Climate

About: <p>Climate change! Currently, the most discussed topic in the world. <a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/category/climate">Climate change&nbsp;</a>occurs when changes in Earth's climate system result in new&nbsp;weather&nbsp;patterns that last for at least a few decades, and maybe for millions of years. Climate change can also result from &lsquo;external forcing&rsquo; and include changes in solar output and volcanism.</p> <h2>Climate News And Human Activities</h2> <p>Human activities can also influence our climate. Debates, posts, and answers on (social) platforms about humanity's role in the climate change process regularly lead to heated discussions.</p> <p>If there was an urge to develop a sustainable way of living solutions and share these topics globally, it&rsquo;s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers, and influencers to write about tiny houses, your experiences, and expectations for the future at home and globally.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Boost Global Sustainability Now, that&rsquo;s what you can do together with WhatsOrb.&nbsp;<a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/newsletter/your-shared-sustainable-ideas-make-our-earth-a-better-place">What's in for me?</a></p>
Close Welcome writers, influencers and dreamers, make the world a greener place
Register here
Forgot password
Forgot password
or
or

Close
Close Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations
Close Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations
Close Reset password
your profile is 33% complete:
33%
Update profile Close
Close WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-Change

For writers, influencers and dreamers who want to make the world a greener place.

WhatsOrb reaches monthly about 28.000 thousand visitors who want - like you - to make the world a greener place. Share your expertise and all can benefit.

Become an influencer and write and share sustainable news and innovations globally
Are you a writer or do you have ideas about sustainability which you want to share? Register and share your green knowledge and news. WhatsOrb offers you global exposure for your article.

If your article meets certain standards, you receive promotional gains like Facebook promotions and Google Ads advertising.

