Community

About: <p>A community is you and me. A network of social, economic, ecological and many other relationships. We all work together and live in urban, suburban and rural areas. Social sustainability is becoming increasingly important on our small planet. We define: support, quality of life, development, adaptation, rights and labour.</p> <p>We belong to a group of individuals - <a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/society">our society</a> - in which we belong geographically. Certain environmental issues play an important role in our society. Here, sustainable solutions are sought, developed and implemented. This may differ from societies in other countries, but because of our global environmental issues and&nbsp;<span lang="en" tabindex="0">dependence</span>, we must learn to work more together so that we can all benefit from sharing sustainable knowledge to tackle, for example, climate change.</p> <p><a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/green-architecture">Green architecture</a> is important. Building with local materials that can be recycled and reused brings us a big step forward to have less impact on the environment. With green architecture we can build <a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/smart-cities">smart cities</a> where resources can be used more efficiently and information can be shared, thus improving our society, your community.</p> <p><a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/lifestyle">Lifestyle</a> is the way we live, the dynamics of personality. Fashion defines our self and together with food it is getting - at present - an even more important role in our society. It's not just about taste, but especially about the burden that the fashion industry, agriculture and the meat industry have on our resources, especially water.</p> <p>If there was an urge to come up with a sustainable way of living solutions and share these topics globally it&rsquo;s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about tiny houses, your experiences and expectations for the future at home and globally.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Global Sustainability X-change, that&rsquo;s what you can do together with WhatsOrb.&nbsp;<a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/newsletter/your-shared-sustainable-ideas-make-our-earth-a-better-place">What's in for me?</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
Close Welcome writers, influencers and dreamers, make the world a greener place
Register here
Forgot password
Forgot password
or
or

Close
Close Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations
Close Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations
Close Reset password
your profile is 33% complete:
33%
Update profile Close
Close WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-Change

For writers, influencers and dreamers who want to make the world a greener place.

WhatsOrb reaches monthly about 28.000 thousand visitors who want - like you - to make the world a greener place. Share your expertise and all can benefit.

Become an influencer and write and share sustainable news and innovations globally
Are you a writer or do you have ideas about sustainability which you want to share? Register and share your green knowledge and news. WhatsOrb offers you global exposure for your article.

If your article meets certain standards, you receive promotional gains like Facebook promotions and Google Ads advertising.

