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3D Bioprinting Market Overview | New Investment Opportunities 2018-2024
Comprehensive analysis of the prospects for  Global 3D Bioprinting Market . To receive forecasts of Global 3D Bioprinting Market Research sales in leading country markets from 2018-2024, including leading and emerging country from developed and developing regions. We provide similar reports also such as  Global Wearable Medical Devices Market . Scope of Global 3D Bioprinting Market Reports – 3D bio-printing is a new innovative technology in the field of tissue engineering and involves the identification of the key architectural and compositional components of a target tissue for creating a design that can be utilized by a bio-printer so as to generate that tissue in a laboratory environment. 3D bioprinting technologies have wide range of clinical and research applications and its advent has led to a significant advancement in the manufacture of large bioartificial organs such as the bones, livers, hearts, cartilages and skins with heterogenic compositions. So, during the study of Global 3D Bioprinting market, we have considered 3D Bioprinting products and consumables to analyze the market. Global 3D Bioprinting Market Dynamics  Advancement in technology,  incorporation of IT within the healthcare industry, rising geriatric population base, improving Research & Development activities, rise in demand and supply of organs and tissues, improvement in the healthcare infrastructure are the major key drivers for the growth of the Global 3D Bioprinting Market. 3D bioprinting is rapidly evolving into new therapies and diagnostics. However, high costs and lack of reimbursement facilities by the government are the major restrains of the Global Medical Robotic Market. For instance, bioprinting of live cells using biological materials could reach USD 300,000. Nonetheless, untapped market and availability of low-cost bio-printers may generate new opportunities in forecast period. Global 3D Bioprinting Market Regional Analysis – North America dominates the market with highest market share due to increasing adoption of advanced healthcare services, increasing demand of organ and tissue transplant, increasing scope of bioengineering products. According to the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN), in 2016, more than 33,600 transplants were in U.S. Europe is the second largest market across the globe for 3D bioprinting and is driven by advancement in research and development activities and establishment of new key players. Germany is the most involved European country in terms of 3D printing investment, with an advanced marketing strategy strategy through creating links between science and industry. Asia Pacific 3D Bioprinting Market is witnessed with strong growth rate majorly due increasing expenditure on healthcare, advancement in research and development activities. Companies based Japan, South Korea and Taiwan are making strides in applying 3-D printing technology to medical uses, helped by government support for the industry. Key Benefits for Global 3D Bioprinting Market Reports – Global 3D Bioprinting Market report covers in depth historical and forecast analysis. Global 3D Bioprinting Market research report provides detail information about Market Introduction, Market Summary, Global market Revenue (Revenue USD), Market Drivers, Market Restraints, Market Opportunities, Competitive Analysis, Regional and Country Level. Global 3D Bioprinting Market report helps to identify opportunities in marketplace. Global 3D Bioprinting Market report covers extensive analysis of emerging trends and competitive landscape.
Comprehensive analysis of the prospects for  Global 3D Bioprinting Market . To receive forecasts of Global 3D Bioprinting Market Research sales in leading country markets from 2018-2024, including leading and emerging country from developed and developing regions. We provide similar reports also such as  Global Wearable Medical Devices Market . Scope of Global 3D Bioprinting Market Reports – 3D bio-printing is a new innovative technology in the field of tissue engineering and involves the identification of the key architectural and compositional components of a target tissue for creating a design that can be utilized by a bio-printer so as to generate that tissue in a laboratory environment. 3D bioprinting technologies have wide range of clinical and research applications and its advent has led to a significant advancement in the manufacture of large bioartificial organs such as the bones, livers, hearts, cartilages and skins with heterogenic compositions. So, during the study of Global 3D Bioprinting market, we have considered 3D Bioprinting products and consumables to analyze the market. Global 3D Bioprinting Market Dynamics  Advancement in technology,  incorporation of IT within the healthcare industry, rising geriatric population base, improving Research & Development activities, rise in demand and supply of organs and tissues, improvement in the healthcare infrastructure are the major key drivers for the growth of the Global 3D Bioprinting Market. 3D bioprinting is rapidly evolving into new therapies and diagnostics. However, high costs and lack of reimbursement facilities by the government are the major restrains of the Global Medical Robotic Market. For instance, bioprinting of live cells using biological materials could reach USD 300,000. Nonetheless, untapped market and availability of low-cost bio-printers may generate new opportunities in forecast period. Global 3D Bioprinting Market Regional Analysis – North America dominates the market with highest market share due to increasing adoption of advanced healthcare services, increasing demand of organ and tissue transplant, increasing scope of bioengineering products. According to the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN), in 2016, more than 33,600 transplants were in U.S. Europe is the second largest market across the globe for 3D bioprinting and is driven by advancement in research and development activities and establishment of new key players. Germany is the most involved European country in terms of 3D printing investment, with an advanced marketing strategy strategy through creating links between science and industry. Asia Pacific 3D Bioprinting Market is witnessed with strong growth rate majorly due increasing expenditure on healthcare, advancement in research and development activities. Companies based Japan, South Korea and Taiwan are making strides in applying 3-D printing technology to medical uses, helped by government support for the industry. Key Benefits for Global 3D Bioprinting Market Reports – Global 3D Bioprinting Market report covers in depth historical and forecast analysis. Global 3D Bioprinting Market research report provides detail information about Market Introduction, Market Summary, Global market Revenue (Revenue USD), Market Drivers, Market Restraints, Market Opportunities, Competitive Analysis, Regional and Country Level. Global 3D Bioprinting Market report helps to identify opportunities in marketplace. Global 3D Bioprinting Market report covers extensive analysis of emerging trends and competitive landscape.
