Community

About: <p>A community is you and me. A network of social, economic, ecological and many other relationships. We all work together and live in urban, suburban and rural areas. Social sustainability is becoming increasingly important on our small planet. We define: support, quality of life, development, adaptation, rights and labour.</p> <p>We belong to a group of individuals - <a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/society">our society</a> - in which we belong geographically. Certain environmental issues play an important role in our society. Here, sustainable solutions are sought, developed and implemented. This may differ from societies in other countries, but because of our global environmental issues and&nbsp;<span lang="en" tabindex="0">dependence</span>, we must learn to work more together so that we can all benefit from sharing sustainable knowledge to tackle, for example, climate change.</p> <p><a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/green-architecture">Green architecture</a> is important. Building with local materials that can be recycled and reused brings us a big step forward to have less impact on the environment. With green architecture we can build <a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/smart-cities">smart cities</a> where resources can be used more efficiently and information can be shared, thus improving our society, your community.</p> <p><a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/lifestyle">Lifestyle</a> is the way we live, the dynamics of personality. Fashion defines our self and together with food it is getting - at present - an even more important role in our society. It's not just about taste, but especially about the burden that the fashion industry, agriculture and the meat industry have on our resources, especially water.</p> <p>If there was an urge to come up with a sustainable way of living solutions and share these topics globally it&rsquo;s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about tiny houses, your experiences and expectations for the future at home and globally.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Global Sustainability X-change, that&rsquo;s what you can do together with WhatsOrb.&nbsp;<a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/blog/your-shared-sustainable-ideas-make-our-earth-a-better-place">What's in for me?</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
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Greenest Buildings In The World: Sustainable Highlights
The battle against global warming must be fought on all fronts. Not only should we be looking at industry action and a radical shift in means of transportation, we also ought to take a good hard look at the way we go about our daily business. At the way our cities are currently organised to not only become ‘smarter’, but also more sustainable.   Under the growing pressure of urbanisation and sharply rising property prices, cities have to find ways of allowing more people to comfortably live in the same area - while decreasing their carbon footprint. A challenge that some are struggling with, while others are tackling it heads-on. One new trend is that of urban gardens and vertical farms, more and more of which are sprouting up in cities worldwide. Architects are quick to jump on this trend as well, and are coming up with increasingly ingenious solutions to make their buildings greener. At times, it looks as if they are locked in a fierce competition to come up with the most striking, the most sustainable, and the most eye-catching design that really makes a green statement.   Ready to get inspired? Then take a look at some of the most publicised or remarkable examples. The Crystal, London, United Kingdom Often hailed as ‘one of the greenest buildings ever built by mankind’, The Crystal is a stunning landmark that cleverly uses natural daylight to significantly cut back on lighting costs. The smart lighting system in place, powered by solar panels, further eliminates unnecessary lighting; integrating LED and fluorescent lights when needed. Serving as the headquarters of telecom-giant Siemens, The Crystal also recycles both rainwater and sewage to generate fresh drinking water.   Pixel Building, Melbourne, Australia The Pixel Building was the first building ever to obtain a perfect Green Star score, setting the benchmark for sustainable architecture in Australia. Not only is it completely carbon-free, in that the carbon generated by the building’s operations are offset by its generation of renewable energy. It is also proud of its carbon-neutral status, having offset the carbon in materials that were used to construct the building. The Change Initiative, Shaikh Zayed Road, Dubai As one of the world’s leading nations in mind-bending architecture and design, Dubai could not stay behind. After having built some of the world’s tallest skyscrapers, The Change Initiative was the next prestige project - a commercial building that took over the Pixel Building’s status as most sustainable building in the world. Not only does it house various shops and restaurants promoting green living, it also frequently hosts exhibitions and events highlighting new sustainable innovations. Bullitt Center, Seattle, USA Upon its presentation, the Bullitt Center was introduced as a building with an ideal lifespan of 250 years. This really set the mark for making buildings part of a more ‘natural’ ecosystem, having an expiration date, so to speak. This brainchild of Bullitt Foundation president Denis Hayes is carbon and energy neutral, hosts a self-sufficient water and sewage processing system, and generates its energy using photovoltaic solar panels.   {youtube}                                                    Greenest Buildings In The World: Fighting Global Warming                                                  Coolest Most Environmentally Friendly Buildings in The World ACROS Fukuoka Foundation Building, Fukuoka, Japan Japan’s seventh largest city Fukuoka has spared little expense in promoting the ACROS Fukuoka Foundation Building as one of its main attractions. It is a poster child of the architectural concept of eco-architecture, blending in local greenery with sharp building designs. The heart of this building is made up of a massive atrium, flooding the insides with natural light. The water drainage system on the roof is also remarkable: it flows down like a mountain, watering the vegetation on its way down in a perfectly mimicked natural process. Phipps’ Center For Sustainable Landscapes, Pittsburgh, USA For a building carrying this name, you would already expect something quite spectacular. Thankfully, the Phipps’ Center For Sustainable Landscapes does not disappoint. From its beautiful rooftop garden, where visitors can take a stroll over the green roof, to its plant-filled hallways and staircases. Extra pluses include its water recycling system and use of renewable energy sources like wind, solar and geothermal for its operations. Wat Pa Maha Chedi Kaew, Sisaket, Thailand This modern Buddhist temple, located in the beautiful town of Khun Han, Sisaket, also goes by the name of The Million Bottle Temple. Refreshingly, this states exactly what it is made out of: a million empty beer bottles. Befittingly green Heineken bottles are mixed with the brown bottles of local beer brand Chang to create a stunning whole. Construction already started back in 1984, as in initiative of Buddhist monks, with the temple and its surrounding comfort rooms and crematorium now acting as a literal beacon of green innovation. Bahrain World Trade Center, Manama, Bahrain Standing tall at 50 floors, this twin tower complex celebrated its tenth birthday last year. As of now, the Bahrain World Trade Center, or BWTC, is still the only skyscraper in the world to have incorporated wind turbines as part of its blueprint. In an exceptional design feat, the two towers are interconnected using imposing sky bridges, which also act as the beams to which 225 kW wind turbines are attached. It looks good - and does well. Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Yishun Central, Singapore You will not be surprised to find out that one of the greenest hospitals in the world can be found in the tiny Asian island nation of Singapore, a hotspot for modern architecture. In the Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, an overwhelmingly green environment has been created to provide a healing environment for its patients - but also to take care of our planet’s health, through the use of a solar water heating system and renewable energy sources. Taipei Public Library, Beitou branch, Taiwan Lingering on the topic of public buildings in tiny Asian nations, the Taipei Public Library was largely designed around its huge windows that can be opened wide - allowing both light and fresh air to come in, reducing the need for artificial light and fans or airconditioning systems. Its roof catches rainwater, which is used to flush the toilets, and renewable energy sources are the norm. Toronto Tree Tower, Toronto, Canada A must-mention on any self-respecting list of green buildings, the Toronto Tree Tower is an ambitious project that proposes to build a residential block out of timber, complete with staggering walls overgrown with plants and trees rooting on large balconies. Watch this space. Yin & Yang House, Kassel, Germany One would not quickly associate Yin & Yang retreats with the German town on Kassel, although one only has to look at it to be convinced of its benefits. The house boasts gorgeous, relaxing gardens on its interlocking roof, while being fully self-sufficient. Architect Chris Precht has described his vision as “ ecological materials we want to touch. Integrated gardens we can smell and eat. And buildings we can hear because bees and birds nest in them .” Park Royal Hotel Pickering, Singapore High rise gardens, reflecting pools, waterfalls and green walls. Need we say more? Recommended:  Sustainable Green Buildings, Innovative Architects: Globally ‘Off The Grid Office’, location undecided Another ambitious idea that has not yet been constructed but certainly deserves a mention. The ‘Off The Grid Office’ tries to mimic nature in its design and construction, in an attempt to bring us closer to nature: “ any kind of human environment should be integrated in the existing natural environment, because it already offers perks that we normally try to reproduce through artificial materials ,” according to architect Stefan Mantu. Shilda Winery, Kakheti, Georgia In the remote location of Kakheti, Georgia, one will have to look hard to find the Shilda Winery. The building is quite literally embedded in the surrounding vineyards and immerses itself in its natural environment. It effectively uses the thermal mass of the soil to optimise cooling inside the building - a must-have for any good winery - and has been designed to face north and therefore avoid direct solar gain. Now we really want to go out and visit all of those impressive buildings in person. Recommended:  Sustainable Circular Architecture, The Svart Hotel: Norway Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day.
The battle against global warming must be fought on all fronts. Not only should we be looking at industry action and a radical shift in means of transportation, we also ought to take a good hard look at the way we go about our daily business. At the way our cities are currently organised to not only become ‘smarter’, but also more sustainable.   Under the growing pressure of urbanisation and sharply rising property prices, cities have to find ways of allowing more people to comfortably live in the same area - while decreasing their carbon footprint. A challenge that some are struggling with, while others are tackling it heads-on. One new trend is that of urban gardens and vertical farms, more and more of which are sprouting up in cities worldwide. Architects are quick to jump on this trend as well, and are coming up with increasingly ingenious solutions to make their buildings greener. At times, it looks as if they are locked in a fierce competition to come up with the most striking, the most sustainable, and the most eye-catching design that really makes a green statement.   Ready to get inspired? Then take a look at some of the most publicised or remarkable examples. The Crystal, London, United Kingdom Often hailed as ‘one of the greenest buildings ever built by mankind’, The Crystal is a stunning landmark that cleverly uses natural daylight to significantly cut back on lighting costs. The smart lighting system in place, powered by solar panels, further eliminates unnecessary lighting; integrating LED and fluorescent lights when needed. Serving as the headquarters of telecom-giant Siemens, The Crystal also recycles both rainwater and sewage to generate fresh drinking water.   