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BLOCKCHAIN FOR SUSTAINABILITY: IMPLEMENTING A BETTER WORLD
Much has been written about the technology of blockchain. This invention of the as of yet unidentified person or entity Satoshi Nakamoto, who published it in 2008, is one of the most hyped methods that will affect businesses on a global level. In its simplest form, blockchain is best described as a ledger or database of sorts. One with an unparalleled level of security, through advanced cryptography techniques, that makes it resistant to modification.   At the same time, its public and decentralised nature ensures that everyone can have access to it and add to it as they want - after which the peer-to-peer network, over which the database is distributed, has to verify the new data before it literally becomes set in stone. This makes it an ideal solution for any industry where it is crucial that data is accurate, publicly available, and can be relied on. APPLICATIONS IN  SUSTAINABILITY While blockchain has achieved most of its fame as the platform enabling cryptocurrencies, such as Bitcoin, it shows plenty of promise for other, widely varying industries as well. To illustrate this versatility, the World Economic Forum has published a comprehensive report on the use of blockchain in environmental conservation, adeptly titled ‘Building Block(chain)s for a Better Planet’.   It looks at potential game-changing applications of blockchain in battling the greatest dangers that our planet is facing, including environmental degradation, air pollution and climate change. In this, examples of initiatives per challenge are singled out, that could potentially have a massive positive impact on our globe. BLOCKCHAIN IN CLIMATE CHANGE The applications for blockchain in combatting climate change are diverse. It could include initiatives relevant to any of us, for example through a citizen loyalty and reward platform, which allows citizens of a certain area to register and be rewarded for their own smart and green home innovations. This includes lighting, heating, and other sustainable smart home improvements.   Another application of blockchain in battling climate change is its function in allowing for sustainable land use. Through blockchain, mining and agricultural activities can closely and publicly be monitored, and through automation of data collection, the entire process can become more sustainable and durable. Similarly, blockchain could enhance clean power initiatives, for example through peer-to-peer renewable energy trading systems or an optimised distributed grid management.   BLOCKCHAIN IN BIODIVERSITY AND CONSERVATION Applicaties of blockchain can also be used to increase global  biodiversity and conservation. It could, for instance, be used to track the geographic reach and movements of endangered animal species, while at the same time raise more funds for investments in habitat restoration and species conservation.   Natural resources, such as wood, can also be better protected and tracked if it is included in a blockchain ledger, that requires the input of producers and manufacturers alike. At the same time, it could incentivise farmers and reward them for responsible waste management or limited use of pesticide on their land.   The word ‘sustainable production’ and ‘sustainable trade’ can also be given more meaning, now that it is possible to track the entire supply chain of produce or livestock. The transparant supply chain will allow consumers to look right back to the origins of a product, and verify whether its production has in fact be sustainable. BLOCKCHAIN FOR HEALTHY  OCEANS The application of blockchain for the protection of species and habitats in our oceans is mentioned as well, allowing for a decentralised and open-source database with ocean data and tracking data. Secondly, it will allow for more sustainable fishing solutions: fish can be tracked, while illegal fishing can quickly be identified. Additionally, pollution of the oceans can largely be prevented, for example through incentivised ocean plastic recycling initiatives, as well as a transparent ledger for faster, safer and more efficient shipping routes. Finally, the impact from climate change can be made visible, for instance through real-time monitoring of the ocean temperature and collection of data on ocean conditions. And, once again, the ease of fundraising through blockchain will also make a world of difference for our oceans, as people can easily, directly and safely donate to ocean clean-up efforts or the protection of endangered sea-species. BLOCKCHAIN FOR CLEAN WATER   Another huge challenge that the world is facing is the availability of clean and safe drinking water. Blockchain could assist through increasing water supply - through water monitoring and micropayment generation for water meter donations - as well as increased water efficiency, through the introduction of peer-to-peer trading systems of excess water supplies and smart meters.   The quality of  water can be improved through control applications. Similarly, adequate sanitation efforts could “feed” more efficient water treatment systems. All the while, blockchain could empower drought planning through monitoring and forecasting of precipitation and the provision of automated crop insurances for drought periods.   BLOCKCHAIN FOR CLEAN AIR Alongside water, a second resource crucial to mankind is air. After all, without clean water and clean air, life would not be possible. As such, the applications of blockchain towards improving the quality of air are potentially very valuable as well. These include filtering and capturing solutions, such as the automatic activation of air-filtration devices and the collation of data on air pollutants from various sources.   Similarly, air quality can be monitored through intelligent methane monitoring systems and real-time, local monitoring of particulates and NO2. Through early warning systems, operating on blockchain, we can be quicker and more effective in combatting potentially hazardous or health-comprising situations.   BLOCKCHAIN FOR WEATHER AND DISASTER RESILIENCE A final byproduct of our current environmental problems, is the occurrence of extreme weather and natural distasters. Once again something that blockchain can offer various applications for: from prediction and forecasting to early warning systems, and from resilience planning and resilient infrastructure to the quick deployment of financial instruments to fund recovery efforts and insurance claims.   WHY INCLUDE BLOCKCHAIN? Blockchain has the potential to not only aid, but also transform the way in which we deal with  environmental issues. Its potential impact on existing and innovative solutions alike could be huge, especially through the ease and the transparency of the system. Everyone will know what is being done and by who, without any room for error or fraud. Not only will it become painfully obvious where the sore points are, therefore making it easier to identify and punish wrongdoers or great polluters, blockchain is also able to reward and incentivise those who are doing the right thing.   As such, industry and consumers alike are pushed to take a good, critical look at their use of resources and the way that they treat the environment. A technology that, therefore, does not only have disruptive and transformative attributes, but that also harnesses the collective self-interests to let people combine their efforts to push the world to a better place. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/blockchain