3D Bioprinting Market Overview | New Investment Opportunities 2018-2024
World Environment Day. The way in which our natural capital is currently consumed is looting
The current consumption of non-renewable raw materials and energy sources means that future generations no longer have them at their disposal, but that they are stuck with the negative consequences of their use: pollution, deforestation, climate change, desertification, summarized as an ecological crisis. A liberal ethics for the consumption of non-renewable resources and energy sources How could we account for this consumption towards future generations? Which arguments would future generations consider acceptable? Which arguments for the use of, for example, plastic - which has increased exponentially in recent decades - can we give to future generations living in a world in which plastic has negatively affected the ecosystems of planet Earth? The argument 'plastic is a convenient and cheap packaging material' will most likely not be recognized as sufficient justification. Natural capital If raw materials and non-renewable energy sources are used to create a sustainable society, the consumption of natural capital can be seen as an investment for the long term. And by long term I mean the next 200,000 years. The resources of planet Earth can be seen as the natural capital. People can live off the interest of that capital, that is to say, the benefits that nature produces and regenerates. Another option is to enter the natural capital. Take a bongard as an example. The fruit trees yields fruit. When people grow that fruit, the ecosystem remains intact. However, in the short term, besides the fruit, the wood of the fruit trees could also be used and the land of the bongard could be sold to build houses. This yields more economically than just the use of the fruit, but there is a reduction in the natural capital. The short term prevails over the long term when it comes to natural capital. Looting Fossil fuels are finite. Even if there is still oil available for 1,000 years, it is still the question what its use justifies when future generations, after 1,000 years, are without sitting and are also dealing with a warmed up planet. According BP one of worlds largest oil producers, the world has 53.3 years left to find an alternative to oil before current proved reserves run dry. Of course, nations are finding new oil – meaning that number is rising – but new extraction methods are costly and can pose environmental threats. Any use of non-renewable resources must be morally justified. If part of the non-renewable resources, the natural capital, are used for the transition to a sustainable economy and society that will benefit future generations, then this is a convincing moral argument. The consumption of a part of the natural capital does not harm future generations (at least not fundamentally), but it is beneficial for future generations. The way in which natural capital is consumed now is looting: natural capital is used for the short-term self-interest and the interests of future generations are harmed. This goes against the liberal non-harmful principle. Waste bin capacity Of whom is the natural capital actually? The legal definitions of property, as commodities are owned by the inhabitants of nations, are short-sighted. The  natural capital belongs to all earthlings, now and in the future. We know that man has been scurrying around on this planet for about 200,000 years. Let us assume for the sake of convenience that man will last another 200,000 years. That means that the natural capital of planet Earth must also last 200,000 years. The natural capital of planet Earth consists not only of the amount of raw materials that people consume (minerals, fossil fuels), but also the amount of waste that the Earth can absorb, or the waste bin capacity. There is a limited amount of waste that the earth can absorb, but it is quickly exceeded. The quantities of plastic, pesticides, fertilizers and greenhouse gases in the atmosphere disrupt the planet Earth's ecosystem, which naturally invades capital. If, for example, deltas, where millions of people live, are under water due to climate change, it is clear that this is causing damage. Megafauna How can you justify to your grandchildren your consumption of natural capital that has contributed to the bankruptcy of system earth? The consumption of natural capital requires moral reflection. However, in the current political-economic system there is no reflection on the justification of natural capital. However different the political-economic systems may be, they all prioritize contemporary self-interest at the expense of future generations and at the expense of the common good. When few people lived on planet Earth and humans did not yet have technology, there was no need to reflect on the issue of the justification of the consumption of natural capital. Yet people have very early on the natural capital. For example, the disappearance of the megafauna, such as the mammoth, is largely due to man being overrun. However, since the industrial revolution, the use of natural capital has increased exponentially as a result of the technology and the problem has therefore become urgent. Wasting natural capital The ecological crisis is the impending bankruptcy of planet Earth. When the natural capital becomes depleted, there will be a tipping point in the ecosystem of planet Earth, as a result of which the living environment for, among others, the animal species will become unfavorable. However, as long as the capital is not up, it seems like life is a party. Optimists see the party that is financed by the slurping of natural capital. Pessimists see the long term, the mess that remains when the party is over. The ethics of consumption of natural capital is a moral blind spot. It is not a question that is addressed in the political-economic paradigm. The reasons why the natural capital is widely disassembled is that it is possible and that we also have a legal system in which it is legal to do. Technology is making more and more possible, but in practice this leads to ever more intensive looting of natural capital. The bankrupt of system earth The extent to which looted can be measured with the ecological footprint. The average ecological footprint of the Dutch person today is 3.7 planet Earths. This means that if everyone would live on Earth if the average Dutch person would need 3.7 planet Earths. Since we have to live on 1 planet Earth, this means that we commit suicide and we attack the natural capital. We rob us of future generations. Shell and Friesland Campina are examples of companies that deprive future generations of the opportunity to enjoy the proceeds of the natural capital because they participate in the plunder of the planet. Individuals can also ask themselves the question: what justifies my consumption of natural capital? The richer people become, the greater their ecological footprint . Although the rich may have acquired their money within legal frameworks, not everything has been said about the moral justification of an exorbitant lifestyle with a large consumption of energy from non-renewable resources and raw materials (or a large ecological footprint). How can you justify to your grandchildren your consumption of natural capital that has contributed to the bankruptcy of system earth? https://www.whatsorb.com/category/community By: Floris van den Berg. Photo Cover: Bigstock
The current consumption of non-renewable raw materials and energy sources means that future generations no longer have them at their disposal, but that they are stuck with the negative consequences of their use: pollution, deforestation, climate change, desertification, summarized as an ecological crisis. A liberal ethics for the consumption of non-renewable resources and energy sources How could we account for this consumption towards future generations? Which arguments would future generations consider acceptable? Which arguments for the use of, for example, plastic - which has increased exponentially in recent decades - can we give to future generations living in a world in which plastic has negatively affected the ecosystems of planet Earth? The argument 'plastic is a convenient and cheap packaging material' will most likely not be recognized as sufficient justification. Natural capital If raw materials and non-renewable energy sources are used to create a sustainable society, the consumption of natural capital can be seen as an investment for the long term. And by long term I mean the next 200,000 years. The resources of planet Earth can be seen as the natural capital. People can live off the interest of that capital, that is to say, the benefits that nature produces and regenerates. Another option is to enter the natural capital. Take a bongard as an example. The fruit trees yields fruit. When people grow that fruit, the ecosystem remains intact. However, in the short term, besides the fruit, the wood of the fruit trees could also be used and the land of the bongard could be sold to build houses. This yields more economically than just the use of the fruit, but there is a reduction in the natural capital. The short term prevails over the long term when it comes to natural capital. Looting Fossil fuels are finite. Even if there is still oil available for 1,000 years, it is still the question what its use justifies when future generations, after 1,000 years, are without sitting and are also dealing with a warmed up planet. According BP one of worlds largest oil producers, the world has 53.3 years left to find an alternative to oil before current proved reserves run dry. Of course, nations are finding new oil – meaning that number is rising – but new extraction methods are costly and can pose environmental threats. Any use of non-renewable resources must be morally justified. If part of the non-renewable resources, the natural capital, are used for the transition to a sustainable economy and society that will benefit future generations, then this is a convincing moral argument. The consumption of a part of the natural capital does not harm future generations (at least not fundamentally), but it is beneficial for future generations. The way in which natural capital is consumed now is looting: natural capital is used for the short-term self-interest and the interests of future generations are harmed. This goes against the liberal non-harmful principle. Waste bin capacity Of whom is the natural capital actually? The legal definitions of property, as commodities are owned by the inhabitants of nations, are short-sighted. The  natural capital belongs to all earthlings, now and in the future. We know that man has been scurrying around on this planet for about 200,000 years. Let us assume for the sake of convenience that man will last another 200,000 years. That means that the natural capital of planet Earth must also last 200,000 years. The natural capital of planet Earth consists not only of the amount of raw materials that people consume (minerals, fossil fuels), but also the amount of waste that the Earth can absorb, or the waste bin capacity. There is a limited amount of waste that the earth can absorb, but it is quickly exceeded. The quantities of plastic, pesticides, fertilizers and greenhouse gases in the atmosphere disrupt the planet Earth's ecosystem, which naturally invades capital. If, for example, deltas, where millions of people live, are under water due to climate change, it is clear that this is causing damage. Megafauna How can you justify to your grandchildren your consumption of natural capital that has contributed to the bankruptcy of system earth? The consumption of natural capital requires moral reflection. However, in the current political-economic system there is no reflection on the justification of natural capital. However different the political-economic systems may be, they all prioritize contemporary self-interest at the expense of future generations and at the expense of the common good. When few people lived on planet Earth and humans did not yet have technology, there was no need to reflect on the issue of the justification of the consumption of natural capital. Yet people have very early on the natural capital. For example, the disappearance of the megafauna, such as the mammoth, is largely due to man being overrun. However, since the industrial revolution, the use of natural capital has increased exponentially as a result of the technology and the problem has therefore become urgent. Wasting natural capital The ecological crisis is the impending bankruptcy of planet Earth. When the natural capital becomes depleted, there will be a tipping point in the ecosystem of planet Earth, as a result of which the living environment for, among others, the animal species will become unfavorable. However, as long as the capital is not up, it seems like life is a party. Optimists see the party that is financed by the slurping of natural capital. Pessimists see the long term, the mess that remains when the party is over. The ethics of consumption of natural capital is a moral blind spot. It is not a question that is addressed in the political-economic paradigm. The reasons why the natural capital is widely disassembled is that it