MenuMenu

Community categorybanner Green Architecture

Our Food With Rising Sea Levels. Never Give Up
The world population keeps growing, the climate changing, and sea-levels rising. Make floating housing for coastal communities, and the future looks already much brighter. Our Food: What About Building Shelter, Generating Energy, And Producing Clean Water. In the Philippines, the architecture firm Dada set their ideas on paper for waterfront areas. But there are more companies like Seasteading, Architecture studio Goldsmith, Peter, Minke van Wingerden of Beladon, a company that specializes in waterborne architecture in the Netherlands and. Researchers at Nottingham University. The Jellyfish Barge project and the Italian Studiomobile. Worldwide there are many coastal communities. Once started for the immense amount of resources, trade, and the refreshing water can provide. Of course, there was always a fragile balance between what the climate could cause, like storms and high seas, and the resistance people could come up with to endure these stressful events.  Recommended:  Floating Cities: A Sustainable Concept For Future Communities Rising Sea Levels. Never Give Up: The Coronavirus The coronavirus pandemic has given fringe libertarian groups around the world renewed vigor to pursue their dreams of building autonomous new societies. Government-enforced lockdowns and increased digital surveillance have added fuel to their suspicions of state control. In contrast, the suspension of day-to-day norms and the specter of an economic meltdown have amplified their calls to rethink society. When you’re not sure which virus is more contagious, says the slogan of a recent meme made by Americans for Liberty. 'Covid-19, or those fine with complete government control.' Photo by Dada. Blue as the new green as a design philosophy. Dada floating houses Our Food With Rising Sea Levels: Save Shelters There was always the quest for save shelters. Now with the given of a dense population, dwindling resources, and a fast-changing climate, the stakes for saving shelters were never higher. So with the techniques, we have nowadays, and centuries of experience of living in coastal areas, floating villages, and houses on steels, It’s time to prepare for the future sustainably. Dada came up with futuristic structures that are fully adaptable to their environment. The design is mainly focussed on the circumstances in the Philippines. {youtube}                                                       Jacques Rougerie Foundation's: ‘Curunts for Currents’   The houses are powered by solar and tidal energy. This way of energy creating can also be used to earn money. Not only creates solar and tidal energy more than enough power for the floating community, but the surplus can also be sold. Recommended:  Blue Floating Energy: Wind, Solar, Hydrogen, Waves The heart of the project lies in its design, which utilizes the unique at-sea context to the structures’ operational advantage. The houses are powered by both tidal and solar energy, harvested by technological systems incorporated within the units themselves, rendering the entire community to be wholly off-the-grid and self-sufficient. Graph by Dada: floating house adapting to the wind and a tidal energy installation Another advantage is the space in these shelters where food can be grown with aquaponics techniques. These systems not only provide each unit with a sustainable primary source of power but also a means of livelihood and source of income in electricity farming for nearby inland communities. Although initially created for the Philippines environment, the modular design of these houses, as well as the use of universally available material for its main structural frame, are molded plastic, which allows for their ease in construction in practically any coastal site around the world. Recommended:  Solar Floating Energy: A Smart Blue Innovation Graph by Dada: Floating house with a tidal energy installation Our Food: A Floating Cow Farm In The Netherlands No country has more experience with coping with water than the Netherlands. Almost two-thirds of the country is situated below sea-level. For this reason alone, The Dutch had to build dikes construct pumping stations, build bridges, and locks. One of the positive outcomes of this process was not only be protected from the sea but also gained land by dry pumping low areas. Photo by Goldsmith: floating cow-farm, the Netherlands. Now Minke van Wingerden, a partner in the Rotterdam-based property development firm Beladon designed a floating cow farm. If we want to live in floating cities soon, we also have to find a way to produce food. Not only it produces milk, cheese and meat ‘next doors it also saves transport time and pollution. The cows will be kept on the second floor from a garden-like enclosure. One level up the greenhouse will produce grass, and other food will come as used grain from local breweries. On the ‘ground’ floor, there will be equipped to process and package the milk and yogurt. Robots will scoop the manure, which will be sold as fertilizer. Recommended:  Floating City: A Sci-Fi Trope Or A Salvation? Our Food: A Floating Chicken Farm Goldsmith Architecture Studio Came Up With A Floating Chicken Farm. It is the follow up from the floating cow farm. The Floating farm will not only housing chickens but also have the equipment to produce eggs and other food products. Graph by Goldsmith. The exterior of the floating chicken farm. The well-being of the chickens is one of the most critical assumptions. They will have much more space in comparison with the industrial chicken farms. The chicken farm has natural light, and the solar panels used to generate electricity also produce shade. Recommended:  The First Floating Wind-farm Is Operating In Scotland Floating Deep Farms: Growing Food Underwater At Nottingham University, researchers have developed the idea of floating deep farms. It is large vertical containers that are submerged underwater close to coastal areas. It will be possible to grow a variety of crops. The containers also can act as a ‘sink’ for CO2 capture from the local government. Prof Saffa Riffat came up with the concept. He works in the field of sustainable energy. Graph floating, submurged farm. Recommended:  Agriculture Under Water: Farming At Sea In Italy Greenhouse Floating In Rivers And At Sea: Future Of Our Food The Jellyfish Barge is a floating greenhouse consisting of a plastic dome and a base made from recycled plastic drums. The greenhouse can desalinate seawater to water the plants. A solar panel at the bottom of the barge generates the energy needed to heat the salted water and or polluted water to make it evaporate. I this way, about 150 liters of clean, sweet water is produced. This water gets many times recycled and used in the hydroponic system. The substrate where the plants grow in is from clay enriched by mineral nutrients. Photo by Matteo de Mayda  With this technique, 70% of clean water is saved in comparison with traditional cultivation. The project got executed by Studiomobile, an Italian architect duo existing out of Cristiana Favretto and professor Stefano Mancuso, a botanist from the University of Florance. Photo by Matteo de Mayda  Our Food: Our Future Soon, many coastal areas will be affected by rising sea levels. Above shows that many organizations are preparing and testing housing and facilities to live and grow food. Not only because of rising sea levels but also when seawater submerges fertile soil, which makes the farmland useless, the above solutions could give a relive and provide shelter and food. Another solution is to start urban farming projects in and on highrise buildings, which are realized already in many countries. Having – autonomous – communities that can produce their food, clean water, and energy on a small scale is crucial to survive future challenges. Photo by Dada. Floating houses The area of building large structures has come to an end. Future buildings and communities will be small, self-reliant, and modular. Cover photo. All residential units are modular and accompanied by co-working spaces, fab labs, recycling plants, science labs, educational hotels, sports fields, and aquaponic farms. Before you go! Recommended:  Tiny Houses Tips And Tricks: Minimalistic Living Experience Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about green architecture?  What you gain?  Extra: Global exposure, a valuable backlink!