Much has been written about the technology of blockchain. This invention of the as of yet unidentified person or entity Satoshi Nakamoto, who published it in 2008, is one of the most hyped methods that will affect businesses on a global level. In its simplest form, blockchain is best described as a ledger or database of sorts. One with an unparalleled level of security, through advanced cryptography techniques, that makes it resistant to modification.   At the same time, its public and decentralised nature ensures that everyone can have access to it and add to it as they want - after which the peer-to-peer network, over which the database is distributed, has to verify the new data before it literally becomes set in stone. This makes it an ideal solution for any industry where it is crucial that data is accurate, publicly available, and can be relied on. APPLICATIONS IN  SUSTAINABILITY While blockchain has achieved most of its fame as the platform enabling cryptocurrencies, such as Bitcoin, it shows plenty of promise for other, widely varying industries as well. To illustrate this versatility, the World Economic Forum has published a comprehensive report on the use of blockchain in environmental conservation, adeptly titled ‘Building Block(chain)s for a Better Planet’.   It looks at potential game-changing applications of blockchain in battling the greatest dangers that our planet is facing, including environmental degradation, air pollution and climate change. In this, examples of initiatives per challenge are singled out, that could potentially have a massive positive impact on our globe. BLOCKCHAIN IN CLIMATE CHANGE The applications for blockchain in combatting climate change are diverse. It could include initiatives relevant to any of us, for example through a citizen loyalty and reward platform, which allows citizens of a certain area to register and be rewarded for their own smart and green home innovations. This includes lighting, heating, and other sustainable smart home improvements.   Another application of blockchain in battling climate change is its function in allowing for sustainable land use. Through blockchain, mining and agricultural activities can closely and publicly be monitored, and through automation of data collection, the entire process can become more sustainable and durable. Similarly, blockchain could enhance clean power initiatives, for example through peer-to-peer renewable energy trading systems or an optimised distributed grid management.   BLOCKCHAIN IN BIODIVERSITY AND CONSERVATION Applicaties of blockchain can also be used to increase global  biodiversity and conservation. It could, for instance, be used to track the geographic reach and movements of endangered animal species, while at the same time raise more funds for investments in habitat restoration and species conservation.   Natural resources, such as wood, can also be better protected and tracked if it is included in a blockchain ledger, that requires the input of producers and manufacturers alike. At the same time, it could incentivise farmers and reward them for responsible waste management or limited use of pesticide on their land.   The word ‘sustainable production’ and ‘sustainable trade’ can also be given more meaning, now that it is possible to track the entire supply chain of produce or livestock. The transparant supply chain will allow consumers to look right back to the origins of a product, and verify whether its production has in fact be sustainable. BLOCKCHAIN FOR HEALTHY  OCEANS The application of blockchain for the protection of species and habitats in our oceans is mentioned as well, allowing for a decentralised and open-source database with ocean data and tracking data. Secondly, it will allow for more sustainable fishing solutions: fish can be tracked, while illegal fishing can quickly be identified. Additionally, pollution of the oceans can largely be prevented, for example through incentivised ocean plastic recycling initiatives, as well as a transparent ledger for faster, safer and more efficient shipping routes. Finally, the impact from climate change can be made visible, for instance through real-time monitoring of the ocean temperature and collection of data on ocean conditions. And, once again, the ease of fundraising through blockchain will also make a world of difference for our oceans, as people can easily, directly and safely donate to ocean clean-up efforts or the protection of endangered sea-species. BLOCKCHAIN FOR CLEAN WATER   Another huge challenge that the world is facing is the availability of clean and safe drinking water. Blockchain could assist through increasing water supply - through water monitoring and micropayment generation for water meter donations - as well as increased water efficiency, through the introduction of peer-to-peer trading systems of excess water supplies and smart meters.   The quality of  water can be improved through control applications. Similarly, adequate sanitation efforts could “feed” more efficient water treatment systems. All the while, blockchain could empower drought planning through monitoring and forecasting of precipitation and the provision of automated crop insurances for drought periods.   BLOCKCHAIN FOR CLEAN AIR Alongside water, a second resource crucial to mankind is air. After all, without clean water and clean air, life would not be possible. As such, the applications of blockchain towards improving the quality of air are potentially very valuable as well. These include filtering and capturing solutions, such as the automatic activation of air-filtration devices and the collation of data on air pollutants from various sources.   Similarly, air quality can be monitored through intelligent methane monitoring systems and real-time, local monitoring of particulates and NO2. Through early warning systems, operating on blockchain, we can be quicker and more effective in combatting potentially hazardous or health-comprising situations.   BLOCKCHAIN FOR WEATHER AND DISASTER RESILIENCE A final byproduct of our current environmental problems, is the occurrence of extreme weather and natural distasters. Once again something that blockchain can offer various applications for: from prediction and forecasting to early warning systems, and from resilience planning and resilient infrastructure to the quick deployment of financial instruments to fund recovery efforts and insurance claims.   WHY INCLUDE BLOCKCHAIN? Blockchain has the potential to not only aid, but also transform the way in which we deal with  environmental issues. Its potential impact on existing and innovative solutions alike could be huge, especially through the ease and the transparency of the system. Everyone will know what is being done and by who, without any room for error or fraud. Not only will it become painfully obvious where the sore points are, therefore making it easier to identify and punish wrongdoers or great polluters, blockchain is also able to reward and incentivise those who are doing the right thing.   As such, industry and consumers alike are pushed to take a good, critical look at their use of resources and the way that they treat the environment. A technology that, therefore, does not only have disruptive and transformative attributes, but that also harnesses the collective self-interests to let people combine their efforts to push the world to a better place. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/blockchain
BLOCKCHAIN FOR SUSTAINABILITY: IMPLEMENTING A BETTER WORLD
BLOCKCHAIN FOR SUSTAINABILITY: IMPLEMENTING A BETTER WORLD
Digital disruption and how you can use it in your organization
