations, parking spaces and roads must also be enlarged. For this to happen, space is needed, but where to find the space? How about space on water? What does Schiphol mean? There are several legends about the name 'Schiphol' Consequently, this place became known as: 'Schip Holl' or 'Scheepshol'. 'Schip' and 'Scheep' meaning 'ship', and 'hol' meaning 'grave' in this context. Another explanation is that the name comes from the word 'scheepshaal'. Schiphol's name is derived from a former fortification named Fort Schiphol, which was part of theStelling van Amsterdam defence works. Before 1852, theHaarlemmermeer polder in which the airport lies was a large lake with some shallow areas. There are multiple stories of how the place got its name. A Floating Airport: Radical Solutions Technically, socially and legally, it is possible. The integral social cost-benefit analysis will be beneficial.  Is Schiphol airport below sea level? -3 m                                                                  World's First Floating City Documentary                                                    A Floating Airport Cutting Edge Madness Or Visionary? On May 25, 1961, John F. Kennedy gave his famous Moon Shot Speech: "First, I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the earth." The rest is history and the U.S.A. is still revelling in its accomplishment. Recommended:  Climate Change Dodgy Politicians And Lobbyists Match Badly Google successfully uses the moon-shot strategy. The core of this strategy and its operations is simple: think of a major problem in the medium-long term, think of radical solutions and use ground-breaking knowledge. Reasoned attempts is about trial and error. We do not solve new problems with conventional solutions. Based on a growth strategy, maintaining Schiphol Airport in the Haarlemmermeer (municipality in the south of the Dutch province of Noord-Holland) is not an option in the longer term. Noise pollution, fuel tanks, congestion and so on lead to public uproar and riots. ‘It is the economy, stupid’ will not always apply. Slowing down is an expensive economic and political cost. The growth of the national aviation sector is only possible if a radically innovative solution is chosen. Aviation must be CO2 neutral and not cause any inconvenience. The water offers unprecedented opportunities for this. Recommended:  CO2 Absorption: Does A Dutch Professor Have The Answer? By placing an airport at sea, the flight paths can also largely take place over the sea and do not cause any inconvenience. Around the floating airport, enough biofuels can be produced by means of floating algae and seaweed plantations to fuel the Schiphol fleet. Recommended: Algae-Based Bioreactor Swallows  CO2  Faster Than Trees! How? Why float and not land reclamation? Research with underwater drones shows that ecology remains under floating platforms and sometimes even strengthened. In the case of land reclamation, the aquatic ecology disappears. With a floating airport you also retain the flexibility to move further in the future. After all, Schiphol Airport was once also a sea, so who knows what needs will exist in future? Finally, a floating airport adapts to rising sea levels and is therefore a climate-adaptive solution. Recommended:  Agriculture Under Water: Farming Deep At Sea In Italy Floating Schiphol can be connected to Amsterdam and Rotterdam with lightning fast connections with a travel time of less than 20 minutes. An example of such a connection based on vacuum tubes is the Hyperloop system. This is an initiative of Tesla boss Elon Musk, where TU Delft is working on. Recommended:  Sustainable Travel With Elon Musk’s Hyperloop The Boring Company Around Schiphol, other functions can be added such as artificial reefs, energy storage and logistics. This creates an iconic project in which the Netherlands can put itself on the map internationally as a water and innovation country. The Netherlands: Testbed For Floating Developments In the Netherlands we realized already floating projects, the most iconic example is the floating pavilion in Rotterdam. The floating pavilion is a pilot for building on water as a first step towards floating urbanization. What are dikes and polders? A polder (Dutch pronunciation: (ˈpɔldər) is a low-lying tract of land that forms an artificial hydrological entity, enclosed by embankments known as dikes. Flood plains separated from the sea or river by a dike. The urban development in unprotected areas outside the dikes is of major importance to cities like Rotterdam (largest harbour in Europe). With this project the municipality of Rotterdam took a pioneering role in climate adaption and delta technology. The floating pavilion demonstrates how cities can pro-actively adapt to the effects of climate change. In cooperation with InHolland University of Applied Sciences, Blue21 (global leading expert in floating architecture and urban development) developed a masterplan for redevelopment of the Rijnhaven harbor. It combines many floating building blocks that already exist. Like floating houses, floating wetlands, breakwaters and roads. The Rijnhaven is an ideal playground for floating. Floating trees Rijnhaven Harbour Rotterdam, Netherlands At the moment the redevelopment of the Rijnhaven is just a plan. But if we take climate change serious and care about the wellbeing of people and our planet, then we need to take action now. Plans like these are a stepping stone for floating urbanization and sustainable projects to save our oceans, the planet and the lives of people. New developments and initiatives that improve the quality of life can be commercially attractive at the same time! Floating Cutting Edge Madness Or Visionary Urbanization 2030 - 2050 What does it mean to be a visionary? A visionary is someone with a strong vision of the future. Since such visions aren't always accurate, a visionary's ideas may either work brilliantly or fail miserably. The word is also an adjective; thus, for example, we may speak of a visionary project, a visionary leader, a visionary painter, or a visionary company. Development of floating neighbourhoods and floating cities are a unique opportunity for the Netherlands to become a world leader in floating developments. As an early adapter we can create a competitive advantage over other countries and companies in the world. Dutch floating developments can become an export product by which we are going to write history and save people, our oceans and our planet at the same time. Although it is technically feasible to build large floating structures on the sea, it is commercially more attractive to expand the land to floating islands in densely populated areas.                                 Seasteading: Floating libertarian city coming soon to French Polynesia - TomoNews                                                       A Floating Airport Cutting Edge Madness Or Visionary? Once we have realized floating neighbourhoods in sheltered areas and near high value locations like large cities, it is our ambition to build the first environmentally friendly floating city on the sea. In 2050 the world will look completely different than today. By then, the first floating city in the ocean may have been built and could look like this:  We can save our oceans, we can save our planet and we can improve our quality of live, all at the same time. These floating developments are not science fiction, it is technically feasible and it is already happening. However, to meet the global challenges we are currently facing we don’t have a lot of time… 2050 is closer than we think. Floating city: Plan for 40,000 people to live on the high seas. A Florida-based firm wants to create a 'community on the sea' which would circle the globe every two years Floating developments could save the lives of people in low lying areas like coastal cities and island communities. It provides space for the growing world population. And at the same time, it can produce food and energy in a renewable and sustainable way. References: Jan van Kessel, Barbara, Vicky, David, Harriet, Bart, Karina and Rutger at Blue21 Richard Gray, How can we manage Earth’s land? BBC, 29 June 2017 Joe McCarthy, The Planet Will Face Major Water Shortages by 2050, UN Chief Warns. Global Citizen, 8 June 2017 NU / AT5, Nog ruim 42.000 woningen tekort in regio Amsterdam. 11 February 2019 Joe Quirk, The future of floating cities. World’s Fair Nano Future Festival, 29 March 2018 Before you go! Recommended:  Floating Cities: A Sustainable Concept For Future Communities Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about Floating Cities, Architecture or Future Buildings? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
A Floating Airport Cutting Edge Madness Or Visionary?
A Floating Airport Cutting Edge Madness Or Visionary?
Smart Communities: Eco-Living Through Technology
Meet ReGen Villages. A concept for a smart community, based on eco-friendly living, as ideated by a Danish architectural firm. It is meant to actively combat  climate change and wasteful emissions, while living in a greener and more sustainable manner - through the philosophy of going ‘back to the basics’. Smart Communities: What Are Regen Villages? After all, not too long ago, the world was not as connected as it is today. In earlier times, trade was limited to the exchanging of goods between villagers ('I give you fresh meat, if you share your berries with me') or, at the most, between bordering villages. Just the thought of having tropical fruits such as pineapple and bananas available to you in Western Europe in the dead of winter, would be nothing short of laughable in medieval times. What does eco living mean? Eco-friendly literally means earth-friendly or not harmful to the environment (see References 1). This term most commonly refers to products that contribute to green living or practices that help conserve resources like water and energy. Eco-friendly products also prevent contributions to air, water and land pollution. Community were built to be self-reliant, rather than reliant on external factors, excessive power demands, and complicated (inter)national trade relations. If something could not be produced or generated, it was simply not available. In essence, this sums up what ReGen Villages are hoping to achieve. Recommended:  Regenerative Agriculture: Basics For Safe Food (Part 1 of 3) Essentially, ReGen villages aim to be a micro-city, which offer residents the luxury of living in a 'high-tech eco village'. So, back to basics, in a high-tech manner! To reach this unique goal, artificial intelligence is integrated with self-providing systems. As such, this entire community is self-reliant and minimises its waste and energy use. Even if this means converting trash into sources of energy to fuel other projects in the village. And no, this project is not the ambitious dream of a dreamer. Plans for implementing it are in an advanced stage, with the first pilot community planned to be built in the Almere area in the Netherlands at the end of this year. Plans for similar ReGen Villages in Northern Europe, the USA, and even in Asia are well underway as well. So if you are looking to play your part in making the world a better place and always wanted to live in a small-scale, self-sufficient village, this might just be your chance. What is the difference between eco friendly and environmentally friendly? Eco-friendly isn't quite so broad. It means that something doesn't harm the planet. Compared to 'green” and eco-friendly',sustainability has much higher standards. Sustainability includes eco-friendly activities and green products, but green doesn't necessarily mean sustainable. Eco-Living Through Technology: ReGen Villages The Netherlands The Netherlands is set to have the World’s First Self-Sustaining Eco Village near Amsterdam. The world’s first self-sustaining eco village near Amsterdam is coming in 2020: truly the height of Dutch innovation. The village has been designed and will be built by ReGenVillages.  ReGenVillages, how does this work exactly? This 60-acre village in Almere does what it says on the tin – it’s going to be self-sustaining. This means that roads will only be the width of a bike or pedestrian path and no houses will have a driveway, so no cars allowed! The surrounding landscape will be filled with fruit and vegetable patches and greenhouses, complete with collected rainwater, to feed the neighbouring residents. Rainwater will also be filtered through these 194 homes and then it can be used as drinking water. Any food waste that the residents have will be used to feed fish and other animals, which are used for farming. You’ll even be able to volunteer at the community centre and in return, you would get Home Association fee discounts. And if you want to go into Amsterdam and the center of Almere, self-driving electric buses and cars, located on the outskirts of this village will take you there. Clever, huh? The construction company ReGen Villages, wanted to be able to tackle the issues of our time – population growth, housing shortages and environmental and sustainability issues. This is definitely one way of doing it! ReGenVillages: How much will they cost? Prices will range quite considerably within this village. On the lower end of the scale, the smaller houses will go for around €200,000, whereas a much larger place will go for around €850,000. Once you’ve bought a house there, you are expected to maintain the sustainability by helping out. Like I said earlier, as a reward you’d get HOA free discounts, which is possible by logging the number of hours worked by using blockchain technology. When is this new Regen Village coming to Almere? While 203 homes were approved by Almere in July 2018, ReGen filed for more land for more homes this year. If approved, they could be breaking ground in 2020! Click here for more information. What are your thoughts on this new self-sustaining eco village near Amsterdam? Let us know in the comments! {youtube}                                                       Smart Communities: Eco-Living Through Technology                                                                                  Regen Villages   Eco-Living Through Technology: Agricultural Communes The inventors drew inspiration from the idea of small agriculture communes, that produce all the food that they need. And such initiatives could prove to be very valuable and much needed: one of the greatest threats to our earth is the excessive agriculture, serving to feed billions and billions of people. Resulting in deforestation, scarcity of water, higher CO2 emissions and excessive consumption water and fertiliser. Hence, a huge threat to the wellbeing of our future generations. How can I be eco friendly?  Ten Easy Ways To Live A More Eco-Friendly Lifestyle Eat less meat Use paper less and recycle more Use canvas bags instead of plastic Start a compost pile or bin Purchase the right light bulb Choose cloth over paper Cut down on energy in your home Borrow instead of buying By combining existing techniques, ReGen Villages will help the environment recover instead of actively destroying it. The small community hosts various buildings that are dedicated to the cultivation of certain vegetables and crops, all grown in a favourable climate through the use of greenhouses. This leads to a quiet and rustic, yet cohesive neighbourhood that feeds its diverse population with organic food, that meets the equally diverse nutritional needs. Eco-Living: Off Grid Sustainable Neighbourhoods The villages will be positively off-grid, cleverly playing in to the ever increasing need of a place to unwind and settle down, in this increasingly noisier and busier time. They are comprised of power positive homes alone, while completely running on renewable energy, employing smart and sustainable water management, and using advanced waste-to-resource systems. All of these systems will continuously be subject to ongoing research to further improve and optimise its efficiency.   For these systems to work smoothly, artificial intelligence and the Internet of Things play an important role. Such as for the infrastructure of the community, eventually leading to more energy, water and organic food being produced per household than that it actually uses. The surplus can be exchanged for reduced mortgage payments.   Recommended:  Regenerative Farming: Agro-Ecology In Practice (Part 2 of 3) Eco Living: Why Should You Join The Waiting List? ReGen is just one of the many eco-village concepts that are popping up left, right and center. Although, as most of these projects are still in the stage of being built, you might not be able to move into one of these communities instantly. But if you are excited and passionate about the concept, you are welcome to join the waiting list for any of the planned communities in your desired country. Why, you ask? Well, for one, living in such a micro-city will ensure that the life of your family does not negatively impact the planet. Such eco villages combine smart living and the technology of smart cities with a higher quality of life and more of that unique community-feel. At the same time, they offer an open platform for more innovation initiatives, especially when it comes to solutions for renewable energy, smart agriculture, and water and waste management. And, even more importantly, a platform that can easily be duplicated.   All of these are arguments that you could use to convince your spouse or significant other to pack your bags, put the house on sale, and secure your spot in a true eco-community. Although they might be more tempted by the stunning house and lack of noisy neighbours that come with the deal. Before you go! Recommended:  Regenerative Agriculture: Its Full Potential (Part 3 of 3) Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Meet ReGen Villages. A concept for a smart community, based on eco-friendly living, as ideated by a Danish architectural firm. It is meant to actively combat  climate change and wasteful emissions, while living in a greener and more sustainable manner - through the philosophy of going ‘back to the basics’. Smart Communities: What Are Regen Villages? After all, not too long ago, the world was not as connected as it is today. In earlier times, trade was limited to the exchanging of goods between villagers ('I give you fresh meat, if you share your berries with me') or, at the most, between bordering villages. Just the thought of having tropical fruits such as pineapple and bananas available to you in Western Europe in the dead of winter, would be nothing short of laughable in medieval times. What does eco living mean? Eco-friendly literally means earth-friendly or not harmful to the environment (see References 1). This term most commonly refers to products that contribute to green living or practices that help conserve resources like water and energy. Eco-friendly products also prevent contributions to air, water and land pollution. Community were built to be self-reliant, rather than reliant on external factors, excessive power demands, and complicated (inter)national trade relations. If something could not be produced or generated, it was simply not available. In essence, this sums up what ReGen Villages are hoping to achieve. Recommended:  Regenerative Agriculture: Basics For Safe Food (Part 1 of 3) Essentially, ReGen villages aim to be a micro-city, which offer residents the luxury of living in a 'high-tech eco village'. So, back to basics, in a high-tech manner! To reach this unique goal, artificial intelligence is integrated with self-providing systems. As such, this entire community is self-reliant and minimises its waste and energy use. Even if this means converting trash into sources of energy to fuel other projects in the village. And no, this project is not the ambitious dream of a dreamer. Plans for implementing it are in an advanced stage, with the first pilot community planned to be built in the Almere area in the Netherlands at the end of this year. Plans for similar ReGen Villages in Northern Europe, the USA, and even in Asia are well underway as well. So if you are looking to play your part in making the world a better place and always wanted to live in a small-scale, self-sufficient village, this might just be your chance. What is the difference between eco friendly and environmentally friendly? Eco-friendly isn't quite so broad. It means that something doesn't harm the planet. Compared to 'green” and eco-friendly',sustainability has much higher standards. Sustainability includes eco-friendly activities and green products, but green doesn't necessarily mean sustainable. Eco-Living Through Technology: ReGen Villages The Netherlands The Netherlands is set to have the World’s First Self-Sustaining Eco Village near Amsterdam. The world’s first self-sustaining eco village near Amsterdam is coming in 2020: truly the height of Dutch innovation. The village has been designed and will be built by ReGenVillages.  ReGenVillages, how does this work exactly? This 60-acre village in Almere does what it says on the tin – it’s going to be self-sustaining. This means that roads will only be the width of a bike or pedestrian path and no houses will have a driveway, so no cars allowed! The surrounding landscape will be filled with fruit and vegetable patches and greenhouses, complete with collected rainwater, to feed the neighbouring residents. Rainwater will also be filtered through these 194 homes and then it can be used as drinking water. Any food waste that the residents have will be used to feed fish and other animals, which are used for farming. You’ll even be able to volunteer at the community centre and in return, you would get Home Association fee discounts. And if you want to go into Amsterdam and the center of Almere, self-driving electric buses and cars, located on the outskirts of this village will take you there. Clever, huh? The construction company ReGen Villages, wanted to be able to tackle the issues of our time – population growth, housing shortages and environmental and sustainability issues. This is definitely one way of doing it! ReGenVillages: How much will they cost? Prices will range quite considerably within this village. On the lower end of the scale, the smaller houses will go for around €200,000, whereas a much larger place will go for around €850,000. Once you’ve bought a house there, you are expected to maintain the sustainability by helping out. Like I said earlier, as a reward you’d get HOA free discounts, which is possible by logging the number of hours worked by using blockchain technology. When is this new Regen Village coming to Almere? While 203 homes were approved by Almere in July 2018, ReGen filed for more land for more homes this year. If approved, they could be breaking ground in 2020! Click here for more information. What are your thoughts on this new self-sustaining eco village near Amsterdam? Let us know in the comments! {youtube}                                                       Smart Communities: Eco-Living Through Technology                                                                                  Regen Villages   Eco-Living Through Technology: Agricultural Communes The inventors drew inspiration from the idea of small agriculture communes, that produce all the food that they need. And such initiatives could prove to be very valuable and much needed: one of the greatest threats to our earth is the excessive agriculture, serving to feed billions and billions of people. Resulting in deforestation, scarcity of water, higher CO2 emissions and excessive consumption water and fertiliser. Hence, a huge threat to the wellbeing of our future generations. How can I be eco friendly?  Ten Easy Ways To Live A More Eco-Friendly Lifestyle Eat less meat Use paper less and recycle more Use canvas bags instead of plastic Start a compost pile or bin Purchase the right light bulb Choose cloth over paper Cut down on energy in your home Borrow instead of buying By combining existing techniques, ReGen Villages will help the environment recover instead of actively destroying it. The small community hosts various buildings that are dedicated to the cultivation of certain vegetables and crops, all grown in a favourable climate through the use of greenhouses. This leads to a quiet and rustic, yet cohesive neighbourhood that feeds its diverse population with organic food, that meets the equally diverse nutritional needs. Eco-Living: Off Grid Sustainable Neighbourhoods The villages will be positively off-grid, cleverly playing in to the ever increasing need of a place to unwind and settle down, in this increasingly noisier and busier time. They are comprised of power positive homes alone, while completely running on renewable energy, employing smart and sustainable water management, and using advanced waste-to-resource systems. All of these systems will continuously be subject to ongoing research to further improve and optimise its efficiency.   For these systems to work smoothly, artificial intelligence and the Internet of Things play an important role. Such as for the infrastructure of the community, eventually leading to more energy, water and organic food being produced per household than that it actually uses. The surplus can be exchanged for reduced mortgage payments.   Recommended:  Regenerative Farming: Agro-Ecology In Practice (Part 2 of 3) Eco Living: Why Should You Join The Waiting List? ReGen is just one of the many eco-village concepts that are popping up left, right and center. Although, as most of these projects are still in the stage of being built, you might not be able to move into one of these communities instantly. But if you are excited and passionate about the concept, you are welcome to join the waiting list for any of the planned communities in your desired country. Why, you ask? Well, for one, living in such a micro-city will ensure that the life of your family does not negatively impact the planet. Such eco villages combine smart living and the technology of smart cities with a higher quality of life and more of that unique community-feel. At the same time, they offer an open platform for more innovation initiatives, especially when it comes to solutions for renewable energy, smart agriculture, and water and waste management. And, even more importantly, a platform that can easily be duplicated.   All of these are arguments that you could use to convince your spouse or significant other to pack your bags, put the house on sale, and secure your spot in a true eco-community. Although they might be more tempted by the stunning house and lack of noisy neighbours that come with the deal. Before you go! Recommended:  Regenerative Agriculture: Its Full Potential (Part 3 of 3) Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Smart Communities: Eco-Living Through Technology
Smart Communities: Eco-Living Through Technology
Greenest Buildings In The World: Sustainable Highlights
The battle against global warming must be fought on all fronts. Not only should we be looking at industry action and a radical shift in means of transportation, we also ought to take a good hard look at the way we go about our daily business. At the way our cities are currently organised to not only become ‘smarter’, but also more sustainable.   Under the growing pressure of urbanisation and sharply rising property prices, cities have to find ways of allowing more people to comfortably live in the same area - while decreasing their carbon footprint. A challenge that some are struggling with, while others are tackling it heads-on. One new trend is that of urban gardens and vertical farms, more and more of which are sprouting up in cities worldwide. Architects are quick to jump on this trend as well, and are coming up with increasingly ingenious solutions to make their buildings greener. At times, it looks as if they are locked in a fierce competition to come up with the most striking, the most sustainable, and the most eye-catching design that really makes a green statement.   Ready to get inspired? Then take a look at some of the most publicised or remarkable examples. The Crystal, London, United Kingdom Often hailed as ‘one of the greenest buildings ever built by mankind’, The Crystal is a stunning landmark that cleverly uses natural daylight to significantly cut back on lighting costs. The smart lighting system in place, powered by solar panels, further eliminates unnecessary lighting; integrating LED and fluorescent lights when needed. Serving as the headquarters of telecom-giant Siemens, The Crystal also recycles both rainwater and sewage to generate fresh drinking water.   Pixel Building, Melbourne, Australia The Pixel Building was the first building ever to obtain a perfect Green Star score, setting the benchmark for sustainable architecture in Australia. Not only is it completely carbon-free, in that the carbon generated by the building’s operations are offset by its generation of renewable energy. It is also proud of its carbon-neutral status, having offset the carbon in materials that were used to construct the building. The Change Initiative, Shaikh Zayed Road, Dubai As one of the world’s leading nations in mind-bending architecture and design, Dubai could not stay behind. After having built some of the world’s tallest skyscrapers, The Change Initiative was the next prestige project - a commercial building that took over the Pixel Building’s status as most sustainable building in the world. Not only does it house various shops and restaurants promoting green living, it also frequently hosts exhibitions and events highlighting new sustainable innovations. Bullitt Center, Seattle, USA Upon its presentation, the Bullitt Center was introduced as a building with an ideal lifespan of 250 years. This really set the mark for making buildings part of a more ‘natural’ ecosystem, having an expiration date, so to speak. This brainchild of Bullitt Foundation president Denis Hayes is carbon and energy neutral, hosts a self-sufficient water and sewage processing system, and generates its energy using photovoltaic solar panels.   {youtube}                                                    Greenest Buildings In The World: Fighting Global Warming                                                  Coolest Most Environmentally Friendly Buildings in The World ACROS Fukuoka Foundation Building, Fukuoka, Japan Japan’s seventh largest city Fukuoka has spared little expense in promoting the ACROS Fukuoka Foundation Building as one of its main attractions. It is a poster child of the architectural concept of eco-architecture, blending in local greenery with sharp building designs. The heart of this building is made up of a massive atrium, flooding the insides with natural light. The water drainage system on the roof is also remarkable: it flows down like a mountain, watering the vegetation on its way down in a perfectly mimicked natural process. Phipps’ Center For Sustainable Landscapes, Pittsburgh, USA For a building carrying this name, you would already expect something quite spectacular. Thankfully, the Phipps’ Center For Sustainable Landscapes does not disappoint. From its beautiful rooftop garden, where visitors can take a stroll over the green roof, to its plant-filled hallways and staircases. Extra pluses include its water recycling system and use of renewable energy sources like wind, solar and geothermal for its operations. Wat Pa Maha Chedi Kaew, Sisaket, Thailand This modern Buddhist temple, located in the beautiful town of Khun Han, Sisaket, also goes by the name of The Million Bottle Temple. Refreshingly, this states exactly what it is made out of: a million empty beer bottles. Befittingly green Heineken bottles are mixed with the brown bottles of local beer brand Chang to create a stunning whole. Construction already started back in 1984, as in initiative of Buddhist monks, with the temple and its surrounding comfort rooms and crematorium now acting as a literal beacon of green innovation. Bahrain World Trade Center, Manama, Bahrain Standing tall at 50 floors, this twin tower complex celebrated its tenth birthday last year. As of now, the Bahrain World Trade Center, or BWTC, is still the only skyscraper in the world to have incorporated wind turbines as part of its blueprint. In an exceptional design feat, the two towers are interconnected using imposing sky bridges, which also act as the beams to which 225 kW wind turbines are attached. It looks good - and does well. Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Yishun Central, Singapore You will not be surprised to find out that one of the greenest hospitals in the world can be found in the tiny Asian island nation of Singapore, a hotspot for modern architecture. In the Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, an overwhelmingly green environment has been created to provide a healing environment for its patients - but also to take care of our planet’s health, through the use of a solar water heating system and renewable energy sources. Taipei Public Library, Beitou branch, Taiwan Lingering on the topic of public buildings in tiny Asian nations, the Taipei Public Library was largely designed around its huge windows that can be opened wide - allowing both light and fresh air to come in, reducing the need for artificial light and fans or airconditioning systems. Its roof catches rainwater, which is used to flush the toilets, and renewable energy sources are the norm. Toronto Tree Tower, Toronto, Canada A must-mention on any self-respecting list of green buildings, the Toronto Tree Tower is an ambitious project that proposes to build a residential block out of timber, complete with staggering walls overgrown with plants and trees rooting on large balconies. Watch this space. Yin & Yang House, Kassel, Germany One would not quickly associate Yin & Yang retreats with the German town on Kassel, although one only has to look at it to be convinced of its benefits. The house boasts gorgeous, relaxing gardens on its interlocking roof, while being fully self-sufficient. Architect Chris Precht has described his vision as “ ecological materials we want to touch. Integrated gardens we can smell and eat. And buildings we can hear because bees and birds nest in them .” Park Royal Hotel Pickering, Singapore High rise gardens, reflecting pools, waterfalls and green walls. Need we say more? Recommended:  Sustainable Green Buildings, Innovative Architects: Globally ‘Off The Grid Office’, location undecided Another ambitious idea that has not yet been constructed but certainly deserves a mention. The ‘Off The Grid Office’ tries to mimic nature in its design and construction, in an attempt to bring us closer to nature: “ any kind of human environment should be integrated in the existing natural environment, because it already offers perks that we normally try to reproduce through artificial materials ,” according to architect Stefan Mantu. Shilda Winery, Kakheti, Georgia In the remote location of Kakheti, Georgia, one will have to look hard to find the Shilda Winery. The building is quite literally embedded in the surrounding vineyards and immerses itself in its natural environment. It effectively uses the thermal mass of the soil to optimise cooling inside the building - a must-have for any good winery - and has been designed to face north and therefore avoid direct solar gain. Now we really want to go out and visit all of those impressive buildings in person. Recommended:  Sustainable Circular Architecture, The Svart Hotel: Norway Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day.