MenuMenu

Climate categorybanner Man-Made

Climate Change: Groundwater An Out-Of-Sight Crisis
Attention for climate change worldwide? Fortunately, yes. However, the groundwater challenge's effects are still underexposed — time to tackle this out-of-sight, growing crisis. Climate Change: Groundwater An out-of-sight Crisis Groundwater Is A Valuable Resource Groundwater is a valuable resource that meets many of the hydrological needs of people and habitats worldwide. Groundwater provides a safety net against climate change; it contributes to streams in rivers and lakes, supports aquifers' proper functioning, and promotes economic activity. A durable and flourishing future depends on surface water. The quality and also the quantity of groundwater are affected by long periods of drought and flooding. This is a consequence of the extreme events and variations in precipitation caused by climate change. {youtube}                     War For Water: What Happens When Asia's Rivers Dry Up? | The Longest Day | Climate Change 6 Million People Rely On California's Groundwater More than 6 million people in California depend on groundwater for water supply. In times of drought, this amounts to almost 60% of the freshwater used throughout California. In agricultural areas, such as Central Valley, this is even higher. If less groundwater is available, this harms infrastructure, agricultural productivity, and ecosystems. Besides, rising sea levels can penetrate coastal aquifers, polluting drinking water sources. Photo by Rolf Schulten. The California Aqueduct moves water from the state’s wetter north to the drier south. But it can’t carry enough water to prevent overpumping of groundwater.   Recommended:  Blue Planet Earth: The Amount Of Water You Use Indirect Effects Caused By Humans Worldwide Because we initiate environmental changes worldwide, the groundwater supply also is under pressure. There are more intensive land use and domestic activities. In India, there was a "silent revolution" as a result of undifferentiated extraction. This has resulted in an annual groundwater use that is more than that of both the U.S. and China combined. Photo by Vietnam News/ANN. Canals severely polluted for years and have been affecting local people’s health (Viet Nam News/ANN) Recommended:  Asia’s Water War: Is The Mekong Still A River? The Role Of Groundwater In Water And Food Supply That groundwater plays an essential role in water supply, and food security is clear. There is an urgent need for up-to-date research, raising awareness, and sharing knowledge about climate change and groundwater. Only then can we make a change, and sustainable use will remain. This will strongly lead to the achievement of SDG 6 (clean water and sanitation) and other SDG's, like poverty eradication (SDG 1), fighting climate change (SDG 13), food security (SDG 2), and gender equality (SDG 5). A True Opportunity in Hand The relationship between groundwater and climate change must be further investigated, with extra focus on the effects of a changing climate on the subsurface. International organizations, academics, policymakers, businesses, and citizens need to approach these interrelations by taking four steps to good decision-making. First, share and inform people about the latest scientific investigation, tools, methodologies, technologies, and policy approaches to climate change and groundwater. It would help if you raised awareness about climate change and groundwater. Secondly, gather practical information, performed on-site, reporting on links between groundwater and climate change. These can be an inspiring source of change that can be reproduced. Third, make it easy for people to participate in political and scientific discussions. Organize collaborative events between established networks, experts, partners, and other key stakeholders, and have exchange knowledge sessions. This will raise the awareness to create solutions. Lastly, promote sharing and exchange scientific studies about the effects of climate change on groundwater. When information is way more approachable, there will be room for discussion. It is our job to circulate these issues through our network. Let's bring these issues up in meetings, governance, and legislative processes. Photo by Rowan Heuvel.  Jaipur, Rajasthan, India Recommended:  Ireland Is Leaking 760 Million Litres Water A day Conclusion The effects of the groundwater challenge are still underexposed. Still, eventually, with more policy and scientific research, decision-making processes should be improved. The sustainable use and management of groundwater globally need an improvement to aim goals, like SDG 6 and other related purposes. Our near future depends on it. Before you go! Recommended:  Climate Change, Water Scarcity, Hunger: Who Cares Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about worlds water supply? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Attention for climate change worldwide? Fortunately, yes. However, the groundwater challenge's effects are still underexposed — time to tackle this out-of-sight, growing crisis. Climate Change: Groundwater An out-of-sight Crisis Groundwater Is A Valuable Resource Groundwater is a valuable resource that meets many of the hydrological needs of people and habitats worldwide. Groundwater provides a safety net against climate change; it contributes to streams in rivers and lakes, supports aquifers' proper functioning, and promotes economic activity. A durable and flourishing future depends on surface water. The quality and also the quantity of groundwater are affected by long periods of drought and flooding. This is a consequence of the extreme events and variations in precipitation caused by climate change. {youtube}                     War For Water: What Happens When Asia's Rivers Dry Up? | The Longest Day | Climate Change 6 Million People Rely On California's Groundwater More than 6 million people in California depend on groundwater for water supply. In times of drought, this amounts to almost 60% of the freshwater used throughout California. In agricultural areas, such as Central Valley, this is even higher. If less groundwater is available, this harms infrastructure, agricultural productivity, and ecosystems. Besides, rising sea levels can penetrate coastal aquifers, polluting drinking water sources. Photo by Rolf Schulten. The California Aqueduct moves water from the state’s wetter north to the drier south. But it can’t carry enough water to prevent overpumping of groundwater.   Recommended:  Blue Planet Earth: The Amount Of Water You Use Indirect Effects Caused By Humans Worldwide Because we initiate environmental changes worldwide, the groundwater supply also is under pressure. There are more intensive land use and domestic activities. In India, there was a "silent revolution" as a result of undifferentiated extraction. This has resulted in an annual groundwater use that is more than that of both the U.S. and China combined. Photo by Vietnam News/ANN. Canals severely polluted for years and have been affecting local people’s health (Viet Nam News/ANN) Recommended:  Asia’s Water War: Is The Mekong Still A River? The Role Of Groundwater In Water And Food Supply That groundwater plays an essential role in water supply, and food security is clear. There is an urgent need for up-to-date research, raising awareness, and sharing knowledge about climate change and groundwater. Only then can we make a change, and sustainable use will remain. This will strongly lead to the achievement of SDG 6 (clean water and sanitation) and other SDG's, like poverty eradication (SDG 1), fighting climate change (SDG 13), food security (SDG 2), and gender equality (SDG 5). A True Opportunity in Hand The relationship between groundwater and climate change must be further investigated, with extra focus on the effects of a changing climate on the subsurface. International organizations, academics, policymakers, businesses, and citizens need to approach these interrelations by taking four steps to good decision-making. First, share and inform people about the latest scientific investigation, tools, methodologies, technologies, and policy approaches to climate change and groundwater. It would help if you raised awareness about climate change and groundwater. Secondly, gather practical information, performed on-site, reporting on links between groundwater and climate change. These can be an inspiring source of change that can be reproduced. Third, make it easy for people to participate in political and scientific discussions. Organize collaborative events between established networks, experts, partners, and other key stakeholders, and have exchange knowledge sessions. This will raise the awareness to create solutions. Lastly, promote sharing and exchange scientific studies about the effects of climate change on groundwater. When information is way more approachable, there will be room for discussion. It is our job to circulate these issues through our network. Let's bring these issues up in meetings, governance, and legislative processes. Photo by Rowan Heuvel.  Jaipur, Rajasthan, India Recommended:  Ireland Is Leaking 760 Million Litres Water A day Conclusion The effects of the groundwater challenge are still underexposed. Still, eventually, with more policy and scientific research, decision-making processes should be improved. The sustainable use and management of groundwater globally need an improvement to aim goals, like SDG 6 and other related purposes. Our near future depends on it. Before you go! Recommended:  Climate Change, Water Scarcity, Hunger: Who Cares Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about worlds water supply? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Climate Change: Groundwater An Out-Of-Sight Crisis
Climate Change: Groundwater An Out-Of-Sight Crisis
Climate Change Fought By The Kingdom of Bhutan