Digital disruption: why your sector can not escape it Kodak did not keep up with the rapid digitization of photography, travel agencies contrasted it with online counterparts and the music industry ended up in another disruptive period. The consequences of digital disruption are great. Newcomers often turn the market upside down by making smart use of new digital possibilities. Be prepared! If you believe the specialists, in the long term no industry can escape it. In this article I explain the term digital disruption, I describe why it is current now, let me see what the signals are that indicate whether a market is ripe for it, and briefly give a few tips on how you can use it as an organization. We will go into this in more detail in a subsequent article. Emergence of digital disruption For some years, the term digital disruption has been emerging as a subject in professional literature and at conferences. This was mainly about disruptive innovation: innovations that throw the game rules of an existing market overboard and create completely new markets and value networks at the expense of the existing market. More than ever, today's digital possibilities are the driving force behind radical innovations. This led in the technical jargon to the logical composition of the terms digital and disruption. Digital Disruption in Google Trends Although the underlying theory is decades old, it would not be right to label digital disruption as old wine in new bags. The impact of digital disruption on a market is many times greater than with traditional disruption and the turnaround is much faster. Due to the power of the internet and the existing mobile and social media infrastructure, disruptive ideas can reach a very large target group very quickly. Potentially a start-up with a relatively simple app can shake up a traditional market in a short time. An example of this is FitNow, that with the mobile app Lose It! better anticipate consumer needs than traditional diet and waste experts. The app keeps track of what you eat, has smart gamification elements and includes a network of connected buddies. For example, the consumer can consult a buddy at any time if the temptation to start sweating becomes just too big. And that proves to be effective. Lose it! poses a serious threat to established organizations such as Weighwatchers, who have helped millions of people lose weight since 1963. At least, if Weightwatchers does not come soon enough with an answer. The newcomers often enter a market with disruptive business models that would have been impossible without the current digital infrastructure: - Use instead of own: Spotify, Netflix - Freemium: Skype - Peer-to-peer commerce: AirBnB, 99dresses.com - Creativity of the crowd: threadless.com - Mass personalization: chocstar.nl, shirtbyhand.nl - Sharing sustainability news: whatsorb.com According to Forrester Research, digital disruption is relatively new. Only a few industries have already gone through it today. The most obvious example is the music industry, which, thanks to digital disruption, changed from a total turnover of 14 billion in 1990 to 6.8 billion (including digital) in 2010. Meanwhile, the Spotify business model is turning the music industry upside down again. Digital disruption has caused a similar effect in other media. Every branch - no matter how analogous - is sensitive to digital disruption. It is not a matter of whether it happens, but when and by whom. The driving forces behind digital disruption These are challenging times for industries and organizations trying to achieve digital transformation. Because never before have so many different developments come together at the same time to pave the way for radical digital innovation. Together they form the driving force behind digital disruption: - Social cultural - Everyone is online - Buying online is not scary anymore - Online communication has become quite normal - Technologically Internet is always and everywhere available: penetration of the smartphone and tablet - The costs of data storage have fallen enormously - High processor speeds and data analysis methods - Software as a service (cloud technology) - Presence of platforms such as Apple iTunes store, Facebook and the strongly developing           Amazon.com network - Reliable digital payment systems Products are increasingly connected to the internet (internet of things) Which branches are ripe for disruption? Every sector is sensitive to digital disruption, but some markets are more sensitive than others. In Australia, Deloitte identified 18 industries based on 13 factors and 26 indicators on the vulnerability to digital disruption from two perspectives: - the size of the impact (the bang) - the threat of change (the length of the fuse). Short fuse, big bang industry is expected to face significant digital disruption in the short term: - financial services, retail (retail), business services, media and telecommunications. Together     these industries make up about one third of the Australian economy. - Long fuse, big bang - industries that can expect considerable disruption, but over a longer         period of time: such as education, healthcare, transport and government services. These           industries also make up a third of the Australian economy. - Long fuse, smaller pop industries that can expect lower levels of digital disruption are for          example industry and mining. In order to determine the impact of digital disruption for a sector, the following factors have been examined: - The extent to which products and services are delivered physically - The extent to which customers use digital channels - The importance of computer use and broadband infrastructure in business operations - How is the penetration of mobile among customers and employees and their average age - The importance of social media and innovations such as cloud computing - How digital innovation can be inhibited by the government, regulations or other factors In addition, the size of the market and the competitive structure play a role. In markets where (excessive) profit is made, are more sensitive than markets where the margins are small. Especially when high margins are earned on activities that customers can do themselves. The broker and insurance intermediary have already experienced this, for the civil-law notary, physician or lawyer, that does not take long. In this digital age, customers no longer accept rates of 200 euros or more for relatively simple administrative tasks such as drafting a will or marriage certificate. Had this research been carried out in Europe, it would probably have given a similar picture. However, it is good to zoom in a little bit more per branch. The impact within an industry certainly does not have to be the same for all sub-segments. Research conducted by GfK 2012 shows that within the retail sector some product groups are much more prone to e-commerce than other product groups. Respond to digital disruption Research by Forrester Research shows that those involved see digital disruption in their industry arrive in time, but do relatively little with it. For example, 86% of respondents see significant digital opportunities to change the industry and only 36% of companies have developed specific policies. From our own research (The New Digital Reality, Jungle Minds 2012) the main cause of this lies with the top management of the organizations. 