Pixel Building, Melbourne, Australia The Pixel Building was the first building ever to obtain a perfect Green Star score, setting the benchmark for sustainable architecture in Australia. Not only is it completely carbon-free, in that the carbon generated by the building’s operations are offset by its generation of renewable energy. It is also proud of its carbon-neutral status, having offset the carbon in materials that were used to construct the building. The Change Initiative, Shaikh Zayed Road, Dubai As one of the world’s leading nations in mind-bending architecture and design, Dubai could not stay behind. After having built some of the world’s tallest skyscrapers, The Change Initiative was the next prestige project - a commercial building that took over the Pixel Building’s status as most sustainable building in the world. Not only does it house various shops and restaurants promoting green living, it also frequently hosts exhibitions and events highlighting new sustainable innovations. Bullitt Center, Seattle, USA Upon its presentation, the Bullitt Center was introduced as a building with an ideal lifespan of 250 years. This really set the mark for making buildings part of a more ‘natural’ ecosystem, having an expiration date, so to speak. This brainchild of Bullitt Foundation president Denis Hayes is carbon and energy neutral, hosts a self-sufficient water and sewage processing system, and generates its energy using photovoltaic solar panels.   {youtube}                                                    Greenest Buildings In The World: Fighting Global Warming                                                  Coolest Most Environmentally Friendly Buildings in The World ACROS Fukuoka Foundation Building, Fukuoka, Japan Japan’s seventh largest city Fukuoka has spared little expense in promoting the ACROS Fukuoka Foundation Building as one of its main attractions. It is a poster child of the architectural concept of eco-architecture, blending in local greenery with sharp building designs. The heart of this building is made up of a massive atrium, flooding the insides with natural light. The water drainage system on the roof is also remarkable: it flows down like a mountain, watering the vegetation on its way down in a perfectly mimicked natural process. Phipps’ Center For Sustainable Landscapes, Pittsburgh, USA For a building carrying this name, you would already expect something quite spectacular. Thankfully, the Phipps’ Center For Sustainable Landscapes does not disappoint. From its beautiful rooftop garden, where visitors can take a stroll over the green roof, to its plant-filled hallways and staircases. Extra pluses include its water recycling system and use of renewable energy sources like wind, solar and geothermal for its operations. Wat Pa Maha Chedi Kaew, Sisaket, Thailand This modern Buddhist temple, located in the beautiful town of Khun Han, Sisaket, also goes by the name of The Million Bottle Temple. Refreshingly, this states exactly what it is made out of: a million empty beer bottles. Befittingly green Heineken bottles are mixed with the brown bottles of local beer brand Chang to create a stunning whole. Construction already started back in 1984, as in initiative of Buddhist monks, with the temple and its surrounding comfort rooms and crematorium now acting as a literal beacon of green innovation. Bahrain World Trade Center, Manama, Bahrain Standing tall at 50 floors, this twin tower complex celebrated its tenth birthday last year. As of now, the Bahrain World Trade Center, or BWTC, is still the only skyscraper in the world to have incorporated wind turbines as part of its blueprint. In an exceptional design feat, the two towers are interconnected using imposing sky bridges, which also act as the beams to which 225 kW wind turbines are attached. It looks good - and does well. Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Yishun Central, Singapore You will not be surprised to find out that one of the greenest hospitals in the world can be found in the tiny Asian island nation of Singapore, a hotspot for modern architecture. In the Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, an overwhelmingly green environment has been created to provide a healing environment for its patients - but also to take care of our planet’s health, through the use of a solar water heating system and renewable energy sources. Taipei Public Library, Beitou branch, Taiwan Lingering on the topic of public buildings in tiny Asian nations, the Taipei Public Library was largely designed around its huge windows that can be opened wide - allowing both light and fresh air to come in, reducing the need for artificial light and fans or airconditioning systems. Its roof catches rainwater, which is used to flush the toilets, and renewable energy sources are the norm. Toronto Tree Tower, Toronto, Canada A must-mention on any self-respecting list of green buildings, the Toronto Tree Tower is an ambitious project that proposes to build a residential block out of timber, complete with staggering walls overgrown with plants and trees rooting on large balconies. Watch this space. Yin & Yang House, Kassel, Germany One would not quickly associate Yin & Yang retreats with the German town on Kassel, although one only has to look at it to be convinced of its benefits. The house boasts gorgeous, relaxing gardens on its interlocking roof, while being fully self-sufficient. Architect Chris Precht has described his vision as “ ecological materials we want to touch. Integrated gardens we can smell and eat. And buildings we can hear because bees and birds nest in them .” Park Royal Hotel Pickering, Singapore High rise gardens, reflecting pools, waterfalls and green walls. Need we say more? Recommended:  Sustainable Green Buildings, Innovative Architects: Globally ‘Off The Grid Office’, location undecided Another ambitious idea that has not yet been constructed but certainly deserves a mention. The ‘Off The Grid Office’ tries to mimic nature in its design and construction, in an attempt to bring us closer to nature: “ any kind of human environment should be integrated in the existing natural environment, because it already offers perks that we normally try to reproduce through artificial materials ,” according to architect Stefan Mantu. Shilda Winery, Kakheti, Georgia In the remote location of Kakheti, Georgia, one will have to look hard to find the Shilda Winery. The building is quite literally embedded in the surrounding vineyards and immerses itself in its natural environment. It effectively uses the thermal mass of the soil to optimise cooling inside the building - a must-have for any good winery - and has been designed to face north and therefore avoid direct solar gain. Now we really want to go out and visit all of those impressive buildings in person. Recommended:  Sustainable Circular Architecture, The Svart Hotel: Norway Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day.
Greenest Buildings In The World: Sustainable Highlights
Greenest Buildings In The World: Sustainable Highlights
Sustainable Housing Reused Materials And Photo-voltaic Panels
There are various problems concerning housing construction in countries as Lebanon: problems of waste management and construction pressure, for example. A solution could be Lifehaus, a new housing prototype for homes that regain building techniques from the ancestor and that use natural and recycled materials to create home-free emissions. The designers are aiming for a sustainable and inexpensive alternative that helps alleviate the problem of access to housing in developing countries. Self-reliance and a low carbon footprint The idea for Lifehaus emerged from the hand of Lebanese architect Nizar Haddad and Australian journalist Nadine Mazloum. The concept revolves around affordability, self-reliance and a low carbon footprint. The design corresponds to a house of 160 square meters: this surface consists of a study with living room, mezzanine, terrace, greenhouse and a technical room. The first experimental test was held in Baskinta, Lebanon. The construction process Lifehaus: comfortable, made with natural materials and low cost. It all sounds like a dream, but how does the design of Lifehaus actually work? In this video you will get to know in depth the construction process and the characteristics of this house, which is offered in three categories: economic, standard and luxury. It combines comfort with the application of traditional methods of construction and the use of natural materials available in the environment, to which parts and recycled products are added. Reused materials and photovoltaic panels The construction is shaped by different types of material. In particular, a fundamental part is based on local materials of low energy consumption such as limestone, clay, hemp or rock. Also, materials like reused glass bottles, tires and aluminium cans are discussed. Because there is no availability of wood or bamboo in the area, cement is chosen for the roofs. The area around the house has been of great important in the design of Lifehaus. Created in a way that allows to retain heat and humidity, as well as to protect the interior of the external climatological conditions, this house is designed to operate outside the network and thus give a response to those who live in areas without access to electricity. Therefore, the design incorporates photovoltaic panels, as well as wind and hydraulic turbines to ensure the supply of the home. The scarcity of water has also been included in the design. The house is equipped with a system for collecting rainwater, in addition to using recycled water for irrigation. And this model also seeks to alleviate the lack of food that effects millions of people in the world, which is why these houses also include  a greenhouse and a hydroponic cultivation system. A low-cost option With Lifehaus, the creators want to facilitate access to housing by offering a low-cost option. Specifically, the price per square meter would be reduced by half compared to a house built by oneself. The reduced dependence on fuel and electricity would also mean significant savings for those who choose this type of house. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/green-architecture
There are various problems concerning housing construction in countries as Lebanon: problems of waste management and construction pressure, for example. A solution could be Lifehaus, a new housing prototype for homes that regain building techniques from the ancestor and that use natural and recycled materials to create home-free emissions. The designers are aiming for a sustainable and inexpensive alternative that helps alleviate the problem of access to housing in developing countries. Self-reliance and a low carbon footprint The idea for Lifehaus emerged from the hand of Lebanese architect Nizar Haddad and Australian journalist Nadine Mazloum. The concept revolves around affordability, self-reliance and a low carbon footprint. The design corresponds to a house of 160 square meters: this surface consists of a study with living room, mezzanine, terrace, greenhouse and a technical room. The first experimental test was held in Baskinta, Lebanon. The construction process Lifehaus: comfortable, made with natural materials and low cost. It all sounds like a dream, but how does the design of Lifehaus actually work? In this video you will get to know in depth the construction process and the characteristics of this house, which is offered in three categories: economic, standard and luxury. It combines comfort with the application of traditional methods of construction and the use of natural materials available in the environment, to which parts and recycled products are added. Reused materials and photovoltaic panels The construction is shaped by different types of material. In particular, a fundamental part is based on local materials of low energy consumption such as limestone, clay, hemp or rock. Also, materials like reused glass bottles, tires and aluminium cans are discussed. Because there is no availability of wood or bamboo in the area, cement is chosen for the roofs. The area around the house has been of great important in the design of Lifehaus. Created in a way that allows to retain heat and humidity, as well as to protect the interior of the external climatological conditions, this house is designed to operate outside the network and thus give a response to those who live in areas without access to electricity. Therefore, the design incorporates photovoltaic panels, as well as wind and hydraulic turbines to ensure the supply of the home. The scarcity of water has also been included in the design. The house is equipped with a system for collecting rainwater, in addition to using recycled water for irrigation. And this model also seeks to alleviate the lack of food that effects millions of people in the world, which is why these houses also include  a greenhouse and a hydroponic cultivation system. A low-cost option With Lifehaus, the creators want to facilitate access to housing by offering a low-cost option. Specifically, the price per square meter would be reduced by half compared to a house built by oneself. The reduced dependence on fuel and electricity would also mean significant savings for those who choose this type of house. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/green-architecture
Sustainable Housing Reused Materials And Photo-voltaic Panels
Sustainable Housing Reused Materials And Photo-voltaic Panels
Sustainable Luxury: QO Is The Tesla Among Green Hotels
In the hotel of the future, sustainability is the standard. Hotel concept QO makes this standard visible, or actually, invisible: and it’s precisely the intention. Sustainable luxury is reflected in the choice of materials, the restaurant menu and installations. This hotel does not place the responsibility with the guest, but takes it. A patchwork of sliding panels and large windows characterizes the façade of the hotel. Above the glass revolving door of the 'Dutch eatery' that is located on the ground floor, you can read the name Persijn – a very conscious choice. The name refers to the thirteenth-century Amsterdam landowner Jan Persijn van Velsen. Connection is most important to the QO: between hotel visitors and local residents, between building and district and between neighbourhood and city. Forming a sustainable vision; everybody needs to belong "An universal need of people is to belong to a community, whether it's in a shed in Guatemala or in a penthouse in Manhattan," says Xander Bueno de Mesquita. With his innovative vision, the project started about ten years ago. When he returned to the Netherlands after a long-term trip, he decided that he wanted to translate this universal need to belong into a sustainable hotel concept. "I wanted to develop the Tesla among the hotels." A sustainability vision was formed to determine an appropriate sustainability label. Bueno de Mesquita did not want to start his project with the certification, to prevent just finishing a sustainability checklist. LEED Platinum proved to be the best fit: in order to achieve this status, sustainability had to be fully integrated. Do not feed waste! A tight schedule reduced the transport movements from, to and at the construction site. In addition, prefabrication resulted in less waste during construction. Ready-made work packages were delivered and assembled according to a just-in-time principle, 95 percent of the waste that still originated was separated on site. Waste recycling and reduction were also included in the contracts with subcontractors, with the motto: "do not feed waste". In the choice of materials, reuse and distance have also been taken into account. For example, the façade of the former Amsterdam Shell tower was ground into granules and processed into the concrete construction of the QO. At least fifty percent of all material used during construction originates from locations within a radius of 800 kilometres. Waste is one of the cycles that the hotel focuses on. The others are water, energy and food. Shower water once again receives value as flushing water for the toilet and vegetables, herbs and fish are grown in a closed system in the greenhouse. The sustainable vision is also reflected in the hotel menu. It’s 'Dutch cuisine', which emphasizes the use of local products. Seeking the connection The hotel actively seeks the connection with the city and the surrounding area. According to Bueno de Mesquita, this is necessary for a sustainable building: "It's about co-creation with unexpected parties, not only with architects, but also with the neighbourhood." The greenhouse on the roof, for example, can serve as an educational location for the local school. The location of the sustainable hotel is no accident. It fits in with the urban plan of the city of Amsterdam to redevelop the Amstelkwartier district in a sustainable way. A sustainable hotel therefore fits in seamlessly. Nevertheless, sustainability and a hotel environment do not automatically match, says general manager Inge van Weert: "In general, a hotel is a very wasteful environment ."   The management of QO deviates from that standard with its zero waste ambition. To achieve this, the QO makes agreements with partners and suppliers. For example, farmers supply fruit and vegetables in crates that the QO provided. In the rooms the care products are in bags, boxes or large refill containers. With each partner, agreements have been made about what happens when products no longer last. "In about a year or two plant pots can be made from the uniforms." Sustainability should be standard Sustainability is the standard in QO, but not yet in the Netherlands. The hotel demonstrates: sustainability can become the standard with a sustainable vision, perseverance and co-creation with unexpected parties. Without the guest having to notice anything, sustainability comes back everywhere: from the construction drawing to the board. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/architecture
In the hotel of the future, sustainability is the standard. Hotel concept QO makes this standard visible, or actually, invisible: and it’s precisely the intention. Sustainable luxury is reflected in the choice of materials, the restaurant menu and installations. This hotel does not place the responsibility with the guest, but takes it. A patchwork of sliding panels and large windows characterizes the façade of the hotel. Above the glass revolving door of the 'Dutch eatery' that is located on the ground floor, you can read the name Persijn – a very conscious choice. The name refers to the thirteenth-century Amsterdam landowner Jan Persijn van Velsen. Connection is most important to the QO: between hotel visitors and local residents, between building and district and between neighbourhood and city. Forming a sustainable vision; everybody needs to belong "An universal need of people is to belong to a community, whether it's in a shed in Guatemala or in a penthouse in Manhattan," says Xander Bueno de Mesquita. With his innovative vision, the project started about ten years ago. When he returned to the Netherlands after a long-term trip, he decided that he wanted to translate this universal need to belong into a sustainable hotel concept. "I wanted to develop the Tesla among the hotels." A sustainability vision was formed to determine an appropriate sustainability label. Bueno de Mesquita did not want to start his project with the certification, to prevent just finishing a sustainability checklist. LEED Platinum proved to be the best fit: in order to achieve this status, sustainability had to be fully integrated. Do not feed waste! A tight schedule reduced the transport movements from, to and at the construction site. In addition, prefabrication resulted in less waste during construction. Ready-made work packages were delivered and assembled according to a just-in-time principle, 95 percent of the waste that still originated was separated on site. Waste recycling and reduction were also included in the contracts with subcontractors, with the motto: "do not feed waste". In the choice of materials, reuse and distance have also been taken into account. For example, the façade of the former Amsterdam Shell tower was ground into granules and processed into the concrete construction of the QO. At least fifty percent of all material used during construction originates from locations within a radius of 800 kilometres. Waste is one of the cycles that the hotel focuses on. The others are water, energy and food. Shower water once again receives value as flushing water for the toilet and vegetables, herbs and fish are grown in a closed system in the greenhouse. The sustainable vision is also reflected in the hotel menu. It’s 'Dutch cuisine', which emphasizes the use of local products. Seeking the connection The hotel actively seeks the connection with the city and the surrounding area. According to Bueno de Mesquita, this is necessary for a sustainable building: "It's about co-creation with unexpected parties, not only with architects, but also with the neighbourhood." The greenhouse on the roof, for example, can serve as an educational location for the local school. The location of the sustainable hotel is no accident. It fits in with the urban plan of the city of Amsterdam to redevelop the Amstelkwartier district in a sustainable way. A sustainable hotel therefore fits in seamlessly. Nevertheless, sustainability and a hotel environment do not automatically match, says general manager Inge van Weert: "In general, a hotel is a very wasteful environment ."   The management of QO deviates from that standard with its zero waste ambition. To achieve this, the QO makes agreements with partners and suppliers. For example, farmers supply fruit and vegetables in crates that the QO provided. In the rooms the care products are in bags, boxes or large refill containers. With each partner, agreements have been made about what happens when products no longer last. "In about a year or two plant pots can be made from the uniforms." Sustainability should be standard Sustainability is the standard in QO, but not yet in the Netherlands. The hotel demonstrates: sustainability can become the standard with a sustainable vision, perseverance and co-creation with unexpected parties. Without the guest having to notice anything, sustainability comes back everywhere: from the construction drawing to the board. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/architecture
Sustainable Luxury: QO Is The Tesla Among Green Hotels
Sustainable Luxury: QO Is The Tesla Among Green Hotels
A Geodesic Dome: Sustainable Arctic Circle Living In Style
The Arctic Circle is not exactly known for its pleasant living conditions. The temperatures are more often than not lingering around the freezing point. The winter is long and dark, while the summer is short and still rather cool. Only very few animal and plant species are able to survive in those harsh conditions, making it an even tougher place to live.   The Hjertefølger family took on the challenge of living in this place where the nearest neighbour might be dozens of miles away. Mom, dad, and four kids have spent the last three years in a hand-built cob house, protected by a huge, geodesic glass dome. Inside, the family can live comfortably during the year, while growing their own food as well. Sounds futuristic? Well, it sure it! Meet the Arctic Nature House of the Hjertefølgers The house of the Hjertefølgers is located in the north of Norway , on an island called Sandhornøya. A gorgeous, rough environment, for sure, that is shrouded in darkness for the majority in the year. This puts a great strain on any building. As such, the family came up with their treasured project, that took over two years to design and build.   The end result? The Naturhuset, or Nature House, is self-sustaining and powered by solar energy, consisting of three storeys and boasting five bedrooms. Along with this, a large irrigated outdoor garden was designed to guarantee a stable supply of food. These crops will be able to grow in the toughest of winters, as they are placed under a massive, 25-foot-high glass dome. Even fruits and vegetables that are not normally suited for the climate thrive in this environment. Green, eco-friendly and  sustainable architecture All aspects of this building have been designed in such a way that they are as eco-friendly and carbon neutral as possible. For instance, the family composts and re-uses water to water the plants. Additionally, the solar system on the roof ensure that, for those summer months in which the sun is actually out and shining, it fully operates on renewable energy sources.   Mother Ingrid has been a driving force behind this new family home. She calls herself a permaculturalist, vegan and yoga practitioner and prides herself on a carbon-neutral lifestyle - that she is happy to pass on to her children. And although most would not consider the Arctic Circle to be the best place to raise a family, she is happy they did: “ The house works as we intended and planned. We love the house; it has a soul of its own and it feels very personal. What surprises us is the fact that we built ourselves anew as we built the house. The process changed us, shaped us .” Further technical details Ingrid is not exactly exaggerating when she claims that she and her family built the house from scratch. It truly is a labour of love, built out of cob. This mixture of earth, straw and sand is an ancient-old, natural material; that is allegedly able to withstand fire and earthquakes - all while being cheap and energy-efficient.   As for the dome, this has been constructed using 360 panels of 6-millimeter thick glass. At this thickness, it is capable of withstanding the heavy winds and snowfall that the area is infamous for. These glass panels are placed in a recycled aluminium frame, chosen for its lifespan of over 100 years, its low maintenance costs and its structural integrity. To top it off, the solar system covering the dome generates sufficient renewable energy to meet the house’s needs. Why the dome-home is such a great idea Normally, people would be discouraged from taking on the challenge of building a house on or near the Arctic Circle. Not only is the delivery of building materials an absolute headache, the energy needs of such a process are substantial. Yet the movement where people opt for homes under a dome is commendable and promising. The greenhouse-dome will mitigate the worst of temperatures and keep heating costs down, a notorious pitfall for Arctic houses. At the same time, it allows households to grow their own produce, using the excess heat stored in the dome. Homegrown, local products are always preferable to imported fruits and vegetables - another promising movement to drive down energy costs.   And if this does not ring true - then consider the great pictures you can share on your Instagram account. Just ask Ingrid (@im_hjerte). https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/green-architecture
The Arctic Circle is not exactly known for its pleasant living conditions. The temperatures are more often than not lingering around the freezing point. The winter is long and dark, while the summer is short and still rather cool. Only very few animal and plant species are able to survive in those harsh conditions, making it an even tougher place to live.   The Hjertefølger family took on the challenge of living in this place where the nearest neighbour might be dozens of miles away. Mom, dad, and four kids have spent the last three years in a hand-built cob house, protected by a huge, geodesic glass dome. Inside, the family can live comfortably during the year, while growing their own food as well. Sounds futuristic? Well, it sure it! Meet the Arctic Nature House of the Hjertefølgers The house of the Hjertefølgers is located in the north of Norway , on an island called Sandhornøya. A gorgeous, rough environment, for sure, that is shrouded in darkness for the majority in the year. This puts a great strain on any building. As such, the family came up with their treasured project, that took over two years to design and build.   The end result? The Naturhuset, or Nature House, is self-sustaining and powered by solar energy, consisting of three storeys and boasting five bedrooms. Along with this, a large irrigated outdoor garden was designed to guarantee a stable supply of food. These crops will be able to grow in the toughest of winters, as they are placed under a massive, 25-foot-high glass dome. Even fruits and vegetables that are not normally suited for the climate thrive in this environment. Green, eco-friendly and  sustainable architecture All aspects of this building have been designed in such a way that they are as eco-friendly and carbon neutral as possible. For instance, the family composts and re-uses water to water the plants. Additionally, the solar system on the roof ensure that, for those summer months in which the sun is actually out and shining, it fully operates on renewable energy sources.   