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Sustainable Housing Reused Materials and Photo-voltaic Panels
There are various problems concerning housing construction in countries as Lebanon: problems of waste management and construction pressure, for example. A solution could be Lifehaus, a new housing prototype for homes that regain building techniques from the ancestor and that use natural and recycled materials to create home-free emissions. The designers are aiming for a sustainable and inexpensive alternative that helps alleviate the problem of access to housing in developing countries. Self-reliance and a low carbon footprint The idea for Lifehaus emerged from the hand of Lebanese architect Nizar Haddad and Australian journalist Nadine Mazloum. The concept revolves around affordability, self-reliance and a low carbon footprint. The design corresponds to a house of 160 square meters: this surface consists of a study with living room, mezzanine, terrace, greenhouse and a technical room. The first experimental test was held in Baskinta, Lebanon. The construction process Lifehaus: comfortable, made with natural materials and low cost. It all sounds like a dream, but how does the design of Lifehaus actually work? In this video you will get to know in depth the construction process and the characteristics of this house, which is offered in three categories: economic, standard and luxury. It combines comfort with the application of traditional methods of construction and the use of natural materials available in the environment, to which parts and recycled products are added. Reused materials and photovoltaic panels The construction is shaped by different types of material. In particular, a fundamental part is based on local materials of low energy consumption such as limestone, clay, hemp or rock. Also, materials like reused glass bottles, tires and aluminium cans are discussed. Because there is no availability of wood or bamboo in the area, cement is chosen for the roofs. The area around the house has been of great important in the design of Lifehaus. Created in a way that allows to retain heat and humidity, as well as to protect the interior of the external climatological conditions, this house is designed to operate outside the network and thus give a response to those who live in areas without access to electricity. Therefore, the design incorporates photovoltaic panels, as well as wind and hydraulic turbines to ensure the supply of the home. The scarcity of water has also been included in the design. The house is equipped with a system for collecting rainwater, in addition to using recycled water for irrigation. And this model also seeks to alleviate the lack of food that effects millions of people in the world, which is why these houses also include  a greenhouse and a hydroponic cultivation system. A low-cost option With Lifehaus, the creators want to facilitate access to housing by offering a low-cost option. Specifically, the price per square meter would be reduced by half compared to a house built by oneself. The reduced dependence on fuel and electricity would also mean significant savings for those who choose this type of house. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/architecture
There are various problems concerning housing construction in countries as Lebanon: problems of waste management and construction pressure, for example. A solution could be Lifehaus, a new housing prototype for homes that regain building techniques from the ancestor and that use natural and recycled materials to create home-free emissions. The designers are aiming for a sustainable and inexpensive alternative that helps alleviate the problem of access to housing in developing countries. Self-reliance and a low carbon footprint The idea for Lifehaus emerged from the hand of Lebanese architect Nizar Haddad and Australian journalist Nadine Mazloum. The concept revolves around affordability, self-reliance and a low carbon footprint. The design corresponds to a house of 160 square meters: this surface consists of a study with living room, mezzanine, terrace, greenhouse and a technical room. The first experimental test was held in Baskinta, Lebanon. The construction process Lifehaus: comfortable, made with natural materials and low cost. It all sounds like a dream, but how does the design of Lifehaus actually work? In this video you will get to know in depth the construction process and the characteristics of this house, which is offered in three categories: economic, standard and luxury. It combines comfort with the application of traditional methods of construction and the use of natural materials available in the environment, to which parts and recycled products are added. Reused materials and photovoltaic panels The construction is shaped by different types of material. In particular, a fundamental part is based on local materials of low energy consumption such as limestone, clay, hemp or rock. Also, materials like reused glass bottles, tires and aluminium cans are discussed. Because there is no availability of wood or bamboo in the area, cement is chosen for the roofs. The area around the house has been of great important in the design of Lifehaus. Created in a way that allows to retain heat and humidity, as well as to protect the interior of the external climatological conditions, this house is designed to operate outside the network and thus give a response to those who live in areas without access to electricity. Therefore, the design incorporates photovoltaic panels, as well as wind and hydraulic turbines to ensure the supply of the home. The scarcity of water has also been included in the design. The house is equipped with a system for collecting rainwater, in addition to using recycled water for irrigation. And this model also seeks to alleviate the lack of food that effects millions of people in the world, which is why these houses also include  a greenhouse and a hydroponic cultivation system. A low-cost option With Lifehaus, the creators want to facilitate access to housing by offering a low-cost option. Specifically, the price per square meter would be reduced by half compared to a house built by oneself. The reduced dependence on fuel and electricity would also mean significant savings for those who choose this type of house. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/architecture
Sustainable Housing Reused Materials and Photo-voltaic Panels
Sustainable Housing Reused Materials and Photo-voltaic Panels
A Geodesic Dome: Sustainable Arctic Circle Living In Style
The Arctic Circle is not exactly known for its pleasant living conditions. The temperatures are more often than not lingering around the freezing point. The winter is long and dark, while the summer is short and still rather cool. Only very few animal and plant species are able to survive in those harsh conditions, making it an even tougher place to live.   The Hjertefølger family took on the challenge of living in this place where the nearest neighbour might be dozens of miles away. Mom, dad, and four kids have spent the last three years in a hand-built cob house, protected by a huge, geodesic glass dome. Inside, the family can live comfortably during the year, while growing their own food as well. Sounds futuristic? Well, it sure it! Meet the Arctic Nature House of the Hjertefølgers The house of the Hjertefølgers is located in the north of Norway , on an island called Sandhornøya. A gorgeous, rough environment, for sure, that is shrouded in darkness for the majority in the year. This puts a great strain on any building. As such, the family came up with their treasured project, that took over two years to design and build.   The end result? The Naturhuset, or Nature House, is self-sustaining and powered by solar energy, consisting of three storeys and boasting five bedrooms. Along with this, a large irrigated outdoor garden was designed to guarantee a stable supply of food. These crops will be able to grow in the toughest of winters, as they are placed under a massive, 25-foot-high glass dome. Even fruits and vegetables that are not normally suited for the climate thrive in this environment. Green, eco-friendly and  sustainable architecture All aspects of this building have been designed in such a way that they are as eco-friendly and carbon neutral as possible. For instance, the family composts and re-uses water to water the plants. Additionally, the solar system on the roof ensure that, for those summer months in which the sun is actually out and shining, it fully operates on renewable energy sources.   Mother Ingrid has been a driving force behind this new family home. She calls herself a permaculturalist, vegan and yoga practitioner and prides herself on a carbon-neutral lifestyle - that she is happy to pass on to her children. And although most would not consider the Arctic Circle to be the best place to raise a family, she is happy they did: “ The house works as we intended and planned. We love the house; it has a soul of its own and it feels very personal. What surprises us is the fact that we built ourselves anew as we built the house. The process changed us, shaped us .” Further technical details Ingrid is not exactly exaggerating when she claims that she and her family built the house from scratch. It truly is a labour of love, built out of cob. This mixture of earth, straw and sand is an ancient-old, natural material; that is allegedly able to withstand fire and earthquakes - all while being cheap and energy-efficient.   As for the dome, this has been constructed using 360 panels of 6-millimeter thick glass. At this thickness, it is capable of withstanding the heavy winds and snowfall that the area is infamous for. These glass panels are placed in a recycled aluminium frame, chosen for its lifespan of over 100 years, its low maintenance costs and its structural integrity. To top it off, the solar system covering the dome generates sufficient renewable energy to meet the house’s needs. Why the dome-home is such a great idea Normally, people would be discouraged from taking on the challenge of building a house on or near the Arctic Circle. Not only is the delivery of building materials an absolute headache, the energy needs of such a process are substantial. Yet the movement where people opt for homes under a dome is commendable and promising. The greenhouse-dome will mitigate the worst of temperatures and keep heating costs down, a notorious pitfall for Arctic houses. At the same time, it allows households to grow their own produce, using the excess heat stored in the dome. Homegrown, local products are always preferable to imported fruits and vegetables - another promising movement to drive down energy costs.   And if this does not ring true - then consider the great pictures you can share on your Instagram account. Just ask Ingrid (@im_hjerte). https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/green-architecture
The Arctic Circle is not exactly known for its pleasant living conditions. The temperatures are more often than not lingering around the freezing point. The winter is long and dark, while the summer is short and still rather cool. Only very few animal and plant species are able to survive in those harsh conditions, making it an even tougher place to live.   The Hjertefølger family took on the challenge of living in this place where the nearest neighbour might be dozens of miles away. Mom, dad, and four kids have spent the last three years in a hand-built cob house, protected by a huge, geodesic glass dome. Inside, the family can live comfortably during the year, while growing their own food as well. Sounds futuristic? Well, it sure it! Meet the Arctic Nature House of the Hjertefølgers The house of the Hjertefølgers is located in the north of Norway , on an island called Sandhornøya. A gorgeous, rough environment, for sure, that is shrouded in darkness for the majority in the year. This puts a great strain on any building. As such, the family came up with their treasured project, that took over two years to design and build.   The end result? The Naturhuset, or Nature House, is self-sustaining and powered by solar energy, consisting of three storeys and boasting five bedrooms. Along with this, a large irrigated outdoor garden was designed to guarantee a stable supply of food. These crops will be able to grow in the toughest of winters, as they are placed under a massive, 25-foot-high glass dome. Even fruits and vegetables that are not normally suited for the climate thrive in this environment. Green, eco-friendly and  sustainable architecture All aspects of this building have been designed in such a way that they are as eco-friendly and carbon neutral as possible. For instance, the family composts and re-uses water to water the plants. Additionally, the solar system on the roof ensure that, for those summer months in which the sun is actually out and shining, it fully operates on renewable energy sources.   Mother Ingrid has been a driving force behind this new family home. She calls herself a permaculturalist, vegan and yoga practitioner and prides herself on a carbon-neutral lifestyle - that she is happy to pass on to her children. And although most would not consider the Arctic Circle to be the best place to raise a family, she is happy they did: “ The house works as we intended and planned. We love the house; it has a soul of its own and it feels very personal. What surprises us is the fact that we built ourselves anew as we built the house. The process changed us, shaped us .” Further technical details Ingrid is not exactly exaggerating when she claims that she and her family built the house from scratch. It truly is a labour of love, built out of cob. This mixture of earth, straw and sand is an ancient-old, natural material; that is allegedly able to withstand fire and earthquakes - all while being cheap and energy-efficient.   As for the dome, this has been constructed using 360 panels of 6-millimeter thick glass. At this thickness, it is capable of withstanding the heavy winds and snowfall that the area is infamous for. These glass panels are placed in a recycled aluminium frame, chosen for its lifespan of over 100 years, its low maintenance costs and its structural integrity. To top it off, the solar system covering the dome generates sufficient renewable energy to meet the house’s needs. Why the dome-home is such a great idea Normally, people would be discouraged from taking on the challenge of building a house on or near the Arctic Circle. Not only is the delivery of building materials an absolute headache, the energy needs of such a process are substantial. Yet the movement where people opt for homes under a dome is commendable and promising. The greenhouse-dome will mitigate the worst of temperatures and keep heating costs down, a notorious pitfall for Arctic houses. At the same time, it allows households to grow their own produce, using the excess heat stored in the dome. Homegrown, local products are always preferable to imported fruits and vegetables - another promising movement to drive down energy costs.   And if this does not ring true - then consider the great pictures you can share on your Instagram account. Just ask Ingrid (@im_hjerte). https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/green-architecture
A Geodesic Dome: Sustainable Arctic Circle Living In Style
A Geodesic Dome: Sustainable Arctic Circle Living In Style
Solar Cells Providing Energy, Water And Food: A Sky Shelter
Three Polish designers have come up with a mobile skyscraper that is easy to transport, takes up little space and is sustainable. With this they won the annual design competition of the magazine eVolo earlier this year.  eVolo is an architectural and design magazine that awards a prize every year for a new idea that has to do with vertical architecture. Mobile skyscraper as a sustainable solution in disaster areas: The Skyshelter.zip The mobile skyscraper, the Skyshelter.zip, is a multifunctional shelter that provides food, energy and water in, for example, disaster areas. The Skyshelter.zip is very easy to move with helicopters because of the foldable structure and the minimum weight. Because no more trucks are needed for this, it is simpler, faster and better for the environment. The system works as follows: the base supports are anchored in the ground and then the skyscraper unfolds thanks to the large helium balloon that is placed in the package. The helium balloon can pull up the entire structure and hold it standing. Furthermore, structural steel wires are behind the canvas of the skyscraper, which makes it resistant to gusts of wind. Sustainable  elements For the Skyshelter.zip, Nano material is used on the basis of durable ETFE film. In this material, the designers want to create a network of small separate  solar cells. These are then not fixed on a large plate so that the fabric remains flexible. With the solar cells, the building is able to produce clean energy when needed in case of emergency. In addition, the top of the balloon is shaped so that rainwater can flow through the hollow center of the skyscraper. Here the water is cleaned with special filters and then collected for further use. By: Britt van den Elshout https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/smart-cities
Three Polish designers have come up with a mobile skyscraper that is easy to transport, takes up little space and is sustainable. With this they won the annual design competition of the magazine eVolo earlier this year.  eVolo is an architectural and design magazine that awards a prize every year for a new idea that has to do with vertical architecture. Mobile skyscraper as a sustainable solution in disaster areas: The Skyshelter.zip The mobile skyscraper, the Skyshelter.zip, is a multifunctional shelter that provides food, energy and water in, for example, disaster areas. The Skyshelter.zip is very easy to move with helicopters because of the foldable structure and the minimum weight. Because no more trucks are needed for this, it is simpler, faster and better for the environment. The system works as follows: the base supports are anchored in the ground and then the skyscraper unfolds thanks to the large helium balloon that is placed in the package. The helium balloon can pull up the entire structure and hold it standing. Furthermore, structural steel wires are behind the canvas of the skyscraper, which makes it resistant to gusts of wind. Sustainable  elements For the Skyshelter.zip, Nano material is used on the basis of durable ETFE film. In this material, the designers want to create a network of small separate  solar cells. These are then not fixed on a large plate so that the fabric remains flexible. With the solar cells, the building is able to produce clean energy when needed in case of emergency. In addition, the top of the balloon is shaped so that rainwater can flow through the hollow center of the skyscraper. Here the water is cleaned with special filters and then collected for further use. By: Britt van den Elshout https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/smart-cities
Solar Cells Providing Energy, Water And Food: A Sky Shelter
Solar Cells Providing Energy, Water And Food: A Sky Shelter
Sustainable Chocolate Factory Chocolatemakers: The Netherlands
Chocolate producer ‘Chocolatemakers’ is building a very sustainable chocolate factory in the port of Amsterdam (the Netherlands) that will be completely self-sufficient in the field of energy. The factory is also being opened to visitors. The roof of the factory is made entirely of transparent  solar panels that produce enough energy for the entire factory. In addition, as much as possible is built with circular building material. When the factory is built, Chocolatemakers will focus on the sustainable burning of beans. The most sustainable chocolate factory in Amsterdam (the Netherlands) The ship Tres Hombres transports the cocoa beans in a  sustainable manner At the location, a mooring place for the sailing ship Tres Hombres had to be taken into account. Once a year the sailing ship travels across the Atlantic to transport cocoa beans to the Netherlands in a sustainable manner. In this way Chocolatemakers wants to draw attention to sustainable transport. Sustainable chocolate producer The owners of 'Chocolademakers'; Rodney en Enver. Chocolate makers is the only chocolate producer in the Netherlands that owns all the links in the chain itself. In this way, the company wants to produce chocolate as sustainably as possible. Since 2011 Chocolatemakers wants to show people that the entire cocoa chain can be transparent, honest and sustainable. With the arrival of the new visitable chocolate factory, that is now finally possible. The opening of the chocolate factory is planned for March 2019.ut Chocolate producer Barry Callebaut sets itself the goal to only buy sustainable chocolate in 2025. That is what Barry Callebaut is making known in its new sustainability strategy Forever Chocolate. In this, the company sets itself the goal of moving sustainable chocolate from a niche to the norm in less than ten years. 100 percent sustainable chocolate "We have been at the forefront of sustainability in cocoa and chocolate for years, and we have made great progress," says Antoine de Saint-Affrique, CEO of Barry Callebaut. "But despite all our efforts, only 23 percent of the cocoa beans that we purchase come from sustainability programs. We are determined to change this and buy 100 percent of our chocolate and sustainable ingredients in 2020. " In addition to purchasing 100 percent sustainable chocolate and ingredients, Barry Callebaut has also set the following goals for 2025: - Abolishing child labor from the supply chain - Taking more than 500,000 cocoa farmers out of poverty - CO2 and forest positive. Sustainable production According to De Saint-Affrique, it is impossible to achieve these objectives alone. That is why the company has plans for a movement with governments, NGOs, consumers and our customers. "'Forever Chocolate' is an open invitation to work with us to develop structural solutions for the sustainability challenges in the chocolate production chain," says the CEO. The chocolate producer works through various initiatives to make the supply chain of chocolate sustainable, both ecologically and socially. For example, Barry Callebaut has set up various programs that support farmers and their families in cocoa communities. Collaboration with The Sustainable Trade Initiative (IDH) In addition, the company recently started a collaboration with The Sustainable Trade Initiative (IDH). As part of this collaboration, Barry Callebaut is testing a sustainable cocoa system in Ivory Coast. The system must balance between profitable cocoa production and forest conservation by supporting farmers in increasing their productivity and improving agroforestry while making the local population aware of forest protection. Traceable cocoa The company has also recently collaborated with the Dutch chocolate product Tony's Chocolonely. For example, Barry Callebaut installed a new cocoa butter tank to process for Tony's Chocolonely cocoa butter of traceable cocoa beans. By: Britt van den Elshout and Chris Thijssen https://www.whatsorb.com/category/food
Chocolate producer ‘Chocolatemakers’ is building a very sustainable chocolate factory in the port of Amsterdam (the Netherlands) that will be completely self-sufficient in the field of energy. The factory is also being opened to visitors. The roof of the factory is made entirely of transparent  solar panels that produce enough energy for the entire factory. In addition, as much as possible is built with circular building material. When the factory is built, Chocolatemakers will focus on the sustainable burning of beans. The most sustainable chocolate factory in Amsterdam (the Netherlands) The ship Tres Hombres transports the cocoa beans in a  sustainable manner At the location, a mooring place for the sailing ship Tres Hombres had to be taken into account. Once a year the sailing ship travels across the Atlantic to transport cocoa beans to the Netherlands in a sustainable manner. In this way Chocolatemakers wants to draw attention to sustainable transport. Sustainable chocolate producer The owners of 'Chocolademakers'; Rodney en Enver. Chocolate makers is the only chocolate producer in the Netherlands that owns all the links in the chain itself. In this way, the company wants to produce chocolate as sustainably as possible. Since 2011 Chocolatemakers wants to show people that the entire cocoa chain can be transparent, honest and sustainable. With the arrival of the new visitable chocolate factory, that is now finally possible. The opening of the chocolate factory is planned for March 2019.ut Chocolate producer Barry Callebaut sets itself the goal to only buy sustainable chocolate in 2025. That is what Barry Callebaut is making known in its new sustainability strategy Forever Chocolate. In this, the company sets itself the goal of moving sustainable chocolate from a niche to the norm in less than ten years. 100 percent sustainable chocolate "We have been at the forefront of sustainability in cocoa and chocolate for years, and we have made great progress," says Antoine de Saint-Affrique, CEO of Barry Callebaut. "But despite all our efforts, only 23 percent of the cocoa beans that we purchase come from sustainability programs. We are determined to change this and buy 100 percent of our chocolate and sustainable ingredients in 2020. " In addition to purchasing 100 percent sustainable chocolate and ingredients, Barry Callebaut has also set the following goals for 2025: - Abolishing child labor from the supply chain - Taking more than 500,000 cocoa farmers out of poverty - CO2 and forest positive. Sustainable production According to De Saint-Affrique, it is impossible to achieve these objectives alone. That is why the company has plans for a movement with governments, NGOs, consumers and our customers. "'Forever Chocolate' is an open invitation to work with us to develop structural solutions for the sustainability challenges in the chocolate production chain," says the CEO. The chocolate producer works through various initiatives to make the supply chain of chocolate sustainable, both ecologically and socially. For example, Barry Callebaut has set up various programs that support farmers and their families in cocoa communities. Collaboration with The Sustainable Trade Initiative (IDH) In addition, the company recently started a collaboration with The Sustainable Trade Initiative (IDH). As part of this collaboration, Barry Callebaut is testing a sustainable cocoa system in Ivory Coast. The system must balance between profitable cocoa production and forest conservation by supporting farmers in increasing their productivity and improving agroforestry while making the local population aware of forest protection. Traceable cocoa The company has also recently collaborated with the Dutch chocolate product Tony's Chocolonely. For example, Barry Callebaut installed a new cocoa butter tank to process for Tony's Chocolonely cocoa butter of traceable cocoa beans. By: Britt van den Elshout and Chris Thijssen https://www.whatsorb.com/category/food
Sustainable Chocolate Factory Chocolatemakers: The Netherlands
Sustainable Chocolate Factory Chocolatemakers: The Netherlands
Sustainable Picnic Charging Point,
You can recharge your electric bike, equip in a covered area and create a new route. It is the first in the world. Sustainable building (bicycle starting point)is tablet, charging point and picnic area in one Developer Kees Boer (Netherlands) is proud of it: "It has become very beautiful!" The Bureau for Tourism VVV has a large touchscreen in the boarding point. Hikers and cyclists can map out routes in this. "The screen also gives useful tips," explains Jeroen Woudenberg from the Bureau for Tourism (VVV). "Because ‘the building’ is connected to the internet, he thinks, so if it rains hard he will not recommend you to take a walk on the beach, but it is looking for an indoor activity in the neighborhood." A sustainable charging point The Bureau for Tourism (VVV) Zeeland, the Province and developer Ecotap have worked for one and a half years on the pick-up point. It is made with technology that is also in electric cars and electric charging stations, but is sustainable: the solar panels on the roof make it self-sufficient. The bicycle starting point is shiny on all sides. "I have polished it especially before the opening", says Boer. "It is big: made to go up in nature and very solid." In total, ten bicycle take-off points must be constructed. {youtube} https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/green-architecture
You can recharge your electric bike, equip in a covered area and create a new route. It is the first in the world. Sustainable building (bicycle starting point)is tablet, charging point and picnic area in one Developer Kees Boer (Netherlands) is proud of it: "It has become very beautiful!" The Bureau for Tourism VVV has a large touchscreen in the boarding point. Hikers and cyclists can map out routes in this. "The screen also gives useful tips," explains Jeroen Woudenberg from the Bureau for Tourism (VVV). "Because ‘the building’ is connected to the internet, he thinks, so if it rains hard he will not recommend you to take a walk on the beach, but it is looking for an indoor activity in the neighborhood." A sustainable charging point The Bureau for Tourism (VVV) Zeeland, the Province and developer Ecotap have worked for one and a half years on the pick-up point. It is made with technology that is also in electric cars and electric charging stations, but is sustainable: the solar panels on the roof make it self-sufficient. The bicycle starting point is shiny on all sides. "I have polished it especially before the opening", says Boer. "It is big: made to go up in nature and very solid." In total, ten bicycle take-off points must be constructed. {youtube} https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/green-architecture
Sustainable Picnic Charging Point, 'Tablet: The Netherlands
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