40% of respondents in the survey indicated that management was not aware of the need to invest in a digital future. Timing Timing is an important dilemma in digital disruption. Investing too early in a digital innovation can lead to high costs, without result. This happened a lot during the internet bubble around 2001. But above all, it can cannibalize your own business. As a market leader you therefore think for a moment before you start to compete for your own profitable market share. According to research by D. Charitoe, established companies respond to disruption in their industry in five ways: Response 1: invest more in the traditional way of working Response 2: ignore it, see it as a different market Response 3: counterattack: disrupt the disruption Response 4: adopt the innovation and play both at the same time Response 5: Embrace the new innovation and increase the scale Which response strategy is chosen in practice depends, according to the researchers, on the ability of the organization to adapt and the motivation to do so. But it is clear that the first two strategies are not sensible in the long term. Established organizations are obliged to continuously adapt to changing market situations. Innovation guru Clayton Christensen, expresses it nicely: "If a company is going to cannibalize your business, you will almost always be better off if that company is your own." You better make yourself redundant, before someone else does that for you. Abuse digital disruption The way in which you as an organization can deal with a digital disruption depends strongly on the situation and industry in which you are. There is a movement that says that you have to tackle it big and complete through digital transformations. No business process is left untouched. The large consultancy and ICT companies are currently preparing to implement these major transformations at their customers. A broad approach is not wrong. The only question is whether you can react sufficiently decisively. At Jungle Minds we are convinced that large established organizations can survive digital disruption by learning to think and do as a start-up (see eg The Lean Startup). This means always being busy devising new business models, developing better customer experiences and working agile and multidisciplinary. It is our experience that this works best with a mix of experienced experts, young digital talent, little hierarchy and plenty of room for creativity. And above all, experiment a lot with the shortest possible time to market: think, create, improve. Because ultimately being late in digital is always more expensive than too early. In a subsequent article, my colleague Bart Vijfhuizen will go deeper into the question of how you as an established company can respond to digital disruption. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/blockchain By: Robert Jan van Nouhuys from Digital Boulevard
Digital disruption: why your sector can not escape it Kodak did not keep up with the rapid digitization of photography, travel agencies contrasted it with online counterparts and the music industry ended up in another disruptive period. The consequences of digital disruption are great. Newcomers often turn the market upside down by making smart use of new digital possibilities. Be prepared! If you believe the specialists, in the long term no industry can escape it. In this article I explain the term digital disruption, I describe why it is current now, let me see what the signals are that indicate whether a market is ripe for it, and briefly give a few tips on how you can use it as an organization. We will go into this in more detail in a subsequent article. Emergence of digital disruption For some years, the term digital disruption has been emerging as a subject in professional literature and at conferences. This was mainly about disruptive innovation: innovations that throw the game rules of an existing market overboard and create completely new markets and value networks at the expense of the existing market. More than ever, today's digital possibilities are the driving force behind radical innovations. This led in the technical jargon to the logical composition of the terms digital and disruption. Digital Disruption in Google Trends Although the underlying theory is decades old, it would not be right to label digital disruption as old wine in new bags. The impact of digital disruption on a market is many times greater than with traditional disruption and the turnaround is much faster. Due to the power of the internet and the existing mobile and social media infrastructure, disruptive ideas can reach a very large target group very quickly. Potentially a start-up with a relatively simple app can shake up a traditional market in a short time. An example of this is FitNow, that with the mobile app Lose It! better anticipate consumer needs than traditional diet and waste experts. The app keeps track of what you eat, has smart gamification elements and includes a network of connected buddies. For example, the consumer can consult a buddy at any time if the temptation to start sweating becomes just too big. And that proves to be effective. Lose it! poses a serious threat to established organizations such as Weighwatchers, who have helped millions of people lose weight since 1963. At least, if Weightwatchers does not come soon enough with an answer. The newcomers often enter a market with disruptive business models that would have been impossible without the current digital infrastructure: - Use instead of own: Spotify, Netflix - Freemium: Skype - Peer-to-peer commerce: AirBnB, 99dresses.com - Creativity of the crowd: threadless.com - Mass personalization: chocstar.nl, shirtbyhand.nl - Sharing sustainability news: whatsorb.com According to Forrester Research, digital disruption is relatively new. Only a few industries have already gone through it today. The most obvious example is the music industry, which, thanks to digital disruption, changed from a total turnover of 14 billion in 1990 to 6.8 billion (including digital) in 2010. Meanwhile, the Spotify business model is turning the music industry upside down again. Digital disruption has caused a similar effect in other media. Every branch - no matter how analogous - is sensitive to digital disruption. It is not a matter of whether it happens, but when and by whom. The driving forces behind digital disruption These are challenging times for industries and organizations trying to achieve digital transformation. Because never before have so many different developments come together at the same time to pave the way for radical digital innovation. Together they form the driving force behind digital disruption: - Social cultural - Everyone is online - Buying online is not scary anymore - Online communication has become quite normal - Technologically Internet is always and everywhere available: penetration of the smartphone and tablet - The costs of data storage have fallen enormously - High processor speeds and data analysis methods - Software as a service (cloud technology) - Presence of platforms such as Apple iTunes store, Facebook and the strongly developing           Amazon.com network - Reliable digital payment systems Products are increasingly connected to the internet (internet of things) Which branches are ripe for disruption? Every sector is sensitive to digital disruption, but some markets are more sensitive than others. In Australia, Deloitte identified 18 industries based on 13 factors and 26 indicators on the vulnerability to digital disruption from two perspectives: - the size of the impact (the bang) - the threat of change (the length of the fuse). Short fuse, big bang industry is expected to face significant digital disruption in the short term: - financial services, retail (retail), business services, media and telecommunications. Together     these industries make up about one third of the Australian economy. - Long fuse, big bang - industries that can expect considerable disruption, but over a longer         period of time: such as education, healthcare, transport and government services. These           industries also make up a third of the Australian economy. - Long fuse, smaller pop industries that can expect lower levels of digital disruption are for          example industry and mining. In order to determine the impact of digital disruption for a sector, the following factors have been examined: - The extent to which products and services are delivered physically - The extent to which customers use digital channels - The importance of computer use and broadband infrastructure in business operations - How is the