The battle against global warming must be fought on all fronts. Not only should we be looking at industry action and a radical shift in means of transportation, we also ought to take a good hard look at the way we go about our daily business. At the way our cities are currently organised to not only become ‘smarter’, but also more sustainable.   Under the growing pressure of urbanisation and sharply rising property prices, cities have to find ways of allowing more people to comfortably live in the same area - while decreasing their carbon footprint. A challenge that some are struggling with, while others are tackling it heads-on. One new trend is that of urban gardens and vertical farms, more and more of which are sprouting up in cities worldwide. Architects are quick to jump on this trend as well, and are coming up with increasingly ingenious solutions to make their buildings greener. At times, it looks as if they are locked in a fierce competition to come up with the most striking, the most sustainable, and the most eye-catching design that really makes a green statement.   Ready to get inspired? Then take a look at some of the most publicised or remarkable examples. The Crystal, London, United Kingdom Often hailed as ‘one of the greenest buildings ever built by mankind’, The Crystal is a stunning landmark that cleverly uses natural daylight to significantly cut back on lighting costs. The smart lighting system in place, powered by solar panels, further eliminates unnecessary lighting; integrating LED and fluorescent lights when needed. Serving as the headquarters of telecom-giant Siemens, The Crystal also recycles both rainwater and sewage to generate fresh drinking water.   Pixel Building, Melbourne, Australia The Pixel Building was the first building ever to obtain a perfect Green Star score, setting the benchmark for sustainable architecture in Australia. Not only is it completely carbon-free, in that the carbon generated by the building’s operations are offset by its generation of renewable energy. It is also proud of its carbon-neutral status, having offset the carbon in materials that were used to construct the building. The Change Initiative, Shaikh Zayed Road, Dubai As one of the world’s leading nations in mind-bending architecture and design, Dubai could not stay behind. After having built some of the world’s tallest skyscrapers, The Change Initiative was the next prestige project - a commercial building that took over the Pixel Building’s status as most sustainable building in the world. Not only does it house various shops and restaurants promoting green living, it also frequently hosts exhibitions and events highlighting new sustainable innovations. Bullitt Center, Seattle, USA Upon its presentation, the Bullitt Center was introduced as a building with an ideal lifespan of 250 years. This really set the mark for making buildings part of a more ‘natural’ ecosystem, having an expiration date, so to speak. This brainchild of Bullitt Foundation president Denis Hayes is carbon and energy neutral, hosts a self-sufficient water and sewage processing system, and generates its energy using photovoltaic solar panels.   {youtube}                                                    Greenest Buildings In The World: Fighting Global Warming                                                  Coolest Most Environmentally Friendly Buildings in The World ACROS Fukuoka Foundation Building, Fukuoka, Japan Japan’s seventh largest city Fukuoka has spared little expense in promoting the ACROS Fukuoka Foundation Building as one of its main attractions. It is a poster child of the architectural concept of eco-architecture, blending in local greenery with sharp building designs. The heart of this building is made up of a massive atrium, flooding the insides with natural light. The water drainage system on the roof is also remarkable: it flows down like a mountain, watering the vegetation on its way down in a perfectly mimicked natural process. Phipps’ Center For Sustainable Landscapes, Pittsburgh, USA For a building carrying this name, you would already expect something quite spectacular. Thankfully, the Phipps’ Center For Sustainable Landscapes does not disappoint. From its beautiful rooftop garden, where visitors can take a stroll over the green roof, to its plant-filled hallways and staircases. Extra pluses include its water recycling system and use of renewable energy sources like wind, solar and geothermal for its operations. Wat Pa Maha Chedi Kaew, Sisaket, Thailand This modern Buddhist temple, located in the beautiful town of Khun Han, Sisaket, also goes by the name of The Million Bottle Temple. Refreshingly, this states exactly what it is made out of: a million empty beer bottles. Befittingly green Heineken bottles are mixed with the brown bottles of local beer brand Chang to create a stunning whole. Construction already started back in 1984, as in initiative of Buddhist monks, with the temple and its surrounding comfort rooms and crematorium now acting as a literal beacon of green innovation. Bahrain World Trade Center, Manama, Bahrain Standing tall at 50 floors, this twin tower complex celebrated its tenth birthday last year. As of now, the Bahrain World Trade Center, or BWTC, is still the only skyscraper in the world to have incorporated wind turbines as part of its blueprint. In an exceptional design feat, the two towers are interconnected using imposing sky bridges, which also act as the beams to which 225 kW wind turbines are attached. It looks good - and does well. Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Yishun Central, Singapore You will not be surprised to find out that one of the greenest hospitals in the world can be found in the tiny Asian island nation of Singapore, a hotspot for modern architecture. In the Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, an overwhelmingly green environment has been created to provide a healing environment for its patients - but also to take care of our planet’s health, through the use of a solar water heating system and renewable energy sources. Taipei Public Library, Beitou branch, Taiwan Lingering on the topic of public buildings in tiny Asian nations, the Taipei Public Library was largely designed around its huge windows that can be opened wide - allowing both light and fresh air to come in, reducing the need for artificial light and fans or airconditioning systems. Its roof catches rainwater, which is used to flush the toilets, and renewable energy sources are the norm. Toronto Tree Tower, Toronto, Canada A must-mention on any self-respecting list of green buildings, the Toronto Tree Tower is an ambitious project that proposes to build a residential block out of timber, complete with staggering walls overgrown with plants and trees rooting on large balconies. Watch this space. Yin & Yang House, Kassel, Germany One would not quickly associate Yin & Yang retreats with the German town on Kassel, although one only has to look at it to be convinced of its benefits. The house boasts gorgeous, relaxing gardens on its interlocking roof, while being fully self-sufficient. Architect Chris Precht has described his vision as “ ecological materials we want to touch. Integrated gardens we can smell and eat. And buildings we can hear because bees and birds nest in them .” Park Royal Hotel Pickering, Singapore High rise gardens, reflecting pools, waterfalls and green walls. Need we say more? Recommended:  Sustainable Green Buildings, Innovative Architects: Globally ‘Off The Grid Office’, location undecided Another ambitious idea that has not yet been constructed but certainly deserves a mention. The ‘Off The Grid Office’ tries to mimic nature in its design and construction, in an attempt to bring us closer to nature: “ any kind of human environment should be integrated in the existing natural environment, because it already offers perks that we normally try to reproduce through artificial materials ,” according to architect Stefan Mantu. Shilda Winery, Kakheti, Georgia In the remote location of Kakheti, Georgia, one will have to look hard to find the Shilda Winery. The building is quite literally embedded in the surrounding vineyards and immerses itself in its natural environment. It effectively uses the thermal mass of the soil to optimise cooling inside the building - a must-have for any good winery - and has been designed to face north and therefore avoid direct solar gain. Now we really want to go out and visit all of those impressive buildings in person. Recommended:  Sustainable Circular Architecture, The Svart Hotel: Norway Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day.
Greenest Buildings In The World: Sustainable Highlights
Greenest Buildings In The World: Sustainable Highlights
Community

A community is you and me. A network of social, economic, ecological and many other relationships. We all work together and live in urban, suburban and rural areas. Social sustainability is becoming increasingly important on our small planet. We define: support, quality of life, development, adaptation, rights and labour.

We belong to a group of individuals - our society - in which we belong geographically. Certain environmental issues play an important role in our society. Here, sustainable solutions are sought, developed and implemented. This may differ from societies in other countries, but because of our global environmental issues and dependence, we must learn to work more together so that we can all benefit from sharing sustainable knowledge to tackle, for example, climate change.

Green architecture is important. Building with local materials that can be recycled and reused brings us a big step forward to have less impact on the environment. With green architecture we can build smart cities where resources can be used more efficiently and information can be shared, thus improving our society, your community.

Lifestyle is the way we live, the dynamics of personality. Fashion defines our self and together with food it is getting - at present - an even more important role in our society. It's not just about taste, but especially about the burden that the fashion industry, agriculture and the meat industry have on our resources, especially water.

If there was an urge to come up with a sustainable way of living solutions and share these topics globally it’s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about tiny houses, your experiences and expectations for the future at home and globally. 

Global Sustainability X-change, that’s what you can do together with WhatsOrb. What's in for me?

 

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