is possible and that we also have a legal system in which it is legal to do. Technology is making more and more possible, but in practice this leads to ever more intensive looting of natural capital. The bankrupt of system earth The extent to which looted can be measured with the ecological footprint. The average ecological footprint of the Dutch person today is 3.7 planet Earths. This means that if everyone would live on Earth if the average Dutch person would need 3.7 planet Earths. Since we have to live on 1 planet Earth, this means that we commit suicide and we attack the natural capital. We rob us of future generations. Shell and Friesland Campina are examples of companies that deprive future generations of the opportunity to enjoy the proceeds of the natural capital because they participate in the plunder of the planet. Individuals can also ask themselves the question: what justifies my consumption of natural capital? The richer people become, the greater their ecological footprint . Although the rich may have acquired their money within legal frameworks, not everything has been said about the moral justification of an exorbitant lifestyle with a large consumption of energy from non-renewable resources and raw materials (or a large ecological footprint). How can you justify to your grandchildren your consumption of natural capital that has contributed to the bankruptcy of system earth? https://www.whatsorb.com/category/community By: Floris van den Berg. Photo Cover: Bigstock
World Environment Day. The way in which our natural capital is currently consumed is looting
World Environment Day. The way in which our natural capital is currently consumed is looting
The best #green innovations of the week
Hydrogen dustcards and light-up trees A number of eye-catching and potentially transformational innovations have emerged that could help businesses and nations deliver on resource efficiency, low-carbon transitions and combat climate change.  With the European Commission presenting its long-awaited marine-litter-busting proposal on banning single-use plastics, sustainability has once again been pushed to the forefront of media attention. With this in mind, this round-up covers a variety of ideas, concepts, products and systems that could help nations and businesses accelerate sustainability commitments. Turning trees into street lights Cities across the globe have looked at ways to reduce the carbon footprint of their streetlight network through smart solutions this year, with The City of London Corporation confirming in February that “state-of-the-art” technology will coat urban spaces in various lighting types and colours at different times of the night. But Copenhagen-based startup Allumen is studying a way to go one step further than LED lighting and turn trees into natural lamps. Researchers at its labs are trying to isolate the genes that make bioluminescent microalgae glow, so they can tweak them and add them to trees, genetically engineering the  plants to emit light. This could, in theory, eliminate the need for electricity and cut the carbon emissions usually related to building street lamps. Scientists believe the relevant genes can be located fairly quickly but could face challenges with getting the gene to perform in a tree – or with ensuring the plants shine brightly enough to replace LEDs. However, it cannot be denied that the prospect of street lights which actually absorb CO2 rather than contributing to emissions is an attractive one. Self-healing cables Fluid-filled cables were deployed across 8,000km of the UK’s electricity network in the 1960s and 70s in a move to ensure electric cables were better insulated and had fewer voids– but over time, they have started to leak and impact the surrounding environment. Northern Powergrid, alongside the Energy Innovation Centre and system developer Gnosys, has this week announced it has been successful in creating a self-healing alternative to tackle the leaking problems. The new liquid, called self-healing fluid, contains a mixture of tung oil and metal soaps which cause it to react and form a strong cohesive mass when it is exposed to air. This will seal the leaks in a similar way to blood concealing into a scab on a wound. The electricity network will start incorporating the new fluid in its network of 930km of cables before the end of 2018 and anticipates the switch will save the firm up to £20m over the next five years. This summer, up to 20,000 litres of the self-healing fluid will be deployed throughout its cable network. Heavy on the hydrogen As carmakers push to electrify their models and businesses strive to cut fleet emissions, the EV revolution has just begun within the heavy goods vehicles (HGVs) sector, with Volvo last month unveiling its first electric truck designed for heavy-duty roles. This week saw UK waste management firm Grundon launch a low-emission hydrogen and diesel dual-fuel waste collection vehicle, which it claims is the first to be used in Britain’s commercial waste industry. The DAF HGV was retrofitted with a 10kg hydrogen unit in a move which cost £177,000 and was described by Grundon group logistics manager John Stephens as “a significant investment”, but one the firm has been keen to make. The truck is fully operational and is collecting waste from homes in London as part of a trial of the dual-fuel technology. If the trial produces adequate carbon reductions, Grundon will look to invest further and retrofit more of its fleet. Rocking the boat Self-driving cars continue to be a hot topic after the Government launched the first phase of a £100m investment in the development of driverless vehicles earlier this year, but researchers are now turning to boats in a bid to cut congestion and pollution on city canals. Scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have this week unveiled 3D-printed autonomous boats which are fitted with environmental sensors to monitor water pollution and pH levels. Researchers hope the small vessels, which are also equipped with microcontrollers and GPS modules, can be scaled up and used to transport goods and passengers in cities such as Amsterdam, Bangkok and Venice. They have been tested along pre-planned paths in a swimming pool and in the Charles River in Massachusetts, with the inventors now attempting to adapt the model to account for wave disturbances and stronger currents before scaling it up. Coffee cup shake-up In the current market, takeaway paper coffee cups can only be recycled in select infrastructure. They are commonly sealed with a plastic lining to make them waterproof and, although plastic and paper are recyclable, the lining cannot be handled by most recycling facilities. As public awareness around single-use plastics and disposable cups grows, packaging engineering firm Smart Planet Technologies has created a new coating to replace the plastic inside your venti triple-shot latte. Cups lined with the resin-based substance, called EarthCoating, can be widely recycled within existing infrastructure, alongside uncoated paper. Smart Planet Technologies estimates that incorporating the EarthCoating cup results in a cup that contains 43% less plastic than one with standard polyethylene liners, and claims that cups with the substance built in can be recycled up to seven times. The firm has supplied more than seven million of the cups to European clients since launching them last October, and is now looking to expand into the US market. No porky pies With the alternative protein sector set to be worth $5.2bn by 2020, several companies are investing in creating non-meat alternatives to popular dishes. For example, Impossible Foods unveiled a meat-free burger which cost $80m to produce, that uses 95% less land and around 75% less water than traditional burgers. Plant-based food tech startup Beyond Meat has followed suit and turned to breakfast, launching a breakfast sausage patty which is made from pea, mung bean, rice and sunflower protein and designed to look and taste the same as pork. The firm hopes that by mimicking the taste and texture of meat, it can encourage the switch to alternative protein sources and help to slash the estimated 14.5% of global greenhouse gas emissions currently accounted for by meat and fish supply chains. The patty is currently available to US-based restaurants only, but the Californian firm is planning to launch its product range in Europe, Canada, Australia, Mexico, Chile, Israel, Korea, Taiwan and South Africa this year after finding success in Hong Kong and Germany as well as at home. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy By: Sarah George, Eddies, photo cover: Earthbuddies
Hydrogen dustcards and light-up trees A number of eye-catching and potentially transformational innovations have emerged that could help businesses and nations deliver on resource efficiency, low-carbon transitions and combat climate change.  With the European Commission presenting its long-awaited marine-litter-busting proposal on banning single-use plastics, sustainability has once again been pushed to the forefront of media attention. With this in mind, this round-up covers a variety of ideas, concepts, products and systems that could help nations and businesses accelerate sustainability commitments. Turning trees into street lights Cities across the globe have looked at ways to reduce the carbon footprint of their streetlight network through smart solutions this year, with The City of London Corporation confirming in February that “state-of-the-art” technology will coat urban spaces in various lighting types and colours at different times of the night. But Copenhagen-based startup Allumen is studying a way to go one step further than LED lighting and turn trees into natural lamps. Researchers at its labs are trying to isolate the genes that make bioluminescent microalgae glow, so they can tweak them and add them to trees, genetically engineering the  plants to emit light. This could, in theory, eliminate the need for electricity and cut the carbon emissions usually related to building street lamps. Scientists believe the relevant genes can be located fairly quickly but could face challenges with getting the gene to perform in a tree – or with ensuring the plants shine brightly enough to replace LEDs. However, it cannot be denied that the prospect of street lights which actually absorb CO2 rather than contributing to emissions is an attractive one. Self-healing cables Fluid-filled cables were deployed across 8,000km of the UK’s electricity network in the 1960s and 70s in a move to ensure electric cables were better insulated and had fewer voids– but over time, they have started to leak and impact the surrounding environment. Northern Powergrid, alongside the Energy Innovation Centre and system developer Gnosys, has this week announced it has been successful in creating a self-healing alternative to tackle the leaking problems. The new liquid, called self-healing fluid, contains a mixture of tung oil and metal soaps which cause it to react and form a strong cohesive mass when it is exposed to air. This will seal the leaks in a similar way to blood concealing into a scab on a wound. The electricity network will start incorporating the new fluid in its network of 930km of cables before the end of 2018 and anticipates the switch will save the firm up to £20m over the next five years. This summer, up to 20,000 litres of the self-healing fluid will be deployed throughout its cable network. Heavy on the hydrogen As carmakers push to electrify their models and businesses strive to cut fleet emissions, the EV revolution has just begun within the heavy goods vehicles (HGVs) sector, with Volvo last month unveiling its first electric truck designed for heavy-duty roles. This week saw UK waste management firm Grundon launch a low-emission hydrogen and diesel dual-fuel waste collection vehicle, which it claims is the first to be used in Britain’s commercial waste industry. The DAF HGV was retrofitted with a 10kg hydrogen unit in a move which cost £177,000 and was described by Grundon group logistics manager John Stephens as “a significant investment”, but one the firm has been keen to make. The truck is fully operational and is collecting waste from homes in London as part of a trial of the dual-fuel technology. If the trial produces adequate carbon reductions, Grundon will look to invest further and retrofit more of its fleet. Rocking the boat Self-driving cars continue to be a hot topic after the Government launched the first phase of a £100m investment in the development of driverless vehicles earlier this year, but researchers are now turning to boats in a bid to cut congestion and pollution on city canals. Scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have this week unveiled 3D-printed autonomous boats which are fitted with environmental sensors to monitor water pollution and pH levels. Researchers hope the small vessels, which are also equipped with microcontrollers and GPS modules, can be scaled up and used to transport goods and passengers in cities such as Amsterdam, Bangkok and Venice. They have been tested along pre-planned paths in a swimming pool and in the Charles River in Massachusetts, with the inventors now attempting to adapt the model to account for wave disturbances and stronger currents before scaling it up. Coffee cup shake-up In the current market, takeaway paper coffee cups can only be recycled in select infrastructure. They are commonly sealed with a plastic lining to make them waterproof and, although plastic and paper are recyclable, the lining cannot be handled by most recycling facilities. As public awareness around single-use plastics and disposable cups grows, packaging engineering firm Smart Planet Technologies has created a new coating to replace the plastic inside your venti triple-shot latte. Cups lined with the resin-based substance, called EarthCoating, can be widely recycled within existing infrastructure, alongside uncoated paper. Smart Planet Technologies estimates that incorporating the EarthCoating cup results in a cup that contains 43% less plastic than one with standard polyethylene liners, and claims that cups with the substance built in can be recycled up to seven times. The firm has supplied more than seven million of the cups to European clients since launching them last October, and is now looking to expand into the US market. No porky pies With the alternative protein sector set to be worth $5.2bn by 2020, several companies are investing in creating non-meat alternatives to popular dishes. For example, Impossible Foods unveiled a meat-free burger which cost $80m to produce, that uses 95% less land and around 75% less water than traditional burgers. Plant-based food tech startup Beyond Meat has followed suit and turned to breakfast, launching a breakfast sausage patty which is made from pea, mung bean, rice and sunflower protein and designed to look and taste the same as pork. The firm hopes that by mimicking the taste and texture of meat, it can encourage the switch to alternative protein sources and help to slash the estimated 14.5% of global greenhouse gas emissions currently accounted for by meat and fish supply chains. The patty is currently available to US-based restaurants only, but the Californian firm is planning to launch its product range in Europe, Canada, Australia, Mexico, Chile, Israel, Korea, Taiwan and South Africa this year after finding success in Hong Kong and Germany as well as at home. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy By: Sarah George, Eddies, photo cover: Earthbuddies
The best #green innovations of the week
The best #green innovations of the week
Counting the cost - simple steps to a
Nelson Environment Centre's Karen Driver said the idea was to create a "circular economy" for products and waste. Rather than something being made, used, and dumped in landfill at the end of its useful life, it's about repurposing it so parts are reused, not thrown out. "To achieve zero waste properly you need everyone in the chain thinking about it, but it really comes down to the design of products," Driver said. Manufacturers and product designers need to have a product's end-of-life in mind when they make it, giving thought to how it might be reused, fixed, or recycled when they're choosing materials. But everyday consumers have their part to play too. Reduce Driver's first tip is don't buy it if you don't really need it. Avoid products that are single-use, like plastic bags or bottled water. Even if something is able to be recycled, it's best to cut down on anything that creates waste, as recycling isn't without its own environmental impacts. "If you're needing to buy something, just think about the lifetime costs of it,"Driver said. She suggested buying things that can be repaired - wooden-handled garden tools instead of plastic, for example - and spending a bit more on items like clothes, choosing quality garments that will last longer, rather than cheap items that need replacing every year. Buying unpackaged fruits and vegetables is a big one too. Driver said it not only cuts down on plastic from packaging and bags, but it can be cheaper for the consumer, as loose items often have lower per-kilogram cost than packaged goods. She said buying loose items means you're more likely to only buy what you need.  Reuse Anything you do own, in terms of plastic containers and bottles, reuse as much as possible. "Reuse it until it's not reusable anymore and then recycle it," she said. Glass jars and more durable containers can be better in the long-term, however. Driver said places like Bin Inn or organic co-ops will let you bring your own containers to be refilled, to avoid relying on single-use bags or containers. Products like beeswax wraps for food and sandwiches are available as alternative to plastic wrap that only gets one use before its tossed in the waste. Biodegradable bamboo toothbrushes are a more sustainable option than their plastic alternative. Rot Driver said where people often came unstuck was thinking they had to change everything at once. She said a better approach was to take it a step at a time. "Like composting for instance. If you put all your vege scraps in the bin, just think about if you could compost it," she said. Worm farms, compost bins, and bokashi are all popular systems , and the Nelson City Council offers a $20 discount for composting materials.  She said the Nelson Environment Centre were happy to advise people as to how they could manage their food waste based on their living situation. Bokashi systems work well for apartment-dwellers or those without gardens, for example.  Recycle If something can't be broken down by nature's processes, isn't able to be reused, and can't be repaired or repurposed, the last option is to recycle it. Driver said the Environment Centre took old electronics, including cellphones, and where they couldn't use the parts to remake new devices, they would recycle them.  The new government was going to look at ways to charge a levy on vehicle tyres, to help cover the cost of recycling them at their end-of-life, she said.  She said both central and local government had a role to play in providing a framework for manufactures to be responsible with end-of-life management for products, and give incentives where necessary to encourage companies to think about "product stewardships". In Kaikōura, the council realised its landfill was nearly full and didn't want to have to dig a new one, so has been encouraging zero waste practices. Auckland Council has also been setting up community hubs to teach residents how to repurpose things and encourage them to think differently about what is waste.  Because for consumers, Driver said, the first step was to look in their own bin. "Have a think about what's the biggest thing you've got in your bin, in terms of volume or weight, and think about how could you reduce that."  
Nelson Environment Centre's Karen Driver said the idea was to create a "circular economy" for products and waste. Rather than something being made, used, and dumped in landfill at the end of its useful life, it's about repurposing it so parts are reused, not thrown out. "To achieve zero waste properly you need everyone in the chain thinking about it, but it really comes down to the design of products," Driver said. Manufacturers and product designers need to have a product's end-of-life in mind when they make it, giving thought to how it might be reused, fixed, or recycled when they're choosing materials. But everyday consumers have their part to play too. Reduce Driver's first tip is don't buy it if you don't really need it. Avoid products that are single-use, like plastic bags or bottled water. Even if something is able to be recycled, it's best to cut down on anything that creates waste, as recycling isn't without its own environmental impacts. "If you're needing to buy something, just think about the lifetime costs of it,"Driver said. She suggested buying things that can be repaired - wooden-handled garden tools instead of plastic, for example - and spending a bit more on items like clothes, choosing quality garments that will last longer, rather than cheap items that need replacing every year. Buying unpackaged fruits and vegetables is a big one too. Driver said it not only cuts down on plastic from packaging and bags, but it can be cheaper for the consumer, as loose items often have lower per-kilogram cost than packaged goods. She said buying loose items means you're more likely to only buy what you need.  Reuse Anything you do own, in terms of plastic containers and bottles, reuse as much as possible. "Reuse it until it's not reusable anymore and then recycle it," she said. Glass jars and more durable containers can be better in the long-term, however. Driver said places like Bin Inn or organic co-ops will let you bring your own containers to be refilled, to avoid relying on single-use bags or containers. Products like beeswax wraps for food and sandwiches are available as alternative to plastic wrap that only gets one use before its tossed in the waste. Biodegradable bamboo toothbrushes are a more sustainable option than their plastic alternative. Rot Driver said where people often came unstuck was thinking they had to change everything at once. She said a better approach was to take it a step at a time. "Like composting for instance. If you put all your vege scraps in the bin, just think about if you could compost it," she said. Worm farms, compost bins, and bokashi are all popular systems , and the Nelson City Council offers a $20 discount for composting materials.  She said the Nelson Environment Centre were happy to advise people as to how they could manage their food waste based on their living situation. Bokashi systems work well for apartment-dwellers or those without gardens, for example.  Recycle If something can't be broken down by nature's processes, isn't able to be reused, and can't be repaired or repurposed, the last option is to recycle it. Driver said the Environment Centre took old electronics, including cellphones, and where they couldn't use the parts to remake new devices, they would recycle them.  The new government was going to look at ways to charge a levy on vehicle tyres, to help cover the cost of recycling them at their end-of-life, she said.  She said both central and local government had a role to play in providing a framework for manufactures to be responsible with end-of-life management for products, and give incentives where necessary to encourage companies to think about "product stewardships". In Kaikōura, the council realised its landfill was nearly full and didn't want to have to dig a new one, so has been encouraging zero waste practices. Auckland Council has also been setting up community hubs to teach residents how to repurpose things and encourage them to think differently about what is waste.  Because for consumers, Driver said, the first step was to look in their own bin. "Have a think about what's the biggest thing you've got in your bin, in terms of volume or weight, and think about how could you reduce that."  
Counting the cost - simple steps to a
Counting the cost - simple steps to a 'zero waste' life
#Sustainable development goals won’t happen without a radical economic rethink.
The Sustainable Development Goals are ambitious objectives; business as usual will not deliver them. Speaking on the recent International Day for the Eradication of Poverty, U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres acknowledged the need for new thinking. “The pledge to leave no one behind will require innovative approaches, partnerships, and solutions,” he said. But this new model will only come about if we radically reshape the national, regional, and global economies that lie behind many of the obstacles to achieving the SDGs. We must rethink the way we govern and manage the global financial and economic system. In part, that means rethinking the current trend to treat private finance as the default option for development. Private finance is being heavily touted by the World Bank, the G20, and others as the solution to the SDG financing gap — for example, through their enthusiastic promotion of public-private partnerships. Yet international private capital has proven volatile and is often short term. In fact, since 2015, international private finance has been net negative for developing countries — more money has been flowing out than in. This volatility has led some developing countries to protect themselves from external shocks by building up massive reserves. This is a sensible strategy given the lack of faith those countries have in the IMF and other global institutions to protect them in times of crises. However, in practice they build reserves by buying safe assets from developed countries. In other words, the poorer countries are lending trillions of dollars to the richest countries, particularly the U.S., at very low rates of interest. The issue is therefore not how to get more global capital to flow south, but how to make sure that this results in high-quality investments and that developing countries have the tools they need to manage the risks. Most importantly, developing countries also need to make the best use of their own private financial resources, which are almost always several magnitudes larger than foreign capital. Sadly, international rules and institutions too often restrict rather than enhance developing countries’ efforts to make the best use of private finance. For example, the WTO does not allow companies to apply subsidies linked to sourcing domestically or to export performance, and the proliferation of bilateral trade and investment agreements restricts the use of procurement and competition policies to promote domestic industries. The increasing power of investor-state dispute provisions in these treaties gives multinationals the power to challenge governments’ efforts to promote domestic industries and to protect basic human rights.   The prevailing global financial end economic system also works against poorer countries’ efforts to fund their own development by raising domestic public finance, principally through taxation. Domestic public finance — principally tax revenue — is by far the largest development finance resource for those developing countries, dwarfing international private and public flows combined. Developing countries have significantly improved tax collection in recent years. However, they naturally have a limited tax base because of high levels of poverty, and this already-limited base has been hurt by a trend to reduce taxes on multinationals by offering generous tax incentives in a destructive “race to the bottom” to woo foreign investors. Even worse, significant tax revenues are also lost through tax havens, intracompany operations within multinational corporations, and the secret transfer of financial resources out of the global south. As a result, there are significant public resource shortfalls for basic services, social protection, and infrastructure — particularly in least developed countries. International public financial flows — the money sent from donor to recipient countries — are supposed to help fill this gap. But the figures are confusing, as they include large amounts of money that never leave the donor country, such as administrative expenses and the costs of accommodating refugees. What is clear is that these flows have been lower than stated, less than promised, and have proven volatile and subject to changing priorities in developed countries. The architecture of global economic governance has been slow to change. There are major gaps, including the absence of any mechanism to prevent and resolve debt crises, which have sadly become a common occurrence. In addition, the majority of developing countries are either excluded from, or have a limited voice in, global rule setting, thereby seriously weakening the quality of those rules. Despite some notable achievements, secrecy and opacity — as opposed to transparency and openness — remain the norm at international financial institutions. It is clear that the global economic and financial system is severely hindering development progress and that radical changes will be needed if we are to meet the higher level of ambition the SDGs demand. All too often the blockers of reform are the rich countries, which can be accused of “kicking away the ladder” that could allow developing countries to chart their own paths to prosperity. The SDGs set a universal agenda that applies to all countries. If developed nations are to take the SDGs seriously, they need to show they are willing to make the necessary fundamental reforms to the global financial and economic system. As a new report from Eurodad sets out, this would mean changes at home, such as cracking down on the tax havens that are conduits for the loss of resources from the global south. It would also mean a new model of international cooperation, where, for example, the countries with major financial centers support rather than oppose sensible reforms such as the creation of a mechanism to rapidly and fairly resolve debt crises. The benefits of these reforms would be felt at home as well as abroad.   The SDGs represent a step change in global ambitions. If they are to be met, they require a step change in efforts to reform the global financial and economic system.   Join the Devex community and access more in-depth analysis, breaking news and business advice — and a host of other services — on international development, humanitarian aid and global health.
The Sustainable Development Goals are ambitious objectives; business as usual will not deliver them. Speaking on the recent International Day for the Eradication of Poverty, U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres acknowledged the need for new thinking. “The pledge to leave no one behind will require innovative approaches, partnerships, and solutions,” he said. But this new model will only come about if we radically reshape the national, regional, and global economies that lie behind many of the obstacles to achieving the SDGs. We must rethink the way we govern and manage the global financial and economic system. In part, that means rethinking the current trend to treat private finance as the default option for development. Private finance is being heavily touted by the World Bank, the G20, and others as the solution to the SDG financing gap — for example, through their enthusiastic promotion of public-private partnerships. Yet international private capital has proven volatile and is often short term. In fact, since 2015, international private finance has been net negative for developing countries — more money has been flowing out than in. This volatility has led some developing countries to protect themselves from external shocks by building up massive reserves. This is a sensible strategy given the lack of faith those countries have in the IMF and other global institutions to protect them in times of crises. However, in practice they build reserves by buying safe assets from developed countries. In other words, the poorer countries are lending trillions of dollars to the richest countries, particularly the U.S., at very low rates of interest. The issue is therefore not how to get more global capital to flow south, but how to make sure that this results in high-quality investments and that developing countries have the tools they need to manage the risks. Most importantly, developing countries also need to make the best use of their own private financial resources, which are almost always several magnitudes larger than foreign capital. Sadly, international rules and institutions too often restrict rather than enhance developing countries’ efforts to make the best use of private finance. For example, the WTO does not allow companies to apply subsidies linked to sourcing domestically or to export performance, and the proliferation of bilateral trade and investment agreements restricts the use of procurement and competition policies to promote domestic industries. The increasing power of investor-state dispute provisions in these treaties gives multinationals the power to challenge governments’ efforts to promote domestic industries and to protect basic human rights.   The prevailing global financial end economic system also works against poorer countries’ efforts to fund their own development by raising domestic public finance, principally through taxation. Domestic public finance — principally tax revenue — is by far the largest development finance resource for those developing countries, dwarfing international private and public flows combined. Developing countries have significantly improved tax collection in recent years. However, they naturally have a limited tax base because of high levels of poverty, and this already-limited base has been hurt by a trend to reduce taxes on multinationals by offering generous tax incentives in a destructive “race to the bottom” to woo foreign investors. Even worse, significant tax revenues are also lost through tax havens, intracompany operations within multinational corporations, and the secret transfer of financial resources out of the global south. As a result, there are significant public resource shortfalls for basic services, social protection, and infrastructure — particularly in least developed countries. International public financial flows — the money sent from donor to recipient countries — are supposed to help fill this gap. But the figures are confusing, as they include large amounts of money that never leave the donor country, such as administrative expenses and the costs of accommodating refugees. What is clear is that these flows have been lower than stated, less than promised, and have proven volatile and subject to changing priorities in developed countries. The architecture of global economic governance has been slow to change. There are major gaps, including the absence of any mechanism to prevent and resolve debt crises, which have sadly become a common occurrence. In addition, the majority of developing countries are either excluded from, or have a limited voice in, global rule setting, thereby seriously weakening the quality of those rules. Despite some notable achievements, secrecy and opacity — as opposed to transparency and openness — remain the norm at international financial institutions. It is clear that the global economic and financial system is severely hindering development progress and that radical changes will be needed if we are to meet the higher level of ambition the SDGs demand. All too often the blockers of reform are the rich countries, which can be accused of “kicking away the ladder” that could allow developing countries to chart their own paths to prosperity. The SDGs set a universal agenda that applies to all countries. If developed nations are to take the SDGs seriously, they need to show they are willing to make the necessary fundamental reforms to the global financial and economic system. As a new report from Eurodad sets out, this would mean changes at home, such as cracking down on the tax havens that are conduits for the loss of resources from the global south. It would also mean a new model of international cooperation, where, for example, the countries with major financial centers support rather than oppose sensible reforms such as the creation of a mechanism to rapidly and fairly resolve debt crises. The benefits of these reforms would be felt at home as well as abroad.   The SDGs represent a step change in global ambitions. If they are to be met, they require a step change in efforts to reform the global financial and economic system.   Join the Devex community and access more in-depth analysis, breaking news and business advice — and a host of other services — on international development, humanitarian aid and global health.
#Sustainable development goals won’t happen without a radical economic rethink.
#Sustainable development goals won’t happen without a radical economic rethink.
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