penetration of mobile among customers and employees and their average age - The importance of social media and innovations such as cloud computing - How digital innovation can be inhibited by the government, regulations or other factors In addition, the size of the market and the competitive structure play a role. In markets where (excessive) profit is made, are more sensitive than markets where the margins are small. Especially when high margins are earned on activities that customers can do themselves. The broker and insurance intermediary have already experienced this, for the civil-law notary, physician or lawyer, that does not take long. In this digital age, customers no longer accept rates of 200 euros or more for relatively simple administrative tasks such as drafting a will or marriage certificate. Had this research been carried out in Europe, it would probably have given a similar picture. However, it is good to zoom in a little bit more per branch. The impact within an industry certainly does not have to be the same for all sub-segments. Research conducted by GfK 2012 shows that within the retail sector some product groups are much more prone to e-commerce than other product groups. Respond to digital disruption Research by Forrester Research shows that those involved see digital disruption in their industry arrive in time, but do relatively little with it. For example, 86% of respondents see significant digital opportunities to change the industry and only 36% of companies have developed specific policies. From our own research (The New Digital Reality, Jungle Minds 2012) the main cause of this lies with the top management of the organizations. 40% of respondents in the survey indicated that management was not aware of the need to invest in a digital future. Timing Timing is an important dilemma in digital disruption. Investing too early in a digital innovation can lead to high costs, without result. This happened a lot during the internet bubble around 2001. But above all, it can cannibalize your own business. As a market leader you therefore think for a moment before you start to compete for your own profitable market share. According to research by D. Charitoe, established companies respond to disruption in their industry in five ways: Response 1: invest more in the traditional way of working Response 2: ignore it, see it as a different market Response 3: counterattack: disrupt the disruption Response 4: adopt the innovation and play both at the same time Response 5: Embrace the new innovation and increase the scale Which response strategy is chosen in practice depends, according to the researchers, on the ability of the organization to adapt and the motivation to do so. But it is clear that the first two strategies are not sensible in the long term. Established organizations are obliged to continuously adapt to changing market situations. Innovation guru Clayton Christensen, expresses it nicely: "If a company is going to cannibalize your business, you will almost always be better off if that company is your own." You better make yourself redundant, before someone else does that for you. Abuse digital disruption The way in which you as an organization can deal with a digital disruption depends strongly on the situation and industry in which you are. There is a movement that says that you have to tackle it big and complete through digital transformations. No business process is left untouched. The large consultancy and ICT companies are currently preparing to implement these major transformations at their customers. A broad approach is not wrong. The only question is whether you can react sufficiently decisively. At Jungle Minds we are convinced that large established organizations can survive digital disruption by learning to think and do as a start-up (see eg The Lean Startup). This means always being busy devising new business models, developing better customer experiences and working agile and multidisciplinary. It is our experience that this works best with a mix of experienced experts, young digital talent, little hierarchy and plenty of room for creativity. And above all, experiment a lot with the shortest possible time to market: think, create, improve. Because ultimately being late in digital is always more expensive than too early. In a subsequent article, my colleague Bart Vijfhuizen will go deeper into the question of how you as an established company can respond to digital disruption. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/blockchain By: Robert Jan van Nouhuys from Digital Boulevard
Digital disruption and how you can use it in your organization
Digital disruption and how you can use it in your organization
Blockchain as a technology is designed to disrupt the very core of the industry and sector where it is adopted
How is blockchain changing the energy industry Blockchain is reaching every corner of the Earth. See how the energy industry is using it to increase renewable energy. By and far, blockchain as a technology is designed to disrupt the very core of the industry and sector where it is adopted. The general idea behind the blockchain is to decentralize and secure a more mainstream system that is not controlled by any one party or group. By definition, it’s a public ledger of network-based transactions distributed and decentralized among a variety of nodes and systems. There is no central server or core system. Instead, authentication is handled by the entire network, publicly. This affords a variety of benefits unique to the technology. For example, overall transaction costs are reduced because you don’t need to pay any third parties or intermediaries. Also, the exchanging of funds and services is wholly secure, as only the amount of the total transaction is visible to everyone in the blockchain. The related data can only be updated by carrying out a transaction on the network. Many refer to it as a distributed ledger technology, or framework. It’s used heavily in cryptocurrencies and banking, music licensing, gaming, and much more. It’s also not a stretch to predict it will make waves in the medical, retail, and customer service industries, as well as many others. But the disruption capabilities in the energy industry are where we’re looking next. Blockchain in Energy The global electricity market is estimated to be worth nearly $2 trillion, yet it’s heavily monopolized by just a handful of corporations and organizations. Because the major players are all organizations, consumers and end-users are reduced to simply paying inordinate subscription fees to gain access. Renewable energy and more sustainability can change all that. However, corporations are still vying for total control amid its adoption. In some states, utility companies have restricted the sale of energy, which could otherwise be rolled back into the grid. That means any homeowners or consumers that own their own solar and renewable energy sources miss out on a lot of opportunities. Blockchain is poised to change this, or disrupt it entirely. Imagine the adoption of a centralized energy market where you can buy and sell energy to fellow consumers, without corporations and third parties. It sounds insane and slightly dystopic, but such a thing is possible with blockchain. If the technology hits big in the market, it could mean the emergence of several systems that will uproot current monopolies. Consider peer-based energy trading markets, variable electricity rates that are dynamically adjusted based on demand and availability, or even the payment with modern cryptocurrencies. As more micro-grids crop up—many are operating in New York, Sydney, Perth, and other metropolitan areas—we’ll need ways for communities to facilitate the trade of energy. Companies like Electron have appeared and are working to provide the kind of systems necessary to make this happen. Well over 15 startups—and growing—are currently introducing blockchain-based technologies into the energy sector to uproot the current state of the industry. 6 Global Blockchain Startups in Energy Conjoule A blockchain platform for peer-to-peer trading of energy among rooftop PV owners and interested public-sector or corporate buyers. With a pilot program in Germany, this program offers people more control and transparency over their energy while keeping the value of energy produced closed to home. WePower This blockchain-based green energy trading platform enables green energy producers to raise capital by issuing tradable energy tokens. The Ethereum-based platform was born in January of 2017 and is looking to launch in April of 2018 in Europe. Drift This company is changing electricity delivery in deregulated markets by connecting users to energy producers with blockchain. Drift is made up of engineers from giants like Amazon, Google, and Microsoft working towards a platform that will allow the company to granularly match a customer’s environmental preference. MyBit The Switzerland-based blockchain company is investigating using solar energy to benefit energy-demanding innovative tech like artificial intelligence and the IoT. The company plans to do this by developing a decentralized energy grid. Electron U.K. startup Electron is harnessing blockchain technologies to design more efficient, resilient, and flexible systems for users interested in using its platform to support broader energy trading and grid-balancing solutions. It has since won governmental support in the U.K. to scale its platform Power Ledger One of Australia’s most well-known blockchain entrants, Power Ledger is leading the peer-to-peer marketplace for renewable energy. The company is rolling out pilot projects for its blockchain platform, built to support a broad range of energy market applications, in Australia and New Zealand. What Needs to Happen? Of course, this all begs the question: what needs to happen for such a change or disruption to truly take place? More importantly, how long will it be until the kind of systems discussed here are rolled out and available to everyone? For starters, the technology itself needs to be hashed out properly to account for these new solutions and systems. As a technology, blockchain is still in its early days, especially in terms of adoption and deployment. There are many startups, companies and groups working toward adapting the technology and deploying it on the open market, but it’s going to take some time. How long remains to be seen. Energi Mine is just one emerging platform. It encourages users to consume less energy and trade it on the open market using ETK digital tokens. You earn tokens or are rewarded for being more efficient and sustainable, doing things like taking public transportation or cutting down on home power consumption. The tokens can then be redeemed to pay energy bills, charge electric vehicles, or exchanged for regular currencies. It incentivizes the idea of green and sustainable practices, allowing users to earn money for their good deeds. Unfortunately, the availability of the ETK coin and platform has yet to make its way to the greater public. Support is coming, though, and that’s the promise of this new technology. Blockchain has incredible potential to disrupt the energy sector, and may do so in many ways. For now, we’ll just have to wait and see what happens in the near future. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/blockchain By: Megan Ray Nichols
How is blockchain changing the energy industry Blockchain is reaching every corner of the Earth. See how the energy industry is using it to increase renewable energy. By and far, blockchain as a technology is designed to disrupt the very core of the industry and sector where it is adopted. The general idea behind the blockchain is to decentralize and secure a more mainstream system that is not controlled by any one party or group. By definition, it’s a public ledger of network-based transactions distributed and decentralized among a variety of nodes and systems. There is no central server or core system. Instead, authentication is handled by the entire network, publicly. This affords a variety of benefits unique to the technology. For example, overall transaction costs are reduced because you don’t need to pay any third parties or intermediaries. Also, the exchanging of funds and services is wholly secure, as only the amount of the total transaction is visible to everyone in the blockchain. The related data can only be updated by carrying out a transaction on the network. Many refer to it as a distributed ledger technology, or framework. It’s used heavily in cryptocurrencies and banking, music licensing, gaming, and much more. It’s also not a stretch to predict it will make waves in the medical, retail, and customer service industries, as well as many others. But the disruption capabilities in the energy industry are where we’re looking next. Blockchain in Energy The global electricity market is estimated to be worth nearly $2 trillion, yet it’s heavily monopolized by just a handful of corporations and organizations. Because the major players are all organizations, consumers and end-users are reduced to simply paying inordinate subscription fees to gain access. Renewable energy and more sustainability can change all that. However, corporations are still vying for total control amid its adoption. In some states, utility companies have restricted the sale of energy, which could otherwise be rolled back into the grid. That means any homeowners or consumers that own their own solar and renewable energy sources miss out on a lot of opportunities. Blockchain is poised to change this, or disrupt it entirely. Imagine the adoption of a centralized energy market where you can buy and sell energy to fellow consumers, without corporations and third parties. It sounds insane and slightly dystopic, but such a thing is possible with blockchain. If the technology hits big in the market, it could mean the emergence of several systems that will uproot current monopolies. Consider peer-based energy trading markets, variable electricity rates that are dynamically adjusted based on demand and availability, or even the payment with modern cryptocurrencies. As more micro-grids crop up—many are operating in New York, Sydney, Perth, and other metropolitan areas—we’ll need ways for communities to facilitate the trade of energy. Companies like Electron have appeared and are working to provide the kind of systems necessary to make this happen. Well over 15 startups—and growing—are currently introducing blockchain-based technologies into the energy sector to uproot the current state of the industry. 6 Global Blockchain Startups in Energy Conjoule A blockchain platform for peer-to-peer trading of energy among rooftop PV owners and interested public-sector or corporate buyers. With a pilot program in Germany, this program offers people more control and transparency over their energy while keeping the value of energy produced closed to home. WePower This blockchain-based green energy trading platform enables green energy producers to raise capital by issuing tradable energy tokens. The Ethereum-based platform was born in January of 2017 and is looking to launch in April of 2018 in Europe. Drift This company is changing electricity delivery in deregulated markets by connecting users to energy producers with blockchain. Drift is made up of engineers from giants like Amazon, Google, and Microsoft working towards a platform that will allow the company to granularly match a customer’s environmental preference. MyBit The Switzerland-based blockchain company is investigating using solar energy to benefit energy-demanding innovative tech like artificial intelligence and the IoT. The company plans to do this by developing a decentralized energy grid. Electron U.K. startup Electron is harnessing blockchain technologies to design more efficient, resilient, and flexible systems for users interested in using its platform to support broader energy trading and grid-balancing solutions. It has since won governmental support in the U.K. to scale its platform Power Ledger One of Australia’s most well-known blockchain entrants, Power Ledger is leading the peer-to-peer marketplace for renewable energy. The company is rolling out pilot projects for its blockchain platform, built to support a broad range of energy market applications, in Australia and New Zealand. What Needs to Happen? Of course, this all begs the question: what needs to happen for such a change or disruption to truly take place? More importantly, how long will it be until the kind of systems discussed here are rolled out and available to everyone? For starters, the technology itself needs to be hashed out properly to account for these new solutions and systems. As a technology, blockchain is still in its early days, especially in terms of adoption and deployment. There are many startups, companies and groups working toward adapting the technology and deploying it on the open market, but it’s going to take some time. How long remains to be seen. Energi Mine is just one emerging platform. It encourages users to consume less energy and trade it on the open market using ETK digital tokens. You earn tokens or are rewarded for being more efficient and sustainable, doing things like taking public transportation or cutting down on home power consumption. The tokens can then be redeemed to pay energy bills, charge electric vehicles, or exchanged for regular currencies. It incentivizes the idea of green and sustainable practices, allowing users to earn money for their good deeds. Unfortunately, the availability of the ETK coin and platform has yet to make its way to the greater public. Support is coming, though, and that’s the promise of this new technology. Blockchain has incredible potential to disrupt the energy sector, and may do so in many ways. For now, we’ll just have to wait and see what happens in the near future. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/blockchain By: Megan Ray Nichols
Blockchain as a technology is designed to disrupt the very core of the industry and sector where it is adopted
Blockchain as a technology is designed to disrupt the very core of the industry and sector where it is adopted
How Blockchain Technology Helps Healthcare Industry? Read Market Insights:
Ø What is a 'Blockchain' While blockchain standards were first connected in the money related world as the innovation that enabled Bitcoin to work, it has applications in numerous enterprises including social insurance. Blockchains are dispersed frameworks that log exchange records on connected pieces and store them on an encoded computerized record. There is nobody focal director, yet it has phenomenal security benefits since records are spread over a system of duplicated databases that are dependable in a state of harmony. Clients can just refresh the square they approach, and those updates get reproduced over the system. All passages are time and date stamped. Ø What are potential uses of blockchains in healthcare? In spite of the fact that there are some unimaginably energizing ways blockchains can upgrade social insurance tasks, it won't be a cure for the business today, yet it would positively be a positive development. The social insurance industry is suffocating in information—clinical trials, tolerant restorative records, complex charging, therapeutic research and that's only the tip of the iceberg. Reception and usage of blockchains will be a development after some time as blockchains applications are verified and embraced and in addition the business meeting up to decide joint effort and administration issues. Ø Global Healthcare Blockchain Technology Market by End User ·         Biotechnology Companies ·         Pharmaceutical Companies ·         Hospitals and Clinics ·         Insurance Companies ·         Patients Ø Technical Advantages of Blockchain in Healthcare Blockchain Innovation depends on open-source programming, product equipment, and open Programming interface. the Blockchain design has in-assembled adaptation to internal failure, information encryption, and cryptography innovations which as generally utilized and acknowledged as industry norms. What's more, because of these abilities, the wellbeing IT frameworks could turn out to be anything but difficult to work with and take out the need creating complex point-to-point information coordination frameworks. BrandEssence market research provides these reports to receive a comprehensive analysis of the prospects for Global Healthcare Blockchain Market Research, To receive forecasts of Global Healthcare Blockchain Market Research sales in leading country markets from 2018-2024, including leading and emerging country from develop and developing regions. We provide similar reports also such as Urinary Tract Infection Market 
Ø What is a 'Blockchain' While blockchain standards were first connected in the money related world as the innovation that enabled Bitcoin to work, it has applications in numerous enterprises including social insurance. Blockchains are dispersed frameworks that log exchange records on connected pieces and store them on an encoded computerized record. There is nobody focal director, yet it has phenomenal security benefits since records are spread over a system of duplicated databases that are dependable in a state of harmony. Clients can just refresh the square they approach, and those updates get reproduced over the system. All passages are time and date stamped. Ø What are potential uses of blockchains in healthcare? In spite of the fact that there are some unimaginably energizing ways blockchains can upgrade social insurance tasks, it won't be a cure for the business today, yet it would positively be a positive development. The social insurance industry is suffocating in information—clinical trials, tolerant restorative records, complex charging, therapeutic research and that's only the tip of the iceberg. Reception and usage of blockchains will be a development after some time as blockchains applications are verified and embraced and in addition the business meeting up to decide joint effort and administration issues. Ø Global Healthcare Blockchain Technology Market by End User ·         Biotechnology Companies ·         Pharmaceutical Companies ·         Hospitals and Clinics ·         Insurance Companies ·         Patients Ø Technical Advantages of Blockchain in Healthcare Blockchain Innovation depends on open-source programming, product equipment, and open Programming interface. the Blockchain design has in-assembled adaptation to internal failure, information encryption, and cryptography innovations which as generally utilized and acknowledged as industry norms. What's more, because of these abilities, the wellbeing IT frameworks could turn out to be anything but difficult to work with and take out the need creating complex point-to-point information coordination frameworks. BrandEssence market research provides these reports to receive a comprehensive analysis of the prospects for Global Healthcare Blockchain Market Research, To receive forecasts of Global Healthcare Blockchain Market Research sales in leading country markets from 2018-2024, including leading and emerging country from develop and developing regions. We provide similar reports also such as Urinary Tract Infection Market 
How Blockchain Technology Helps Healthcare Industry? Read Market Insights:
Why would you #waste energy from #bitcoin mining?
Sustainable agriculture heats through bitcoin mining In Canada, lettuce grows on heat generated by bitcoin mining. In his software company annex fish and vegetable nursery, entrepreneur Bruce Hardy produces food in a semi-closed cycle. In doing so, he reuses the heat that the energy-absorbing blockchain technology delivers. Bitcoin mining Bitcoin mining costs a lot of energy, because computers need a lot of computing power. Put simply, mining ensures that the cryptocurrency can be traded decentrally in a safe manner. Blockchain, the technological infrastructure behind Bitcoin, is increasingly being used because of its decentralized, transparent and safe character. The American bank Morgan Stanley estimates that the power consumption of bitcoin mining in 2018 will be 120 to 140 terawatt hours, Bright wrote earlier. By way of comparison: according to Statistics Netherlands, electricity consumption in the Netherlands has just dropped slightly below 120 terawatt hours in recent years. This means that bitcoin miners consume as much energy as the Netherlands uses in a year. Now bitcoin mining mainly generates money for the miners themselves and the financial market. Blockchain and sustainability Blockchain also offers opportunities in terms of sustainability, but the energy consumption that validates the data can be a stumbling block. In a pilot study by Wageningen University & Research and TNO (Netherlands), the negative climate impact of mining is mentioned as a downside for the application of blockchain technology in the agrifood sector. Aquaponics: growing fish and vegetables at the same time Aquaponics is a system in which the waste that is produced by fish is converted by bacteria into nutrients for crops. The plants absorb these nutrients and filter the waste from the water. The clean water goes back to the fish, which reuse it. This keeps the circle in the semi-closed system. This ultimately yields two products for food consumption: vegetables and fish. The concept has been around for some time. For example, farmers in countries such as China, Thailand and Indonesia have been growing fish in rice fields for a long time. But by adding technology to the already old aquaponics technology, a new, innovative system is created with opportunities for large-scale production. The infographic below shows how it works. By: Rianne Lachmeijer
Sustainable agriculture heats through bitcoin mining In Canada, lettuce grows on heat generated by bitcoin mining. In his software company annex fish and vegetable nursery, entrepreneur Bruce Hardy produces food in a semi-closed cycle. In doing so, he reuses the heat that the energy-absorbing blockchain technology delivers. Bitcoin mining Bitcoin mining costs a lot of energy, because computers need a lot of computing power. Put simply, mining ensures that the cryptocurrency can be traded decentrally in a safe manner. Blockchain, the technological infrastructure behind Bitcoin, is increasingly being used because of its decentralized, transparent and safe character. The American bank Morgan Stanley estimates that the power consumption of bitcoin mining in 2018 will be 120 to 140 terawatt hours, Bright wrote earlier. By way of comparison: according to Statistics Netherlands, electricity consumption in the Netherlands has just dropped slightly below 120 terawatt hours in recent years. This means that bitcoin miners consume as much energy as the Netherlands uses in a year. Now bitcoin mining mainly generates money for the miners themselves and the financial market. Blockchain and sustainability Blockchain also offers opportunities in terms of sustainability, but the energy consumption that validates the data can be a stumbling block. In a pilot study by Wageningen University & Research and TNO (Netherlands), the negative climate impact of mining is mentioned as a downside for the application of blockchain technology in the agrifood sector. Aquaponics: growing fish and vegetables at the same time Aquaponics is a system in which the waste that is produced by fish is converted by bacteria into nutrients for crops. The plants absorb these nutrients and filter the waste from the water. The clean water goes back to the fish, which reuse it. This keeps the circle in the semi-closed system. This ultimately yields two products for food consumption: vegetables and fish. The concept has been around for some time. For example, farmers in countries such as China, Thailand and Indonesia have been growing fish in rice fields for a long time. But by adding technology to the already old aquaponics technology, a new, innovative system is created with opportunities for large-scale production. The infographic below shows how it works. By: Rianne Lachmeijer
Why would you #waste energy from #bitcoin mining?
Why would you #waste energy from #bitcoin mining?
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