Mother Ingrid has been a driving force behind this new family home. She calls herself a permaculturalist, vegan and yoga practitioner and prides herself on a carbon-neutral lifestyle - that she is happy to pass on to her children. And although most would not consider the Arctic Circle to be the best place to raise a family, she is happy they did: “ The house works as we intended and planned. We love the house; it has a soul of its own and it feels very personal. What surprises us is the fact that we built ourselves anew as we built the house. The process changed us, shaped us .” Further technical details Ingrid is not exactly exaggerating when she claims that she and her family built the house from scratch. It truly is a labour of love, built out of cob. This mixture of earth, straw and sand is an ancient-old, natural material; that is allegedly able to withstand fire and earthquakes - all while being cheap and energy-efficient.   As for the dome, this has been constructed using 360 panels of 6-millimeter thick glass. At this thickness, it is capable of withstanding the heavy winds and snowfall that the area is infamous for. These glass panels are placed in a recycled aluminium frame, chosen for its lifespan of over 100 years, its low maintenance costs and its structural integrity. To top it off, the solar system covering the dome generates sufficient renewable energy to meet the house’s needs. Why the dome-home is such a great idea Normally, people would be discouraged from taking on the challenge of building a house on or near the Arctic Circle. Not only is the delivery of building materials an absolute headache, the energy needs of such a process are substantial. Yet the movement where people opt for homes under a dome is commendable and promising. The greenhouse-dome will mitigate the worst of temperatures and keep heating costs down, a notorious pitfall for Arctic houses. At the same time, it allows households to grow their own produce, using the excess heat stored in the dome. Homegrown, local products are always preferable to imported fruits and vegetables - another promising movement to drive down energy costs.   And if this does not ring true - then consider the great pictures you can share on your Instagram account. Just ask Ingrid (@im_hjerte). https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/green-architecture
A Geodesic Dome: Sustainable Arctic Circle Living In Style
A Geodesic Dome: Sustainable Arctic Circle Living In Style
Sustainable Way To The Top: Refuge Du Gouter France
Only a small number of us will ever be able to experience it: the last stop before the final climb to the top of the Mont Blanc. This stop on the main route was notorious for its lousy accommodation: a bland, uncomfortable building built in the sixties, that was not only painfully outdated but also an environmental hazard. Those visiting for an overnight stay would do well to prepare themselves for recurring problems with hygiene - the two outside toilets are not only inconvenient, they also heavily pollute the surrounding area through its direct emptying of waste on the mountainside - and freezing nightly temperatures, even inside.   Not exactly a great preparation for one of the biggest climbs in some climbers’ lives, yet it certainly adds a certain something to the charm and roughness associated with mountaineering. Right? Well, that logic might have been sound until recently, when it was high time to upgrade the lodging. A new, sustainable mountain hut This was done in the form of the Refuge du Goûter, a new and ecological hut. The remarkable structure, resembling some kind of futuristic egg, has four stories and an all-wooden structure that has been clad using stainless steel. It partly overhangs the cliff below, guaranteeing breathtaking views and enhancing its ‘curb appeal’. And appeal it certainly has. Not only from an architectural point of view (the Swiss designer Hervé Dessimoz spent five years merely designing the building), but also from an ecological point of view. The building is self-sufficient in its demand for energy and water, boasting a solar thermal system and self-sufficient water supply.   Plenty of ecological features This sophisticated system for water reclamation provides a supply of water for cooking and washing. It makes good use of the egg shape of the building: because of the wind, constant turbulence lets the snow slide across its outer skin, after which it accumulates in a grid of some 60 square meters. Within this grid, heat generated by solar panels melts this snow, after which it is collected in huge tanks. Due to the size of these tanks, the building can operate for 16 days without snow.   These solar panels also generate heat and electricity for the building, providing in nearly all of its heating and power needs - only the kitchen still makes use of gas. When there is no sunlight, a backup generator that runs on rapeseed oil will produce electricity.   Sewage farm and isolation Another huge plus: human waste will no longer be dumped on the mountainside. Instead, the six environmentally friendly toilets within the hut are built to be ecological and clean. The amount of water that they use is minimised through the implementation of a vacuum-suction system that most of us will know from aircrafts. Upon flushing, the human waste will be collected in a tiny sewage farm that processes it into some kind of highly compacted sludge that can, if required, be heliported down to the valley and be disposed properly. No longer will eager mountaineers have to suffer from the cold: the new location is equipped with triple glazing and dual-flow ventilation, as well as insulation provided by wood-fibre panels. All of this ensures an indoor temperature that ranges between 18 degrees Celsius and 22 degrees Celsius.   Construction in pieces The entire structure was put together in pieces: pre-assembled parts were taken in by helicopter and mounted securely using a specific resin adhesive. This drastically reduced the number of nuts and bolts that would be required. It took three years to complete construction, with work only possible in the warmer months of the years - and frequently interrupted by severe weather events.   Despite the difficulties, the project supervisor Thomas Büchi and architect Dessimoz never wavered in their dedication to the project: “ What we're saying is that, if it's possible to build a self-sufficient, eco-friendly building at 3,835 metres, there's no excuse for not doing it at sea level .” And right they are! The need for an ecologically sustainable building at this altitude and in this spot might have been doubted by some, yet it only seems to highlight the possibilities and the ease with which it can be executed, if only those in charge are dedicated to doing ‘the right thing’.   Countering the effects of global warming Even in this small Mont Blanc community, the effects of global warming and other strains that have been put on the natural  environment are starting to show. The number of serious accidents amongst climbers on the Mont Blanc has increased significantly in recent years, most of which resulting from falling rocks. In the past, snow and ice would keep them in place, yet due to warmer temperatures, they are loose and subject to sliding at any time. Last summer alone, more than 1,000 climbers experienced falling rocks on their ascent. With the ever-increasing number of people gearing up to conquer Europe’s highest mountain, it only seems to underline the importance of providing ecological and sustainable accommodation and facilities: to preserve this miracle of Mother Nature for many generations to come. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/green-architecture