Bhutan is one of the most pristine hotspots of biodiversity in the world. About 72 percent of the country is covered with forest, and with the approval of the population, the government has declared 60 percent of the forests as a protected area. Bhutan's glaciers withdraw because they melt, leading to dangerous flooding and water scarcity despite this attention to the environment. Climate Change Fought By The Kingdom of Bhutan This story is from National Geographic to promote natural research and nature conservation. Both organizations are focused on the joint support of experienced naturalists, guiding novice researchers, and protecting natural wonders. Recommended:  Climate Change: China Floods The Arctic On Fire Bhutan is about Switzerland's size and certainly has no less mountainous - although geographically, it is much more isolated. In the south, landlocked Bhutan borders India, while the mighty Himalayas forms the northern border. Before 1974, Bhutan was completely closed to tourists and most foreigners, and even now, only a handful of paying visitors are admitted at a time. The kingdom can boast a lively and ancient culture and beautiful scenery. The Gangkhar Puensum, according to many, the highest mountain that has never been climbed, rises 7570 meters in the clouds. Apart from an outdoor feeling for adventure, it would help if you had a lot of money to visit this unique principality. Silver firs form dense vegetation in this forest in Bhutan. The Bhutan Constitution guarantees that 60% of the forests in the country will remain protected. The Kingdom Of Bhutan Fought Climate Change. The Slovenian photographer Ciril Jazbec is one of the few lucky people who have visited Bhutan. Recently he traveled through this country, past villages and vast forests, and spoke to the people. The result of his journey is a personal look behind the scenes of a mysterious little country that few foreigners ever get to see. His photographs range from traditional rural scenes that may seem surprisingly modern to outsiders. And because we are talking about Bhutan, we also see imposing mountains with dense, green forests in the background. All in all, his photographs give the impression of a special place that shows two sides: of history and change, of old and new, of adaptation and resilience. Both ancient traditions and renewal characterize this predominantly Buddhist country. It is probably best known for its happy people and beautiful forests, which have escaped the threat of environmental degradation. Jazbec discusses this in more detail. Recommended:  Hurting The Environment: The Palm Oil Paradox Bhutan Must Develop New Infrastructure. At the end of the last century, the Bhutanese government introduced a socio-economic indicator, referred to as 'Gross National Happiness.' The indicator functions as a social thermometer and should prevent the country's economic development from supplanting the population's traditional way of life. The idea was praised all over the world as original and humanitarian. During their work on a rice field in Laya, two peasant women take a break. Last year, Laya was connected to the power grid for the first time. The connection was welcomed because the nearest village is several days' walk away.  But of course, with the introduction of the 'BNG,' not all problems of the country are solved. In the recent World Happiness Report of the UN, Bhutan was 97th place, mainly attributed to income inequality and unemployment. Recommended:  Climate Change: Natural Or man Made? Let's See! Another growing problem is that the country's limited and vulnerable ecosystem is being affected by climate change. Bhutan's glaciers are melting, causing sudden flooding, and the rainy season is becoming increasingly irregular, leading to water shortages in dry seasons. But although little Bhutan cannot be held responsible for the greenhouse gases that blow the rest of the world into the atmosphere, the country reacts by sharpening its own environmental rules - which are already very strict. About sixty percent of the Bhutanese forests are protected areas, and new infrastructure must be developed sustainably. More attention is paid to electric public transport and hybrid cars than to the traditional vehicle fleet development. With this kind of measure, Bhutan not only manages to remain CO2-neutral but even acts as a 'storage place' of CO2: thanks to its vast forests, Bhutan absorbs more CO2 from the air than emissions. The Bhutanese attention to the fight against climate change was emphasized once again last year by the country's prime minister. His message about the ambitious measures that the country would take in light of the changing climate was why the photographer Jazbec visited the country and recorded the population's resilience. "Bhutan really has an extraordinary relationship with the environment," says Jazbec. "I've never seen anything like this before." Fighting Climate Change: Taking Care Of The Environment Jazbec has made photographs of communities facing climate change worldwide, but Bhutan, who, because of his non-disabled people, touched a sensitive chord. When Jazbec visited the kingdom last year, he was shown around by a 'fixer' or local guide, who showed him several villages. One day Jazbec tried to drive a moth off the screen of his laptop. According to the photographer, his fixer was so upset about what he saw that he appealed to his foreign guest. "He told me that all living beings have a soul," says Jazbec. "He accepted the fact that animals need space." Recommended:  Environmental Activism Is For Everyone, Not Just Scientists That feeling comes, of course, partly from the main religion in the country, Buddhism. Jazbec saw that many people in Bhutan were trying to take good care of the environment. Whether they were motivated by their religion, their community, or by a less tangible concept, Jazbec noticed how cautiously people dealt with nature and their animals. As an outsider, he wanted to capture the essence of a country that had long been described as a 'Shangri-La,' an idea that Westerners have always addressed but that they have never been able to grasp. Archery is the national sport of Bhutan and is practiced by young and old.  Photos by Of Ciril Jazbec Before you go! Recommended:  Global Cooling Or Warming: Will It Kill Us? Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about climate change? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Bhutan is one of the most pristine hotspots of biodiversity in the world. About 72 percent of the country is covered with forest, and with the approval of the population, the government has declared 60 percent of the forests as a protected area. Bhutan's glaciers withdraw because they melt, leading to dangerous flooding and water scarcity despite this attention to the environment. Climate Change Fought By The Kingdom of Bhutan This story is from National Geographic to promote natural research and nature conservation. Both organizations are focused on the joint support of experienced naturalists, guiding novice researchers, and protecting natural wonders. Recommended:  Climate Change: China Floods The Arctic On Fire Bhutan is about Switzerland's size and certainly has no less mountainous - although geographically, it is much more isolated. In the south, landlocked Bhutan borders India, while the mighty Himalayas forms the northern border. Before 1974, Bhutan was completely closed to tourists and most foreigners, and even now, only a handful of paying visitors are admitted at a time. The kingdom can boast a lively and ancient culture and beautiful scenery. The Gangkhar Puensum, according to many, the highest mountain that has never been climbed, rises 7570 meters in the clouds. Apart from an outdoor feeling for adventure, it would help if you had a lot of money to visit this unique principality. Silver firs form dense vegetation in this forest in Bhutan. The Bhutan Constitution guarantees that 60% of the forests in the country will remain protected. The Kingdom Of Bhutan Fought Climate Change. The Slovenian photographer Ciril Jazbec is one of the few lucky people who have visited Bhutan. Recently he traveled through this country, past villages and vast forests, and spoke to the people. The result of his journey is a personal look behind the scenes of a mysterious little country that few foreigners ever get to see. His photographs range from traditional rural scenes that may seem surprisingly modern to outsiders. And because we are talking about Bhutan, we also see imposing mountains with dense, green forests in the background. All in all, his photographs give the impression of a special place that shows two sides: of history and change, of old and new, of adaptation and resilience. Both ancient traditions and renewal characterize this predominantly Buddhist country. It is probably best known for its happy people and beautiful forests, which have escaped the threat of environmental degradation. Jazbec discusses this in more detail. Recommended:  Hurting The Environment: The Palm Oil Paradox Bhutan Must Develop New Infrastructure. At the end of the last century, the Bhutanese government introduced a socio-economic indicator, referred to as 'Gross National Happiness.' The indicator functions as a social thermometer and should prevent the country's economic development from supplanting the population's traditional way of life. The idea was praised all over the world as original and humanitarian. During their work on a rice field in Laya, two peasant women take a break. Last year, Laya was connected to the power grid for the first time. The connection was welcomed because the nearest village is several days' walk away.  