The world population keeps growing, the climate changing, and sea-levels rising. Make floating housing for coastal communities, and the future looks already much brighter. Our Food: What About Building Shelter, Generating Energy, And Producing Clean Water. In the Philippines, the architecture firm Dada set their ideas on paper for waterfront areas. But there are more companies like Seasteading, Architecture studio Goldsmith, Peter, Minke van Wingerden of Beladon, a company that specializes in waterborne architecture in the Netherlands and. Researchers at Nottingham University. The Jellyfish Barge project and the Italian Studiomobile. Worldwide there are many coastal communities. Once started for the immense amount of resources, trade, and the refreshing water can provide. Of course, there was always a fragile balance between what the climate could cause, like storms and high seas, and the resistance people could come up with to endure these stressful events.  Recommended:  Floating Cities: A Sustainable Concept For Future Communities Rising Sea Levels. Never Give Up: The Coronavirus The coronavirus pandemic has given fringe libertarian groups around the world renewed vigor to pursue their dreams of building autonomous new societies. Government-enforced lockdowns and increased digital surveillance have added fuel to their suspicions of state control. In contrast, the suspension of day-to-day norms and the specter of an economic meltdown have amplified their calls to rethink society. When you’re not sure which virus is more contagious, says the slogan of a recent meme made by Americans for Liberty. 'Covid-19, or those fine with complete government control.' Photo by Dada. Blue as the new green as a design philosophy. Dada floating houses Our Food With Rising Sea Levels: Save Shelters There was always the quest for save shelters. Now with the given of a dense population, dwindling resources, and a fast-changing climate, the stakes for saving shelters were never higher. So with the techniques, we have nowadays, and centuries of experience of living in coastal areas, floating villages, and houses on steels, It’s time to prepare for the future sustainably. Dada came up with futuristic structures that are fully adaptable to their environment. The design is mainly focussed on the circumstances in the Philippines. {youtube}                                                       Jacques Rougerie Foundation's: ‘Curunts for Currents’   The houses are powered by solar and tidal energy. This way of energy creating can also be used to earn money. Not only creates solar and tidal energy more than enough power for the floating community, but the surplus can also be sold. Recommended:  Blue Floating Energy: Wind, Solar, Hydrogen, Waves The heart of the project lies in its design, which utilizes the unique at-sea context to the structures’ operational advantage. The houses are powered by both tidal and solar energy, harvested by technological systems incorporated within the units themselves, rendering the entire community to be wholly off-the-grid and self-sufficient. Graph by Dada: floating house adapting to the wind and a tidal energy installation Another advantage is the space in these shelters where food can be grown with aquaponics techniques. These systems not only provide each unit with a sustainable primary source of power but also a means of livelihood and source of income in electricity farming for nearby inland communities. Although initially created for the Philippines environment, the modular design of these houses, as well as the use of universally available material for its main structural frame, are molded plastic, which allows for their ease in construction in practically any coastal site around the world. Recommended:  Solar Floating Energy: A Smart Blue Innovation Graph by Dada: Floating house with a tidal energy installation Our Food: A Floating Cow Farm In The Netherlands No country has more experience with coping with water than the Netherlands. Almost two-thirds of the country is situated below sea-level. For this reason alone, The Dutch had to build dikes construct pumping stations, build bridges, and locks. One of the positive outcomes of this process was not only be protected from the sea but also gained land by dry pumping low areas. Photo by Goldsmith: floating cow-farm, the Netherlands. Now Minke van Wingerden, a partner in the Rotterdam-based property development firm Beladon designed a floating cow farm. If we want to live in floating cities soon, we also have to find a way to produce food. Not only it produces milk, cheese and meat ‘next doors it also saves transport time and pollution. The cows will be kept on the second floor from a garden-like enclosure. One level up the greenhouse will produce grass, and other food will come as used grain from local breweries. On the ‘ground’ floor, there will be equipped to process and package the milk and yogurt. Robots will scoop the manure, which will be sold as fertilizer. Recommended:  Floating City: A Sci-Fi Trope Or A Salvation? Our Food: A Floating Chicken Farm Goldsmith Architecture Studio Came Up With A Floating Chicken Farm. It is the follow up from the floating cow farm. The Floating farm will not only housing chickens but also have the equipment to produce eggs and other food products. Graph by Goldsmith. The exterior of the floating chicken farm. The well-being of the chickens is one of the most critical assumptions. They will have much more space in comparison with the industrial chicken farms. The chicken farm has natural light, and the solar panels used to generate electricity also produce shade. Recommended:  The First Floating Wind-farm Is Operating In Scotland Floating Deep Farms: Growing Food Underwater At Nottingham University, researchers have developed the idea of floating deep farms. It is large vertical containers that are submerged underwater close to coastal areas. It will be possible to grow a variety of crops. The containers also can act as a ‘sink’ for CO2 capture from the local government. Prof Saffa Riffat came up with the concept. He works in the field of sustainable energy. Graph floating, submurged farm. Recommended:  Agriculture Under Water: Farming At Sea In Italy Greenhouse Floating In Rivers And At Sea: Future Of Our Food The Jellyfish Barge is a floating greenhouse consisting of a plastic dome and a base made from recycled plastic drums. The greenhouse can desalinate seawater to water the plants. A solar panel at the bottom of the barge generates the energy needed to heat the salted water and or polluted water to make it evaporate. I this way, about 150 liters of clean, sweet water is produced. This water gets many times recycled and used in the hydroponic system. The substrate where the plants grow in is from clay enriched by mineral nutrients. Photo by Matteo de Mayda  With this technique, 70% of clean water is saved in comparison with traditional cultivation. The project got executed by Studiomobile, an Italian architect duo existing out of Cristiana Favretto and professor Stefano Mancuso, a botanist from the University of Florance. Photo by Matteo de Mayda  Our Food: Our Future Soon, many coastal areas will be affected by rising sea levels. Above shows that many organizations are preparing and testing housing and facilities to live and grow food. Not only because of rising sea levels but also when seawater submerges fertile soil, which makes the farmland useless, the above solutions could give a relive and provide shelter and food. Another solution is to start urban farming projects in and on highrise buildings, which are realized already in many countries. Having – autonomous – communities that can produce their food, clean water, and energy on a small scale is crucial to survive future challenges. Photo by Dada. Floating houses The area of building large structures has come to an end. Future buildings and communities will be small, self-reliant, and modular. Cover photo. All residential units are modular and accompanied by co-working spaces, fab labs, recycling plants, science labs, educational hotels, sports fields, and aquaponic farms. Before you go! Recommended:  Tiny Houses Tips And Tricks: Minimalistic Living Experience Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about green architecture?  What you gain?  Extra: Global exposure, a valuable backlink!
Our Food With Rising Sea Levels. Never Give Up
Our Food With Rising Sea Levels. Never Give Up
Green Forest House Showcase For Our Urban Future
Trees burst through walls of Ha Long Villa by Vo Trong Nghia Architects. Vo Trong Nghia Architects has built a house on Vietnam's scenic Ha Long Bay with trees growing through its concrete walls. Green Forest House Big rectangular openings dot the concrete facade of Ha Long Villa, and each one contains a tree. The Ho Chi Minh City studio, which won Architect of the Year at last year's Dezeen Awards, wanted to give residents the experience of living in nature. "We have designed a sustainable home that exists in harmony with the surrounding environment and seeks to become part of its landscape," explained the studio, which also goes by the name VTN Architects. Forest House Showcase For Our Urban Future 'The main concept of the house is to create a space where people can live in a forest.' The building is one of many new homes that have been constructed on Ha Long Bay, as Vietnam's coastline continues to experience a tourism boom. The bay is one of eight UNESCO World Heritage Sites in the country. VTN Architects hopes this house, which is part-building and part-landscape, can serve as a reminder about the importance of maintaining a balance between the two. Green Forest House: Our Urban Future Ha Long Villa is a pentagonal in plan and contains six floors. These are connected by a staircase that spirals up around the perimeter. Recommended:  Sustainable University Hanoi: By Vo Trong Nghia Architects {youtube}                        Anther forest house by Vo Trong Nghia Architects: Stepping Park House, Ho Chi Minh City    Planting boxes are slotted into the gaps between different sections of the staircase, creating plenty of space for the trees to grow. Window openings align with the trees, allowing room for the branches to grow out. Creating this 'buffer zone' around the exterior of the building has other benefits, too, it helps to cool the interior without the need for air conditioning naturally. Forest House This buffer space between the interior and exterior spaces protects the house against the hot climate and noise. Recommended:  Tiny Houses And Food Forests Good For Climate And Sustainability Green Forest House Showcase: Interior The architects chose wood-textured concrete for the exterior wall, to give the building a natural, rock-like aesthetic. Inside, this textured surface is swapped for more traditional domestic finishes, including wooden floors, smooth-rendered walls, and curtains. Living spaces can be found on the two lower levels, while bedrooms occupy the second, third, and fourth floors. The fifth floor contains a garden where residents can grow their vegetables. Recommended:  Solar-Powered Eco Home With Gardens on All Floors: Argentina "These distinctive spaces offer residents options in their daily lives, like whether to dine inside or outside on a particular day," said VTN Architects. Ha Long Villa forms part of the series House for Trees, a collection of tree-covered houses that VTN Architects has been building across Vietnam in the past decade. The first House for Trees, completed in 2014, featured a series of concrete blocks that looked like oversized pot plants. Others include the geometric Binh House and the multi-level Ha House. Before you go! Recommended:  Smart Communities: Eco-Living Through Technology Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about green architecture?  What you gain?  Extra: Global exposure, a valuable backlink!
Trees burst through walls of Ha Long Villa by Vo Trong Nghia Architects. Vo Trong Nghia Architects has built a house on Vietnam's scenic Ha Long Bay with trees growing through its concrete walls. Green Forest House Big rectangular openings dot the concrete facade of Ha Long Villa, and each one contains a tree. The Ho Chi Minh City studio, which won Architect of the Year at last year's Dezeen Awards, wanted to give residents the experience of living in nature. "We have designed a sustainable home that exists in harmony with the surrounding environment and seeks to become part of its landscape," explained the studio, which also goes by the name VTN Architects. Forest House Showcase For Our Urban Future 'The main concept of the house is to create a space where people can live in a forest.' The building is one of many new homes that have been constructed on Ha Long Bay, as Vietnam's coastline continues to experience a tourism boom. The bay is one of eight UNESCO World Heritage Sites in the country. VTN Architects hopes this house, which is part-building and part-landscape, can serve as a reminder about the importance of maintaining a balance between the two. Green Forest House: Our Urban Future Ha Long Villa is a pentagonal in plan and contains six floors. These are connected by a staircase that spirals up around the perimeter. Recommended:  Sustainable University Hanoi: By Vo Trong Nghia Architects {youtube}                        Anther forest house by Vo Trong Nghia Architects: Stepping Park House, Ho Chi Minh City    Planting boxes are slotted into the gaps between different sections of the staircase, creating plenty of space for the trees to grow. Window openings align with the trees, allowing room for the branches to grow out. Creating this 'buffer zone' around the exterior of the building has other benefits, too, it helps to cool the interior without the need for air conditioning naturally. Forest House This buffer space between the interior and exterior spaces protects the house against the hot climate and noise. Recommended:  Tiny Houses And Food Forests Good For Climate And Sustainability Green Forest House Showcase: Interior The architects chose wood-textured concrete for the exterior wall, to give the building a natural, rock-like aesthetic. Inside, this textured surface is swapped for more traditional domestic finishes, including wooden floors, smooth-rendered walls, and curtains. Living spaces can be found on the two lower levels, while bedrooms occupy the second, third, and fourth floors. The fifth floor contains a garden where residents can grow their vegetables. Recommended:  Solar-Powered Eco Home With Gardens on All Floors: Argentina "These distinctive spaces offer residents options in their daily lives, like whether to dine inside or outside on a particular day," said VTN Architects. Ha Long Villa forms part of the series House for Trees, a collection of tree-covered houses that VTN Architects has been building across Vietnam in the past decade. The first House for Trees, completed in 2014, featured a series of concrete blocks that looked like oversized pot plants. Others include the geometric Binh House and the multi-level Ha House. Before you go! Recommended:  Smart Communities: Eco-Living Through Technology Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about green architecture?  What you gain?  Extra: Global exposure, a valuable backlink!
Green Forest House Showcase For Our Urban Future
Green Forest House Showcase For Our Urban Future
Solar Zero Energy Homes: Green Prefab Realty
A set of affordable homes for growing families just popped up in Örebro, Sweden, and they utilize passive building principles and photovoltaic panels to generate as much energy as they use each year. Stockholm-based Street Monkey Architects designed the zero-energy homes to be well insulated and nearly airtight, with ventilation systems that retain as much heat as possible. A row of homes facing east-west is topped with solar panels. Each home’s pitch is angled to catch as much sun as possible. Solar Zero Energy Homes Rooftop solar panels almost completely power the homes, and on-site batteries store unused energy that can be sold back to the grid. Additionally, the buildings’ energy consumption is measured on an ongoing basis to adjust for power needs. {youtube}                                   Essential Secrets to Sustainable Net-Zero Solar Homes: Geos Neighborhood                      Geos Neighborhood in Arvada, Colorado, sustainable, net-zero, solar, fossil fuel-free homes  Each two-story, 1,600-square-foot structure is composed of six factory-built modules that arrived on-site with finished interiors. Once erected, the facades were connected to smooth over transitional moments between the homes. Four houses face east-west, while six have a north-south orientation, and all of the roofs are topped with solar panels angled toward the path of the sun. The solar panel–topped roofs vary slightly in height for added visual interest. Although the development is designed as an interlocking series of homes, subtle variations give each residence its character. Some features white plaster facades, while the row running north to south is finished in dark, silvery steel. Recommended:  Smart Communities: Eco-Living Through Technology A more detailed shot shows the variation.  Wood slatting attached to every other house creates a visual rhythm, an element that Street Monkey Architects hopes will provide a sense of individuality for prospective homeowners. Recommended:  Tiny House With Solar Panels Is Off Grid: The Netherlands Each home has a deck with an extended backyard that’s accessed via glass doors. The entrance (at the back corner) leads directly into the kitchen, dining room, and living room. The kitchen is designed in a U-shape to enable socializing and to optimize space flow. The living room, located adjacent to the dining area, leads to the backyard. The homes’ interiors are open and airy. The ground-floor kitchen opens to the dining room, which leads to the living area. There, two sets of glass doors provide access to a terrace, expanding available living space. Steel stairs suspended by vertical wires allow light to filter to the ground floor. The upper level holds three bedrooms, a family room, and a large bathroom. Recommended:  Off-Grid Homes And Tiny Houses: With Solar Panels And Prefab Metal stairs attached via wires allow an abundance of light to reach the first floor At the top of the stairs is a family room with natural wood floors and white walls The family room sits adjacent to the bedrooms and a large bathroom.  A master bedroom on the second floor gets natural light through glass doors.  Before you go! Recommended:  Tiny Houses Tips And Tricks: Minimalistic Living Experience Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about green architecture?  What you gain?  Extra: Global exposure, a valuable backlink!
A set of affordable homes for growing families just popped up in Örebro, Sweden, and they utilize passive building principles and photovoltaic panels to generate as much energy as they use each year. Stockholm-based Street Monkey Architects designed the zero-energy homes to be well insulated and nearly airtight, with ventilation systems that retain as much heat as possible. A row of homes facing east-west is topped with solar panels. Each home’s pitch is angled to catch as much sun as possible. Solar Zero Energy Homes Rooftop solar panels almost completely power the homes, and on-site batteries store unused energy that can be sold back to the grid. Additionally, the buildings’ energy consumption is measured on an ongoing basis to adjust for power needs. {youtube}                                   Essential Secrets to Sustainable Net-Zero Solar Homes: Geos Neighborhood                      Geos Neighborhood in Arvada, Colorado, sustainable, net-zero, solar, fossil fuel-free homes  Each two-story, 1,600-square-foot structure is composed of six factory-built modules that arrived on-site with finished interiors. Once erected, the facades were connected to smooth over transitional moments between the homes. Four houses face east-west, while six have a north-south orientation, and all of the roofs are topped with solar panels angled toward the path of the sun. The solar panel–topped roofs vary slightly in height for added visual interest. Although the development is designed as an interlocking series of homes, subtle variations give each residence its character. Some features white plaster facades, while the row running north to south is finished in dark, silvery steel. Recommended:  Smart Communities: Eco-Living Through Technology A more detailed shot shows the variation.  Wood slatting attached to every other house creates a visual rhythm, an element that Street Monkey Architects hopes will provide a sense of individuality for prospective homeowners. Recommended:  Tiny House With Solar Panels Is Off Grid: The Netherlands Each home has a deck with an extended backyard that’s accessed via glass doors. The entrance (at the back corner) leads directly into the kitchen, dining room, and living room. The kitchen is designed in a U-shape to enable socializing and to optimize space flow. The living room, located adjacent to the dining area, leads to the backyard. The homes’ interiors are open and airy. The ground-floor kitchen opens to the dining room, which leads to the living area. There, two sets of glass doors provide access to a terrace, expanding available living space. Steel stairs suspended by vertical wires allow light to filter to the ground floor. The upper level holds three bedrooms, a family room, and a large bathroom. Recommended:  Off-Grid Homes And Tiny Houses: With Solar Panels And Prefab Metal stairs attached via wires allow an abundance of light to reach the first floor At the top of the stairs is a family room with natural wood floors and white walls The family room sits adjacent to the bedrooms and a large bathroom.  A master bedroom on the second floor gets natural light through glass doors.  Before you go! Recommended:  Tiny Houses Tips And Tricks: Minimalistic Living Experience Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about green architecture?  What you gain?  Extra: Global exposure, a valuable backlink!
Solar Zero Energy Homes: Green Prefab Realty
Solar Zero Energy Homes: Green Prefab Realty
CO2 Footprint Reduction: 5 Innovative Solutions
For decades, scientists have been warning us about global warming, and the consequences of human actions on the planet in the form of environmental disasters. The construction sector is today one of the major contributors to global warming and the climate crisis. CO2 Footprint Reduction According to data of the United Nations (UN), currently, 36% of the global energy is dedicated to buildings and 7 to 8% of all pollutant emissions are caused by the production of concrete alone. Therefore, the architectural community is directly related to climate change, through the energy wasted on buildings and material production for the construction sector. Reflecting on this, we have compiled a set of five projects from different parts of the world that offer solutions to aid the fight against the climate crisis.  Recommended:  CO2 Absorption: Does A Dutch Professor Have The Answer? {youtube}                                                   Using concrete to trap greenhouse gasses | The Fix CO2 Footprint Reduction: Rotterdam Climate Initiative In order to address the challenges of global climate change, and aiming to be the world capital of reduction of CO2 by reducing 50% of its carbon emissions, Rotterdam developed a set of self-sustainable floating structures, with ambitious plans to adapt to rising sea levels. What is the meaning of green architecture? Green architecture, or green design, is an approach to building that minimizes the harmful effects of construction projects on human health and the environment. The "green" architect or designer attempts to safeguard air, water, and earth by choosing eco-friendly building materials and construction practices The project is a catalyst for combating climate change, operating from three connected domes anchored within the Dutch city’s old harbor. The pavilion was designed by DeltaSync and Publicdomain Architects and is an unprecedented example of innovative, sustainable and climate-proof architecture. The idea is that the structures host different uses, but above all a community of floating houses. The translucent shelter relies on solar energy and its structure is made of anti-corrosive plastic ETFE, which is 100 times lighter than glass and therefore ideal for a floating structure. Recommended:  Smart Cities Or Dumb Cities? Let’s Embrace Low Tech CO2 Footprint Reduction: Innovative Solution Humanscapes Habitat Built in India, this housing project is an applied research and demonstration project of Sustainable and Integrated Urban Living Project, used for benchmarking in housing. Appropriated due to the present global crisis of energy and climate change, it presents solutions in order to achieve a sustainable development, seeking to upgrade the capability of the currently unorganized construction sector of India, encouraging the transition of buildings with high embodied energy materials to technology and building materials that may reduce the carbon footprint.  What are the main goals of green architecture? Green architecture, philosophy of architecture that advocates sustainable energy sources, the conservation of energy, the reuse and safety of building materials, and the siting of a building with consideration of its impact on the environment. Using local building materials and skills, the residences become a net energy-positive habitat by generating their own renewable energy. Some crucial items of the project are: zero-discharge of water, reduction and recycling of solid waste, local endemic species landscaping, and growing organic food. In addition, some natural consequences of the campus set-up are the reduction of journeys by integrating work and living spaces, coordinating community and infrastructure, as well as the adoption of clean mobility options like e-vehicles for external contact. Recommended:  New Foodscape Alternatives Gets Attention In The Netherlands CO2 Footprint Reduction: Innovative Solution From NLÉ Architects The Makoko, floating school Taking into account the impact of climate change and sea-level rise in the last few years, and the coastal erosion and tropical rains that have overloaded the current system, NLÉ Architects developed this project for Makoko school. It was designed as a floating prototype to encourage architecture and urbanism of the coastal cities of Africa, creating houses, community centers and playgrounds with the same system. How can we reduce CO2 in construction? 8 steps to reduce embodied carbon in construction lifecycle Reuse buildings instead of constructing new ones Specify low-carbon concrete mixes Limit carbon-intensive materials Choose lower carbon alternatives Choose carbon sequestering materials Reuse materials Use high-recycled content materials Maximize structural efficiency Recommended:  A Floating Airport Cutting Edge Madness Or Visionary? Designed for 100 students and their teachers, the school offers 100m² of area and 10 meters of ceiling height. The project uses around 256 recycled plastic barrels to float on the water and reused wood structure. The electricity relies on solar panels, while the rainwater collection facilitates the use of odorless composting, installed as a solution for the nonexistent sewer system, making it self-sustainable. Recommended:  Floating Cities: A Sustainable Concept For Future Communities CO2 Reduction: Innovative Solution Archifest Zero Waste Pavilion Using zero waste as a constructive strategy, this project was developed around two highly rapidly deployable and reusable systems. The zero-waste strategy considered time, materials, costs and the afterlife of the elements. How do you become carbon neutral? Carbon-neutral status can be achieved in two ways: Balancing carbon dioxide emissions with carbon removal beyond natural processes, often through carbon offsetting, or the process of removing or sequestering carbon dioxide from the atmosphere to make up for emissions elsewhere The box-truss system, including the roof, takes a maximum of approximately 7 days to deploy The membrane takes a maximum of approximately 3 days to install Overall, the time frame to complete WonderWall would be of about 10-15 days The cellular membrane once taken down can be reused for other functions.Thanks to WOW Architects Recommended:  How An Artificial Leaf Sucks CO2 And Makes Fuel. Amazing! Innovative Solution 5: Oceanix City, Bjarke Ingels Group As part of UN-Habitat’s New Urban Agenda, this project developed by Bjarke Ingels Group seeks to respond to the imminent threat of climate change, proposing the creation of the world’s first resilient and sustainable floating community, designed to accommodate 10.000 people. “Oceanix City” is a response to the prediction that by 2050, 90% of the world’s largest cities will be exposed to rising seas, resulting in mass displacement, and the destruction of homes and infrastructure. The scheme is anchored in the UN Sustainable Development Goals, enacting circular flows of food, energy, water, and waste, becoming self-sustainable. According to Ingels, "The only constant in the universe is change. Our world is always changing, and right now, our climate is changing. No matter how critical the crisis is, and it is, this is also our collective human superpower. That we have the power to adapt to change and we have the power to give form to our future". Before you go! Recommended:  Regenerative Agriculture: Its Full Potential (Part 3 of 3) Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about green architecture? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
For decades, scientists have been warning us about global warming, and the consequences of human actions on the planet in the form of environmental disasters. The construction sector is today one of the major contributors to global warming and the climate crisis. CO2 Footprint Reduction According to data of the United Nations (UN), currently, 36% of the global energy is dedicated to buildings and 7 to 8% of all pollutant emissions are caused by the production of concrete alone. Therefore, the architectural community is directly related to climate change, through the energy wasted on buildings and material production for the construction sector. Reflecting on this, we have compiled a set of five projects from different parts of the world that offer solutions to aid the fight against the climate crisis.  Recommended:  CO2 Absorption: Does A Dutch Professor Have The Answer? {youtube}                                                   Using concrete to trap greenhouse gasses | The Fix CO2 Footprint Reduction: Rotterdam Climate Initiative In order to address the challenges of global climate change, and aiming to be the world capital of reduction of CO2 by reducing 50% of its carbon emissions, Rotterdam developed a set of self-sustainable floating structures, with ambitious plans to adapt to rising sea levels. What is the meaning of green architecture? Green architecture, or green design, is an approach to building that minimizes the harmful effects of construction projects on human health and the environment. The "green" architect or designer attempts to safeguard air, water, and earth by choosing eco-friendly building materials and construction practices The project is a catalyst for combating climate change, operating from three connected domes anchored within the Dutch city’s old harbor. The pavilion was designed by DeltaSync and Publicdomain Architects and is an unprecedented example of innovative, sustainable and climate-proof architecture. The idea is that the structures host different uses, but above all a community of floating houses. The translucent shelter relies on solar energy and its structure is made of anti-corrosive plastic ETFE, which is 100 times lighter than glass and therefore ideal for a floating structure. Recommended:  Smart Cities Or Dumb Cities? Let’s Embrace Low Tech CO2 Footprint Reduction: Innovative Solution Humanscapes Habitat Built in India, this housing project is an applied research and demonstration project of Sustainable and Integrated Urban Living Project, used for benchmarking in housing. Appropriated due to the present global crisis of energy and climate change, it presents solutions in order to achieve a sustainable development, seeking to upgrade the capability of the currently unorganized construction sector of India, encouraging the transition of buildings with high embodied energy materials to technology and building materials that may reduce the carbon footprint.  What are the main goals of green architecture? Green architecture, philosophy of architecture that advocates sustainable energy sources, the conservation of energy, the reuse and safety of building materials, and the siting of a building with consideration of its impact on the environment. Using local building materials and skills, the residences become a net energy-positive habitat by generating their own renewable energy. Some crucial items of the project are: zero-discharge of water, reduction and recycling of solid waste, local endemic species landscaping, and growing organic food. In addition, some natural consequences of the campus set-up are the reduction of journeys by integrating work and living spaces, coordinating community and infrastructure, as well as the adoption of clean mobility options like e-vehicles for external contact. Recommended:  New Foodscape Alternatives Gets Attention In The Netherlands CO2 Footprint Reduction: Innovative Solution From NLÉ Architects The Makoko, floating school Taking into account the impact of climate change and sea-level rise in the last few years, and the coastal erosion and tropical rains that have overloaded the current system, NLÉ Architects developed this project for Makoko school. It was designed as a floating prototype to encourage architecture and urbanism of the coastal cities of Africa, creating houses, community centers and playgrounds with the same system. How can we reduce CO2 in construction? 8 steps to reduce embodied carbon in construction lifecycle Reuse buildings instead of constructing new ones Specify low-carbon concrete mixes Limit carbon-intensive materials Choose lower carbon alternatives Choose carbon sequestering materials Reuse materials Use high-recycled content materials Maximize structural efficiency Recommended:  A Floating Airport Cutting Edge Madness Or Visionary? Designed for 100 students and their teachers, the school offers 100m² of area and 10 meters of ceiling height. The project uses around 256 recycled plastic barrels to float on the water and reused wood structure. The electricity relies on solar panels, while the rainwater collection facilitates the use of odorless composting, installed as a solution for the nonexistent sewer system, making it self-sustainable. Recommended:  Floating Cities: A Sustainable Concept For Future Communities CO2 Reduction: Innovative Solution Archifest Zero Waste Pavilion Using zero waste as a constructive strategy, this project was developed around two highly rapidly deployable and reusable systems. The zero-waste strategy considered time, materials, costs and the afterlife of the elements. How do you become carbon neutral? Carbon-neutral status can be achieved in two ways: Balancing carbon dioxide emissions with carbon removal beyond natural processes, often through carbon offsetting, or the process of removing or sequestering carbon dioxide from the atmosphere to make up for emissions elsewhere The box-truss system, including the roof, takes a maximum of approximately 7 days to deploy The membrane takes a maximum of approximately 3 days to install Overall, the time frame to complete WonderWall would be of about 10-15 days The cellular membrane once taken down can be reused for other functions.Thanks to WOW Architects Recommended:  How An Artificial Leaf Sucks CO2 And Makes Fuel. Amazing! Innovative Solution 5: Oceanix City, Bjarke Ingels Group As part of UN-Habitat’s New Urban Agenda, this project developed by Bjarke Ingels Group seeks to respond to the imminent threat of climate change, proposing the creation of the world’s first resilient and sustainable floating community, designed to accommodate 10.000 people. “Oceanix City” is a response to the prediction that by 2050, 90% of the world’s largest cities will be exposed to rising seas, resulting in mass displacement, and the destruction of homes and infrastructure. The scheme is anchored in the UN Sustainable Development Goals, enacting circular flows of food, energy, water, and waste, becoming self-sustainable. According to Ingels, "The only constant in the universe is change. Our world is always changing, and right now, our climate is changing. No matter how critical the crisis is, and it is, this is also our collective human superpower. That we have the power to adapt to change and we have the power to give form to our future". Before you go! Recommended:  Regenerative Agriculture: Its Full Potential (Part 3 of 3) Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about green architecture? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
CO2 Footprint Reduction: 5 Innovative Solutions
Madness Or Visionary? A Floating Airport
Schiphol Airport (Netherlands) at sea is slowly but surely coming into the picture again as a future perspective for aviation. The public debate about the future of Schiphol has completely erupted yet. Residents’ associations and D66 (political party) suggest that Schiphol at sea is a solution for stranded Schiphol. Schiphol Airport Cutting Edge As a vital hub in international aviation, Schiphol Airport has offered excellent accessibility to business people and tourists over the years, steadily benefiting the employment and economic growth of the Netherlands. However, it is predicted that the number of air travelers will continue to grow shortly. To maintain Schiphol’s current ‘hub position,’ the airport will have to increase its capacity to cater for the needs of travelers. In addition to improving service systems inside the airport, the infrastructure surrounding the airport such as stations, parking spaces and roads must also be enlarged. For this to happen, space is needed, but where to find the space? How about space on water? What does Schiphol mean? There are several legends about the name 'Schiphol' Consequently, this place became known as: 'Schip Holl' or 'Scheepshol'. 'Schip' and 'Scheep' meaning 'ship', and 'hol' meaning 'grave' in this context. Another explanation is that the name comes from the word 'scheepshaal'. Schiphol's name is derived from a former fortification named Fort Schiphol, which was part of theStelling van Amsterdam defence works. Before 1852, theHaarlemmermeer polder in which the airport lies was a large lake with some shallow areas. There are multiple stories of how the place got its name. A Floating Airport: Radical Solutions Technically, socially and legally, it is possible. The fundamental social cost-benefit analysis will be beneficial.  Is Schiphol airport below sea level? -3 m                                                                    World's First Floating City Documentary                                                    A Floating Airport Cutting Edge Madness Or Visionary? On May 25, 1961, John F. Kennedy gave his famous Moon Shot Speech: "First, I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieve the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the earth." The rest is history, and the U.S.A. is still reveling in its accomplishment. Recommended:  Climate Change Dodgy Politicians And Lobbyists Match Badly Google successfully uses the moon-shot strategy. The core of this strategy and its operations is simple: think of a significant problem in the medium-long term, think of radical solutions, and use ground-breaking knowledge. Reasoned attempts are about trial and error. We do not solve new problems with conventional solutions. Based on a growth strategy, maintaining Schiphol Airport in the Haarlemmermeer (a municipality in the south of the Dutch province of Noord-Holland) is not an option in the longer term. Noise pollution, fuel tanks, congestion, and so on lead to public uproar and riots. ‘It is the economy; stupid’ will not always apply. Slowing down is an expensive economic and political cost. The growth of the national aviation sector is only possible if a radically innovative solution is chosen. Aviation must be CO2 neutral and not cause any inconvenience. The water offers unprecedented opportunities for this. Recommended:  CO2 Absorption: Does A Dutch Professor Have The Answer? By placing an airport at sea, the flight paths can also primarily take place over the sea and do not cause any inconvenience. Around the floating airport, enough biofuels can be produced utilizing floating algae and seaweed plantations to fuel the Schiphol fleet. Recommended: Algae-Based Bioreactor Swallows  CO2  Faster Than Trees! How? Why float and not land reclamation? Research with underwater drones shows that ecology remains under floating platforms and sometimes even strengthened. In the case of land reclamation, the aquatic ecology disappears. With a floating airport, you also retain the flexibility to move further in the future. After all, Schiphol Airport was once also a sea, so who knows what needs will exist in the future? Finally, a floating airport adapts to rising sea levels and is, therefore, a climate-adaptive solution. Recommended:  Agriculture Under Water: Farming Deep At Sea In Italy Floating Schiphol can be connected to Amsterdam and Rotterdam with lightning-fast connections with a travel time of fewer than 20 minutes. An example of such a connection based on vacuum tubes is the Hyperloop system. This is an initiative of Tesla boss Elon Musk, where TU Delft is working on. Recommended:  Sustainable Travel With Elon Musk’s Hyperloop The Boring Company Around Schiphol, other functions can be added, such as artificial reefs, energy storage, and logistics. This creates an iconic project in which the Netherlands can put itself on the map internationally as a water and innovation country. The Netherlands: Testbed For Floating Developments In the Netherlands, we realized already floating projects; the most iconic example is the floating pavilion in Rotterdam. The floating pavilion is a pilot for building on the water as the first step towards floating urbanization. What are dikes and polders? A polder (Dutch pronunciation: (ˈpɔldər) is a low-lying tract of land that forms an artificial hydrological entity, enclosed by embankments known as dikes. Flood plains separated from the sea or river by a dike. The urban development in unprotected areas outside the dikes is of significant importance to cities like Rotterdam (largest harbor in Europe). With this project, the municipality of Rotterdam took a pioneering role in climate adaption and delta technology. The floating pavilion demonstrates how cities can proactively adapt to the effects of climate change. In cooperation with InHolland University of Applied Sciences, Blue21 (leading global expert in floating architecture and urban development) developed a masterplan for the redevelopment of the Rijnhaven harbor. It combines many floating building blocks that already exist like floating houses, floating wetlands, breakwaters, and roads. The Rijnhaven is an ideal playground for floating. Floating trees Rijnhaven Harbour Rotterdam, Netherlands At the moment, the redevelopment of the Rijnhaven is just a plan. But if we take climate change seriously and care about the wellbeing of people and our planet, then we need to take action now. Ideas like these are a stepping stone for floating urbanization and sustainable projects to save our oceans, the earth, and the lives of people. New developments and initiatives that improve the quality of life can be commercially attractive at the same time! Floating Cutting Edge Madness Or Visionary Urbanization 2030 - 2050 What does it mean to be a visionary? A visionary is someone with a strong vision of the future. Since such visions aren't always accurate, a visionary's ideas may either work brilliantly or fail miserably. The word is also an adjective; thus, for example, we may speak of a visionary project, a visionary leader, a visionary painter, or a visionary company. The development of floating neighborhoods and floating cities are a unique opportunity for the Netherlands to become a world leader in floating events. As an early adapter, we can create a competitive advantage over other countries and companies in the world. Dutch floating events can become an export product by which we are going to write history and save people, our oceans, and our planet at the same time. Although it is technically feasible to build massive floating structures on the sea, it is commercially more attractive to expand the land to floating islands in densely populated areas.                                   Seasteading: Floating libertarian city coming soon to French Polynesia - TomoNews                                                       A Floating Airport Cutting Edge Madness Or Visionary? Once we have realized floating neighborhoods in sheltered areas and near high-value locations like large cities, it is our ambition to build the first environmentally friendly floating city on the sea. In 2050 the world will look completely different than today. By then, the first floating city in the ocean may have been built and could look like this:  We can save our oceans, we can save our planet, and we can improve our quality of life, all at the same time. These floating developments are not science fiction, it is technically feasible, and it is already happening. However, to meet the global challenges, we are currently facing, we don’t have a lot of time. 2050 Is closer than we think. Floating city: Plan for 40,000 people to live on the high seas. A Florida-based firm wants to create a 'community on the sea' which would circle the globe every two years. Floating developments could save the lives of people in low lying areas like coastal cities and island communities. It provides space for the growing world population. And at the same time, it can produce food and energy in a renewable and sustainable way. References: Jan van Kessel, Barbara, Vicky, David, Harriet, Bart, Karina and Rutger at Blue21 Richard Gray, How can we manage Earth’s land? BBC, 29 June 2017 Joe McCarthy, The Planet Will Face Major Water Shortages by 2050, UN Chief Warns. Global Citizen, 8 June 2017 NU / AT5, Nog ruim 42.000 woningen tekort in regio Amsterdam. 11 February 2019 Joe Quirk, The future of floating cities. World’s Fair Nano Future Festival, 29 March 2018 Before you go! Recommended:  Floating Cities: A Sustainable Concept For Future Communities Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about Floating Cities, Architecture, or Future Buildings? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Schiphol Airport (Netherlands) at sea is slowly but surely coming into the picture again as a future perspective for aviation. The public debate about the future of Schiphol has completely erupted yet. Residents’ associations and D66 (political party) suggest that Schiphol at sea is a solution for stranded Schiphol. Schiphol Airport Cutting Edge As a vital hub in international aviation, Schiphol Airport has offered excellent accessibility to business people and tourists over the years, steadily benefiting the employment and economic growth of the Netherlands. However, it is predicted that the number of air travelers will continue to grow shortly. To maintain Schiphol’s current ‘hub position,’ the airport will have to increase its capacity to cater for the needs of travelers. In addition to improving service systems inside the airport, the infrastructure surrounding the airport such as stations, parking spaces and roads must also be enlarged. For this to happen, space is needed, but where to find the space? How about space on water? What does Schiphol mean? There are several legends about the name 'Schiphol' Consequently, this place became known as: 'Schip Holl' or 'Scheepshol'. 'Schip' and 'Scheep' meaning 'ship', and 'hol' meaning 'grave' in this context. Another explanation is that the name comes from the word 'scheepshaal'. Schiphol's name is derived from a former fortification named Fort Schiphol, which was part of theStelling van Amsterdam defence works. Before 1852, theHaarlemmermeer polder in which the airport lies was a large lake with some shallow areas. There are multiple stories of how the place got its name. A Floating Airport: Radical Solutions Technically, socially and legally, it is possible. The fundamental social cost-benefit analysis will be beneficial.  Is Schiphol airport below sea level? -3 m                                                                    World's First Floating City Documentary                                                    A Floating Airport Cutting Edge Madness Or Visionary? On May 25, 1961, John F. Kennedy gave his famous Moon Shot Speech: "First, I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieve the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the earth." The rest is history, and the U.S.A. is still reveling in its accomplishment. Recommended:  Climate Change Dodgy Politicians And Lobbyists Match Badly Google successfully uses the moon-shot strategy. The core of this strategy and its operations is simple: think of a significant problem in the medium-long term, think of radical solutions, and use ground-breaking knowledge. Reasoned attempts are about trial and error. We do not solve new problems with conventional solutions. Based on a growth strategy, maintaining Schiphol Airport in the Haarlemmermeer (a municipality in the south of the Dutch province of Noord-Holland) is not an option in the longer term. Noise pollution, fuel tanks, congestion, and so on lead to public uproar and riots. ‘It is the economy; stupid’ will not always apply. Slowing down is an expensive economic and political cost. The growth of the national aviation sector is only possible if a radically innovative solution is chosen. Aviation must be CO2 neutral and not cause any inconvenience. The water offers unprecedented opportunities for this. Recommended:  CO2 Absorption: Does A Dutch Professor Have The Answer? By placing an airport at sea, the flight paths can also primarily take place over the sea and do not cause any inconvenience. Around the floating airport, enough biofuels can be produced utilizing floating algae and seaweed plantations to fuel the Schiphol fleet. Recommended: Algae-Based Bioreactor Swallows  CO2  Faster Than Trees! How? Why float and not land reclamation? Research with underwater drones shows that ecology remains under floating platforms and sometimes even strengthened. In the case of land reclamation, the aquatic ecology disappears. With a floating airport, you also retain the flexibility to move further in the future. After all, Schiphol Airport was once also a sea, so who knows what needs will exist in the future? Finally, a floating airport adapts to rising sea levels and is, therefore, a climate-adaptive solution. Recommended:  Agriculture Under Water: Farming Deep At Sea In Italy Floating Schiphol can be connected to Amsterdam and Rotterdam with lightning-fast connections with a travel time of fewer than 20 minutes. An example of such a connection based on vacuum tubes is the Hyperloop system. This is an initiative of Tesla boss Elon Musk, where TU Delft is working on. Recommended:  Sustainable Travel With Elon Musk’s Hyperloop The Boring Company Around Schiphol, other functions can be added, such as artificial reefs, energy storage, and logistics. This creates an iconic project in which the Netherlands can put itself on the map internationally as a water and innovation country. The Netherlands: Testbed For Floating Developments In the Netherlands, we realized already floating projects; the most iconic example is the floating pavilion in Rotterdam. The floating pavilion is a pilot for building on the water as the first step towards floating urbanization. What are dikes and polders? A polder (Dutch pronunciation: (ˈpɔldər) is a low-lying tract of land that forms an artificial hydrological entity, enclosed by embankments known as dikes. Flood plains separated from the sea or river by a dike. The urban development in unprotected areas outside the dikes is of significant importance to cities like Rotterdam (largest harbor in Europe). With this project, the municipality of Rotterdam took a pioneering role in climate adaption and delta technology. The floating pavilion demonstrates how cities can proactively adapt to the effects of climate change. In cooperation with InHolland University of Applied Sciences, Blue21 (leading global expert in floating architecture and urban development) developed a masterplan for the redevelopment of the Rijnhaven harbor. It combines many floating building blocks that already exist like floating houses, floating wetlands, breakwaters, and roads. The Rijnhaven is an ideal playground for floating. Floating trees Rijnhaven Harbour Rotterdam, Netherlands At the moment, the redevelopment of the Rijnhaven is just a plan. But if we take climate change seriously and care about the wellbeing of people and our planet, then we need to take action now. Ideas like these are a stepping stone for floating urbanization and sustainable projects to save our oceans, the earth, and the lives of people. New developments and initiatives that improve the quality of life can be commercially attractive at the same time! Floating Cutting Edge Madness Or Visionary Urbanization 2030 - 2050 What does it mean to be a visionary? A visionary is someone with a strong vision of the future. Since such visions aren't always accurate, a visionary's ideas may either work brilliantly or fail miserably. The word is also an adjective; thus, for example, we may speak of a visionary project, a visionary leader, a visionary painter, or a visionary company. The development of floating neighborhoods and floating cities are a unique opportunity for the Netherlands to become a world leader in floating events. As an early adapter, we can create a competitive advantage over other countries and companies in the world. Dutch floating events can become an export product by which we are going to write history and save people, our oceans, and our planet at the same time. Although it is technically feasible to build massive floating structures on the sea, it is commercially more attractive to expand the land to floating islands in densely populated areas.                                   Seasteading: Floating libertarian city coming soon to French Polynesia - TomoNews                                                       A Floating Airport Cutting Edge Madness Or Visionary? Once we have realized floating neighborhoods in sheltered areas and near high-value locations like large cities, it is our ambition to build the first environmentally friendly floating city on the sea. In 2050 the world will look completely different than today. By then, the first floating city in the ocean may have been built and could look like this:  We can save our oceans, we can save our planet, and we can improve our quality of life, all at the same time. These floating developments are not science fiction, it is technically feasible, and it is already happening. However, to meet the global challenges, we are currently facing, we don’t have a lot of time. 2050 Is closer than we think. Floating city: Plan for 40,000 people to live on the high seas. A Florida-based firm wants to create a 'community on the sea' which would circle the globe every two years. Floating developments could save the lives of people in low lying areas like coastal cities and island communities. It provides space for the growing world population. And at the same time, it can produce food and energy in a renewable and sustainable way. References: Jan van Kessel, Barbara, Vicky, David, Harriet, Bart, Karina and Rutger at Blue21 Richard Gray, How can we manage Earth’s land? BBC, 29 June 2017 Joe McCarthy, The Planet Will Face Major Water Shortages by 2050, UN Chief Warns. Global Citizen, 8 June 2017 NU / AT5, Nog ruim 42.000 woningen tekort in regio Amsterdam. 11 February 2019 Joe Quirk, The future of floating cities. World’s Fair Nano Future Festival, 29 March 2018 Before you go! Recommended:  Floating Cities: A Sustainable Concept For Future Communities Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about Floating Cities, Architecture, or Future Buildings? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Madness Or Visionary? A Floating Airport
Madness Or Visionary? A Floating Airport
Community

A community is you and me. A network of social, economic, ecological and many other relationships. We all work together and live in urban, suburban and rural areas. Social sustainability is becoming increasingly important on our small planet. We define: support, quality of life, development, adaptation, rights and labour.

We belong to a group of individuals - our society - in which we belong geographically. Certain environmental issues play an important role in our society. Here, sustainable solutions are sought, developed and implemented. This may differ from societies in other countries, but because of our global environmental issues and dependence, we must learn to work more together so that we can all benefit from sharing sustainable knowledge to tackle, for example, climate change.

Green architecture is important. Building with local materials that can be recycled and reused brings us a big step forward to have less impact on the environment. With green architecture we can build smart cities where resources can be used more efficiently and information can be shared, thus improving our society, your community.

Lifestyle is the way we live, the dynamics of personality. Fashion defines our self and together with food it is getting - at present - an even more important role in our society. It's not just about taste, but especially about the burden that the fashion industry, agriculture and the meat industry have on our resources, especially water.

If there was an urge to come up with a sustainable way of living solutions and share these topics globally it’s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about tiny houses, your experiences and expectations for the future at home and globally. 

Global Sustainability X-change, that’s what you can do together with WhatsOrb. What's in for me?

 

Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations