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About: <p>A community is you and me. A network of social, economic, ecological and many other relationships. We all work together and live in urban, suburban and rural areas. Social sustainability is becoming increasingly important on our small planet. We define: support, quality of life, development, adaptation, rights and labour.</p> <p>We belong to a group of individuals - <a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/society">our society</a> - in which we belong geographically. Certain environmental issues play an important role in our society. Here, sustainable solutions are sought, developed and implemented. This may differ from societies in other countries, but because of our global environmental issues and&nbsp;<span lang="en" tabindex="0">dependence</span>, we must learn to work more together so that we can all benefit from sharing sustainable knowledge to tackle, for example, climate change.</p> <p><a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/green-architecture">Green architecture</a> is important. Building with local materials that can be recycled and reused brings us a big step forward to have less impact on the environment. With green architecture we can build <a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/smart-cities">smart cities</a> where resources can be used more efficiently and information can be shared, thus improving our society, your community.</p> <p><a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/lifestyle">Lifestyle</a> is the way we live, the dynamics of personality. Fashion defines our self and together with food it is getting - at present - an even more important role in our society. It's not just about taste, but especially about the burden that the fashion industry, agriculture and the meat industry have on our resources, especially water.</p> <p>If there was an urge to come up with a sustainable way of living solutions and share these topics globally it&rsquo;s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about tiny houses, your experiences and expectations for the future at home and globally.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Global Sustainability X-change, that&rsquo;s what you can do together with WhatsOrb.&nbsp;<a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/newsletter/your-shared-sustainable-ideas-make-our-earth-a-better-place">What's in for me?</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
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Collapse: The World According To WhatsOrb
Humans are blind to the imminent environmental collapse. As it turns out, the acceleration of biodiversity loss may just be the sleeper event of the 21st century. Collapse: The World According To WhatsOrb The World According To WhatsOrb is a seven-part series describing the dire situation in which the world and humanity have now found itself. In continued chapters, it represents solutions, which could make short term improvements and save nature and humanity in the long term. It offers short-term goals that are highly achievable The first chapter - this chapter - highlights the grim situation we are in, our mindset, and our instincts. In the end, it is about our 'infinite' world and a fantastic event somewhere on our nearby horizon. For the first time in human existence, its growth peak! The second ( Climate Cascade ) and third chapters discuss the current state of affairs, including climate change, loss of biodiversity, a decline of insect populations, the use of pesticides, and the dying oceans. These will not be for the faint of heart, as they will highlight the inexcusable predatory behavior as displayed by humanity. It does not do well to dwell on the past. While pointing the finger may feel good at first, we need to get something done. That is why the next four chapters focus on quick, relatively simple solutions.   Chapter 4 talks about scarce resources and energy. What do we need and how can we get this? It is about ancient fossil fuels, nuclear power, and renewables, which are still at the embryonic stage. But it is also about agriculture, permaculture, and food. Chapter 5 moves on to the topic of transportation. It is about commuting and traveling. But it is also about our homes, our cities, villages, and towns. How they are organized and how they should be held. Chapter 6 then finally touches upon solutions for production and the industry. It talks about recycling and how to create a truly circular economy. Chapter 7 is the last article of the series. It explores the timeframe of this all, attempting to find out just how much time we have to get our act together.   Collapse: The World According To WhatsOrb is not about what we want to change by 2040 or 2050. It talks about what we can do tomorrow. It offers short-term goals that are highly achievable and can be understood by anyone, regardless of your background knowledge on the topic. The best part? The results will be visible and measurable within months - or even less. Join us on the journey of Collapse: The World According To WhatsOrb and find out how you can do your part in preventing the soon inevitable collapse of nature. The World According To WhatsOrb: The Human Enterprise Do you know what the unifying yet decidedly unfavorable treat is that we, as humans, all share? We are curious . We always want to find out more, even if it harms us in the long run. This is how we managed to come up with such an extensive database of climate change-related matters, how we founded entire libraries on topics like habitat destruction and soil degradation. How we devised algorithms so precise, we could map the impact of a single millimeter’s rise in sea levels on indigenous monkey populations in the heart of the Amazon. Photo by: Timo Ster, Unsplash. Curiosity makes us travel the world. So far, so good. We know a lot of things, and if we do not understand something, we will set our hearts on finding out. This, combined with our ancient survival instincts, is why we are at the top of the world’s food chain. Bring in the unfavorable part of this trait. When we find out something that we do not necessarily enjoy or that threatens any part of our lives, we employ the ostrich-method. Meaning, we stick our heads in the sand and pretend we are not here. The ostrich-method When we are faced with striking images of starving kids in Africa, we tend to look away. Rationalize it by saying that those images were doctored, and those things do not happen anymore. Actively fight it, by arguing that those charities are out to rob us and those poor babies will never see a cent of the donations. Notable exceptions aside, our first instinct is to turn a blind eye. We have this natural blind spot for things that we just don’t like. Recommended:  Hurting The Environment: The Palm Oil Paradox Enter the heaps and heaps of data gathered on how exactly we are harming Mother Nature. The evidence is there, laid out for all of us to see. Unfortunately, most of us will look at this and agree that we are headed for our imminent demise but concede within the next breath that there is nothing ‘they’ can do about it right now. Let’s make it someone else’s problem at another time. Not here, not now. That would be inconvenient, after all. Unfortunately, biodiversity does not have the time to wait ‘one more moment.’ There are a whole bunch of papers highlighting an alarming trend, in which the number of insects is found to be declining at a bizarre pace - up to 75% over the past few decades. Bird populations are faced with similar declines. This is a mass-murder event, but no news outlet feels obliged to report it. Why? Photo by Santanu Banduri, Unsplash. We like birds and a Bee-eater like on the picture, but do we care? It appears that the loss of biodiversity has become the sleeper event of this century. As we, The Human Enterprise, continue to grow our operations, we do so at the detriment of other businesses. Or, in this case, all non-human life on earth. We take away their habitats, we change the climate that they thrive in, we excessively use pesticides, we pollute their soil and water, and we leave them homeless as we continue to expand. The World: Finite We tend to think of our world as a constant, a given. Something that will always be there, no matter what. We could not be further from the truth. The world is finite. Always has been, always will be. Together with millions and millions of other species, we share limited resources, too. And as one species thrives, it will inevitably lead to the demise of different species. That’s what survival of the fittest is all about. In recent years, we lost track of this whole survival of the fittest proposition. Instead, we appear to be headed for our demise. We are no longer the most qualified, most suitable at adapting to our (changing) environment. Instead, we are the most headstrong, thinking that we can solve all of our problems by expanding and producing some more. This makes the battle between protecting nature and fostering economic growth such a heated one. Photo by: Sergio Souza, Unsplash. Thinking that we can solve all of our problems by expanding and producing some more We are actively pushing other species out of the game. In the past 50 years, we managed to decrease worldwide wildlife populations by 60 percent. A large number of animals have found themselves ranking near the top of the WWF’s most endangered list, including the African elephant, black rhino, tigers and killer whale. This cannot be the plan. Worldwide decline of the entomofauna: A review of its drivers' PDF At least these animals still get some attention. It is quite unprecedented how much effort has been put in the protection and forced procreation of pandas, for instance - with great thanks to its cuddliness. There are many more animals which are not so lucky. They lack the appeal, let’s just call it charisma, of some of the before-mentioned animals. These are the insects, microbes, and amphibians that we so direly need to keep the world as it is. Hence, the imminent collapse. Recommended:  Mankind Could Disappear Globally But The Earth Will Survive Collapse: We Don’t Give A Damn Funnily enough, most of us just do not seem to give a damn about the imminence and severity of this collapse. We claim not to care much for nature. Let’s see how much we care about our food, though. A large portion of foods that people undoubtedly enjoy is grown with the help of some of these animals, that now find themselves threatened by our very existence. Through pollination, for instance.   Recommended:  Robot Bees Are All The Buzz: Bees In Decline Let’s not forget that we are not the ones who created this earth as we know it. We are the result of billions and billions of years of evaluation and progress, all of which performed at the hands of - you guessed it - nature and the microbes living in it. {youtube}                                           Humans and the Environment | Essentials of Environmental Science Only Half-Century’s Worth Of Arable Soils Left If someone would walk up to you today and tell you that we only have enough soil left to last us some 50 years, you would probably stop in your tracks and stare at this person. You might either feel scared or find yet another way of rationalizing their claim: ‘But we will probably have found suitable alternatives by then…’ The fact is that biological processes cannot be recreated. These are the processes that ‘make’ the earth as it is. They maintain the chemical balance of our oceans. They foster plants and bacteria that produce oxygen through photosynthesis. And they provide the healthy soil that we need to grow our food, courtesy of countless bacteria, microbes, and fungi.   We are disrupting these processes to such an extent that nature cannot rebound. Soil, for instance, will be depleted in some 50 years. That was not a joke. Agriculture, building, and industry took away so much of it that it did not have enough time to restore. That process takes a long time, much longer than we would ideally want to. Denial of this basic scientific fact led to the precarious position that we find ourselves in today, where we will indeed run out of soil soon. This might pose an even more significant threat than climate change. Without soil, we cannot produce the food that we need to survive. Similarly, biodiversity loss will be disastrous for many crucial processes as well, while the lack of sufficient renewable energy sources will, in effect, do the same. It will lead to shortages of essential elements. Soil. Energy. Water. Crops. Insects. Some of the necessary ingredients of life. Why Are We Not Alarmed? We are coming back to the earlier point. How come we are taking this beating while sitting down? Why are we not standing up and fighting back? We ought to protect our oceans, our soils, our biodiversity. It really should not be that hard. If one earth-crucial process fails, the entire system will start to collapse. And as more and more operations grind to a halt, this system collapse will only accelerate, dragging all of us down with it. Recommended:  Breaking: Did You Know, All You Read About CO2 Rise Is Half The Truth Avoiding this collapse should be our number 1 issue right now. It is what global leaders should be talking about; it is what voters should be most concerned with. Unfortunately, this does not seem to be the case. The number of people who are sticking their heads out above the sand to face the problem head-on is just too small. They cannot do it alone. Too bad the rest of us, including most government leaders, seem to be in denial. The Human Growth Peak As we are battling the COVID-19 pandemic, the first contours of our future society take shape. One that sees nature preserving over economic prosperity, one that has something outside of our control, takes over our lives - leaving us scrambling to catch up. We moan and whine about life ‘as we know it’ has ended, with the limitations pushed upon us by the ‘new reality’ only now starting to sink in.   Recommended:  Climate Change And Viruses: Do Threats Converge? Life will change. Those who are holding out hope that someday soon everything will return to normal will find themselves disillusioned in the end. There are many more catastrophic events waiting around the corner. We have pushed nature to her limits, and she now appears to be taking back control. Photo by: Cheng Feng, Unsplash. Catastrophic events waiting around the corner. Coronavirus, COVID-19, 2020. At the same time, the human growth peak is approaching. And we can feel it in our bones. For the first time in our history, we might be looking at a declining world population. But this means that there will have to be a peak first. This is expected to occur around 2050, after which the downward trend will start. For the first time, more people will die than people are being born. A pretty significant event - that might just be the turning point in history. Radical Change So, ever since our ‘species’ came to being, our number has increased. Sometimes more rapidly, other times are slowing down, but the world population has been growing at a steady pace. It has done so since the first homo sapiens stood up. We started spreading around the world after our ancestors left Africa, some 70,000 years ago. It may have just been a handful of humans, but they were determined to find new lands. They moved to Asia, with some of them moving up further to Europe. Others walked across Siberia and ‘found’ the Americas, with a few of them moving down and reaching the southernmost tip of Patagonia.   This was some 15,000 years ago. Humanity had spread all across the world. This kickstarted an era of even more significant growth, with civilizations forming and clashing with one another in a bet for land, power, or resources. While different cultures were leading at different points in time, it was eventually the West that prospered most. 'The West' was the first to set sail and cross oceans to - often forcefully - get their hands on prized resources, that would fuel their prosperity even more. Colonization had begun. And it hasn’t stopped yet. Colonize It, Enslave It, Control It And Dominate It Our behavior led to the creation of a so-called predatory-exploitative mindset, one that now characterizes us as a species. We are in this game to win it. We consider ourselves to be on top of the food chain, capable of ‘getting’ whatever we want, no matter the cost.   Recommended:  Inequality And Over-Exploitation: All People Matter We are predatory. We exploit to get what we want. This is who we are as a species. We use other countries, other people. We use nature and scarce resources to get what we need. Or ‘deserve,’ as we seem to think. Those who win are always right, and it is only up to history to prove their wrong. Cue the Roman emperors, European colonizers, and slave-owners. The Nazis. They all thought they were doing the right thing for ‘their’ people. They colonized, enslaved, controlled, and dominated. No matter the cost. This Age Is Troubled: The Exponential Curve This is where our current age is so significant. We will soon cease to grow—both in number and mindset. There are no more lands left to discover, nor can we continue our colonization and domination of the earth. We will no longer be able to do so, even if we would want to. We are entering some troubled times. As the world population peaks, we will find ourselves fighting for a limited - and decreasing - number of resources, along with a record number of other people. Cue social unrest. Violence. Poverty. Rage, despair. Rise of fascism and different extreme political views. People want more. But for the first time in history, we cannot have more.   Photo: Shutterstock. Hong Kong protesters as a black bloc that built barricades and set up a fire. Our mindset will have to shift from the predatory-exploitative mindset to something more accommodating. There’s nothing left to hunt down, nothing left to exploit. You know what most animals tend to do when they have performed their job at the top of the food-chain so thoroughly that there is nothing left to hunt? Right, they turn on their own. Precisely what we are doing today. We just do not know what else to do.   Humanity At The End Has Matured In a fun twist of event, some biological definitions would finally place us, as a species, at the point of reaching maturity. We are no longer growing and expanding, but instead settling down, finally having accepted our limitations and stopped our wild ‘wandering about.’ Humanity is now mature. We are now adults. This means that we have to start acting like it as well. And as we all are well-aware, adulthood means stopping the senseless rebellion, letting go of a spirit-filled with wanderlust and greed. It means rising above what we have been and acknowledging our past mistakes. We can - and must! - be better. This especially goes for our treasured earth. We have to do right by her - and this might be the right occasion.   It is time to let go of our predatory-exploitative mindset and start caring. Move to a mindset that is more conscious, more constructive. One that builds up instead of breaks down. Creating this mindset will take a lot of time. It requires hard work and an open mind. This series of articles hopes to point the way. But coming up first: what processes are on the brink of collapsing? Before you go! Recommended:  Brazil Is Burning For Your Beef: Amazon’s Nature, Our Luxury Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about human enterprise? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Humans are blind to the imminent environmental collapse. As it turns out, the acceleration of biodiversity loss may just be the sleeper event of the 21st century. Collapse: The World According To WhatsOrb The World According To WhatsOrb is a seven-part series describing the dire situation in which the world and humanity have now found itself. In continued chapters, it represents solutions, which could make short term improvements and save nature and humanity in the long term. It offers short-term goals that are highly achievable The first chapter - this chapter - highlights the grim situation we are in, our mindset, and our instincts. In the end, it is about our 'infinite' world and a fantastic event somewhere on our nearby horizon. For the first time in human existence, its growth peak! The second ( Climate Cascade ) and third chapters discuss the current state of affairs, including climate change, loss of biodiversity, a decline of insect populations, the use of pesticides, and the dying oceans. These will not be for the faint of heart, as they will highlight the inexcusable predatory behavior as displayed by humanity. It does not do well to dwell on the past. While pointing the finger may feel good at first, we need to get something done. That is why the next four chapters focus on quick, relatively simple solutions.   Chapter 4 talks about scarce resources and energy. What do we need and how can we get this? It is about ancient fossil fuels, nuclear power, and renewables, which are still at the embryonic stage. But it is also about agriculture, permaculture, and food. Chapter 5 moves on to the topic of transportation. It is about commuting and traveling. But it is also about our homes, our cities, villages, and towns. How they are organized and how they should be held. Chapter 6 then finally touches upon solutions for production and the industry. It talks about recycling and how to create a truly circular economy. Chapter 7 is the last article of the series. It explores the timeframe of this all, attempting to find out just how much time we have to get our act together.   Collapse: The World According To WhatsOrb is not about what we want to change by 2040 or 2050. It talks about what we can do tomorrow. It offers short-term goals that are highly achievable and can be understood by anyone, regardless of your background knowledge on the topic. The best part? The results will be visible and measurable within months - or even less. Join us on the journey of Collapse: The World According To WhatsOrb and find out how you can do your part in preventing the soon inevitable collapse of nature. The World According To WhatsOrb: The Human Enterprise Do you know what the unifying yet decidedly unfavorable treat is that we, as humans, all share? We are curious . We always want to find out more, even if it harms us in the long run. This is how we managed to come up with such an extensive database of climate change-related matters, how we founded entire libraries on topics like habitat destruction and soil degradation. How we devised algorithms so precise, we could map the impact of a single millimeter’s rise in sea levels on indigenous monkey populations in the heart of the Amazon. Photo by: Timo Ster, Unsplash. Curiosity makes us travel the world. So far, so good. We know a lot of things, and if we do not understand something, we will set our hearts on finding out. This, combined with our ancient survival instincts, is why we are at the top of the world’s food chain. Bring in the unfavorable part of this trait. When we find out something that we do not necessarily enjoy or that threatens any part of our lives, we employ the ostrich-method. Meaning, we stick our heads in the sand and pretend we are not here. The ostrich-method When we are faced with striking images of starving kids in Africa, we tend to look away. Rationalize it by saying that those images were doctored, and those things do not happen anymore. Actively fight it, by arguing that those charities are out to rob us and those poor babies will never see a cent of the donations. Notable exceptions aside, our first instinct is to turn a blind eye. We have this natural blind spot for things that we just don’t like. Recommended:  Hurting The Environment: The Palm Oil Paradox Enter the heaps and heaps of data gathered on how exactly we are harming Mother Nature. The evidence is there, laid out for all of us to see. Unfortunately, most of us will look at this and agree that we are headed for our imminent demise but concede within the next breath that there is nothing ‘they’ can do about it right now. Let’s make it someone else’s problem at another time. Not here, not now. That would be inconvenient, after all. Unfortunately, biodiversity does not have the time to wait ‘one more moment.’ There are a whole bunch of papers highlighting an alarming trend, in which the number of insects is found to be declining at a bizarre pace - up to 75% over the past few decades. Bird populations are faced with similar declines. This is a mass-murder event, but no news outlet feels obliged to report it. Why? Photo by Santanu Banduri, Unsplash. We like birds and a Bee-eater like on the picture, but do we care? It appears that the loss of biodiversity has become the sleeper event of this century. As we, The Human Enterprise, continue to grow our operations, we do so at the detriment of other businesses. Or, in this case, all non-human life on earth. We take away their habitats, we change the climate that they thrive in, we excessively use pesticides, we pollute their soil and water, and we leave them homeless as we continue to expand. The World: Finite We tend to think of our world as a constant, a given. Something that will always be there, no matter what. We could not be further from the truth. The world is finite. Always has been, always will be. Together with millions and millions of other species, we share limited resources, too. And as one species thrives, it will inevitably lead to the demise of different species. That’s what survival of the fittest is all about. In recent years, we lost track of this whole survival of the fittest proposition. Instead, we appear to be headed for our demise. We are no longer the most qualified, most suitable at adapting to our (changing) environment. Instead, we are the most headstrong, thinking that we can solve all of our problems by expanding and producing some more. This makes the battle between protecting nature and fostering economic growth such a heated one. Photo by: Sergio Souza, Unsplash. Thinking that we can solve all of our problems by expanding and producing some more We are actively pushing other species out of the game. In the past 50 years, we managed to decrease worldwide wildlife populations by 60 percent. A large number of animals have found themselves ranking near the top of the WWF’s most endangered list, including the African elephant, black rhino, tigers and killer whale. This cannot be the plan. Worldwide decline of the entomofauna: A review of its drivers' PDF At least these animals still get some attention. It is quite unprecedented how much effort has been put in the protection and forced procreation of pandas, for instance - with great thanks to its cuddliness. There are many more animals which are not so lucky. They lack the appeal, let’s just call it charisma, of some of the before-mentioned animals. These are the insects, microbes, and amphibians that we so direly need to keep the world as it is. Hence, the imminent collapse. Recommended:  Mankind Could Disappear Globally But The Earth Will Survive Collapse: We Don’t Give A Damn Funnily enough, most of us just do not seem to give a damn about the imminence and severity of this collapse. We claim not to care much for nature. Let’s see how much we care about our food, though. A large portion of foods that people undoubtedly enjoy is grown with the help of some of these animals, that now find themselves threatened by our very existence. Through pollination, for instance.   Recommended:  Robot Bees Are All The Buzz: Bees In Decline Let’s not forget that we are not the ones who created this earth as we know it. We are the result of billions and billions of years of evaluation and progress, all of which performed at the hands of - you guessed it - nature and the microbes living in it. {youtube}                                           Humans and the Environment | Essentials of Environmental Science Only Half-Century’s Worth Of Arable Soils Left If someone would walk up to you today and tell you that we only have enough soil left to last us some 50 years, you would probably stop in your tracks and stare at this person. You might either feel scared or find yet another way of rationalizing their claim: ‘But we will probably have found suitable alternatives by then…’ The fact is that biological processes cannot be recreated. These are the processes that ‘make’ the earth as it is. They maintain the chemical balance of our oceans. They foster plants and bacteria that produce oxygen through photosynthesis. And they provide the healthy soil that we need to grow our food, courtesy of countless bacteria, microbes, and fungi.   We are disrupting these processes to such an extent that nature cannot rebound. Soil, for instance, will be depleted in some 50 years. That was not a joke. Agriculture, building, and industry took away so much of it that it did not have enough time to restore. That process takes a long time, much longer than we would ideally want to. Denial of this basic scientific fact led to the precarious position that we find ourselves in today, where we will indeed run out of soil soon. This might pose an even more significant threat than climate change. Without soil, we cannot produce the food that we need to survive. Similarly, biodiversity loss will be disastrous for many crucial processes as well, while the lack of sufficient renewable energy sources will, in effect, do the same. It will lead to shortages of essential elements. Soil. Energy. Water. Crops. Insects. Some of the necessary ingredients of life. Why Are We Not Alarmed? We are coming back to the earlier point. How come we are taking this beating while sitting down? Why are we not standing up and fighting back? We ought to protect our oceans, our soils, our biodiversity. It really should not be that hard. If one earth-crucial process fails, the entire system will start to collapse. And as more and more operations grind to a halt, this system collapse will only accelerate, dragging all of us down with it. Recommended:  Breaking: Did You Know, All You Read About CO2 Rise Is Half The Truth Avoiding this collapse should be our number 1 issue right now. It is what global leaders should be talking about; it is what voters should be most concerned with. Unfortunately, this does not seem to be the case. The number of people who are sticking their heads out above the sand to face the problem head-on is just too small. They cannot do it alone. Too bad the rest of us, including most government leaders, seem to be in denial. The Human Growth Peak As we are battling the COVID-19 pandemic, the first contours of our future society take shape. One that sees nature preserving over economic prosperity, one that has something outside of our control, takes over our lives - leaving us scrambling to catch up. We moan and whine about life ‘as we know it’ has ended, with the limitations pushed upon us by the ‘new reality’ only now starting to sink in.   Recommended:  Climate Change And Viruses: Do Threats Converge? Life will change. Those who are holding out hope that someday soon everything will return to normal will find themselves disillusioned in the end. There are many more catastrophic events waiting around the corner. We have pushed nature to her limits, and she now appears to be taking back control. Photo by: Cheng Feng, Unsplash. Catastrophic events waiting around the corner. Coronavirus, COVID-19, 2020. At the same time, the human growth peak is approaching. And we can feel it in our bones. For the first time in our history, we might be looking at a declining world population. But this means that there will have to be a peak first. This is expected to occur around 2050, after which the downward trend will start. For the first time, more people will die than people are being born. A pretty significant event - that might just be the turning point in history. Radical Change So, ever since our ‘species’ came to being, our number has increased. Sometimes more rapidly, other times are slowing down, but the world population has been growing at a steady pace. It has done so since the first homo sapiens stood up. We started spreading around the world after our ancestors left Africa, some 70,000 years ago. It may have just been a handful of humans, but they were determined to find new lands. They moved to Asia, with some of them moving up further to Europe. Others walked across Siberia and ‘found’ the Americas, with a few of them moving down and reaching the southernmost tip of Patagonia.   This was some 15,000 years ago. Humanity had spread all across the world. This kickstarted an era of even more significant growth, with civilizations forming and clashing with one another in a bet for land, power, or resources. While different cultures were leading at different points in time, it was eventually the West that prospered most. 'The West' was the first to set sail and cross oceans to - often forcefully - get their hands on prized resources, that would fuel their prosperity even more. Colonization had begun. And it hasn’t stopped yet. Colonize It, Enslave It, Control It And Dominate It Our behavior led to the creation of a so-called predatory-exploitative mindset, one that now characterizes us as a species. We are in this game to win it. We consider ourselves to be on top of the food chain, capable of ‘getting’ whatever we want, no matter the cost.   Recommended:  Inequality And Over-Exploitation: All People Matter We are predatory. We exploit to get what we want. This is who we are as a species. We use other countries, other people. We use nature and scarce resources to get what we need. Or ‘deserve,’ as we seem to think. Those who win are always right, and it is only up to history to prove their wrong. Cue the Roman emperors, European colonizers, and slave-owners. The Nazis. They all thought they were doing the right thing for ‘their’ people. They colonized, enslaved, controlled, and dominated. No matter the cost. This Age Is Troubled: The Exponential Curve This is where our current age is so significant. We will soon cease to grow—both in number and mindset. There are no more lands left to discover, nor can we continue our colonization and domination of the earth. We will no longer be able to do so, even if we would want to. We are entering some troubled times. As the world population peaks, we will find ourselves fighting for a limited - and decreasing - number of resources, along with a record number of other people. Cue social unrest. Violence. Poverty. Rage, despair. Rise of fascism and different extreme political views. People want more. But for the first time in history, we cannot have more.   Photo: Shutterstock. Hong Kong protesters as a black bloc that built barricades and set up a fire. Our mindset will have to shift from the predatory-exploitative mindset to something more accommodating. There’s nothing left to hunt down, nothing left to exploit. You know what most animals tend to do when they have performed their job at the top of the food-chain so thoroughly that there is nothing left to hunt? Right, they turn on their own. Precisely what we are doing today. We just do not know what else to do.   Humanity At The End Has Matured In a fun twist of event, some biological definitions would finally place us, as a species, at the point of reaching maturity. We are no longer growing and expanding, but instead settling down, finally having accepted our limitations and stopped our wild ‘wandering about.’ Humanity is now mature. We are now adults. This means that we have to start acting like it as well. And as we all are well-aware, adulthood means stopping the senseless rebellion, letting go of a spirit-filled with wanderlust and greed. It means rising above what we have been and acknowledging our past mistakes. We can - and must! - be better. This especially goes for our treasured earth. We have to do right by her - and this might be the right occasion.   It is time to let go of our predatory-exploitative mindset and start caring. Move to a mindset that is more conscious, more constructive. One that builds up instead of breaks down. Creating this mindset will take a lot of time. It requires hard work and an open mind. This series of articles hopes to point the way. But coming up first: what processes are on the brink of collapsing? Before you go! Recommended:  Brazil Is Burning For Your Beef: Amazon’s Nature, Our Luxury Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about human enterprise? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Collapse: The World According To WhatsOrb
Collapse: The World According To WhatsOrb
Crisis What Crisis: The World Is full Of Opportunities
The corona crisis is making the world 'small,', and many people worry. For many years I - and many around me - have been tense about the future of humanity on our planet Earth. With a crisis like a drought in the Netherlands in 2018, but also in my environment: forest fires, tornadoes, and floods doesn't make my worries less. At the same time harrowing stories of refugees on and about the sea. Crisis What Crisis! I believe we should say goodbye to our current system, where the global economy is predominant. It ensures the exploitation of people, the depletion of natural resources on earth, and unimaginable animal suffering. But how? The film 'Economics Of Happiness' shows it nicely. It exposes how the Ladakhs in India had a great wealth of their own until roads were built and multinationals made their appearance. People mirrored a fictional ideal and became unhappy. What did the Ladakhs do before that they were doing so well together? Things we can do here too? Recommended:  Consumerism In ‘The West’: A Society Built On Exploitation Far from the heat, noise, and chaos, atop India’s snow-capped mountains, I found peace. How did the Ladakhs live before the major roads in the 1980s? They grow their food in fields with an eye for the natural functioning of those fields, and for the ecosystems. Working together is binding. Several generations meet in the area. Care for each other comes up close. They make their clothes, have their music and dance and history. They are proud, not of themselves, but each other. Everyone is seen. There is no competition. Our lives look very different. But what ideas can we draw from their example for our own lives? {youtube}                                                                      The Economics of Happiness  The World Is Full Of Opportunity: How Would Such A Life Look? Because of this Coronavirus period, we are suddenly much more at home. I noticed by the forced sitting at home that there is more rest among the children. Finally, there is time to make the crafts from the craft book, build the hut, or make the birdhouse. They learn fanatically in the morning and continue singing and playing throughout the day. What would it be like if the competition and performance pressure of the school system disappears, and we only learn for ourselves without comparing it with others? And also mainly learn other things? About ecosystems, about caring for each other, making music (own music but more than just the national anthem), about making clothes yourself, baking pots, weaving baskets? What would it be like if there was time for this? What would it be like if we produce food without loss of quality of soil and biodiversity? Wouldn't it be nice if we felt with every harvest that the earth would be better instead of worse? Isn't it useful to pay more attention to everything that happens and is possible in our immediate environment? For example, for agriculture, health care, nature, and the economy within an hour's walk. Recommended:  Smart Communities: Eco-Living Through Technology Opportunities: A Lot Is Already Happening In my immediate vicinity, Eefde and Zutphen, in The Netherlands, there are already many beautiful initiatives to join, which bring us closer to nature and together and reduces our footprint. Some examples: A basic income (a Zutphens initiative) would kick-start the creation of less stress from crowds. Farming together according to permaculture principles, provides income and food for others / a biodiverse environment. You can harvest yourself at the permaculture market garden 'De Veldhof in Joppe.'  You can also find a lot of healthy food in nature. 'Pluk De Stad' visualized it for Zutphen, among others. In Zutphen, ' KratjeLokaal ' delivers local food to your door every week. As a self-employed person, you can work together in various contexts, such as 'The Zutphense Coopkracht.' It ensures that you do not have to do it all alone and that you are also entitled to 'work at home.' Perhaps we should replace the 'healthcare' sector with the social cohesion sector. When people feel seen, less care is proven to be needed. We are used to family living far away, having distant friends, and some closey. We are used to living in subcultures and without much contact with neighbors. There are often significant ideological differences between people on the street. That does not always make it easy. What if we meet each other automatically, for example, at the community garden or 'Animal Meadow Of Eefde? If we learn together, work together, will there be more understanding and mutual respect? And if people still need help despite their social embedding, this can simply come from the neighborhood with Buurtzorg or, for example, Help just home care, a cooperative of self-employed persons. Herbert Nijkamp's flock grazing grass fields and roadsides in Eefde. Children like to watch and play around the herd. Opening roadsides for adaptation is a first step in the municipality of Lochem. For example, no less than 3000 m2 of roadside was sown with flour mixture by all the neighbors of a street. In Zutphen there are also green adoption projects such as the bee garden where people do yoga together, for example. We used to burn coal and wood, then oil and gas came, now we have learned to make energy from wind and sun. Let's take advantage of this, but after we cut back to the max, otherwise, there will be acres of land left. Choose a non-profit, local energy company. They consider energy saving of paramount importance—for example, ZutphenEnergie or LochemEnergie. You are as strong as your ecosystem, so make sure it is robust. De-stone, your garden, give space to flowers and insects. Participate in the construction and maintenance of nature in your area, ensure a lot of neighborhood greenery. Zutphen and Eefdese green initiatives are Emerpark, Gorsselse heather, biodiverse roadsides. It is a lot of fun to make your clothes. A permanent fabric shop can be found in Epse, 'Javro Fabric Market,' but (eco) fabrics are also for sale at the weekly market in Zutphen. There are also several good seamstresses, such as Radijsje in the Laarstraat. Besides, there are many second-hand clothing stores in Laarstraat that reduce the pressure on raw materials. The World: Locally And With Each Other Think in connection with this. You don't have to learn and do it all alone. There are many active people in your immediate environment. There are repair cafes to go to, the Zutphense Energy Shop with energy coaches, gardens where you are welcome on the 'Kaardebol.' There are also various active Facebook groups to join, such as: 'the Zussen van Zutphen' or 'Ruilen and Sell.' Various people are linked here. This also applies to the equally beautiful Zutphen initiative 'Buddy to Buddy', in which asylum seekers get a native buddy. They have been awarded the 'Appeltje van Oranje.' Queen Maxima from the Netherlands and members of 'Budy to Budy' receive the 'Appeltjes van Oranje reward It is possible in Zutphen and Eefde. So it can be done anywhere! By: Tjitske Ypma (on behalf of Stichting de Lynx) Before you go! Recommended:  Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about your community life? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
The corona crisis is making the world 'small,', and many people worry. For many years I - and many around me - have been tense about the future of humanity on our planet Earth. With a crisis like a drought in the Netherlands in 2018, but also in my environment: forest fires, tornadoes, and floods doesn't make my worries less. At the same time harrowing stories of refugees on and about the sea. Crisis What Crisis! I believe we should say goodbye to our current system, where the global economy is predominant. It ensures the exploitation of people, the depletion of natural resources on earth, and unimaginable animal suffering. But how? The film 'Economics Of Happiness' shows it nicely. It exposes how the Ladakhs in India had a great wealth of their own until roads were built and multinationals made their appearance. People mirrored a fictional ideal and became unhappy. What did the Ladakhs do before that they were doing so well together? Things we can do here too? Recommended:  Consumerism In ‘The West’: A Society Built On Exploitation Far from the heat, noise, and chaos, atop India’s snow-capped mountains, I found peace. How did the Ladakhs live before the major roads in the 1980s? They grow their food in fields with an eye for the natural functioning of those fields, and for the ecosystems. Working together is binding. Several generations meet in the area. Care for each other comes up close. They make their clothes, have their music and dance and history. They are proud, not of themselves, but each other. Everyone is seen. There is no competition. Our lives look very different. But what ideas can we draw from their example for our own lives? {youtube}                                                                      The Economics of Happiness  The World Is Full Of Opportunity: How Would Such A Life Look? Because of this Coronavirus period, we are suddenly much more at home. I noticed by the forced sitting at home that there is more rest among the children. Finally, there is time to make the crafts from the craft book, build the hut, or make the birdhouse. They learn fanatically in the morning and continue singing and playing throughout the day. What would it be like if the competition and performance pressure of the school system disappears, and we only learn for ourselves without comparing it with others? And also mainly learn other things? About ecosystems, about caring for each other, making music (own music but more than just the national anthem), about making clothes yourself, baking pots, weaving baskets? What would it be like if there was time for this? What would it be like if we produce food without loss of quality of soil and biodiversity? Wouldn't it be nice if we felt with every harvest that the earth would be better instead of worse? Isn't it useful to pay more attention to everything that happens and is possible in our immediate environment? For example, for agriculture, health care, nature, and the economy within an hour's walk. Recommended:  Smart Communities: Eco-Living Through Technology Opportunities: A Lot Is Already Happening In my immediate vicinity, Eefde and Zutphen, in The Netherlands, there are already many beautiful initiatives to join, which bring us closer to nature and together and reduces our footprint. Some examples: A basic income (a Zutphens initiative) would kick-start the creation of less stress from crowds. Farming together according to permaculture principles, provides income and food for others / a biodiverse environment. You can harvest yourself at the permaculture market garden 'De Veldhof in Joppe.'  You can also find a lot of healthy food in nature. 'Pluk De Stad' visualized it for Zutphen, among others. In Zutphen, ' KratjeLokaal ' delivers local food to your door every week. As a self-employed person, you can work together in various contexts, such as 'The Zutphense Coopkracht.' It ensures that you do not have to do it all alone and that you are also entitled to 'work at home.' Perhaps we should replace the 'healthcare' sector with the social cohesion sector. When people feel seen, less care is proven to be needed. We are used to family living far away, having distant friends, and some closey. We are used to living in subcultures and without much contact with neighbors. There are often significant ideological differences between people on the street. That does not always make it easy. What if we meet each other automatically, for example, at the community garden or 'Animal Meadow Of Eefde? If we learn together, work together, will there be more understanding and mutual respect? And if people still need help despite their social embedding, this can simply come from the neighborhood with Buurtzorg or, for example, Help just home care, a cooperative of self-employed persons. Herbert Nijkamp's flock grazing grass fields and roadsides in Eefde. Children like to watch and play around the herd. Opening roadsides for adaptation is a first step in the municipality of Lochem. For example, no less than 3000 m2 of roadside was sown with flour mixture by all the neighbors of a street. In Zutphen there are also green adoption projects such as the bee garden where people do yoga together, for example. We used to burn coal and wood, then oil and gas came, now we have learned to make energy from wind and sun. Let's take advantage of this, but after we cut back to the max, otherwise, there will be acres of land left. Choose a non-profit, local energy company. They consider energy saving of paramount importance—for example, ZutphenEnergie or LochemEnergie. You are as strong as your ecosystem, so make sure it is robust. De-stone, your garden, give space to flowers and insects. Participate in the construction and maintenance of nature in your area, ensure a lot of neighborhood greenery. Zutphen and Eefdese green initiatives are Emerpark, Gorsselse heather, biodiverse roadsides. It is a lot of fun to make your clothes. A permanent fabric shop can be found in Epse, 'Javro Fabric Market,' but (eco) fabrics are also for sale at the weekly market in Zutphen. There are also several good seamstresses, such as Radijsje in the Laarstraat. Besides, there are many second-hand clothing stores in Laarstraat that reduce the pressure on raw materials. The World: Locally And With Each Other Think in connection with this. You don't have to learn and do it all alone. There are many active people in your immediate environment. There are repair cafes to go to, the Zutphense Energy Shop with energy coaches, gardens where you are welcome on the 'Kaardebol.' There are also various active Facebook groups to join, such as: 'the Zussen van Zutphen' or 'Ruilen and Sell.' Various people are linked here. This also applies to the equally beautiful Zutphen initiative 'Buddy to Buddy', in which asylum seekers get a native buddy. They have been awarded the 'Appeltje van Oranje.' Queen Maxima from the Netherlands and members of 'Budy to Budy' receive the 'Appeltjes van Oranje reward It is possible in Zutphen and Eefde. So it can be done anywhere! By: Tjitske Ypma (on behalf of Stichting de Lynx) Before you go! Recommended:  Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about your community life? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Crisis What Crisis: The World Is full Of Opportunities
Coronavirus Scam Kills Environment, Kills Society
If you’ve been marking the pandemic by the coronavirus by the pileup of cautious reopening and rescheduled events, you might think that an end to this global coronavirus disaster is insight. The Olympics are scheduled to start in Tokyo on July 23rd, 2021. There’s just one problem: if anyone says that they know precisely when this pandemic will be over, they are probably wrong. Coronavirus Kills Society No one can see the future. The coronavirus is an unknown player (is it?), and the best minds on Earth can’t do more than make educated guesses about what comes next and when. Hell, we didn’t even notice the blood clot situation caused by the coronavirus until just recently. A guess is not comforting when you’re dreading another week of monotony in the same four walls. End dates are comforting. Reopenings are comforting. Contemplating a future that looks a lot like our cozy, crowded past is  way more supportive than our isolated present. But let’s not confuse comfort for truth. Recommended:  The Environment Or Us? The dates politicians are throwing around do not finish lines. They aren’t guesses at an end date for this coronavirus pandemic, either. Shelter-in-place orders are just time-outs. We have no sure-fire treatments for the coronavirus, no vaccine, and a limited supply of health care workers. To keep as many people alive as possible, we’ve done the only thing we can do to slow the spread: we’ve hidden from each other. Can we believe all they say? Coronavirus: Government Reaction In the US, they started a webpage titled ‘Coronavirus Rumour Control’ that offers the following advice to help ‘the public distinguish between rumors and facts’ about the coronavirus pandemic: Don’t believe the rumors. Don’t pass them along. Go to trusted sources of information to get the facts about the federal (COVID-19) response. The media screams about rumors, scams, misinformation, and hoaxes. Don't listen to them' they 'say' and some social websites like YOUTUBE and Facebook delete information which - in their opinion - is false! But how is it possible for people like you and me without any background on health-related issues to find out what is right or wrong? There are many reasons and facts from the past that prove that neither governments, global media, the pharmaceutical industry, and other organizations can be trusted if money or power could be gained from specific actions. So, I as a civilian will follow my common sense and start asking some questions! Coronavirus Scam: Questions Being at home for many weeks, watching TV, having an occasional telephone call with friends and family about their whereabouts, questions started to raise about the coronavirus, the lockdown, the why, and how? So without wanting to spread any rumors, I like to cover some questions and share these with you. I'm not a scientist, not in any way educated in health-related matters but just a civilian who can't get a grip and understanding about the measures governments are taking. So here we go! In many articles and announcements, it is mentioned that about 80% of the people who die from the coronavirus had underlying health problems. If there was flu and these people would die, would they get the  'label' 'died from the flu virus' or the label just passed away because of their underlying condition? If above is true, why would you lockdown societies and causing the bankruptcy of many businesses? If 20% of the people really would die because of the impact of the coronavirus, would that mean that 'only' worldwide today - the 6th of May 2020, 258,975 death worldwide - in reality 'just' 51.795 have died from the coronavirus?  I once read an article that children nowadays are so vulnerable to infections because our households and bodies are too clean! We wash, we spray, we brush and dust. By doing so, do we destroy not only the harmful germs and bugs but also the good ones who help our natural immune system to fight unwanted 'visitors'? Because of the above, I'm afraid when the next winter season is due; people are even more conceivable for the 'normal' occurring flue and probably still present coronavirus. Do you think my concern is justified? The economic impact will be immense. What will be the consequences for the health of people who will: lose their business, go broke, get unemployed, get divorced, etc.? And what about domestic violence, sexual abuse, etc.? In the media, there is often talk about a quick fix to make a vaccine. By just searching on Google - for what it is - I find many articles which tell it takes at least a year or one and half year to get 'any' vaccine, and that still would be very fast. So what do I have to believe from 'people, politicians' who tell that 'they' maybe have a virus in a few months ready?                                                  Why will a coronavirus vaccine take 18 months to develop? According to a study from the Northwell Health - New York state’s most extensive hospital system - Almost 42 percent of all patients hospitalized with coronavirus were reportedly obese, with a body mass index (BMI) of more than or at 30. More than half of COVID-19 patients, or 56.6 percent, simultaneously had hypertension, a cardiovascular disease. Diabetes was also found to be a prevalent pre-existing condition, with 33.8 percent of coronavirus patients reported as being diabetic. Why is the food industry still allowed to produce 'bad food' with ingredients 'we' all know - politicians, producers, researchers in food labs, lobbyists, etc. - it will result in unhealthy people and unnecessary pressure on the existing health care system? Globally, there are now more people who are obese than those who are underweight, a trend observed in every region over the world except parts of sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. In 2013, an estimated 2.1 billion adults were overweight , as compared with 857 million in 1980. Of adults who are overweight, 31% are obese. Isn't this a hugely important issue for all governments - again, the food industry - but also health care, educators, parents, etc. to change habits but especially force the food industry to produce healthier food and stop marketers from advertising lousy food which is acutely a crime against humanity? In the last 20 years, we had MERS, Sars, bird-flue, pigs fever, and Q-fever (Netherlands, goats). All viruses which jumped from animals to humans. After all these bad experiences, you should expect that governments would learn that packing animals close to each other, close to humans, and the destruction of habitats from animals is just waiting for disasters to happen. Why is there still no urge to forbid factory farming? I saw an interview with a doctor in DR Congo. She said that there are still hundreds of thousands killed by measles and malaria. The vaccines and treatments are available already for many years, but even a lot don't get it. Now 'the world' - some organizations -  are in a hurry to vaccinate the whole world against the coronavirus. With the coronavirus, there turns to be an incredible hurry to vaccinate every soul on this planet but not with the measles and malaria. Why? Coronavirus Scam Kills Environment, Kills Society: Videos Below you can find some videos from people working in the medical field who share their 'very different opinion - about the origin, cause, and reaction from 'governments' on the coronavirus crisis.    Unfortunately, YOUTUBE starts taken down videos that show different opinions about the coronavirus; it's the origin, the way the WHO has acted, etc. It is worrisome that particular social media organizations are taking down information which under scribes different opinions. I don't know what the exact truth is about the coronavirus, but taking away information and therefore taking away the possibility for people's to decide what is real or not as an adult is the start of undermining democracy. The video 'The Hidden Agenda Behind Covid-19' is one of the deleted video's which was before visible on YOUTUBE. At this moment, another video from a Dutch pulmonologist. Unfortunate, it is only in the Dutch language.                                          Longarts David Prins stelt vragen over het beleid omtrent Corona                                             A killer pandemic imprisons humanity. People are being arrested for surfing in the ocean and meditating in nature. Nations are collapsing. Hungry citizens are rioting for food. The media has generated so much confusion and fear that people are begging for salvation in a syringe. Billionaire patent owners are pushing for globally mandated vaccines. Anyone who refuses to be injected with experimental poisons will be prohibited from travel, education, and work. No, this is not a synopsis for a new horror movie. This is our current reality. Let’s back up to address how we got here. In the early 1900s, America’s first billionaire, John D. Rockefeller bought a German pharmaceutical company that would later assist Hitler to implement his eugenics-based vision by manufacturing chemicals and poisons for war. Rockefeller wanted to eliminate the competitors of Western medicine, so he submitted a report to Congress declaring that there were too many doctors and medical schools in America and that all-natural healing modalities were unscientific quackery. Rockefeller called for the standardization of medical education, whereby only his organization be allowed to grant medical school licenses in the US. And so began the practice of immune suppressive, synthetic and toxic drugs. Once people had become dependent on this new system and the addictive drugs it provided, the network switched to a paid program, creating lifelong customers for the Rockefellers. Currently, medical error is the third leading cause of death in the US. Rockefeller’s secret weapon to success was the strategy known as 'problem-reaction-solution.' Create a problem, escalate fear, then offer a pre-planned solution. Sound familiar? Flash forward to 2020. They named it COVID19. Our leaders of world health predicted millions would die. The National Guard was deployed. Makeshift hospitals were erected to care for a massive overflow of patients. Mass graves were dug. Terrifying news reports had people everywhere seeking shelter to avoid contact with others. The plan is unfolding with precision. But the masters of the Pandemic underestimated one thing... the people. Recommended:  Coronavirus: The New Normal And Global Updates Medical professionals and every-day citizens are sharing critical information online. The overlords of big tech have ordered all dissenting voices to be silenced and banned, but they are too late. The slumbering masses are awake and aware that something is not right. Quarantine has provided the missing element: time. Suddenly, our overworked citizenry has ample time to research and investigate for themselves. Once you see, you can’t unsee. The window of opportunity is open like never before. For the first time in human history, we have the world’s attention. Pandemic will expose the scientific and political elite who run the scam that is our global health system while laying out a new plan. This plan allows all of humanity to reconnect with the healing forces of nature. 2020 is the code for perfect vision. It is also the year that will go down in history as the moment we finally opened our eyes.                                                 Corona, an evil crisis: Stefan Noordhoek en Wolfgang Wodarg Dr. Med. Wolfgang Wodarg, born in 1947, is an Internist and Pulmonologist, specialist for Hygiene and Environmental Medicine, as well as for Public Health and Social Medicine. After his clinical activity as an Internist, he was, among other things, Public Health Officer in Schleswig-Holstein for 13 years, a lecturer at universities and universities of applied sciences and Chairman of the Expert Committee for Health-related Environmental Protection at the Schleswig-Holstein Medical Association; in 1991 he received a DAAD Scholarship to Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA (epidemiology). As a member of the German Bundestag from 1994 to 2009, he was initiator and speaker in the Enquête Commission 'Ethics and Law of Modern Medicine', member of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe, where he was chairman of the Subcommittee on Health and deputy chairman of the Committee on Culture, Education and Science. In 2009, he initiated the Committee of Inquiry into WHO's role in H1N1 ('Swine flu') in Strasbourg, where he remained as a scientific expert after leaving Parliament. Since 2011 he has been working as a freelance university lecturer, doctor, and health scientist and was a volunteer member of the board and head of the Health Working Group at Transparency International Germany until 2020. Recommended:  Climate Change And Viruses: Do Threats Converge? {youtube}                                                      Dr. Rashid Butter about Bill Gates and Fauci                                         Tucker: Elites don't want you to question their coronavirus policies Before you go! Recommended:  Coronavirus: Real-Time Laboratory For Urban Life Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about the coronavirus, the possible relation with the winter season, or climate change? Click on  'Re g ister'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
If you’ve been marking the pandemic by the coronavirus by the pileup of cautious reopening and rescheduled events, you might think that an end to this global coronavirus disaster is insight. The Olympics are scheduled to start in Tokyo on July 23rd, 2021. There’s just one problem: if anyone says that they know precisely when this pandemic will be over, they are probably wrong. Coronavirus Kills Society No one can see the future. The coronavirus is an unknown player (is it?), and the best minds on Earth can’t do more than make educated guesses about what comes next and when. Hell, we didn’t even notice the blood clot situation caused by the coronavirus until just recently. A guess is not comforting when you’re dreading another week of monotony in the same four walls. End dates are comforting. Reopenings are comforting. Contemplating a future that looks a lot like our cozy, crowded past is  way more supportive than our isolated present. But let’s not confuse comfort for truth. Recommended:  The Environment Or Us? The dates politicians are throwing around do not finish lines. They aren’t guesses at an end date for this coronavirus pandemic, either. Shelter-in-place orders are just time-outs. We have no sure-fire treatments for the coronavirus, no vaccine, and a limited supply of health care workers. To keep as many people alive as possible, we’ve done the only thing we can do to slow the spread: we’ve hidden from each other. Can we believe all they say? Coronavirus: Government Reaction In the US, they started a webpage titled ‘Coronavirus Rumour Control’ that offers the following advice to help ‘the public distinguish between rumors and facts’ about the coronavirus pandemic: Don’t believe the rumors. Don’t pass them along. Go to trusted sources of information to get the facts about the federal (COVID-19) response. The media screams about rumors, scams, misinformation, and hoaxes. Don't listen to them' they 'say' and some social websites like YOUTUBE and Facebook delete information which - in their opinion - is false! But how is it possible for people like you and me without any background on health-related issues to find out what is right or wrong? There are many reasons and facts from the past that prove that neither governments, global media, the pharmaceutical industry, and other organizations can be trusted if money or power could be gained from specific actions. So, I as a civilian will follow my common sense and start asking some questions! Coronavirus Scam: Questions Being at home for many weeks, watching TV, having an occasional telephone call with friends and family about their whereabouts, questions started to raise about the coronavirus, the lockdown, the why, and how? So without wanting to spread any rumors, I like to cover some questions and share these with you. I'm not a scientist, not in any way educated in health-related matters but just a civilian who can't get a grip and understanding about the measures governments are taking. So here we go! In many articles and announcements, it is mentioned that about 80% of the people who die from the coronavirus had underlying health problems. If there was flu and these people would die, would they get the  'label' 'died from the flu virus' or the label just passed away because of their underlying condition? If above is true, why would you lockdown societies and causing the bankruptcy of many businesses? If 20% of the people really would die because of the impact of the coronavirus, would that mean that 'only' worldwide today - the 6th of May 2020, 258,975 death worldwide - in reality 'just' 51.795 have died from the coronavirus?  I once read an article that children nowadays are so vulnerable to infections because our households and bodies are too clean! We wash, we spray, we brush and dust. By doing so, do we destroy not only the harmful germs and bugs but also the good ones who help our natural immune system to fight unwanted 'visitors'? Because of the above, I'm afraid when the next winter season is due; people are even more conceivable for the 'normal' occurring flue and probably still present coronavirus. Do you think my concern is justified? The economic impact will be immense. What will be the consequences for the health of people who will: lose their business, go broke, get unemployed, get divorced, etc.? And what about domestic violence, sexual abuse, etc.? In the media, there is often talk about a quick fix to make a vaccine. By just searching on Google - for what it is - I find many articles which tell it takes at least a year or one and half year to get 'any' vaccine, and that still would be very fast. So what do I have to believe from 'people, politicians' who tell that 'they' maybe have a virus in a few months ready?                                                  Why will a coronavirus vaccine take 18 months to develop? According to a study from the Northwell Health - New York state’s most extensive hospital system - Almost 42 percent of all patients hospitalized with coronavirus were reportedly obese, with a body mass index (BMI) of more than or at 30. More than half of COVID-19 patients, or 56.6 percent, simultaneously had hypertension, a cardiovascular disease. Diabetes was also found to be a prevalent pre-existing condition, with 33.8 percent of coronavirus patients reported as being diabetic. Why is the food industry still allowed to produce 'bad food' with ingredients 'we' all know - politicians, producers, researchers in food labs, lobbyists, etc. - it will result in unhealthy people and unnecessary pressure on the existing health care system? Globally, there are now more people who are obese than those who are underweight, a trend observed in every region over the world except parts of sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. In 2013, an estimated 2.1 billion adults were overweight , as compared with 857 million in 1980. Of adults who are overweight, 31% are obese. Isn't this a hugely important issue for all governments - again, the food industry - but also health care, educators, parents, etc. to change habits but especially force the food industry to produce healthier food and stop marketers from advertising lousy food which is acutely a crime against humanity? In the last 20 years, we had MERS, Sars, bird-flue, pigs fever, and Q-fever (Netherlands, goats). All viruses which jumped from animals to humans. After all these bad experiences, you should expect that governments would learn that packing animals close to each other, close to humans, and the destruction of habitats from animals is just waiting for disasters to happen. Why is there still no urge to forbid factory farming? I saw an interview with a doctor in DR Congo. She said that there are still hundreds of thousands killed by measles and malaria. The vaccines and treatments are available already for many years, but even a lot don't get it. Now 'the world' - some organizations -  are in a hurry to vaccinate the whole world against the coronavirus. With the coronavirus, there turns to be an incredible hurry to vaccinate every soul on this planet but not with the measles and malaria. Why? Coronavirus Scam Kills Environment, Kills Society: Videos Below you can find some videos from people working in the medical field who share their 'very different opinion - about the origin, cause, and reaction from 'governments' on the coronavirus crisis.    Unfortunately, YOUTUBE starts taken down videos that show different opinions about the coronavirus; it's the origin, the way the WHO has acted, etc. It is worrisome that particular social media organizations are taking down information which under scribes different opinions. I don't know what the exact truth is about the coronavirus, but taking away information and therefore taking away the possibility for people's to decide what is real or not as an adult is the start of undermining democracy. The video 'The Hidden Agenda Behind Covid-19' is one of the deleted video's which was before visible on YOUTUBE. At this moment, another video from a Dutch pulmonologist. Unfortunate, it is only in the Dutch language.                                          Longarts David Prins stelt vragen over het beleid omtrent Corona                                             A killer pandemic imprisons humanity. People are being arrested for surfing in the ocean and meditating in nature. Nations are collapsing. Hungry citizens are rioting for food. The media has generated so much confusion and fear that people are begging for salvation in a syringe. Billionaire patent owners are pushing for globally mandated vaccines. Anyone who refuses to be injected with experimental poisons will be prohibited from travel, education, and work. No, this is not a synopsis for a new horror movie. This is our current reality. Let’s back up to address how we got here. In the early 1900s, America’s first billionaire, John D. Rockefeller bought a German pharmaceutical company that would later assist Hitler to implement his eugenics-based vision by manufacturing chemicals and poisons for war. Rockefeller wanted to eliminate the competitors of Western medicine, so he submitted a report to Congress declaring that there were too many doctors and medical schools in America and that all-natural healing modalities were unscientific quackery. Rockefeller called for the standardization of medical education, whereby only his organization be allowed to grant medical school licenses in the US. And so began the practice of immune suppressive, synthetic and toxic drugs. Once people had become dependent on this new system and the addictive drugs it provided, the network switched to a paid program, creating lifelong customers for the Rockefellers. Currently, medical error is the third leading cause of death in the US. Rockefeller’s secret weapon to success was the strategy known as 'problem-reaction-solution.' Create a problem, escalate fear, then offer a pre-planned solution. Sound familiar? Flash forward to 2020. They named it COVID19. Our leaders of world health predicted millions would die. The National Guard was deployed. Makeshift hospitals were erected to care for a massive overflow of patients. Mass graves were dug. Terrifying news reports had people everywhere seeking shelter to avoid contact with others. The plan is unfolding with precision. But the masters of the Pandemic underestimated one thing... the people. Recommended:  Coronavirus: The New Normal And Global Updates Medical professionals and every-day citizens are sharing critical information online. The overlords of big tech have ordered all dissenting voices to be silenced and banned, but they are too late. The slumbering masses are awake and aware that something is not right. Quarantine has provided the missing element: time. Suddenly, our overworked citizenry has ample time to research and investigate for themselves. Once you see, you can’t unsee. The window of opportunity is open like never before. For the first time in human history, we have the world’s attention. Pandemic will expose the scientific and political elite who run the scam that is our global health system while laying out a new plan. This plan allows all of humanity to reconnect with the healing forces of nature. 2020 is the code for perfect vision. It is also the year that will go down in history as the moment we finally opened our eyes.                                                 Corona, an evil crisis: Stefan Noordhoek en Wolfgang Wodarg Dr. Med. Wolfgang Wodarg, born in 1947, is an Internist and Pulmonologist, specialist for Hygiene and Environmental Medicine, as well as for Public Health and Social Medicine. After his clinical activity as an Internist, he was, among other things, Public Health Officer in Schleswig-Holstein for 13 years, a lecturer at universities and universities of applied sciences and Chairman of the Expert Committee for Health-related Environmental Protection at the Schleswig-Holstein Medical Association; in 1991 he received a DAAD Scholarship to Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA (epidemiology). As a member of the German Bundestag from 1994 to 2009, he was initiator and speaker in the Enquête Commission 'Ethics and Law of Modern Medicine', member of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe, where he was chairman of the Subcommittee on Health and deputy chairman of the Committee on Culture, Education and Science. In 2009, he initiated the Committee of Inquiry into WHO's role in H1N1 ('Swine flu') in Strasbourg, where he remained as a scientific expert after leaving Parliament. Since 2011 he has been working as a freelance university lecturer, doctor, and health scientist and was a volunteer member of the board and head of the Health Working Group at Transparency International Germany until 2020. Recommended:  Climate Change And Viruses: Do Threats Converge? {youtube}                                                      Dr. Rashid Butter about Bill Gates and Fauci                                         Tucker: Elites don't want you to question their coronavirus policies Before you go! Recommended:  Coronavirus: Real-Time Laboratory For Urban Life Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about the coronavirus, the possible relation with the winter season, or climate change? Click on  'Re g ister'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Coronavirus Scam Kills Environment, Kills Society
Coronavirus Scam Kills Environment, Kills Society
The World’s Gone Mad! You Need Mud, No iPhone
For a while, we seem to have gotten our priorities all wrong. We are so eager to get our hands on the latest pair of designer jeans or the newest iPhone or iPad, that we consider it to be a primary necessity for life. You Need Mud: The Basic Necessity For Life We take most other things for granted, but when push comes to shove, we will not be able to breathe in our Calvin Klein shirt, nor can we drink from the latest Samsung model. We need other things for that. Water, oxygen. Gravity. Things that have always been there, quietly supporting life. Yet there is one basic necessity for life that is so obscure most will fail to mention it in this context, while we all use it on a daily basis, in one way or the other. It is the soil beneath our feet. The mud that some of us rummage around in to produce food or just a pretty looking garden that we enjoy   working in, while the rest of us benefits from what we reap - and sow - from it. Recommended:  Smartphones Not Sustainable: Designed To 'Downgrade Humans' The whole concept of mud has gotten a pretty bad rep. Ever since you were a kid, chances are your mother would yell at you if you would dare to enter the house with muddy boots. The family pet who suddenly felt like rolling around in that pile of dirt would undoubtedly be confined to the mudroom - see what is happening in this word? - until he’d gotten a lengthy shower. Mud: The Rich Ecosystem Beneath Our Feet There is much more to soil, though. Unsurprisingly, one of its synonyms is earth. The Earth is our home, largely made up of - yes - earth. There is so much going on beneath our feet that we are not aware of - and the processes that keep on replenishing and reviving the soil are nothing short of miraculous. Take moles, for instance, digging tunnels - and not just for fun. They also effectively aerate the underground. Similarly, the earth happens to be the catch-all for everything dead and dying - both animals, humans, and plants use it to harbour their diseased. All tiny critters that we associate with ‘dirt’ are playing a crucial role in cleaning and composting those dead things, including worms, mites and nematodes. On an even more microscopic level, tardigrades are seeking out bacteria for their lunch. Recommended:  New Foodscape Alternatives Gets Lots Of Attention In The Netherlands Yet the earth also holds us in place, quite literally so. Trees and plants are merely the tip of the iceberg when you look at what goes on underneath the surface. Their roots go on and on, in an endless search for water and firmly locking its occupant in place. On top of that, the earth is our most important bet for figuring out what has happened in the past. Almost like the growth rings on trees, the soil beneath our feet consists of layer after layer of history. Loose Matter Waiting To Be Decomposed At the top, there’s a layer of ‘loose matter’ on top of the soil. Dead plants, animals, tree branches and leaves, it all falls down to decompose. Decomposing is a wonderful process in and of itself, requiring the perfect soil underneath. Moist, but not too moist, so that the small beings in charge of composting are able to survive but will not drown. Recommended:  Regenerative Agriculture: Its Full Potential (Part 3 of 3) Topsoil: Only Enough To Last Us Sixty Years The next layer is the topsoil. This is where the actual decomposition happens, when billions and billions of microorganisms are feasting on the organic matter fed to them. Microorganisms like earthworms, arthropods, nematodes, fungi and bacteria will be amongst the many inhabitants. These play a lead role in creating nutrients that enrich the soil.   It is not hard to see how the quality of dead loose matter plays an important role in determining the quality of the soil - and thus, the overall agricultural prosperity of areas. Take the ancient Egyptian civilisation, one whose riches were largely built on the prosperity of the land. The Nile river flooded every year, replenishing the soil in the process. Other societies in dry areas, including sub-Saharan Africa, were not as lucky. Recommended:  Water War Brewing Over New River Nile Dam: Egypt, Ethiopia One can already see a big problem here. Those areas lucky enough to have stricken the right natural balance between moist and organic waste are thriving, while those that aren’t are - well, not. And in this era of explosive population growth, we are eager to get our hands on more fertile land to feed those who rely on it. We are actively pushing the limits of what we can take, ‘borrowing’ land from forests or other sacred nature areas. In many countries, actions like deforestation were taken that destroyed nature’s fragile balance, with the top soil unable to perform its function as it is blown away from steep, now bare, hillsides. This topsoil ends up downhill, where it clogs up the irrigation systems and existing farmland. The result? A drastic reduction of usable farmland and the inevitable hunger that follows suit. In those areas, top soil is a hot commodity, yet at the same time, it is becoming increasingly rare. Estimates are that we only have enough topsoil left to last us some sixty years, while creating new topsoil will take at least 500 to 1000 years. The math just does not add up. Topsoil As The Base For Billions Of Micro-Organisms There is more to this topsoil than it being a place where dead organisms are decomposing and new organisms can blossom. It is also the home for billions and billions and many, many more billions of micro-organisms. Actually, most of the species that call our Earth home spend their lives under the ground, with some 10,000 to 50,000 species living in a single gram of soil. Miraculous, isn’t it? Colony characteristic of Actinomyces, Bacteria, yeast and Mold on selective media from soil samples for study in laboratory microbiology There’s the bacteria, along with their relatively similar appearing siblings of the archaea. Both groups of species may only be single-celled, but are resilient as they come. And although many confuse the two, they actually split ways - biologically speaking - billions of years ago. They are some of the most important building blocks of our world, performing functions that are a prerequisite for life. They fuel our underground, helping us get rid of waste and preparing it for proper flourishing and growing of plants and much of the produce that we enjoy on a daily basis. Recommended:  Virus, Bacteria, Fungi: Tiny Organisms Will Save Us Globally The Unknown Formula Of Bacteria And Archaea Many of those functions performed by bacteria and archaea are now attempted to be recreated by scientists in labs worldwide, in order to create some kind of synthetic gene that is programmed to do the same thing. This would be great for nations that are now faced with the immediate danger of absent or minimal topsoil, which has rendered whole patches of land barren. Yet it seems much harder than you may think to find this magic ‘cure’, as science has only had minor successes in doing so.   At the same time, these very same bacteria and archaea are changing as well - and not for the better, from our point of view. Through the use of reclaimed water for irrigation purposes and fertilisation, these soil bacteria are exposed to water laced with, amongst others, antibiotics. And that is quite a big deal, as this leads to us finding and creating so-called ‘superbugs’ that are antibiotics-resistant. Recommended:  World’s Population 10 Billion By 2050: Bugs For Dinner? Not just dangerous for crops, plants and trees, but also for animals and our own health. If this soil, full of superbugs, happens to be located right underneath a playground, one can only imagine what the consequences would be. Fungi And The Symbiotic Relationship With Plants   Then, there’s fungi. Something that shares the bad rep of dirt, as many people associate it with something that’s gone bad, something rotten. Not that surprising, considering its genetic make-up. While most animals on our planet internalised their digestion, fungi are happy to keep it all external, actively shedding their digestive enzymes. They play a large role in the decomposing of matter. Just leave a perishable food item for too long and you will surely find that they have found it and covered it in a typical hairy, goosebump-inciting fur. In this same way, they help to get rid of any dead matter, while actually helping underground life flourish. Their unique characteristics make them capable of transferring nutrients from one plant or tree to the other.   {youtube}                                                                      Mycorrhizal Fungi Animation   Similarly, fungi form symbiotic relationships with plants, feeding them with the nutrients that they need and helping them fend off potentially dangerous diseases. Plants that are ‘linked’ with fungi are healthier and thriving. At the same time, the soil as a whole is similarly improved through greater porosity, aeration and water retention - while allowing nutrients to flow freely. Once again, a miracle of Mother Nature herself. Let The Soil Take Care Of Us The soil is not just important for keeping our environment healthy. It can play an equally important role in keeping ourselves healthy. If we continue to mistreat and disregard the dirt beneath our feet, chances are that the heavy contamination of the soil will lead to a variety of diseases, disorders, and superbugs that are all out to bring us down. Similarly, as we have quite literally lost touch with the soil beneath our feet, we become even more vulnerable. In the past, as children played outside a lot more and more people used to work in farming or in a garden, our bodies got used to the tons of microbes in it. Our immune systems were so busy with the soil microbes they regularly encountered, that they grew used to - and immune to - a wide variety of them. Now that this has largely fallen away, we have fallen prey to a range of allergies and health problems, like asthma.   As a rule of thumb, the dirtier your kid is, the better their immune system will be. Playing in the dirt is not just fun, it is important for their health and the health of the planet as a whole. Sufficient reason for all of us to get our hands dirty more often and invest in healthy soil. Recommended:  Agrivoltaics Mutually Beneficial: Food, Water And Energy Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about agriculture? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
For a while, we seem to have gotten our priorities all wrong. We are so eager to get our hands on the latest pair of designer jeans or the newest iPhone or iPad, that we consider it to be a primary necessity for life. You Need Mud: The Basic Necessity For Life We take most other things for granted, but when push comes to shove, we will not be able to breathe in our Calvin Klein shirt, nor can we drink from the latest Samsung model. We need other things for that. Water, oxygen. Gravity. Things that have always been there, quietly supporting life. Yet there is one basic necessity for life that is so obscure most will fail to mention it in this context, while we all use it on a daily basis, in one way or the other. It is the soil beneath our feet. The mud that some of us rummage around in to produce food or just a pretty looking garden that we enjoy   working in, while the rest of us benefits from what we reap - and sow - from it. Recommended:  Smartphones Not Sustainable: Designed To 'Downgrade Humans' The whole concept of mud has gotten a pretty bad rep. Ever since you were a kid, chances are your mother would yell at you if you would dare to enter the house with muddy boots. The family pet who suddenly felt like rolling around in that pile of dirt would undoubtedly be confined to the mudroom - see what is happening in this word? - until he’d gotten a lengthy shower. Mud: The Rich Ecosystem Beneath Our Feet There is much more to soil, though. Unsurprisingly, one of its synonyms is earth. The Earth is our home, largely made up of - yes - earth. There is so much going on beneath our feet that we are not aware of - and the processes that keep on replenishing and reviving the soil are nothing short of miraculous. Take moles, for instance, digging tunnels - and not just for fun. They also effectively aerate the underground. Similarly, the earth happens to be the catch-all for everything dead and dying - both animals, humans, and plants use it to harbour their diseased. All tiny critters that we associate with ‘dirt’ are playing a crucial role in cleaning and composting those dead things, including worms, mites and nematodes. On an even more microscopic level, tardigrades are seeking out bacteria for their lunch. Recommended:  New Foodscape Alternatives Gets Lots Of Attention In The Netherlands Yet the earth also holds us in place, quite literally so. Trees and plants are merely the tip of the iceberg when you look at what goes on underneath the surface. Their roots go on and on, in an endless search for water and firmly locking its occupant in place. On top of that, the earth is our most important bet for figuring out what has happened in the past. Almost like the growth rings on trees, the soil beneath our feet consists of layer after layer of history. Loose Matter Waiting To Be Decomposed At the top, there’s a layer of ‘loose matter’ on top of the soil. Dead plants, animals, tree branches and leaves, it all falls down to decompose. Decomposing is a wonderful process in and of itself, requiring the perfect soil underneath. Moist, but not too moist, so that the small beings in charge of composting are able to survive but will not drown. Recommended:  Regenerative Agriculture: Its Full Potential (Part 3 of 3) Topsoil: Only Enough To Last Us Sixty Years The next layer is the topsoil. This is where the actual decomposition happens, when billions and billions of microorganisms are feasting on the organic matter fed to them. Microorganisms like earthworms, arthropods, nematodes, fungi and bacteria will be amongst the many inhabitants. These play a lead role in creating nutrients that enrich the soil.   It is not hard to see how the quality of dead loose matter plays an important role in determining the quality of the soil - and thus, the overall agricultural prosperity of areas. Take the ancient Egyptian civilisation, one whose riches were largely built on the prosperity of the land. The Nile river flooded every year, replenishing the soil in the process. Other societies in dry areas, including sub-Saharan Africa, were not as lucky. Recommended:  Water War Brewing Over New River Nile Dam: Egypt, Ethiopia One can already see a big problem here. Those areas lucky enough to have stricken the right natural balance between moist and organic waste are thriving, while those that aren’t are - well, not. And in this era of explosive population growth, we are eager to get our hands on more fertile land to feed those who rely on it. We are actively pushing the limits of what we can take, ‘borrowing’ land from forests or other sacred nature areas. In many countries, actions like deforestation were taken that destroyed nature’s fragile balance, with the top soil unable to perform its function as it is blown away from steep, now bare, hillsides. This topsoil ends up downhill, where it clogs up the irrigation systems and existing farmland. The result? A drastic reduction of usable farmland and the inevitable hunger that follows suit. In those areas, top soil is a hot commodity, yet at the same time, it is becoming increasingly rare. Estimates are that we only have enough topsoil left to last us some sixty years, while creating new topsoil will take at least 500 to 1000 years. The math just does not add up. Topsoil As The Base For Billions Of Micro-Organisms There is more to this topsoil than it being a place where dead organisms are decomposing and new organisms can blossom. It is also the home for billions and billions and many, many more billions of micro-organisms. Actually, most of the species that call our Earth home spend their lives under the ground, with some 10,000 to 50,000 species living in a single gram of soil. Miraculous, isn’t it? Colony characteristic of Actinomyces, Bacteria, yeast and Mold on selective media from soil samples for study in laboratory microbiology There’s the bacteria, along with their relatively similar appearing siblings of the archaea. Both groups of species may only be single-celled, but are resilient as they come. And although many confuse the two, they actually split ways - biologically speaking - billions of years ago. They are some of the most important building blocks of our world, performing functions that are a prerequisite for life. They fuel our underground, helping us get rid of waste and preparing it for proper flourishing and growing of plants and much of the produce that we enjoy on a daily basis. Recommended:  Virus, Bacteria, Fungi: Tiny Organisms Will Save Us Globally The Unknown Formula Of Bacteria And Archaea Many of those functions performed by bacteria and archaea are now attempted to be recreated by scientists in labs worldwide, in order to create some kind of synthetic gene that is programmed to do the same thing. This would be great for nations that are now faced with the immediate danger of absent or minimal topsoil, which has rendered whole patches of land barren. Yet it seems much harder than you may think to find this magic ‘cure’, as science has only had minor successes in doing so.   At the same time, these very same bacteria and archaea are changing as well - and not for the better, from our point of view. Through the use of reclaimed water for irrigation purposes and fertilisation, these soil bacteria are exposed to water laced with, amongst others, antibiotics. And that is quite a big deal, as this leads to us finding and creating so-called ‘superbugs’ that are antibiotics-resistant. Recommended:  World’s Population 10 Billion By 2050: Bugs For Dinner? Not just dangerous for crops, plants and trees, but also for animals and our own health. If this soil, full of superbugs, happens to be located right underneath a playground, one can only imagine what the consequences would be. Fungi And The Symbiotic Relationship With Plants   Then, there’s fungi. Something that shares the bad rep of dirt, as many people associate it with something that’s gone bad, something rotten. Not that surprising, considering its genetic make-up. While most animals on our planet internalised their digestion, fungi are happy to keep it all external, actively shedding their digestive enzymes. They play a large role in the decomposing of matter. Just leave a perishable food item for too long and you will surely find that they have found it and covered it in a typical hairy, goosebump-inciting fur. In this same way, they help to get rid of any dead matter, while actually helping underground life flourish. Their unique characteristics make them capable of transferring nutrients from one plant or tree to the other.   {youtube}                                                                      Mycorrhizal Fungi Animation   Similarly, fungi form symbiotic relationships with plants, feeding them with the nutrients that they need and helping them fend off potentially dangerous diseases. Plants that are ‘linked’ with fungi are healthier and thriving. At the same time, the soil as a whole is similarly improved through greater porosity, aeration and water retention - while allowing nutrients to flow freely. Once again, a miracle of Mother Nature herself. Let The Soil Take Care Of Us The soil is not just important for keeping our environment healthy. It can play an equally important role in keeping ourselves healthy. If we continue to mistreat and disregard the dirt beneath our feet, chances are that the heavy contamination of the soil will lead to a variety of diseases, disorders, and superbugs that are all out to bring us down. Similarly, as we have quite literally lost touch with the soil beneath our feet, we become even more vulnerable. In the past, as children played outside a lot more and more people used to work in farming or in a garden, our bodies got used to the tons of microbes in it. Our immune systems were so busy with the soil microbes they regularly encountered, that they grew used to - and immune to - a wide variety of them. Now that this has largely fallen away, we have fallen prey to a range of allergies and health problems, like asthma.   As a rule of thumb, the dirtier your kid is, the better their immune system will be. Playing in the dirt is not just fun, it is important for their health and the health of the planet as a whole. Sufficient reason for all of us to get our hands dirty more often and invest in healthy soil. Recommended:  Agrivoltaics Mutually Beneficial: Food, Water And Energy Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about agriculture? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
The World’s Gone Mad! You Need Mud, No iPhone
The World’s Gone Mad! You Need Mud, No iPhone
Best 15 Coronavirus Photo’s At A glance
First of all, I want to wish you all the very best in these difficult times. Humanity has entered unknown territory. Only by working together and exchanging information in the field of research into the origin and control of the coronavirus, we can find a solution. Best Photos 2020: Coronavirus Images From Around The Globe Below is a selection of images from the media globally to show that we are 'for the first time' together in a struggle against a common 'opponent.'  Photo by unknown. Emergency doctor Lin Shirong and his wife, nurse Li Ping, snuggle up together on a bench outside the isolation ward and video call their children. Photo by unknown. Indonesia’s orangutans are under severe threat from the ongoing depletion and fragmentation of the rainforest.  Saving Orangutans, Nature Stories category nominee: Sumatran orangutans, which once ranged over the entire island of Sumatra, are now restricted to the north and considered critically endangered. They’re almost exclusively arboreal. Females virtually never travel on the ground, and adult males do so rarely. Photo by unknown. A demonstrator attends a protest against riots following clashes between people demonstrating for and against a new citizenship law in New Delhi, India, March 3, 2020.   Photo by unknown. Catholic church altar boys walk down the aisle through the empty Holy Rosary parish church with photos of parishioners taped on church pews, as part of social distancing measures amidst the Covid-19 pandemic, at the start of a procession for Easter Sunday mass in Angeles City, Pampanga province.   {youtube}                                                         Coronavirus, Seattle and France: World in Photos                                                               Photo by unknown. Palestinian groom Mohamed Abu Daga and his bride Israa wear face masks amid the COVID-19 epidemic, during a photoshoot at a studio before their wedding ceremony in Khan Yunis in the southern Gaza Strip. Photo by Ahmad Zohrabi. A man disinfects the shrine of Saint Masoumeh against coronavirus in the city of Qom 78 miles (125 kilometers) south of the capital Tehran, Iran. Iran’s government said Monday that 12 people had died nationwide from the new coronavirus, rejecting claims of a much higher death toll of 50 by a lawmaker from the city of Qom that has been at the epicenter of the virus in the country.  Photo by unknown. The coronavirus hits a man who arrived from Hubei province talks with police at a checkpoint at the Jiujiang Yangtze River Bridge as the country.   Photo by Francesco Fotia. Tourists in Rome to wear protective masks standing in front of the Trevi Fountain. Photo by Niall Carson. Two women in clover-patterned face masks near the Temple Bar neighborhood, St. Patrick's Day. Photo by unknown. A man is cleaning ‘monuments’ close to the tower of Pisa, Italy. Photo by Andrew Kelly. Ballet dancer and performer Ashlee Montague of New York wears a gas mask while she dances in Times Square during the COVID19 outbreak in Manhattan, New York City. Photo by Carlo Cozzoli. A pharmacy serves customers through a security shutter, Milan.   Photo by Muzaffar Kasim shows health workers inspecting young passengers arriving from Wuhan, China, at Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Sepang, outside Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.   Photo by Rungroj Yongrit. A Thai nurse puts face shields on newborn babies as a precaution against the coronavirus pandemic at Princ Hospital Suvarnabhumi in Samut Prakan, Thailand.   Photo by unknown. A man waiting at the Victoria Metro Station, London. All photos: The Guardian Before you go! Recommended:  Virus, Bacteria, Fungi: Tiny Organisms Will Save Us Globally Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about the coronavirus? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
First of all, I want to wish you all the very best in these difficult times. Humanity has entered unknown territory. Only by working together and exchanging information in the field of research into the origin and control of the coronavirus, we can find a solution. Best Photos 2020: Coronavirus Images From Around The Globe Below is a selection of images from the media globally to show that we are 'for the first time' together in a struggle against a common 'opponent.'  Photo by unknown. Emergency doctor Lin Shirong and his wife, nurse Li Ping, snuggle up together on a bench outside the isolation ward and video call their children. Photo by unknown. Indonesia’s orangutans are under severe threat from the ongoing depletion and fragmentation of the rainforest.  Saving Orangutans, Nature Stories category nominee: Sumatran orangutans, which once ranged over the entire island of Sumatra, are now restricted to the north and considered critically endangered. They’re almost exclusively arboreal. Females virtually never travel on the ground, and adult males do so rarely. Photo by unknown. A demonstrator attends a protest against riots following clashes between people demonstrating for and against a new citizenship law in New Delhi, India, March 3, 2020.   Photo by unknown. Catholic church altar boys walk down the aisle through the empty Holy Rosary parish church with photos of parishioners taped on church pews, as part of social distancing measures amidst the Covid-19 pandemic, at the start of a procession for Easter Sunday mass in Angeles City, Pampanga province.   {youtube}                                                         Coronavirus, Seattle and France: World in Photos                                                               Photo by unknown. Palestinian groom Mohamed Abu Daga and his bride Israa wear face masks amid the COVID-19 epidemic, during a photoshoot at a studio before their wedding ceremony in Khan Yunis in the southern Gaza Strip. Photo by Ahmad Zohrabi. A man disinfects the shrine of Saint Masoumeh against coronavirus in the city of Qom 78 miles (125 kilometers) south of the capital Tehran, Iran. Iran’s government said Monday that 12 people had died nationwide from the new coronavirus, rejecting claims of a much higher death toll of 50 by a lawmaker from the city of Qom that has been at the epicenter of the virus in the country.  Photo by unknown. The coronavirus hits a man who arrived from Hubei province talks with police at a checkpoint at the Jiujiang Yangtze River Bridge as the country.   Photo by Francesco Fotia. Tourists in Rome to wear protective masks standing in front of the Trevi Fountain. Photo by Niall Carson. Two women in clover-patterned face masks near the Temple Bar neighborhood, St. Patrick's Day. Photo by unknown. A man is cleaning ‘monuments’ close to the tower of Pisa, Italy. Photo by Andrew Kelly. Ballet dancer and performer Ashlee Montague of New York wears a gas mask while she dances in Times Square during the COVID19 outbreak in Manhattan, New York City. Photo by Carlo Cozzoli. A pharmacy serves customers through a security shutter, Milan.   Photo by Muzaffar Kasim shows health workers inspecting young passengers arriving from Wuhan, China, at Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Sepang, outside Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.   Photo by Rungroj Yongrit. A Thai nurse puts face shields on newborn babies as a precaution against the coronavirus pandemic at Princ Hospital Suvarnabhumi in Samut Prakan, Thailand.   Photo by unknown. A man waiting at the Victoria Metro Station, London. All photos: The Guardian Before you go! Recommended:  Virus, Bacteria, Fungi: Tiny Organisms Will Save Us Globally Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about the coronavirus? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Best 15 Coronavirus Photo’s At A glance
Best 15 Coronavirus Photo’s At A glance
Community

A community is you and me. A network of social, economic, ecological and many other relationships. We all work together and live in urban, suburban and rural areas. Social sustainability is becoming increasingly important on our small planet. We define: support, quality of life, development, adaptation, rights and labour.

We belong to a group of individuals - our society - in which we belong geographically. Certain environmental issues play an important role in our society. Here, sustainable solutions are sought, developed and implemented. This may differ from societies in other countries, but because of our global environmental issues and dependence, we must learn to work more together so that we can all benefit from sharing sustainable knowledge to tackle, for example, climate change.

Green architecture is important. Building with local materials that can be recycled and reused brings us a big step forward to have less impact on the environment. With green architecture we can build smart cities where resources can be used more efficiently and information can be shared, thus improving our society, your community.

Lifestyle is the way we live, the dynamics of personality. Fashion defines our self and together with food it is getting - at present - an even more important role in our society. It's not just about taste, but especially about the burden that the fashion industry, agriculture and the meat industry have on our resources, especially water.

If there was an urge to come up with a sustainable way of living solutions and share these topics globally it’s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about tiny houses, your experiences and expectations for the future at home and globally. 

Global Sustainability X-change, that’s what you can do together with WhatsOrb. What's in for me?

 

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