Only a small number of us will ever be able to experience it: the last stop before the final climb to the top of the Mont Blanc. This stop on the main route was notorious for its lousy accommodation: a bland, uncomfortable building built in the sixties, that was not only painfully outdated but also an environmental hazard. Those visiting for an overnight stay would do well to prepare themselves for recurring problems with hygiene - the two outside toilets are not only inconvenient, they also heavily pollute the surrounding area through its direct emptying of waste on the mountainside - and freezing nightly temperatures, even inside.   Not exactly a great preparation for one of the biggest climbs in some climbers’ lives, yet it certainly adds a certain something to the charm and roughness associated with mountaineering. Right? Well, that logic might have been sound until recently, when it was high time to upgrade the lodging. A new, sustainable mountain hut This was done in the form of the Refuge du Goûter, a new and ecological hut. The remarkable structure, resembling some kind of futuristic egg, has four stories and an all-wooden structure that has been clad using stainless steel. It partly overhangs the cliff below, guaranteeing breathtaking views and enhancing its ‘curb appeal’. And appeal it certainly has. Not only from an architectural point of view (the Swiss designer Hervé Dessimoz spent five years merely designing the building), but also from an ecological point of view. The building is self-sufficient in its demand for energy and water, boasting a solar thermal system and self-sufficient water supply.   Plenty of ecological features This sophisticated system for water reclamation provides a supply of water for cooking and washing. It makes good use of the egg shape of the building: because of the wind, constant turbulence lets the snow slide across its outer skin, after which it accumulates in a grid of some 60 square meters. Within this grid, heat generated by solar panels melts this snow, after which it is collected in huge tanks. Due to the size of these tanks, the building can operate for 16 days without snow.   These solar panels also generate heat and electricity for the building, providing in nearly all of its heating and power needs - only the kitchen still makes use of gas. When there is no sunlight, a backup generator that runs on rapeseed oil will produce electricity.   Sewage farm and isolation Another huge plus: human waste will no longer be dumped on the mountainside. Instead, the six environmentally friendly toilets within the hut are built to be ecological and clean. The amount of water that they use is minimised through the implementation of a vacuum-suction system that most of us will know from aircrafts. Upon flushing, the human waste will be collected in a tiny sewage farm that processes it into some kind of highly compacted sludge that can, if required, be heliported down to the valley and be disposed properly. No longer will eager mountaineers have to suffer from the cold: the new location is equipped with triple glazing and dual-flow ventilation, as well as insulation provided by wood-fibre panels. All of this ensures an indoor temperature that ranges between 18 degrees Celsius and 22 degrees Celsius.   Construction in pieces The entire structure was put together in pieces: pre-assembled parts were taken in by helicopter and mounted securely using a specific resin adhesive. This drastically reduced the number of nuts and bolts that would be required. It took three years to complete construction, with work only possible in the warmer months of the years - and frequently interrupted by severe weather events.   Despite the difficulties, the project supervisor Thomas Büchi and architect Dessimoz never wavered in their dedication to the project: “ What we're saying is that, if it's possible to build a self-sufficient, eco-friendly building at 3,835 metres, there's no excuse for not doing it at sea level .” And right they are! The need for an ecologically sustainable building at this altitude and in this spot might have been doubted by some, yet it only seems to highlight the possibilities and the ease with which it can be executed, if only those in charge are dedicated to doing ‘the right thing’.   Countering the effects of global warming Even in this small Mont Blanc community, the effects of global warming and other strains that have been put on the natural  environment are starting to show. The number of serious accidents amongst climbers on the Mont Blanc has increased significantly in recent years, most of which resulting from falling rocks. In the past, snow and ice would keep them in place, yet due to warmer temperatures, they are loose and subject to sliding at any time. Last summer alone, more than 1,000 climbers experienced falling rocks on their ascent. With the ever-increasing number of people gearing up to conquer Europe’s highest mountain, it only seems to underline the importance of providing ecological and sustainable accommodation and facilities: to preserve this miracle of Mother Nature for many generations to come. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/green-architecture
Sustainable Way To The Top: Refuge Du Gouter France
Sustainable Way To The Top: Refuge Du Gouter France
Community

A community is you and me. A network of social, economic, ecological and many other relationships. We all work together and live in urban, suburban and rural areas. Social sustainability is becoming increasingly important on our small planet. We define: support, quality of life, development, adaptation, rights and labour.

We belong to a group of individuals - our society - in which we belong geographically. Certain environmental issues play an important role in our society. Here, sustainable solutions are sought, developed and implemented. This may differ from societies in other countries, but because of our global environmental issues and dependence, we must learn to work more together so that we can all benefit from sharing sustainable knowledge to tackle, for example, climate change.

Green architecture is important. Building with local materials that can be recycled and reused brings us a big step forward to have less impact on the environment. With green architecture we can build smart cities where resources can be used more efficiently and information can be shared, thus improving our society, your community.

Lifestyle is the way we live, the dynamics of personality. Fashion defines our self and together with food it is getting - at present - an even more important role in our society. It's not just about taste, but especially about the burden that the fashion industry, agriculture and the meat industry have on our resources, especially water.

If there was an urge to come up with a sustainable way of living solutions and share these topics globally it’s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about tiny houses, your experiences and expectations for the future at home and globally. 

Global Sustainability X-change, that’s what you can do together with WhatsOrb. What's in for me?

 

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