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UN Shows Human Devastating Impact On Nature: Worldwide
Meanwhile, almost everyone knows that we as humans have a major impact on nature. But according to a new upsetting report from the UN - this impact is even more devastating than expected. This report will also scare people who were never aware of nature and the environment, hence the conclusion: we kill species at the speed of light, destroy the ecosystems of our planet in an instant and not do we only destroy our nature, we will ultimately destroy ourselves. Fortunately, every enormous and dark cloud has a little silver lining: it is not too late to change. Nature globally declines at rates unprecedented in human history The shocking report from the UN, from the Intergovernmental Science Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services department, to be precise, immediately warns us on the first page: “Nature is declining globally at rates unprecedented in human history – and the rate of species extinctions is accelerating, with grave impacts on people around the world now likely.” Who then makes these statements? Not the least, because the report is composed of research from more than hundreds of experts from different countries. 15,000 scientific and government sources were also consulted when compiling the report, which will be published in its entirety later this year. A baleful picture According to the Intergovernmental Science Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) Chair, Sir Robert Watson, the IPBES Global Assessment, from a wide range of different fields of knowledge, presents an baleful picture. “The health of ecosystems on which we and all other species depend is deteriorating more rapidly than ever. We are eroding the very foundations of our economies, livelihoods, food security, health and quality of life worldwide,” he says. Five reasons for this major human impact on nature The authors of the study note five reasons why an enormous change in nature is taking place. According to the report, these are those reasons, in order of the most harmful: changes in land and sea use, direct exploitation of organisms, climate change, pollution and invasive alien species. The numbers don't lie: the report states that approximately 66 percent of the marine environment has been "seriously changed" by human action. More than three-quarters of a quarter of the land environment is added. In addition, more than 400 million tons of heavy metals and other industrial waste are dumped into the waters of our world every year. The plastic pollution on earth has even increased tenfold since 1980. That creates 'dead zones' in the oceans: the area combined is larger than the entire United Kingdom. To name a few more: to produce our food, we need nearly 75 percent of the world's freshwater supplies and more than a third of the land area to maintain our crops and livestock. More than a million plant- and animal species will be extinct More than a million plant and animal species are threatened with extinction, according to the devastating UN report. That can even happen within decades, and that is all due to our behaviour. The research results are shocking: 40 percent of the amphibians will eventually die out, as will 33 percent of the marine mammals on our planet. Also, 10 percent of the insect species that are still alive today will no longer be there within a few decades. 560 domesticated species of mammals – yes, pets - that will be extinct by 2016, with at least 1,000 more threatened. How shocking… And even more shocking: those are not all the numbers from this distressing VN rapport. In total, up to 1 million of the species living on our earth are threatened with extinction. “Biodiversity and nature’s contributions to people are our common heritage and humanity’s most important life-supporting ‘safety net.' But our safety net is stretched almost to breaking point,” said Professor Sandra Díaz, co-chair of the IPBES Global Assessment. Transformative change: local to global But: IPBES Chair Sir Robert Watson also adds that the report tells us it is not too late to make a change. "only if we start now at every level from local to global,” Watson said. “Through ‘transformative change,’ nature can still be conserved, restored and used sustainably – this is also key to meeting most other global goals. By transformative change, we mean a fundamental, system-wide reorganization across technological, economic and social factors, including paradigms, goals and values.” How can you, as a person and a consumer, contribute to a better world where no million species of animals and plants will die out? Live consciously, look carefully at what you buy (for example, beef and make-up products, fuel and cleaning products with palm oil really do not help) and take the environment into account in your voting behaviour. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/social-sustainabilty
Meanwhile, almost everyone knows that we as humans have a major impact on nature. But according to a new upsetting report from the UN - this impact is even more devastating than expected. This report will also scare people who were never aware of nature and the environment, hence the conclusion: we kill species at the speed of light, destroy the ecosystems of our planet in an instant and not do we only destroy our nature, we will ultimately destroy ourselves. Fortunately, every enormous and dark cloud has a little silver lining: it is not too late to change. Nature globally declines at rates unprecedented in human history The shocking report from the UN, from the Intergovernmental Science Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services department, to be precise, immediately warns us on the first page: “Nature is declining globally at rates unprecedented in human history – and the rate of species extinctions is accelerating, with grave impacts on people around the world now likely.” Who then makes these statements? Not the least, because the report is composed of research from more than hundreds of experts from different countries. 15,000 scientific and government sources were also consulted when compiling the report, which will be published in its entirety later this year. A baleful picture According to the Intergovernmental Science Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) Chair, Sir Robert Watson, the IPBES Global Assessment, from a wide range of different fields of knowledge, presents an baleful picture. “The health of ecosystems on which we and all other species depend is deteriorating more rapidly than ever. We are eroding the very foundations of our economies, livelihoods, food security, health and quality of life worldwide,” he says. Five reasons for this major human impact on nature The authors of the study note five reasons why an enormous change in nature is taking place. According to the report, these are those reasons, in order of the most harmful: changes in land and sea use, direct exploitation of organisms, climate change, pollution and invasive alien species. The numbers don't lie: the report states that approximately 66 percent of the marine environment has been "seriously changed" by human action. More than three-quarters of a quarter of the land environment is added. In addition, more than 400 million tons of heavy metals and other industrial waste are dumped into the waters of our world every year. The plastic pollution on earth has even increased tenfold since 1980. That creates 'dead zones' in the oceans: the area combined is larger than the entire United Kingdom. To name a few more: to produce our food, we need nearly 75 percent of the world's freshwater supplies and more than a third of the land area to maintain our crops and livestock. More than a million plant- and animal species will be extinct More than a million plant and animal species are threatened with extinction, according to the devastating UN report. That can even happen within decades, and that is all due to our behaviour. The research results are shocking: 40 percent of the amphibians will eventually die out, as will 33 percent of the marine mammals on our planet. Also, 10 percent of the insect species that are still alive today will no longer be there within a few decades. 560 domesticated species of mammals – yes, pets - that will be extinct by 2016, with at least 1,000 more threatened. How shocking… And even more shocking: those are not all the numbers from this distressing VN rapport. In total, up to 1 million of the species living on our earth are threatened with extinction. “Biodiversity and nature’s contributions to people are our common heritage and humanity’s most important life-supporting ‘safety net.' But our safety net is stretched almost to breaking point,” said Professor Sandra Díaz, co-chair of the IPBES Global Assessment. Transformative change: local to global But: IPBES Chair Sir Robert Watson also adds that the report tells us it is not too late to make a change. "only if we start now at every level from local to global,” Watson said. “Through ‘transformative change,’ nature can still be conserved, restored and used sustainably – this is also key to meeting most other global goals. By transformative change, we mean a fundamental, system-wide reorganization across technological, economic and social factors, including paradigms, goals and values.” How can you, as a person and a consumer, contribute to a better world where no million species of animals and plants will die out? Live consciously, look carefully at what you buy (for example, beef and make-up products, fuel and cleaning products with palm oil really do not help) and take the environment into account in your voting behaviour. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/social-sustainabilty
UN Shows Human Devastating Impact On Nature: Worldwide
UN Shows Human Devastating Impact On Nature: Worldwide
Water War Between India, Pakistan: Kashmir and Jammu
All over the world conflict situations arise between countries because people are confronted with decreasing natural resources like water as a result of climate change. In the Middle East and in Africa there are several examples of countries where climate change is seen as the cause of violent conflicts. But there is also a major conflict in Asia due to the lack of water resources - which can even involve nuclear weapons. India and Pakistan are directly opposite each other. The problem? Water. The Indus and its tributaries in the Indus Waters Treaty Pakistan and India share a number of important waters, the Indus and its tributaries - a crucial lifeline for both countries. The Indus River, along with its tributaries, is more than 2880 kilometres long. The river flows from north to south India and then ends up in Pakistan. In September 1960, the countries signed the Indus Waters Treaty. This treaty laid down how to deal with waters that start in India but are crucial for Pakistan. Please note: when the signatures were placed under the Indus Waters Treaty, the countries were still relatively peaceful with each other. The World Bank mediated this Indus Waters Treaty, where the six major rivers of the Indus basin were divided between India and Pakistan. The Baes, the Sutlej and the Ravi - the easternmost rivers - were given to India, and the western rivers, the Chenab, the Jhelum and the Indus, are under the control of Pakistan. That seems like a good distribution, but there is a big problem: the waters to which Pakistan is entitled largely flow through Kashmir, which is governed by India and widely controversial. Will the Indus Waters Treaty survive the dispute over the Kashmir region? The dispute over the Kashmir region has been an enormous conflict between India and Pakistan for more than six decades. After the division of the British Indies in 1947, both India and Pakistan claim the former princely state of Kashmir and Jammu. China is a third party in this struggle. The conflict escalated in three wars and several other armed conflicts. Even after these wars and other hostilities, the Indus Water Treaty remained standing, but how long will it take? Pakistan has accused India of throttling its water supply and violating the IWT by constructing dams over the rivers flowing into Pakistan from Kashmir. “Any country with nuclear weapons, if they’re backed into a corner because they have no water — that’s really dangerous,” said Jeff Nesbit, author and executive director of non-profit climate communication organisation Climate Nexus. The Indus is crucial for surviving For Pakistan, the Indus river and its tributaries are crucial waters for surviving. Most of the country depends on the waters as an essential source of freshwater - it also is necessary for ninety percent of the agricultural industry in Pakistan. Without this water, the industry will fall apart. Sherry Rehman, Parliamentary Leader of the left-wing opposition Pakistan People’s Party (PPP) in the Senate tells that "water security has become a regional security threat.” She says: “We are now facing challenges brought about by climate change which were not a primary focus during the negotiations for the Indus Water Treaty.” A 2018 report from the International Monetary Fund ranked Pakistan third among countries facing severe water shortages. When the rapidly melting glaciers in the Himalayas , which feed the Indus waters, eventually disappear as predicted, the dwindling rivers will be slashed even further. The threat of a water war The Indus Waters Treaty almost broke down in September 2016. India accused Pakistani soldiers of a violent attack in Kashmir. The country threatened with the unilateral denunciation of the treaty. “Had they done that, it would have triggered a water war, it would have triggered an actual war. “Never mind a nuclear strike or a military strike, if they were to actually terminate the Indus Water Treaty, that’s much more dangerous to Pakistan’s survival, because they would have no way to grow food. And then they would be relying on food imports at a time when their population is exploding. So that particular incident was really dangerous.” Nesbit states that water issues between India and Pakistan have the potential to become the most deadly climate change-attributed conflict in the world. Why has India not yet lifted the Indus Waters Treaty? That is all because of the third party in this conflict: China. China can do exactly the same with India if they block the water flows to Pakistan. Because of China, the country can face exactly the same fate. That’s why China’s watching the India-Pakistan water wars quite closely, to see the decisions that India makes.  https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/climate/natural
All over the world conflict situations arise between countries because people are confronted with decreasing natural resources like water as a result of climate change. In the Middle East and in Africa there are several examples of countries where climate change is seen as the cause of violent conflicts. But there is also a major conflict in Asia due to the lack of water resources - which can even involve nuclear weapons. India and Pakistan are directly opposite each other. The problem? Water. The Indus and its tributaries in the Indus Waters Treaty Pakistan and India share a number of important waters, the Indus and its tributaries - a crucial lifeline for both countries. The Indus River, along with its tributaries, is more than 2880 kilometres long. The river flows from north to south India and then ends up in Pakistan. In September 1960, the countries signed the Indus Waters Treaty. This treaty laid down how to deal with waters that start in India but are crucial for Pakistan. Please note: when the signatures were placed under the Indus Waters Treaty, the countries were still relatively peaceful with each other. The World Bank mediated this Indus Waters Treaty, where the six major rivers of the Indus basin were divided between India and Pakistan. The Baes, the Sutlej and the Ravi - the easternmost rivers - were given to India, and the western rivers, the Chenab, the Jhelum and the Indus, are under the control of Pakistan. That seems like a good distribution, but there is a big problem: the waters to which Pakistan is entitled largely flow through Kashmir, which is governed by India and widely controversial. Will the Indus Waters Treaty survive the dispute over the Kashmir region? The dispute over the Kashmir region has been an enormous conflict between India and Pakistan for more than six decades. After the division of the British Indies in 1947, both India and Pakistan claim the former princely state of Kashmir and Jammu. China is a third party in this struggle. The conflict escalated in three wars and several other armed conflicts. Even after these wars and other hostilities, the Indus Water Treaty remained standing, but how long will it take? Pakistan has accused India of throttling its water supply and violating the IWT by constructing dams over the rivers flowing into Pakistan from Kashmir. “Any country with nuclear weapons, if they’re backed into a corner because they have no water — that’s really dangerous,” said Jeff Nesbit, author and executive director of non-profit climate communication organisation Climate Nexus. The Indus is crucial for surviving For Pakistan, the Indus river and its tributaries are crucial waters for surviving. Most of the country depends on the waters as an essential source of freshwater - it also is necessary for ninety percent of the agricultural industry in Pakistan. Without this water, the industry will fall apart. Sherry Rehman, Parliamentary Leader of the left-wing opposition Pakistan People’s Party (PPP) in the Senate tells that "water security has become a regional security threat.” She says: “We are now facing challenges brought about by climate change which were not a primary focus during the negotiations for the Indus Water Treaty.” A 2018 report from the International Monetary Fund ranked Pakistan third among countries facing severe water shortages. When the rapidly melting glaciers in the Himalayas , which feed the Indus waters, eventually disappear as predicted, the dwindling rivers will be slashed even further. The threat of a water war The Indus Waters Treaty almost broke down in September 2016. India accused Pakistani soldiers of a violent attack in Kashmir. The country threatened with the unilateral denunciation of the treaty. “Had they done that, it would have triggered a water war, it would have triggered an actual war. “Never mind a nuclear strike or a military strike, if they were to actually terminate the Indus Water Treaty, that’s much more dangerous to Pakistan’s survival, because they would have no way to grow food. And then they would be relying on food imports at a time when their population is exploding. So that particular incident was really dangerous.” Nesbit states that water issues between India and Pakistan have the potential to become the most deadly climate change-attributed conflict in the world. Why has India not yet lifted the Indus Waters Treaty? That is all because of the third party in this conflict: China. China can do exactly the same with India if they block the water flows to Pakistan. Because of China, the country can face exactly the same fate. That’s why China’s watching the India-Pakistan water wars quite closely, to see the decisions that India makes.  https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/climate/natural
Water War Between India, Pakistan: Kashmir and Jammu
Water War Between India, Pakistan: Kashmir and Jammu
Climate Change: Water Scarcity, Hunger, Agriculture And Food
Water: we can’t live without it. Of course, people need it to survive, but water is also the throbbing vein of nature: vegetation, soil and lakes are dependent on fluids. Without water, our agricultural production and food security will collapse, and so will our nutritional security. That’s why we are facing an enormous problem: our freshwater resources are dwindling at an alarming rate. The UN reported that almost half of the population can be affected by water scarcity by 2050. Meanwhile, the world´s population keeps on growing, with higher living standards than ever before. How can we stop this growing water scarcity? ZeroHunger First, it is important to understand the extent to which water is used in our existence. Did you know, for example, that we consume much more water through the food we eat then what we drink? According to an article from the Food and Algriculture Organization of the United Nations, we need 2.000 to 5.000 litres of water to produce to food consumed daily by one person. The FAO has evidence that suggests that two-thirds of the world population could be living in water-stressed countries by 2025 if current consumption patterns continue. “To achieve a #ZeroHunger world by 2030, we need to take action now,” the organisation states. Choose your crops wisely Agriculture is and will continue to be one of the main causes of water scarcity – one of the bigges, actually. The FAO states that farming accounts for almost 70 percent of all water withdrawals, and up to 95 percent in some developing countries. The choice for other crops is an answer to fight water scarcity because of agriculture, according to the FAO. For example, pulses crops have a small water footprint. For one kilogram of lentils, there is 1250 litres of water necessary, comparing to 13.000 litres for the same amount of beef. Use wastewater to decrease the risk of famine We are facing climate change. As a result of the warming global environment, more water will be needed to keep food production going. On the other hand, there will be more frequent and more serious droughts that will further increase water scarcity. The solution? According to FAO, we need to take action to harvest and recycle our freshwater reserves. We can use wastewater to decrease the risk of famine and socioeconomic disruption. The efficiency of water in food value chain We have yet a lot to learn about the efficient use of water in are food value chain. According to FAO, “key decisions such as site selection, technology and suppliers are frequently made without taking into account the impacts on water resources, especially when water is not a limiting factor either in quantities and/or in price”. Food waste is water waste Last but not least: food waste equals wasted water. To fight water scarcity, we have to fight wasted food. Let’s remember that if we throw away food, we also throw away the sources that made this food – water! According to FAO, “one-third of all the food produced is either lost or wasted each year — that translates into a volume of wasted water that is equal to around three times the volume of Lake Geneva”. The solution to foodwaste is simple: stop buying more than what you need. You can even go dumpster diving , to save the environment and some money! As FAO says: “The issue of water scarcity is at the very core of sustainable development.” Without water, we can't grow our food. Fortunately, by changing our habits we can fight water scarcity. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/climate
Water: we can’t live without it. Of course, people need it to survive, but water is also the throbbing vein of nature: vegetation, soil and lakes are dependent on fluids. Without water, our agricultural production and food security will collapse, and so will our nutritional security. That’s why we are facing an enormous problem: our freshwater resources are dwindling at an alarming rate. The UN reported that almost half of the population can be affected by water scarcity by 2050. Meanwhile, the world´s population keeps on growing, with higher living standards than ever before. How can we stop this growing water scarcity? ZeroHunger First, it is important to understand the extent to which water is used in our existence. Did you know, for example, that we consume much more water through the food we eat then what we drink? According to an article from the Food and Algriculture Organization of the United Nations, we need 2.000 to 5.000 litres of water to produce to food consumed daily by one person. The FAO has evidence that suggests that two-thirds of the world population could be living in water-stressed countries by 2025 if current consumption patterns continue. “To achieve a #ZeroHunger world by 2030, we need to take action now,” the organisation states. Choose your crops wisely Agriculture is and will continue to be one of the main causes of water scarcity – one of the bigges, actually. The FAO states that farming accounts for almost 70 percent of all water withdrawals, and up to 95 percent in some developing countries. The choice for other crops is an answer to fight water scarcity because of agriculture, according to the FAO. For example, pulses crops have a small water footprint. For one kilogram of lentils, there is 1250 litres of water necessary, comparing to 13.000 litres for the same amount of beef. Use wastewater to decrease the risk of famine We are facing climate change. As a result of the warming global environment, more water will be needed to keep food production going. On the other hand, there will be more frequent and more serious droughts that will further increase water scarcity. The solution? According to FAO, we need to take action to harvest and recycle our freshwater reserves. We can use wastewater to decrease the risk of famine and socioeconomic disruption. The efficiency of water in food value chain We have yet a lot to learn about the efficient use of water in are food value chain. According to FAO, “key decisions such as site selection, technology and suppliers are frequently made without taking into account the impacts on water resources, especially when water is not a limiting factor either in quantities and/or in price”. Food waste is water waste Last but not least: food waste equals wasted water. To fight water scarcity, we have to fight wasted food. Let’s remember that if we throw away food, we also throw away the sources that made this food – water! According to FAO, “one-third of all the food produced is either lost or wasted each year — that translates into a volume of wasted water that is equal to around three times the volume of Lake Geneva”. The solution to foodwaste is simple: stop buying more than what you need. You can even go dumpster diving , to save the environment and some money! As FAO says: “The issue of water scarcity is at the very core of sustainable development.” Without water, we can't grow our food. Fortunately, by changing our habits we can fight water scarcity. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/climate
Climate Change: Water Scarcity, Hunger, Agriculture And Food
Climate Change: Water Scarcity, Hunger, Agriculture And Food
Zero Emission Day: No Fossil Fuel Transport Worldwide
Zero Emissions Day (ZeDay) is the global 24-hour moratorium on the use of fossil fuels. This movement was started to “give the planet one day off a year” and is organized in the month September. There are 4 simple guidelines: Don’t use or burn oil, gas, or coal. Minimize or eliminate use of electricity generated by fossil fuels. Don’t put anyone in harm’s way: All essential and emergency services operate normally. Do your best, have fun and enjoy the day ZeDay can also be used as an opportunity to raise awareness of the amounts of fossil fuels that are used worldwide every single day. We are going to use this opportunity to share with you some interesting and lesser-known ways in which you could minimize your carbon footprint on the day itself and long-term. What you can do today… Leave your car and/or  public transport pass at home and walk, bike or skate to work - whatever method of transportation you use, make sure that it doesn’t require any fuel or electricity. And who knows, perhaps you will discover exciting hidden gems somewhere you thought you knew so well! Minimize your appliance use on ZeDay. Have a lovely candle-lit dinner, read a book, play a board game or two, practice drawing (like you were planning to do for the past 3 years) – get creative! Plant a tree. Or maybe a bush, or some flowers, or a small herb garden on your balcony – the point is, add more plants! We all know that plants absorb carbon dioxide and transform it into oxygen, so this is a simple way to undo some of the damage that we have already done to the planet and make it at least a bit prettier. Switch over to paper-less billing. Paper bills contribute to carbon emissions in several ways: trees get cut down (which reduces the amount of natural CO2 “converters”), then they are used to manufacture paper (a process that releases many harmful emissions) and then this paper goes in a big adventure full of emissions. Some of it gets transformed into envelopes, some of it gets sent to big warehouses, from where it travels to companies and governmental offices so that they can print it and send it to you. Most of the transport that is used in this process isn’t “green”, so it takes a lot of emissions for you to get a message. Luckily, in the modern age of Internet, many companies and governmental braches allow you to receive all correspondence from them online. Take 10 minutes of your day (yes, you are allow to circumvent the “minimize your appliance use” rule for this!) to make a change that will help you reduce your carbon footprint in the years to come. … And what you can start doing tomorrow Switch to more energy-efficient appliances. This is perhaps an advice that you will see most often, but it is one that can make a lot of difference. You could save a large portion of your energy bill by switching to LED light bulbs and high efficiency appliances. Stop buying fast fashion. Fast fashion is problematic in more ways than one, and production of excessive amount of low quality clothing, transporting it from overseas and short life cycle of the items are just few ways in which this industry plays a big role in increasing carbon emissions. There are better alternatives out there: we have previously discussed the circular fashion movement and introduced you to different technologies that could become the future of sustainable clothing. Being sustainable is trendy! Speaking of circular economy – next time you are looking for something for your house, stop by your nearest charity or thrift shop. There are many amazing items there that can still be used for decades to come; all it takes is some tender loving care. There are also a lot of unique items to be found, they truly don’t make them like they used to anymore. Get some solar chargers to use for your phone, tablet and other small devices. These days there is a vast selection of external batteries, backpacks and even tents that are powered with  solar energy. There are also solar-powered e-bikes, wireless keyboards, Bluetooth speakers and lights in case you want to take in one step further (or simply enjoy spending time in the sun). Vote for greener energy. This is perhaps the most crucial tip of all – it is important for governments and companies to know that we care about where our energy comes from. Make sure to support green causes and if possible don’t purchase from companies that are against making our planet a better place. What other ways do you know to reduce your carbon footprint? Share your tips in the comments! https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/transportation/solar https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/energy/solar
Zero Emissions Day (ZeDay) is the global 24-hour moratorium on the use of fossil fuels. This movement was started to “give the planet one day off a year” and is organized in the month September. There are 4 simple guidelines: Don’t use or burn oil, gas, or coal. Minimize or eliminate use of electricity generated by fossil fuels. Don’t put anyone in harm’s way: All essential and emergency services operate normally. Do your best, have fun and enjoy the day ZeDay can also be used as an opportunity to raise awareness of the amounts of fossil fuels that are used worldwide every single day. We are going to use this opportunity to share with you some interesting and lesser-known ways in which you could minimize your carbon footprint on the day itself and long-term. What you can do today… Leave your car and/or  public transport pass at home and walk, bike or skate to work - whatever method of transportation you use, make sure that it doesn’t require any fuel or electricity. And who knows, perhaps you will discover exciting hidden gems somewhere you thought you knew so well! Minimize your appliance use on ZeDay. Have a lovely candle-lit dinner, read a book, play a board game or two, practice drawing (like you were planning to do for the past 3 years) – get creative! Plant a tree. Or maybe a bush, or some flowers, or a small herb garden on your balcony – the point is, add more plants! We all know that plants absorb carbon dioxide and transform it into oxygen, so this is a simple way to undo some of the damage that we have already done to the planet and make it at least a bit prettier. Switch over to paper-less billing. Paper bills contribute to carbon emissions in several ways: trees get cut down (which reduces the amount of natural CO2 “converters”), then they are used to manufacture paper (a process that releases many harmful emissions) and then this paper goes in a big adventure full of emissions. Some of it gets transformed into envelopes, some of it gets sent to big warehouses, from where it travels to companies and governmental offices so that they can print it and send it to you. Most of the transport that is used in this process isn’t “green”, so it takes a lot of emissions for you to get a message. Luckily, in the modern age of Internet, many companies and governmental braches allow you to receive all correspondence from them online. Take 10 minutes of your day (yes, you are allow to circumvent the “minimize your appliance use” rule for this!) to make a change that will help you reduce your carbon footprint in the years to come. … And what you can start doing tomorrow Switch to more energy-efficient appliances. This is perhaps an advice that you will see most often, but it is one that can make a lot of difference. You could save a large portion of your energy bill by switching to LED light bulbs and high efficiency appliances. Stop buying fast fashion. Fast fashion is problematic in more ways than one, and production of excessive amount of low quality clothing, transporting it from overseas and short life cycle of the items are just few ways in which this industry plays a big role in increasing carbon emissions. There are better alternatives out there: we have previously discussed the circular fashion movement and introduced you to different technologies that could become the future of sustainable clothing. Being sustainable is trendy! Speaking of circular economy – next time you are looking for something for your house, stop by your nearest charity or thrift shop. There are many amazing items there that can still be used for decades to come; all it takes is some tender loving care. There are also a lot of unique items to be found, they truly don’t make them like they used to anymore. Get some solar chargers to use for your phone, tablet and other small devices. These days there is a vast selection of external batteries, backpacks and even tents that are powered with  solar energy. There are also solar-powered e-bikes, wireless keyboards, Bluetooth speakers and lights in case you want to take in one step further (or simply enjoy spending time in the sun). Vote for greener energy. This is perhaps the most crucial tip of all – it is important for governments and companies to know that we care about where our energy comes from. Make sure to support green causes and if possible don’t purchase from companies that are against making our planet a better place. What other ways do you know to reduce your carbon footprint? Share your tips in the comments! https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/transportation/solar https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/energy/solar
Zero Emission Day: No Fossil Fuel Transport Worldwide
Zero Emission Day: No Fossil Fuel Transport Worldwide
Climate Change: Antarctica Is Melting Says NASA
We have all heard that the sea level is rising, but many feel that this change is insignificant, almost negligible. Indeed, this change has so far been happening very slowly – since 1900, the sea has risen only about 8 inches (20.3 cm) in total. However, more than a third of that increase has occurred in the past 25 years. So why is that happening and what can we expect in the years to come? Antarctica’s ice is disappearing at alarming rates Recent study done by the IMBIE (Ice Sheet Mass Balance Inter-comparison Exercise) team, an international collaboration of polar scientists, has shown that Antarctica is quickly becoming one of the largest contributors to sea level rise. In 2012, it was estimated that  Antartic ice melt was causing global sea levels to rise by 0.2mm a year – however, this number has increased to 0.6mm per year. This threefold increase is very significant, considering that it only happened within 5 years’ time. In order to understand why the ice is melting so much faster, the scientists had to study the changes in all 3 areas of Antarctica’s ice sheet: the Antarctic peninsula, West Antarctica and East Antarctica. It appears that West Antarctica has lost the highest volume of ice, thus being the region to contribute most to the sea level change. The reason why West Antarctica is most susceptible to melting is because it is largely made up of glaciers that are located below sea level. Traditionally, when thinking of ice melting, we usually imagine it melting from above as it gets heated from the air, sunlight and infrared energy from the atmosphere. However, recent studies have shown that most of the melting occurs from below – and it is causing more melting. The devastating melting cycle When glaciers melt, they release fresh water into the ocean, making the surface around them less salty and therefore less dense. This slows down or in some cases even prevents natural mixing of the ocean. During winter, the cooler water from the surface cannot mix with warmer water below, allowing the latter to retain its heat and melt the glaciers from below. More fresh water gets released and this cycle repeats itself again, each time accelerating the rates at which the glaciers melt. Currently, ice shelves hold the Antarctic ice sheet in place. The trapped warm waters flowing underneath the shelves can break them down into smaller pieces, making them unable to support the ice sheet. Melting of the ice sheet would lead to catastrophic consequences – West Antarctic part ice sheet alone would raise the sea levels by more than 3 meters (9,8 feet). While West Antarctic is currently the biggest concern, it seems like East Antarctic is also being affected by this devastating cycle. Some of its largest glaciers are starting to show signs of melting and they have the potential of raising sea levels by 4,8 meters (16 feet). This problem is still in its early stages, but it obviously causes a lot of concerns about the future. NASA to launch an ice-monitoring satellite Many islands and coastal areas have already been affected by the sea level rise and accurate predictions could help minimize the negative impacts. In order to help scientists make these predictions, NASA is launching ICESat-2 – a new satellite that will measure the changing heights of Earth’s polar ice using 6 lasers. These lasers will send 10’000 pulses per second, allowing for the measurements to be taken with incredible precision. The ICESat-2 is scheduled to launch on 15 th  of September and the mission has been slated for 3 years, but it can be extended. All of the researchers agree on one thing – sea level is rising at accelerated rate and it is likely directly linked to global warming. There is nothing we can do to reverse the sea level rise, but we can slow down climate change before it is too late. Have you experienced the effects of sea level rise? Share your opinion with us in the comments! https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/climate/general
We have all heard that the sea level is rising, but many feel that this change is insignificant, almost negligible. Indeed, this change has so far been happening very slowly – since 1900, the sea has risen only about 8 inches (20.3 cm) in total. However, more than a third of that increase has occurred in the past 25 years. So why is that happening and what can we expect in the years to come? Antarctica’s ice is disappearing at alarming rates Recent study done by the IMBIE (Ice Sheet Mass Balance Inter-comparison Exercise) team, an international collaboration of polar scientists, has shown that Antarctica is quickly becoming one of the largest contributors to sea level rise. In 2012, it was estimated that  Antartic ice melt was causing global sea levels to rise by 0.2mm a year – however, this number has increased to 0.6mm per year. This threefold increase is very significant, considering that it only happened within 5 years’ time. In order to understand why the ice is melting so much faster, the scientists had to study the changes in all 3 areas of Antarctica’s ice sheet: the Antarctic peninsula, West Antarctica and East Antarctica. It appears that West Antarctica has lost the highest volume of ice, thus being the region to contribute most to the sea level change. The reason why West Antarctica is most susceptible to melting is because it is largely made up of glaciers that are located below sea level. Traditionally, when thinking of ice melting, we usually imagine it melting from above as it gets heated from the air, sunlight and infrared energy from the atmosphere. However, recent studies have shown that most of the melting occurs from below – and it is causing more melting. The devastating melting cycle When glaciers melt, they release fresh water into the ocean, making the surface around them less salty and therefore less dense. This slows down or in some cases even prevents natural mixing of the ocean. During winter, the cooler water from the surface cannot mix with warmer water below, allowing the latter to retain its heat and melt the glaciers from below. More fresh water gets released and this cycle repeats itself again, each time accelerating the rates at which the glaciers melt. Currently, ice shelves hold the Antarctic ice sheet in place. The trapped warm waters flowing underneath the shelves can break them down into smaller pieces, making them unable to support the ice sheet. Melting of the ice sheet would lead to catastrophic consequences – West Antarctic part ice sheet alone would raise the sea levels by more than 3 meters (9,8 feet). While West Antarctic is currently the biggest concern, it seems like East Antarctic is also being affected by this devastating cycle. Some of its largest glaciers are starting to show signs of melting and they have the potential of raising sea levels by 4,8 meters (16 feet). This problem is still in its early stages, but it obviously causes a lot of concerns about the future. NASA to launch an ice-monitoring satellite Many islands and coastal areas have already been affected by the sea level rise and accurate predictions could help minimize the negative impacts. In order to help scientists make these predictions, NASA is launching ICESat-2 – a new satellite that will measure the changing heights of Earth’s polar ice using 6 lasers. These lasers will send 10’000 pulses per second, allowing for the measurements to be taken with incredible precision. The ICESat-2 is scheduled to launch on 15 th  of September and the mission has been slated for 3 years, but it can be extended. All of the researchers agree on one thing – sea level is rising at accelerated rate and it is likely directly linked to global warming. There is nothing we can do to reverse the sea level rise, but we can slow down climate change before it is too late. Have you experienced the effects of sea level rise? Share your opinion with us in the comments! https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/climate/general
Climate Change: Antarctica Is Melting Says NASA
Climate Change: Antarctica Is Melting Says NASA
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