But of course, with the introduction of the 'BNG,' not all problems of the country are solved. In the recent World Happiness Report of the UN, Bhutan was 97th place, mainly attributed to income inequality and unemployment. Recommended:  Climate Change: Natural Or man Made? Let's See! Another growing problem is that the country's limited and vulnerable ecosystem is being affected by climate change. Bhutan's glaciers are melting, causing sudden flooding, and the rainy season is becoming increasingly irregular, leading to water shortages in dry seasons. But although little Bhutan cannot be held responsible for the greenhouse gases that blow the rest of the world into the atmosphere, the country reacts by sharpening its own environmental rules - which are already very strict. About sixty percent of the Bhutanese forests are protected areas, and new infrastructure must be developed sustainably. More attention is paid to electric public transport and hybrid cars than to the traditional vehicle fleet development. With this kind of measure, Bhutan not only manages to remain CO2-neutral but even acts as a 'storage place' of CO2: thanks to its vast forests, Bhutan absorbs more CO2 from the air than emissions. The Bhutanese attention to the fight against climate change was emphasized once again last year by the country's prime minister. His message about the ambitious measures that the country would take in light of the changing climate was why the photographer Jazbec visited the country and recorded the population's resilience. "Bhutan really has an extraordinary relationship with the environment," says Jazbec. "I've never seen anything like this before." Fighting Climate Change: Taking Care Of The Environment Jazbec has made photographs of communities facing climate change worldwide, but Bhutan, who, because of his non-disabled people, touched a sensitive chord. When Jazbec visited the kingdom last year, he was shown around by a 'fixer' or local guide, who showed him several villages. One day Jazbec tried to drive a moth off the screen of his laptop. According to the photographer, his fixer was so upset about what he saw that he appealed to his foreign guest. "He told me that all living beings have a soul," says Jazbec. "He accepted the fact that animals need space." Recommended:  Environmental Activism Is For Everyone, Not Just Scientists That feeling comes, of course, partly from the main religion in the country, Buddhism. Jazbec saw that many people in Bhutan were trying to take good care of the environment. Whether they were motivated by their religion, their community, or by a less tangible concept, Jazbec noticed how cautiously people dealt with nature and their animals. As an outsider, he wanted to capture the essence of a country that had long been described as a 'Shangri-La,' an idea that Westerners have always addressed but that they have never been able to grasp. Archery is the national sport of Bhutan and is practiced by young and old.  Photos by Of Ciril Jazbec Before you go! Recommended:  Global Cooling Or Warming: Will It Kill Us? Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about climate change? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Climate Change Fought By The Kingdom of Bhutan
Climate Change Fought By The Kingdom of Bhutan
Sea Level Rise Limited By Hydro Dams. Strange!
According to scientists, the role of the construction of large-scale hydro dames is surprising in limiting rising seas. Strange Statement Melting glaciers, due to climate change, and the thermal expansion of seawater has caused that ocean level rise over the past century. In new research, scientists show that hydro dams almost stopped sea level rise in the 1970s. They prevented the amount of water from coming into the oceans. Without the hydro dams, the annual surge of water would be 12 percent higher. Recommended:  Sea  Level Rise Due To Climate Change: So What? Hydro Dams Limit Sea Level Rise It is difficult for researchers to measure how much seas have risen in the last century. Researchers discovered that there is a difference between how much water came into the ocean and how many of these oceans actually had increased. In this new study, scientists wanted to have a more accurate estimation, so they have revisited all the information known about rising seas. Melting glaciers and thermal expansion of seas had an influence on the rising sea level, but they also discovered the role of storage facilities, like dams and reservoirs, on sea level. Recommended:  Stop Rising Seas With Manmade Snowstorms Hydro Dams: A Building Boom There are around 58,000 enormous dams in the world but mostly build in the last 60 years. A building boom of these dams was constructed in the 1950s to 1970s, such as the ones in Zimbabwe, Siberia, and Egypt. These giant dams are the reason sea level did not rise as much as expected. By building dams, sea level stopped from rising for almost a decade. The enormous rise of water is due to the melting glaciers. They reacted faster to a warmer earth. The authors of the study believe sea level would be around 12 percent higher without these reservoirs and dams. People were concerned that building hydro dams could be a significant impact on the environment, so the number of projects began to decline. But at the same time, climate change ensured sea level rising and thermal expansion of water because more heat energy going into the oceans. All these elements have contributed to an acceleration in sea-level rise over the past 30 years, which is now 3.35 mm per year. Recommended:  Agriculture Under Water: Farming At Sea In Italy Sea Level Rise Limited By Hydro Dams Is there a possibility to do a project on dams in the world to save the rising sea levels? Earlier this year, a team of researchers presented a document that shows how to prevent the worse impacts of rising seas by building enormous hydro dams across the North Sea. But not everybody thinks this would help. According to Dr. Thomas Frederikse says sea level still rises. "We can slow it down with 0.8 mm per year." Frederikse says that we have to build too many dams to stop the current rise of sea level. "I think that is impossible." According to him, it is better to concentrate on reducing CO2-emissions. Cover photo by Jani Brumat Before you go! Recommended:  A Floating Airport Cutting Edge Madness Or Visionary? Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about sea-level rise? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
According to scientists, the role of the construction of large-scale hydro dames is surprising in limiting rising seas. Strange Statement Melting glaciers, due to climate change, and the thermal expansion of seawater has caused that ocean level rise over the past century. In new research, scientists show that hydro dams almost stopped sea level rise in the 1970s. They prevented the amount of water from coming into the oceans. Without the hydro dams, the annual surge of water would be 12 percent higher. Recommended:  Sea  Level Rise Due To Climate Change: So What? Hydro Dams Limit Sea Level Rise It is difficult for researchers to measure how much seas have risen in the last century. Researchers discovered that there is a difference between how much water came into the ocean and how many of these oceans actually had increased. In this new study, scientists wanted to have a more accurate estimation, so they have revisited all the information known about rising seas. Melting glaciers and thermal expansion of seas had an influence on the rising sea level, but they also discovered the role of storage facilities, like dams and reservoirs, on sea level. Recommended:  Stop Rising Seas With Manmade Snowstorms Hydro Dams: A Building Boom There are around 58,000 enormous dams in the world but mostly build in the last 60 years. A building boom of these dams was constructed in the 1950s to 1970s, such as the ones in Zimbabwe, Siberia, and Egypt. These giant dams are the reason sea level did not rise as much as expected. By building dams, sea level stopped from rising for almost a decade. The enormous rise of water is due to the melting glaciers. They reacted faster to a warmer earth. The authors of the study believe sea level would be around 12 percent higher without these reservoirs and dams. People were concerned that building hydro dams could be a significant impact on the environment, so the number of projects began to decline. But at the same time, climate change ensured sea level rising and thermal expansion of water because more heat energy going into the oceans. All these elements have contributed to an acceleration in sea-level rise over the past 30 years, which is now 3.35 mm per year. Recommended:  Agriculture Under Water: Farming At Sea In Italy Sea Level Rise Limited By Hydro Dams Is there a possibility to do a project on dams in the world to save the rising sea levels? Earlier this year, a team of researchers presented a document that shows how to prevent the worse impacts of rising seas by building enormous hydro dams across the North Sea. But not everybody thinks this would help. According to Dr. Thomas Frederikse says sea level still rises. "We can slow it down with 0.8 mm per year." Frederikse says that we have to build too many dams to stop the current rise of sea level. "I think that is impossible." According to him, it is better to concentrate on reducing CO2-emissions. Cover photo by Jani Brumat Before you go! Recommended:  A Floating Airport Cutting Edge Madness Or Visionary? Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about sea-level rise? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Sea Level Rise Limited By Hydro Dams. Strange!
Sea Level Rise Limited By Hydro Dams. Strange!
Climate Change: China Floods The Arctic On Fire
Since early June, the water levels of 433 rivers in China have risen over the danger mark, with 33 of them rising to historical highs. In Siberia, nearly 300 wildfires are blazing amid record warm weather. China Is Flooding: Torrential Rains China has a four-tier, color-coded weather warning system, with red representing the most severe, followed by orange, yellow, and blue. Since July, 31 people have died or are missing, and 23.85 million people have been affected due to floods in 24 provincial regions, including East China's Anhui and Jiangxi provinces. Water levels on many rivers have been unusually high this year because of torrential rains. Blasting dams and embankments to discharge water was an extreme response employed during China’s worst floods in recent years. Last week, the huge Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze opened three floodgates after the water level rose more than 15 meters (50ft) above flood level. Elsewhere, soldiers and workers have been testing the strength of embankments and shoring them up with sandbags and rocks. Recently, firefighters and others finished filling in a 188-meter (620ft) break on Poyang Lake, China’s largest freshwater lake, that had caused widespread flooding across 15 villages and agricultural fields in Jiangxi province. More than 14,000 people were evacuated. Seasonal flooding strikes large parts of China annually, especially in its central and southern regions, but has been especially severe this summer. Recommended:  Climate Change Pictures: Weird Global Anomalies The second-highest rainfall that's swamped China in more than a half-century has fuelled new questions about the world's biggest hydroelectric facility, billed as helping to tame floodwaters. Vice Minister of Emergency Management Zheng Guoguang told reporters that the Yangtze, Asia's longest river, and parts of its watershed had seen the second-highest rainfall since 1961 over the past six months. But after weeks of devastating flooding, questions are being raised about the Three Gorges Dam's impact on Yangtze floods and if the massive structure itself may be at risk. One of the primary justifications for the Three Gorges Dam was flood control, but less than 20 years after its completion, we have the highest floodwater in recorded history. But the fact is that it cannot prevent these severe events.” China Is Flooding: The Three Gorges Dam The Three Gorges Dam was officially completed in 2006. Its power operation went online in 2012, and it is one of China’s most expensive and questionable developmental projects. Some 1.4 million people had to be resettled as a result of the massive project on the Yangtze River. Photo by Yao Yilong.  The Three Gorges Dam is spanning the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang) near Yichang, Hubei province, China. The dam also was touted as the best way to end centuries of flooding along the Yangtze and provide power for China's industrial boom. But some geologists contended that damming up too much water in the reservoir carried a heightened risk of earthquakes and prolonged damage to the river's ecology. In 2012, the Ministry of Land Resources said the number of landslides and other disasters around the reservoir had increased 70 percent after the water level in the $23 billion projects rose to its maximum in 2010. Recommended:  Asia’s Water War: Is The Mekong Still A River? Critics of the project, like Chinese geologist Fan Xiao, have said that Three Gorges and other major dam projects may make flooding worse by altering the flow of sedimentation down the river. Three Gorges, storage capacity amounts to less than 9 percent of average floodwaters. “It can only partially and temporarily intercept the upstream floods, and is powerless to help with floods caused by heavy rainfall in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River,” he said. {youtube}                                                       Climate change blamed for China flood disaster Damage from this season's floods has been estimated in the hundreds of millions of dollars, further pressuring an economy deeply impacted by the Flooding In Hubei Province Hubei province, through which the Yangtze flows, is known for its numerous lakes and rivers and is under particular threat. The province's capital Wuhan was the epicenter of China's coronavirus outbreak. Residents in the Yangtze River basin in recent weeks have expressed concerns over the ability of the massive dam to handle more heavy rain, even though authorities have been releasing floodwater from the structure. China Is Flooding: Wuhan The central Chinese city of Wuhan and the provinces of Anhui, Jiangxi, and Zhejiang declared red alerts as heavy rain threatened to swell rivers and lakes and bring more disruption across the countryside and to global commerce. Wuhan, on the banks of the Yangtze River, where the novel coronavirus emerged late last year, warned residents to take precautions as water levels fast their maximum guaranteed safety level. The giant Three Gorges reservoir, which has been holding back more water to try to ease downstream flood risks, is more than 10 meters higher than its warning level, with inflows now at more than 50,000 cubic meters a second. Recommended:  Coronavirus: Symptoms Flu And Climate Change The Poyang Lake in Jiangxi province, which is formed from the overspill of the Yangtze, is 2.5 meters higher than its warning level. It has expanded by more than 2,000 square kilometers during thus flood season, and parts of the surrounding town have been inundated. China Is Flooding: Delays In Delivering Of PPE Further east, the Tai lake near Shanghai has also declared a red alert after its water level rose to nearly a meter higher than its safe level. The summer rainy season brings floods to China almost every year, but the impact of the disruption they cause is being felt further afield as Chinese goods become more important in supply chains of items such as personal protective equipment (PPE). "It's just creating another major roadblock here in terms of PPE getting into the United States - it is the worst of times for it to happen, but that's what we're dealing with right now," said Michael Einhorn, president of Dealmed. This U.S. medical supply distributor sources disposable lab coats and other products from Wuhan and nearby regions. Recommended:  Coronavirus: Will The Weather Help Us Beat It? "We cannot get the product out for over a week, which is a very long time in our business," he said, adding that the delays could last another two or three weeks. Economic activity in parts of China, especially construction and steel and cement demand, continues to be hurt by the flooding, analysts say, suggesting some loss of momentum after a stronger than expected bounce in the second quarter from the coronavirus crisis. The Artic, Siberia On Fire You have after reading above already a lot on your mind, but may I suggest one additional topic of alarm for consideration: Siberia is on fire. Siberia, the proverbial coldest place, situated way up at the top of the globe in the Arctic circle, is experiencing record warm temperatures, melting sea ice, and massive wildfires — changes to the environment that even the scientists most urgently tracking the climate crisis didn’t expect to see for another several decade. As New York’s David Wallace-Wells wrote of one town that hit triple-digit temperatures on June 20, “In a world without climate change, this anomaly, one Danish meteorologist calculated, would be a 1-in-100,000-year event.” Recommended:  Climate Change: Antarctica Is Melting Says NASA “We always expected the Arctic to change faster than the rest of the globe,” one researcher told the Washington Post. “But I don’t think anyone expected the changes to happen as fast as we are seeing them happen.” Siberian towns are experiencing a heatwave throughout the region, with many smashing centuries-old temperature records, records that are now being broken year after year. Scientists say that the area is warming at three times the rate of the rest of the world, due to a phenomenon called “Arctic amplification,” in which melting ice exposes more dark sea and lake waters. These turning zones were once net heat-reflecting into heat-absorbing. And temperatures rise even more. The effects of that increase are myriad and terrifying. Melting snow creates dry vegetation for wildfires, which have reached record levels this summer, sending out giant plumes of smoke and releasing more greenhouse gases than ever before. Some of these are troublingly named “zombie fires,” which don’t go out in winter but burn under the snow and ice only to erupt in the air once again once the snow melts. People in Siberia are at risk of infrastructure collapse as towns built for the severe strain under new, extreme conditions. At the same time, the melting of Arctic ice contributes to sea-level rise and irregular weather patterns around the world. Perhaps scariest is the potential calamity of total permafrost melting: Permafrost is a layer of continuous ice that covers nearly a quarter of the landmass in the Northern Hemisphere, in which approximately 1,460 billion to 1,600 billion metric tons of organic carbon is trapped. That’s more than twice the amount of carbon currently in the atmosphere. If with previously stable permafrost subject to never-before-seen heat, it is released, we could reach a tipping point beyond human intervention. Siberia On Fire And The Coronavirus: A Connection? With much of the world consumed by the coronavirus pandemic, and with the United States engaged in reckoning on racial injustice on top of reaching a record number of virus cases, temperature records in Siberia might seem like a faraway problem. But seemingly separate crises are not so disconnected; studies recently show, for example, how warming affects poor pregnant women in the U.S., and Black expecting mothers, in particular, a disparity that will get even worse as warming continues. Recommended:  Bushfires Australia Generate Their Own Weather “When we develop a fever, it’s a sign. It’s a warning sign that something is wrong, and we stop, and we take note,” a Colorado-based Arctic researcher said to the Post. “The Arctic is on fire. It has a fever right now, and so it’s a good warning sign that we need to stop, take note, and figure out what’s going on. Flooding And Climate Change China has perennial flooding in summer, but a combination of climate reasons and human behavior has contributed to a longer-than-usual duration and incessant rainfall in some regions. The subtropical high-pressure system over the western North Pacific was robust this year. Its intersection with cold air has led to continuous heavy rain in the Yangtze River basin. Another reason was global warming. We cannot say a single extreme weather event is directly caused by climate change, but seeing it over the long term, global warming has led to an increase in the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events. From 1961 to 2018, there has been an increase in ‘hefty rainfall’ events in China, according to the China Climate Change Blue Book (2019). And since the mid-1990s, the frequency of extreme precipitation has increased dramatically. Recommended:  China Will Make It Rain In Tibet: Space Technology Over the past 60 years, the number of days of heavy rain has gone up by 3.9 percent a decade. Aside from the rainfall, human behavior has also contributed to the severity of the floods in China. Decades of land reclamation and dam-building on nearby rivers had reduced the area and volume of Poyang Lake, the country’s largest freshwater lake, which is located in Jiangxi. Some 1,300 sq km (502 sq miles) of land was reclaimed there from 1954 to 1998, which caused the surface area of the lake to shrink from 5,160 sq km (1,992 sq miles) to 3,860 sq km (1,490 sq miles), according to a study by University of Alabama geographer David Shankman. Environmental volunteer Zhang Wenbin said he had investigated illegal land reclamation activities at Tuolin, another lake in the province. He said some of the projects around the lake were still underway last year, even though they had been ordered to stop by environmental inspectors from Beijing. “There are many similar cases,” Zhang said, adding that Tuolin Lake had also shrunk in size, reducing its storage capacity for floodwaters. Flooding: How Does It Compare To Other Years? China’s worst known floods were in 1931 when more than 2 million people were killed. The flooding inundated an area the size of England and half of Scotland combined, affecting about 25 million people – or a tenth of the population at the time, Chris Courtney, an assistant professor at Durham University, wrote like Disaster in China . Since the People’s Republic of China was founded in 1949, there have been two catastrophic floods. The first was in the summer of 1954 along the Yangtze River, resulting in over 30,000 deaths and affecting 18 million people. The second was in 1998, again along the Yangtze but also in the south and north of the country. It was the worst flooding in recent years, with more than 3,000 people killed, 15 million left homeless, and US$24 billion in economic losses. The Artic On Fire And Climate Change Climate change has lit parts of the Arctic on fire, with the region also recording temperature highs of 38C (100F), sparking concern among scientists worried about the ramifications for the rest of the world. This year the fires have begun burning even earlier than the usual July start, said Vladimir Chuprov, director of the project department at Greenpeace Russia. Unseasonably warm weather, particularly if coupled with wildfires, causes permafrost to thaw faster. This, in turn, exacerbates global warming by releasing large amounts of methane. This methane a potent greenhouse gas 28 times stronger than carbon dioxide. Recommended:  Our Focus On CO2 Alone: Other Climate Culprits Methane escaping from permafrost thaw sites enters the atmosphere and circulates the globe. Methane that originates in the Arctic, does not stay in the Arctic. It has global ramifications. What is taking place in the Arctic can even warp the weather in Europe and the US. In the summer, the unusual warming lessens the temperature and pressure difference between the Arctic and lower latitudes where more people live. This phenomenon appears to weaken or even stall the jet stream. And the effect of this means weather systems such as those bringing extreme heat or rain can remain in place for several days. Meteorologists at Russian weather agency Rosgidrome believe factors including a high-pressure system with a clear sky and the Sun being very high, extremely long daylight hours, and short warm nights have contributed to the Siberian temperature spike. The ground surface heats up intensively. The nights are hot; the air doesn't have time to cool and continues to heat up for several days." The scientific consensus is the spike indicates a far more extensive global warming trend. Dr. Freja Vamborg, the senior scientist at the UK's Copernicus Climate Change Service, said: "The key point is that the climate is changing and global temperatures are warming. "We will be breaking more and more records as we go." A catastrophic oil spill from a collapsed storage tank last month near the Arctic city of Norilsk has also partly blamed on melting permafrost. In 2011, part of a residential building in Yakutsk, a town in the Sakha Republic, actually collapsed due to the thawing of the frozen ground. The ground surface heats up intensively. The nights are hot; the air doesn't have time to cool and continues to heat up for several days. Scientists agree that the spike is indicative of a much bigger global warming trend. Before you go! Recommended:  Earth Matters. Nature And Us: What Was, What’s Left: Hope? Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about the effect of climate change in your neighborhood? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Since early June, the water levels of 433 rivers in China have risen over the danger mark, with 33 of them rising to historical highs. In Siberia, nearly 300 wildfires are blazing amid record warm weather. China Is Flooding: Torrential Rains China has a four-tier, color-coded weather warning system, with red representing the most severe, followed by orange, yellow, and blue. Since July, 31 people have died or are missing, and 23.85 million people have been affected due to floods in 24 provincial regions, including East China's Anhui and Jiangxi provinces. Water levels on many rivers have been unusually high this year because of torrential rains. Blasting dams and embankments to discharge water was an extreme response employed during China’s worst floods in recent years. Last week, the huge Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze opened three floodgates after the water level rose more than 15 meters (50ft) above flood level. Elsewhere, soldiers and workers have been testing the strength of embankments and shoring them up with sandbags and rocks. Recently, firefighters and others finished filling in a 188-meter (620ft) break on Poyang Lake, China’s largest freshwater lake, that had caused widespread flooding across 15 villages and agricultural fields in Jiangxi province. More than 14,000 people were evacuated. Seasonal flooding strikes large parts of China annually, especially in its central and southern regions, but has been especially severe this summer. Recommended:  Climate Change Pictures: Weird Global Anomalies The second-highest rainfall that's swamped China in more than a half-century has fuelled new questions about the world's biggest hydroelectric facility, billed as helping to tame floodwaters. Vice Minister of Emergency Management Zheng Guoguang told reporters that the Yangtze, Asia's longest river, and parts of its watershed had seen the second-highest rainfall since 1961 over the past six months. But after weeks of devastating flooding, questions are being raised about the Three Gorges Dam's impact on Yangtze floods and if the massive structure itself may be at risk. One of the primary justifications for the Three Gorges Dam was flood control, but less than 20 years after its completion, we have the highest floodwater in recorded history. But the fact is that it cannot prevent these severe events.” China Is Flooding: The Three Gorges Dam The Three Gorges Dam was officially completed in 2006. Its power operation went online in 2012, and it is one of China’s most expensive and questionable developmental projects. Some 1.4 million people had to be resettled as a result of the massive project on the Yangtze River. Photo by Yao Yilong.  The Three Gorges Dam is spanning the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang) near Yichang, Hubei province, China. The dam also was touted as the best way to end centuries of flooding along the Yangtze and provide power for China's industrial boom. But some geologists contended that damming up too much water in the reservoir carried a heightened risk of earthquakes and prolonged damage to the river's ecology. In 2012, the Ministry of Land Resources said the number of landslides and other disasters around the reservoir had increased 70 percent after the water level in the $23 billion projects rose to its maximum in 2010. Recommended:  Asia’s Water War: Is The Mekong Still A River? Critics of the project, like Chinese geologist Fan Xiao, have said that Three Gorges and other major dam projects may make flooding worse by altering the flow of sedimentation down the river. Three Gorges, storage capacity amounts to less than 9 percent of average floodwaters. “It can only partially and temporarily intercept the upstream floods, and is powerless to help with floods caused by heavy rainfall in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River,” he said. {youtube}                                                       Climate change blamed for China flood disaster Damage from this season's floods has been estimated in the hundreds of millions of dollars, further pressuring an economy deeply impacted by the Flooding In Hubei Province Hubei province, through which the Yangtze flows, is known for its numerous lakes and rivers and is under particular threat. The province's capital Wuhan was the epicenter of China's coronavirus outbreak. Residents in the Yangtze River basin in recent weeks have expressed concerns over the ability of the massive dam to handle more heavy rain, even though authorities have been releasing floodwater from the structure. China Is Flooding: Wuhan The central Chinese city of Wuhan and the provinces of Anhui, Jiangxi, and Zhejiang declared red alerts as heavy rain threatened to swell rivers and lakes and bring more disruption across the countryside and to global commerce. Wuhan, on the banks of the Yangtze River, where the novel coronavirus emerged late last year, warned residents to take precautions as water levels fast their maximum guaranteed safety level. The giant Three Gorges reservoir, which has been holding back more water to try to ease downstream flood risks, is more than 10 meters higher than its warning level, with inflows now at more than 50,000 cubic meters a second. Recommended:  Coronavirus: Symptoms Flu And Climate Change The Poyang Lake in Jiangxi province, which is formed from the overspill of the Yangtze, is 2.5 meters higher than its warning level. It has expanded by more than 2,000 square kilometers during thus flood season, and parts of the surrounding town have been inundated. China Is Flooding: Delays In Delivering Of PPE Further east, the Tai lake near Shanghai has also declared a red alert after its water level rose to nearly a meter higher than its safe level. The summer rainy season brings floods to China almost every year, but the impact of the disruption they cause is being felt further afield as Chinese goods become more important in supply chains of items such as personal protective equipment (PPE). "It's just creating another major roadblock here in terms of PPE getting into the United States - it is the worst of times for it to happen, but that's what we're dealing with right now," said Michael Einhorn, president of Dealmed. This U.S. medical supply distributor sources disposable lab coats and other products from Wuhan and nearby regions. Recommended:  Coronavirus: Will The Weather Help Us Beat It? "We cannot get the product out for over a week, which is a very long time in our business," he said, adding that the delays could last another two or three weeks. Economic activity in parts of China, especially construction and steel and cement demand, continues to be hurt by the flooding, analysts say, suggesting some loss of momentum after a stronger than expected bounce in the second quarter from the coronavirus crisis. The Artic, Siberia On Fire You have after reading above already a lot on your mind, but may I suggest one additional topic of alarm for consideration: Siberia is on fire. Siberia, the proverbial coldest place, situated way up at the top of the globe in the Arctic circle, is experiencing record warm temperatures, melting sea ice, and massive wildfires — changes to the environment that even the scientists most urgently tracking the climate crisis didn’t expect to see for another several decade. As New York’s David Wallace-Wells wrote of one town that hit triple-digit temperatures on June 20, “In a world without climate change, this anomaly, one Danish meteorologist calculated, would be a 1-in-100,000-year event.” Recommended:  Climate Change: Antarctica Is Melting Says NASA “We always expected the Arctic to change faster than the rest of the globe,” one researcher told the Washington Post. “But I don’t think anyone expected the changes to happen as fast as we are seeing them happen.” Siberian towns are experiencing a heatwave throughout the region, with many smashing centuries-old temperature records, records that are now being broken year after year. Scientists say that the area is warming at three times the rate of the rest of the world, due to a phenomenon called “Arctic amplification,” in which melting ice exposes more dark sea and lake waters. These turning zones were once net heat-reflecting into heat-absorbing. And temperatures rise even more. The effects of that increase are myriad and terrifying. Melting snow creates dry vegetation for wildfires, which have reached record levels this summer, sending out giant plumes of smoke and releasing more greenhouse gases than ever before. Some of these are troublingly named “zombie fires,” which don’t go out in winter but burn under the snow and ice only to erupt in the air once again once the snow melts. People in Siberia are at risk of infrastructure collapse as towns built for the severe strain under new, extreme conditions. At the same time, the melting of Arctic ice contributes to sea-level rise and irregular weather patterns around the world. Perhaps scariest is the potential calamity of total permafrost melting: Permafrost is a layer of continuous ice that covers nearly a quarter of the landmass in the Northern Hemisphere, in which approximately 1,460 billion to 1,600 billion metric tons of organic carbon is trapped. That’s more than twice the amount of carbon currently in the atmosphere. If with previously stable permafrost subject to never-before-seen heat, it is released, we could reach a tipping point beyond human intervention. Siberia On Fire And The Coronavirus: A Connection? With much of the world consumed by the coronavirus pandemic, and with the United States engaged in reckoning on racial injustice on top of reaching a record number of virus cases, temperature records in Siberia might seem like a faraway problem. But seemingly separate crises are not so disconnected; studies recently show, for example, how warming affects poor pregnant women in the U.S., and Black expecting mothers, in particular, a disparity that will get even worse as warming continues. Recommended:  Bushfires Australia Generate Their Own Weather “When we develop a fever, it’s a sign. It’s a warning sign that something is wrong, and we stop, and we take note,” a Colorado-based Arctic researcher said to the Post. “The Arctic is on fire. It has a fever right now, and so it’s a good warning sign that we need to stop, take note, and figure out what’s going on. Flooding And Climate Change China has perennial flooding in summer, but a combination of climate reasons and human behavior has contributed to a longer-than-usual duration and incessant rainfall in some regions. The subtropical high-pressure system over the western North Pacific was robust this year. Its intersection with cold air has led to continuous heavy rain in the Yangtze River basin. Another reason was global warming. We cannot say a single extreme weather event is directly caused by climate change, but seeing it over the long term, global warming has led to an increase in the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events. From 1961 to 2018, there has been an increase in ‘hefty rainfall’ events in China, according to the China Climate Change Blue Book (2019). And since the mid-1990s, the frequency of extreme precipitation has increased dramatically. Recommended:  China Will Make It Rain In Tibet: Space Technology Over the past 60 years, the number of days of heavy rain has gone up by 3.9 percent a decade. Aside from the rainfall, human behavior has also contributed to the severity of the floods in China. Decades of land reclamation and dam-building on nearby rivers had reduced the area and volume of Poyang Lake, the country’s largest freshwater lake, which is located in Jiangxi. Some 1,300 sq km (502 sq miles) of land was reclaimed there from 1954 to 1998, which caused the surface area of the lake to shrink from 5,160 sq km (1,992 sq miles) to 3,860 sq km (1,490 sq miles), according to a study by University of Alabama geographer David Shankman. Environmental volunteer Zhang Wenbin said he had investigated illegal land reclamation activities at Tuolin, another lake in the province. He said some of the projects around the lake were still underway last year, even though they had been ordered to stop by environmental inspectors from Beijing. “There are many similar cases,” Zhang said, adding that Tuolin Lake had also shrunk in size, reducing its storage capacity for floodwaters. Flooding: How Does It Compare To Other Years? China’s worst known floods were in 1931 when more than 2 million people were killed. The flooding inundated an area the size of England and half of Scotland combined, affecting about 25 million people – or a tenth of the population at the time, Chris Courtney, an assistant professor at Durham University, wrote like Disaster in China . Since the People’s Republic of China was founded in 1949, there have been two catastrophic floods. The first was in the summer of 1954 along the Yangtze River, resulting in over 30,000 deaths and affecting 18 million people. The second was in 1998, again along the Yangtze but also in the south and north of the country. It was the worst flooding in recent years, with more than 3,000 people killed, 15 million left homeless, and US$24 billion in economic losses. The Artic On Fire And Climate Change Climate change has lit parts of the Arctic on fire, with the region also recording temperature highs of 38C (100F), sparking concern among scientists worried about the ramifications for the rest of the world. This year the fires have begun burning even earlier than the usual July start, said Vladimir Chuprov, director of the project department at Greenpeace Russia. Unseasonably warm weather, particularly if coupled with wildfires, causes permafrost to thaw faster. This, in turn, exacerbates global warming by releasing large amounts of methane. This methane a potent greenhouse gas 28 times stronger than carbon dioxide. Recommended:  Our Focus On CO2 Alone: Other Climate Culprits Methane escaping from permafrost thaw sites enters the atmosphere and circulates the globe. Methane that originates in the Arctic, does not stay in the Arctic. It has global ramifications. What is taking place in the Arctic can even warp the weather in Europe and the US. In the summer, the unusual warming lessens the temperature and pressure difference between the Arctic and lower latitudes where more people live. This phenomenon appears to weaken or even stall the jet stream. And the effect of this means weather systems such as those bringing extreme heat or rain can remain in place for several days. Meteorologists at Russian weather agency Rosgidrome believe factors including a high-pressure system with a clear sky and the Sun being very high, extremely long daylight hours, and short warm nights have contributed to the Siberian temperature spike. The ground surface heats up intensively. The nights are hot; the air doesn't have time to cool and continues to heat up for several days." The scientific consensus is the spike indicates a far more extensive global warming trend. Dr. Freja Vamborg, the senior scientist at the UK's Copernicus Climate Change Service, said: "The key point is that the climate is changing and global temperatures are warming. "We will be breaking more and more records as we go." A catastrophic oil spill from a collapsed storage tank last month near the Arctic city of Norilsk has also partly blamed on melting permafrost. In 2011, part of a residential building in Yakutsk, a town in the Sakha Republic, actually collapsed due to the thawing of the frozen ground. The ground surface heats up intensively. The nights are hot; the air doesn't have time to cool and continues to heat up for several days. Scientists agree that the spike is indicative of a much bigger global warming trend. Before you go! Recommended:  Earth Matters. Nature And Us: What Was, What’s Left: Hope? Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about the effect of climate change in your neighborhood? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Climate Change: China Floods The Arctic On Fire
Climate Change: China Floods The Arctic On Fire
Coronavirus 2020: Strange Times And New Monsters
Another article on the Coronavirus! As if there hasn’t been enough written about this pandemic that managed to shut down public life on six continents. Antarctica has been the only one spared thus far. Although they might have more significant issues to deal with, earlier this year, Antarctic temperatures soared to 18.5 degrees Celsius, a heat record. These temperatures event has led to an unprecedented loss of ice and quite a few headaches for locals. Strange Times And New Monsters No, this is not meant to be an article lamenting the loss of that precious ice or bring to mind an image of a lonely polar bear floating on a single sheet of ice that has broken away from the mass. However, I do want to highlight the dangers of what is happening down south, in particular how it correlates to the Coronavirus. But how? You just said that Antarctica had been spared? Recommended:  Coronavirus: Real-Time Laboratory For Urban Life Bacteria From Decades Ago Trapped In The Ice Hear me out. There has been extensive research on the consequences of the Antarctic ice caps and Tibetan glaciers melting. One recent piece of research, in particular, stands out. It attempts to isolate the bacterial population of ice cores to learn about bacteria and diseases which the world has been facing in the past. The layers of ice function like the growth rings of trees, acting as a time capsule for a specific point in time. {youtube}                                                 Scientists Wake Up Ancient Viruses Unknown to Medicine While the research in question, executed by scientists from the Ohio State University, attempted to find out more about the diseases plaguing this earth up to 15,000 years ago, they found something far more worrying. Out of the 33 different viral populations they managed to isolate, they were only able to link 5 to known genera. Anthrax bacteria, computer illustration So there are 28 unknown viral populations, quite literally trapped in the ice like a perfectly preserved wooly haired mammoth. I repeat, 28 new viruses that we, in the modern world, have never encountered before. Out of these 28, more than half displayed infectious properties, meaning that they would be able to infect several hosts and spread from there. Recommended:  Coronavirus: Symptoms Flu And Climate Change New Monsters: Frozen But Not Yet Dead These samples looking for bacterial populations were only taken from one specific region, in a minimal number. This means that there could, no, scratch that - there will be many more bacterial strains hiding out in other parts of the Antarctic ice cover. Now, this would not be so bad if we were not currently well-underway in melting away large parts of this ice, courtesy of global warming. One of the core characteristics of viruses and bacteria is that they are not affected nor destroyed by cold, meaning that they could theoretically be preserved for tens of thousands, or even hundreds of thousands, of years. Photo by: Michael Martin The keyword here is ‘theoretically.’ Researchers are not yet sure what will happen if the ice holding those bacterial populations melts. It might just mean that they go to waste, just like the rest of this substantial frozen archive of the world that gives us a great insight into the past. This is already a disaster for science, as the equivalent of the entire National Archives going up in flames. Or, worse, it could mean that pathogens are released in the environment and gain a foothold again. New Diseases To Emerge The latter admittedly sounds like a near-apocalyptic event, involving an unknown deadly disease from the past being released on our population and killing millions before someone even realizes what disease it is. Or, worse, finding out that we simply do not yet have a test, vaccine, or cure that would protect us. Recommended: Climate Change And Viruses: Do Threats Converge? Is it realistic? Who knows, perhaps not. But if you would have told the world a year ago that we would be living in this surreal Corona-stricken world full of previously unheard of restrictions, they sure would have thought you to be mad as well. Before you go! Recommended:  Climate Change Causes Nature To Change: The World Affected Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about the change in wildlife? Click on  'Re g ister'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Another article on the Coronavirus! As if there hasn’t been enough written about this pandemic that managed to shut down public life on six continents. Antarctica has been the only one spared thus far. Although they might have more significant issues to deal with, earlier this year, Antarctic temperatures soared to 18.5 degrees Celsius, a heat record. These temperatures event has led to an unprecedented loss of ice and quite a few headaches for locals. Strange Times And New Monsters No, this is not meant to be an article lamenting the loss of that precious ice or bring to mind an image of a lonely polar bear floating on a single sheet of ice that has broken away from the mass. However, I do want to highlight the dangers of what is happening down south, in particular how it correlates to the Coronavirus. But how? You just said that Antarctica had been spared? Recommended:  Coronavirus: Real-Time Laboratory For Urban Life Bacteria From Decades Ago Trapped In The Ice Hear me out. There has been extensive research on the consequences of the Antarctic ice caps and Tibetan glaciers melting. One recent piece of research, in particular, stands out. It attempts to isolate the bacterial population of ice cores to learn about bacteria and diseases which the world has been facing in the past. The layers of ice function like the growth rings of trees, acting as a time capsule for a specific point in time. {youtube}                                                 Scientists Wake Up Ancient Viruses Unknown to Medicine While the research in question, executed by scientists from the Ohio State University, attempted to find out more about the diseases plaguing this earth up to 15,000 years ago, they found something far more worrying. Out of the 33 different viral populations they managed to isolate, they were only able to link 5 to known genera. Anthrax bacteria, computer illustration So there are 28 unknown viral populations, quite literally trapped in the ice like a perfectly preserved wooly haired mammoth. I repeat, 28 new viruses that we, in the modern world, have never encountered before. Out of these 28, more than half displayed infectious properties, meaning that they would be able to infect several hosts and spread from there. Recommended:  Coronavirus: Symptoms Flu And Climate Change New Monsters: Frozen But Not Yet Dead These samples looking for bacterial populations were only taken from one specific region, in a minimal number. This means that there could, no, scratch that - there will be many more bacterial strains hiding out in other parts of the Antarctic ice cover. Now, this would not be so bad if we were not currently well-underway in melting away large parts of this ice, courtesy of global warming. One of the core characteristics of viruses and bacteria is that they are not affected nor destroyed by cold, meaning that they could theoretically be preserved for tens of thousands, or even hundreds of thousands, of years. Photo by: Michael Martin The keyword here is ‘theoretically.’ Researchers are not yet sure what will happen if the ice holding those bacterial populations melts. It might just mean that they go to waste, just like the rest of this substantial frozen archive of the world that gives us a great insight into the past. This is already a disaster for science, as the equivalent of the entire National Archives going up in flames. Or, worse, it could mean that pathogens are released in the environment and gain a foothold again. New Diseases To Emerge The latter admittedly sounds like a near-apocalyptic event, involving an unknown deadly disease from the past being released on our population and killing millions before someone even realizes what disease it is. Or, worse, finding out that we simply do not yet have a test, vaccine, or cure that would protect us. Recommended: Climate Change And Viruses: Do Threats Converge? Is it realistic? Who knows, perhaps not. But if you would have told the world a year ago that we would be living in this surreal Corona-stricken world full of previously unheard of restrictions, they sure would have thought you to be mad as well. Before you go! Recommended:  Climate Change Causes Nature To Change: The World Affected Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about the change in wildlife? Click on  'Re g ister'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Coronavirus 2020: Strange Times And New Monsters
Climate

Climate change! Currently, the most discussed topic in the world. Climate change occurs when changes in Earth's climate system result in new weather patterns that last for at least a few decades, and maybe for millions of years. Climate change can also result from ‘external forcing’ and include changes in solar output and volcanism.

Climate News And Human Activities

Human activities can also influence our climate. Debates, posts, and answers on (social) platforms about humanity's role in the climate change process regularly lead to heated discussions.

If there was an urge to develop a sustainable way of living solutions and share these topics globally, it’s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers, and influencers to write about tiny houses, your experiences, and expectations for the future at home and globally. 

Boost Global Sustainability Now, that’s what you can do together with WhatsOrb. What's in for me?

Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations