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These promising e-scooter start-ups are taking over the Netherlands
Did you already spot them down the streets of your hometown? Perhaps you’ve recognised them whizzing past you, or seen them parked on the sidewalks. We’re talking about the e-scooter: this concept is taking over the Netherlands in 2019 – and beyond. The electric scooter frenzy is sky-rocketing, the demand for alternate energy is growing as days pass by. E-scooter: the perfect sustainable city transport The growing popularity of e-scooters is due to the compact body, with the small motor attached with the battery pack. Over time, without any doubt, these electric scooters have evolved into a significantly inexpensive, secure and dependable way of transportation for an tremendous amount of people. We are not the only ones to see this, the investment in micro-mobility start-ups went beyond one billion euros in 2018, according to research from DealRoom. Notably, the electric scooter craze began with Santa Monica-based Bird, which raised its Series-A in October 2017. The report also stated that consumers spend over 1,1 trillion dollar a year on transportation. But what about the Netherlands? These promising e-scooter start-ups are ready to take on Europe. Get ready to hit the road, e-scooter style! Felyx: solving current urban mobility issues  Felyx, based in the bicycle capital of the world (Amsterdam), offers shared e-scooters to solve current urban mobility issues. With over 400 e-scooters that you can locate and activate through an app, Felyx is well on their way to boost the Dutch sharing economy while being sustainable. Sharing is caring: Dott Dott is on a mission to improve European city life. The dockless e-scooters (and bikes) can be shared and are a convenient for short-distance travel. Sharing is caring! Dott, based in Amsterdam, has a most experienced team in mobility and tech in Europe. The start-up raised an initial investment of €20 million, co-led by EQT Ventures and Naspers. Dutch Tesla on Two Wheels; Etergo  Etergo is an automotive company that develops AppScooter, an electric smart vehicle, also known as the ‘Dutch Tesla on Two Wheels’. With Etergo’s e-scooter, you can stream music and take calls without even pulling out the smartphone. With a 7-inch LED touchscreen and the handlebar controls, you’re fully equipped to handle your digital activities. It is the world’s first scooter to run Android apps. The ultimate purpose of this e-scooter is to minimize distractions while travelling. Swheels2Go, an  e-scooter sharing platform SwheelS2Go is introducing sustainable, accessible, affordable, and reliable solutions for urban area's. With their e-scooter sharing platform SwheelS2Go, this start-up is effectively contributing to the environment. Book your e-scooter through the SwheelS2Go app and use the scan code to start your journey. Simple2Go, Sustainable2Go: SwheelS2Go Trikelet: ride and fold! Trikelet offers an e-scooter that is intuitive to ride and fold. It fits under the seat of the train, for instance, and in most of the luggage compartments – it looks like a fancy suitcase, that you can roll along to all your destinations. This e-scooter has no local emission and noise, furthermore, the materials used to build this scooter can be recycled as well. Bird: from California to the Netherlands E-scooter start-up Bird is headquartered in California, but plans to expand across the Netherlands. Founded by former Uber and Lyft executive, Travis VanderZanden, this start-up aims to make cities more livable by reducing car usage, traffic, and carbon emissions. Moreover, it provides a fleet of electric, shared scooters that can be accessed via smartphone. Reduce your carbon footprint. Technology from VOI  VOI Technology is bringing shared electric scooters to the streets of Europe. If you want to reduce your carbon footprint, just jump on a VOI scooter and ride to your destination – all free from emissions. Right now you can find the e-scooter in cities like Stockholm, Paris and Lisboa, but the Netherlands are next. E-bike GiGI, easy-to-fold and handle This Dutch start-up developed an alternative to the folding bike : an easy-to-handle, lightweight, practical, smart and contemporary Li-ion battery powered folding scooter. You can easily take the GiGi e-bike on the train and it’s simple to fold for indoor storage. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/transportation
Did you already spot them down the streets of your hometown? Perhaps you’ve recognised them whizzing past you, or seen them parked on the sidewalks. We’re talking about the e-scooter: this concept is taking over the Netherlands in 2019 – and beyond. The electric scooter frenzy is sky-rocketing, the demand for alternate energy is growing as days pass by. E-scooter: the perfect sustainable city transport The growing popularity of e-scooters is due to the compact body, with the small motor attached with the battery pack. Over time, without any doubt, these electric scooters have evolved into a significantly inexpensive, secure and dependable way of transportation for an tremendous amount of people. We are not the only ones to see this, the investment in micro-mobility start-ups went beyond one billion euros in 2018, according to research from DealRoom. Notably, the electric scooter craze began with Santa Monica-based Bird, which raised its Series-A in October 2017. The report also stated that consumers spend over 1,1 trillion dollar a year on transportation. But what about the Netherlands? These promising e-scooter start-ups are ready to take on Europe. Get ready to hit the road, e-scooter style! Felyx: solving current urban mobility issues  Felyx, based in the bicycle capital of the world (Amsterdam), offers shared e-scooters to solve current urban mobility issues. With over 400 e-scooters that you can locate and activate through an app, Felyx is well on their way to boost the Dutch sharing economy while being sustainable. Sharing is caring: Dott Dott is on a mission to improve European city life. The dockless e-scooters (and bikes) can be shared and are a convenient for short-distance travel. Sharing is caring! Dott, based in Amsterdam, has a most experienced team in mobility and tech in Europe. The start-up raised an initial investment of €20 million, co-led by EQT Ventures and Naspers. Dutch Tesla on Two Wheels; Etergo  Etergo is an automotive company that develops AppScooter, an electric smart vehicle, also known as the ‘Dutch Tesla on Two Wheels’. With Etergo’s e-scooter, you can stream music and take calls without even pulling out the smartphone. With a 7-inch LED touchscreen and the handlebar controls, you’re fully equipped to handle your digital activities. It is the world’s first scooter to run Android apps. The ultimate purpose of this e-scooter is to minimize distractions while travelling. Swheels2Go, an  e-scooter sharing platform SwheelS2Go is introducing sustainable, accessible, affordable, and reliable solutions for urban area's. With their e-scooter sharing platform SwheelS2Go, this start-up is effectively contributing to the environment. Book your e-scooter through the SwheelS2Go app and use the scan code to start your journey. Simple2Go, Sustainable2Go: SwheelS2Go Trikelet: ride and fold! Trikelet offers an e-scooter that is intuitive to ride and fold. It fits under the seat of the train, for instance, and in most of the luggage compartments – it looks like a fancy suitcase, that you can roll along to all your destinations. This e-scooter has no local emission and noise, furthermore, the materials used to build this scooter can be recycled as well. Bird: from California to the Netherlands E-scooter start-up Bird is headquartered in California, but plans to expand across the Netherlands. Founded by former Uber and Lyft executive, Travis VanderZanden, this start-up aims to make cities more livable by reducing car usage, traffic, and carbon emissions. Moreover, it provides a fleet of electric, shared scooters that can be accessed via smartphone. Reduce your carbon footprint. Technology from VOI  VOI Technology is bringing shared electric scooters to the streets of Europe. If you want to reduce your carbon footprint, just jump on a VOI scooter and ride to your destination – all free from emissions. Right now you can find the e-scooter in cities like Stockholm, Paris and Lisboa, but the Netherlands are next. E-bike GiGI, easy-to-fold and handle This Dutch start-up developed an alternative to the folding bike : an easy-to-handle, lightweight, practical, smart and contemporary Li-ion battery powered folding scooter. You can easily take the GiGi e-bike on the train and it’s simple to fold for indoor storage. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/transportation
These promising e-scooter start-ups are taking over the Netherlands
These promising e-scooter start-ups are taking over the Netherlands
The micro electric car Microlino. Italian charm German made
A recent deal in the automobile world made headlines: the German sports carmaker Artega acquired all rights to the micro electric car Microlino, as designed by the Swiss company Micro Mobility Systems and previously produced by the Italian Tazzari. Thus, an electric car that has been influenced by three of the most remarkable countries in Europe - and that is about to take the next step in its lifecycle. The Microlino is an electric city car , targeting ways of optimising urban transportation and mobility. In its design, it is uncompromisingly influenced by the cult classic BMW Isetta, fondly nicknamed bubble car. This two-seater adds up to a length of 2,40 meters and weights 435 kg, making it a great option for busy cities where traffic is a huge problem and parking is scarce.   Tazzari: founders of the ZERO Project Now that Italian producer Tazzari has decided to move out of the urban segment, it sold the headliners of this division to Artega - including its electric taxi e-cab and this electric Isetta look-a-like. Quite a shame, as Tazzari has a rich and exciting history when it comes to producing great electric vehicles. Its heydays started after it announced the ZERO Project in 2006, with the ambitious goal of creating an electric city car with unprecedented technical features, such as an ultralight chassis technology and sophisticated technology to manage the lithium batteries powering the car, to ensure unparalleled performance and autonomy.   Through the extensive research that Tazzari had performed in the past on such technologies, it was quickly able to gain an edge in this industry - aided by its experience in electronics and design. And this leading position clearly shows, as electric cars as produced by Tazzari have the benefit of millions of kilometers of experience, that were driven all over the world. Artega: a quick follower Artega really started to make its move on the world stage back in 2007, upon launching the Artega GT. After that, the German company started specialising in electric sports cars, with their latest project being the Superelletra - a very high-end product that, most likely, will only be sold as part of a limited edition run. Those who fear that the Microlino will go down the same path can rest assured. All signs are pointing towards Artega taking on a much more dynamic approach for their sales strategy. They are certainly not taking half measures: with the current pre-series production being moved in the upcoming weeks from Imola, Italy to their 3,000 square meter production hall in their hometown Delbrück. Production plans for Microlino According to the latest projections, Artega are hoping to produce some 8,000 electric cars out of this factory per year, with production starting next January. This is not to say that you could, if you’d like, purchase a Microlino right away. Only the lucky residents of Switzerland will actually be able to do so, as this is where the first deliveries will be headed to, closely followed by Germany. If small  electronic cars are your thing, then the Microlino might just make you fall in love with it. While it is just as compact and efficient as the electric Smart, it retails at only half the price, at 12,000 euros. Similarly, the hommage to the BMW Isetta is adorable and charming, surely something that will win over the hearts of car lovers.   The developers also cleverly made use of customer participation: on social media, followers were invited to vote on their favourite colour that the car should be produced in. After a massive number of responses, eight colours were chosen: black, white, blue, red, orange, green, brown and grey. Even more important, as the Microlino completed the EU homologation last July, the vehicle is roadworthy and street legal in all countries within Europe. Thus, it will not just be a nice addition to your carpark, it will actually get you to where you want to go, without restrictions. That is, as long as you stay within the official range of 126 km with the small battery and 202 km with the larger battery - which will, at its top speed of 90 km p/h, last you for about 1,5 to 2,5 hours. Running out of power? Then you can recharge your vehicle at any conventional domestic power socket in merely 4 hours, or even in as little as 1 hour if provided with a type-2 connector. Why should you care? If you are finding yourself as part of a large family, with a bunch of kids and dogs, and frequent family trips that require dozens of bags, the Microlino would not be able to transport all of you. It does not have the space, nor the reach. However, if your travel is mainly restricted to short rides in urban areas, its small size might actually be a huge advantage. You will be able to navigate it through busy streets rather easily, and front-park it in small spaces, significantly increasing your chances of finding a decent parking spot. The Microlino is what it is: a smart, compact electric car that will make urban driving a lot more comfortable. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/transportation
A recent deal in the automobile world made headlines: the German sports carmaker Artega acquired all rights to the micro electric car Microlino, as designed by the Swiss company Micro Mobility Systems and previously produced by the Italian Tazzari. Thus, an electric car that has been influenced by three of the most remarkable countries in Europe - and that is about to take the next step in its lifecycle. The Microlino is an electric city car , targeting ways of optimising urban transportation and mobility. In its design, it is uncompromisingly influenced by the cult classic BMW Isetta, fondly nicknamed bubble car. This two-seater adds up to a length of 2,40 meters and weights 435 kg, making it a great option for busy cities where traffic is a huge problem and parking is scarce.   Tazzari: founders of the ZERO Project Now that Italian producer Tazzari has decided to move out of the urban segment, it sold the headliners of this division to Artega - including its electric taxi e-cab and this electric Isetta look-a-like. Quite a shame, as Tazzari has a rich and exciting history when it comes to producing great electric vehicles. Its heydays started after it announced the ZERO Project in 2006, with the ambitious goal of creating an electric city car with unprecedented technical features, such as an ultralight chassis technology and sophisticated technology to manage the lithium batteries powering the car, to ensure unparalleled performance and autonomy.   Through the extensive research that Tazzari had performed in the past on such technologies, it was quickly able to gain an edge in this industry - aided by its experience in electronics and design. And this leading position clearly shows, as electric cars as produced by Tazzari have the benefit of millions of kilometers of experience, that were driven all over the world. Artega: a quick follower Artega really started to make its move on the world stage back in 2007, upon launching the Artega GT. After that, the German company started specialising in electric sports cars, with their latest project being the Superelletra - a very high-end product that, most likely, will only be sold as part of a limited edition run. Those who fear that the Microlino will go down the same path can rest assured. All signs are pointing towards Artega taking on a much more dynamic approach for their sales strategy. They are certainly not taking half measures: with the current pre-series production being moved in the upcoming weeks from Imola, Italy to their 3,000 square meter production hall in their hometown Delbrück. Production plans for Microlino According to the latest projections, Artega are hoping to produce some 8,000 electric cars out of this factory per year, with production starting next January. This is not to say that you could, if you’d like, purchase a Microlino right away. Only the lucky residents of Switzerland will actually be able to do so, as this is where the first deliveries will be headed to, closely followed by Germany. If small  electronic cars are your thing, then the Microlino might just make you fall in love with it. While it is just as compact and efficient as the electric Smart, it retails at only half the price, at 12,000 euros. Similarly, the hommage to the BMW Isetta is adorable and charming, surely something that will win over the hearts of car lovers.   The developers also cleverly made use of customer participation: on social media, followers were invited to vote on their favourite colour that the car should be produced in. After a massive number of responses, eight colours were chosen: black, white, blue, red, orange, green, brown and grey. Even more important, as the Microlino completed the EU homologation last July, the vehicle is roadworthy and street legal in all countries within Europe. Thus, it will not just be a nice addition to your carpark, it will actually get you to where you want to go, without restrictions. That is, as long as you stay within the official range of 126 km with the small battery and 202 km with the larger battery - which will, at its top speed of 90 km p/h, last you for about 1,5 to 2,5 hours. Running out of power? Then you can recharge your vehicle at any conventional domestic power socket in merely 4 hours, or even in as little as 1 hour if provided with a type-2 connector. Why should you care? If you are finding yourself as part of a large family, with a bunch of kids and dogs, and frequent family trips that require dozens of bags, the Microlino would not be able to transport all of you. It does not have the space, nor the reach. However, if your travel is mainly restricted to short rides in urban areas, its small size might actually be a huge advantage. You will be able to navigate it through busy streets rather easily, and front-park it in small spaces, significantly increasing your chances of finding a decent parking spot. The Microlino is what it is: a smart, compact electric car that will make urban driving a lot more comfortable. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/transportation
The micro electric car Microlino. Italian charm German made
The micro electric car Microlino. Italian charm German made
Electric cars; truly green or a new kind of liability?
The electric car truly is the kind of stuff that science fiction dreams are made of. Driving around without the sound or smell of typical cars, and upon coming home, plugging in the car in the reload station. And once it is fully charged, off you go again, without ever having to bother with filling up the tank at smelly, crowded gas stations. Most of us are longingly staring at the Teslas zooming past in the street, or throwing somewhat jealous glances at the reserved parking spots, exclusive for electric charging. Governments have made it clear that they are looking to subsidise these vehicles, to move towards an economy that is largely fuelled by electric cars , motorcycles, busses, planes… and phase out the polluting, gas guzzling products of the fossil fuel industry. GREATER, BETTER, CLEANER? While the retail price of electric cars still far outweigh that of ‘regular’ cars, there are increasingly more subsidies and grants available for those who are seriously considering ‘a car with a plug’. And yes, they will still be more expensive (ranging anywhere between € 20,000 and € 10,000), even though the savings will start to flow in almost instantly, as the average cost of electricity required for fuelling the car adds up to some hundred euros, perhaps, or maximum € 600-700 per year (depending on the exact car brand and type chosen and the kilometers driven in a year). This puts it at roughly 30% to 50% of the cost for fuel. Additionally, the maintenance costs are likely to be lower as well - there are fewer moving parts and a system that is generally easier to understand and repair when needed. Not to mention the cheaper insurances and tax discounts offered for electric cars.   CARBON EMISSIONS One of the major selling points for the electric car is its zero emissions promise. Whereas regular gas-powered vehicles pump out carbon dioxide while driving, the claim used to be that electric cars do not have any (as they are not burning fossil fuels while driving). Yet this is not entirely true, as there have been instances in which the electric car actually produced higher amounts of CO2 per kilometer driven in its lifetime.   What has to be added to this, though, is that this was a result of the size of the car and hinged on the word ‘lifetime’. For example, if you place a rather big Tesla car opposite a regular compact or economy-sized car, this will lead to a negative outcome for the Tesla. Whereas if you put it head-to-head with a similar sized car, it will always come out on top. The crux in this is the cost of car production, battery manufacturing, and projected recycling opportunities. All or this adds to the lifetime CO2 emission, so logic dictates that a larger car, with more parts, will get a higher rating than a smaller ‘regular’ car. Or, as the US Department of Energy put it, considering all, “an electric car like the Tesla Model S has almost four times lower CO2 per mile than an equivalent gas-powered car.” USE OF ‘DIRTY’ ENERGY Some people will claim that it hardly matters anyway. With an electric car, you are merely shifting the pollution source: instead of using fuel and gas, you are employing electricity, that still largely depends on coal and natural gasses for its production as well. Hence, fossil fuels are used no matter what, and so pollution will be the same as well. Right?   No, not exactly. While it cannot be denied that electricity production still largely hinges on fossil fuels, there is a clear shift towards renewable energy sources . Depending on the exact region, renewable energy sources already make up a significant part of the power needs. Tesla’s Elon Musk has pledged a switch to fully renewable energy sources for the production of their Tesla, using nothing but wind and solar energy to manufacture the cars. Especially in the wake of the Paris Agreement, energy is predicted to become increasingly more sustainable. LITHIUM BATTERIES A final, unavoidable note must be made regarding the lithium batteries that are commonly used in electric cars. This rare element is not only difficult to mine, but also potentially hazardous to those processing it. So, its creation is relatively hard on the environment: if only considering the huge amounts of water that are required for the mining (a staggering 1.9 million liters per tonne of lithium) and the adverse effects that the released chemicals have on the local environment and population alone. And yes, this battery will eliminate the need for similarly polluting elements, but the huge (ethical and environmental) pressure that its production puts on primarily third world countries is worrying. SO, WHAT TO DRIVE? There are undoubtedly aspects of the electric car that are far from desirable. And no, it is not the end-product that we have been able to witness in science-fiction pop culture hits, effortlessly floating on air. Yet the current electric car does take a significant bite out of the emission of its gas counterparts. For now it may be a question of being ‘the lesser evil’, but the great progress made in more sustainable production processes of the car and electricity alike, shows great promise. The electric car is driving down the right road! https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/transportation/battery
The electric car truly is the kind of stuff that science fiction dreams are made of. Driving around without the sound or smell of typical cars, and upon coming home, plugging in the car in the reload station. And once it is fully charged, off you go again, without ever having to bother with filling up the tank at smelly, crowded gas stations. Most of us are longingly staring at the Teslas zooming past in the street, or throwing somewhat jealous glances at the reserved parking spots, exclusive for electric charging. Governments have made it clear that they are looking to subsidise these vehicles, to move towards an economy that is largely fuelled by electric cars , motorcycles, busses, planes… and phase out the polluting, gas guzzling products of the fossil fuel industry. GREATER, BETTER, CLEANER? While the retail price of electric cars still far outweigh that of ‘regular’ cars, there are increasingly more subsidies and grants available for those who are seriously considering ‘a car with a plug’. And yes, they will still be more expensive (ranging anywhere between € 20,000 and € 10,000), even though the savings will start to flow in almost instantly, as the average cost of electricity required for fuelling the car adds up to some hundred euros, perhaps, or maximum € 600-700 per year (depending on the exact car brand and type chosen and the kilometers driven in a year). This puts it at roughly 30% to 50% of the cost for fuel. Additionally, the maintenance costs are likely to be lower as well - there are fewer moving parts and a system that is generally easier to understand and repair when needed. Not to mention the cheaper insurances and tax discounts offered for electric cars.   CARBON EMISSIONS One of the major selling points for the electric car is its zero emissions promise. Whereas regular gas-powered vehicles pump out carbon dioxide while driving, the claim used to be that electric cars do not have any (as they are not burning fossil fuels while driving). Yet this is not entirely true, as there have been instances in which the electric car actually produced higher amounts of CO2 per kilometer driven in its lifetime.   What has to be added to this, though, is that this was a result of the size of the car and hinged on the word ‘lifetime’. For example, if you place a rather big Tesla car opposite a regular compact or economy-sized car, this will lead to a negative outcome for the Tesla. Whereas if you put it head-to-head with a similar sized car, it will always come out on top. The crux in this is the cost of car production, battery manufacturing, and projected recycling opportunities. All or this adds to the lifetime CO2 emission, so logic dictates that a larger car, with more parts, will get a higher rating than a smaller ‘regular’ car. Or, as the US Department of Energy put it, considering all, “an electric car like the Tesla Model S has almost four times lower CO2 per mile than an equivalent gas-powered car.” USE OF ‘DIRTY’ ENERGY Some people will claim that it hardly matters anyway. With an electric car, you are merely shifting the pollution source: instead of using fuel and gas, you are employing electricity, that still largely depends on coal and natural gasses for its production as well. Hence, fossil fuels are used no matter what, and so pollution will be the same as well. Right?   No, not exactly. While it cannot be denied that electricity production still largely hinges on fossil fuels, there is a clear shift towards renewable energy sources . Depending on the exact region, renewable energy sources already make up a significant part of the power needs. Tesla’s Elon Musk has pledged a switch to fully renewable energy sources for the production of their Tesla, using nothing but wind and solar energy to manufacture the cars. Especially in the wake of the Paris Agreement, energy is predicted to become increasingly more sustainable. LITHIUM BATTERIES A final, unavoidable note must be made regarding the lithium batteries that are commonly used in electric cars. This rare element is not only difficult to mine, but also potentially hazardous to those processing it. So, its creation is relatively hard on the environment: if only considering the huge amounts of water that are required for the mining (a staggering 1.9 million liters per tonne of lithium) and the adverse effects that the released chemicals have on the local environment and population alone. And yes, this battery will eliminate the need for similarly polluting elements, but the huge (ethical and environmental) pressure that its production puts on primarily third world countries is worrying. SO, WHAT TO DRIVE? There are undoubtedly aspects of the electric car that are far from desirable. And no, it is not the end-product that we have been able to witness in science-fiction pop culture hits, effortlessly floating on air. Yet the current electric car does take a significant bite out of the emission of its gas counterparts. For now it may be a question of being ‘the lesser evil’, but the great progress made in more sustainable production processes of the car and electricity alike, shows great promise. The electric car is driving down the right road! https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/transportation/battery
Electric cars; truly green or a new kind of liability?
Electric cars; truly green or a new kind of liability?
Electric/pedal
Commuting to work and getting a workout at the same time I'm a big fan of the Organic Transit ELF—a pedal electric hybrid that Lloyd believes could replace a car for a lot of people. But every time we write about it, somebody comments that it's simply too expensive and/or it shouldn't be allowed on bike lanes. I can only imagine what people are going to say about Kronfeld Motors' RAHT racer. Here's the basics It's primarily an electric vehicle, but with a pedal function that you can use to get a  workout and/or recharge the battery (a bit!) and/or get a workout. The makers claim it can hit 140 kmh, and once it hits production will be highway legal. It has a range of 190 km city driving, and 115 km at highway speeds. About the pedal aspect. It's likely to add 5-10% in terms of range if you're working hard. The production version will have room for a passenger and/or luggage, and significant improvements in terms of safety. It's currently listed at $24,000, and you can pre-order it with a $500 deposit. Let the fighting in the comments begin Alright, let the fighting in the comments begin. But wait-before we all get into the usual 'rich man's toy' versus 'best idea ever debate, let's remember something: Just because it's not a vehicle that you would drive doesn't mean there isn't a sensible market for it. While it's true that you could now get a 350-km range, four seat electric car for not that much more. And folks have been waiting a long time for their not-dissimilar-looking gas-powered Elios. But this is clearly being marketed to people who enjoy the experience of cycling but need to get places faster and/or like the idea of commuting to work and getting a workout at the same time. And I can see the appeal in that. I, for one, can't imagine myself springing for something like this. I've already established that I can get pretty far, pretty fast on a regular e-bike , and I can go far further than I ever really should have in my used Nissan Leaf. But I do think this would be a blast to ride in. And I can think of people who would totally prefer this over either a motorcycle commute or stooping to the conventionality of a regular car. I wish Kronfeld Motors all the luck in the world. Who knows, with rising gas prices they may not even need it. Now, please be nice in the comments. By: Sami Grover, Treehugger https://www.whatsorb.com/category/transportation
Commuting to work and getting a workout at the same time I'm a big fan of the Organic Transit ELF—a pedal electric hybrid that Lloyd believes could replace a car for a lot of people. But every time we write about it, somebody comments that it's simply too expensive and/or it shouldn't be allowed on bike lanes. I can only imagine what people are going to say about Kronfeld Motors' RAHT racer. Here's the basics It's primarily an electric vehicle, but with a pedal function that you can use to get a  workout and/or recharge the battery (a bit!) and/or get a workout. The makers claim it can hit 140 kmh, and once it hits production will be highway legal. It has a range of 190 km city driving, and 115 km at highway speeds. About the pedal aspect. It's likely to add 5-10% in terms of range if you're working hard. The production version will have room for a passenger and/or luggage, and significant improvements in terms of safety. It's currently listed at $24,000, and you can pre-order it with a $500 deposit. Let the fighting in the comments begin Alright, let the fighting in the comments begin. But wait-before we all get into the usual 'rich man's toy' versus 'best idea ever debate, let's remember something: Just because it's not a vehicle that you would drive doesn't mean there isn't a sensible market for it. While it's true that you could now get a 350-km range, four seat electric car for not that much more. And folks have been waiting a long time for their not-dissimilar-looking gas-powered Elios. But this is clearly being marketed to people who enjoy the experience of cycling but need to get places faster and/or like the idea of commuting to work and getting a workout at the same time. And I can see the appeal in that. I, for one, can't imagine myself springing for something like this. I've already established that I can get pretty far, pretty fast on a regular e-bike , and I can go far further than I ever really should have in my used Nissan Leaf. But I do think this would be a blast to ride in. And I can think of people who would totally prefer this over either a motorcycle commute or stooping to the conventionality of a regular car. I wish Kronfeld Motors all the luck in the world. Who knows, with rising gas prices they may not even need it. Now, please be nice in the comments. By: Sami Grover, Treehugger https://www.whatsorb.com/category/transportation
Electric/pedal
Electric/pedal 'hybrid' claims highway speeds
Charging your electric car while driving
In Sweden, a road has been modified to charge electric cars and trucks with rails while they travel over them It sounds like an ideal solution: electric vehicles that charge because they drive on a special road, instead of connecting them to a charging station. And such a road has just been opened in Sweden. The two-kilometer-long carriageway contains electrical rails that supply power to transport vehicles. Unfortunately you can not drive 1, 2, 3 over it and immediately charge your car; owners must first have their vehicle fitted with a kind of retractable arm that makes contact with the rails. e-RoadArlanda When designing the eRoadArlanda, as the road has been christened, everything seems to have been thought of. For example, the rails only give power when a car is above it and only short stretches of road are supplied with electricity at the same time. When a vehicle stops on the road, the power is broken. The system can calculate the energy consumption of the car or truck, so that electricity costs per vehicle and user can be written off. Is a road with  electricity dangerous? Even then it may seem dangerous: a road with rails with electricity, but the road is designed so that people and animals walking over it are not at risk. The rails on the surface are grounded to prevent shocks, and the conductor itself is buried deeper. To get a power shock, you should sit on your hands and knees with a fork between the rails, but then a fast moving car is the immediate danger. We will continue, because rain is no problem for the e-road. The road section contains a drainage system that drains the water and the contact arm attached to the vehicle is designed to push water out of the channel, as well as gravel and other small obstacles. Moreover, the space between the rails is too small for  cyclists to get stuck between them (that is different with tram rails). Provide all of Sweden The road runs between the Cargo Terminal of Stockholm Arlanda airport and the Rosersberg logistics area outside the capital, and will now only be used by trucks. If that goes well, the Swedish transport administration plans to provide more highways in the country with the rails.We only wonder how they deal with thick packs of snow. Sources: eRoadArlanda, The Guardian, New Atlas Image: eRoadArlanda By: Laurien Onderwater https://www.whatsorb.com/category/transportation
In Sweden, a road has been modified to charge electric cars and trucks with rails while they travel over them It sounds like an ideal solution: electric vehicles that charge because they drive on a special road, instead of connecting them to a charging station. And such a road has just been opened in Sweden. The two-kilometer-long carriageway contains electrical rails that supply power to transport vehicles. Unfortunately you can not drive 1, 2, 3 over it and immediately charge your car; owners must first have their vehicle fitted with a kind of retractable arm that makes contact with the rails. e-RoadArlanda When designing the eRoadArlanda, as the road has been christened, everything seems to have been thought of. For example, the rails only give power when a car is above it and only short stretches of road are supplied with electricity at the same time. When a vehicle stops on the road, the power is broken. The system can calculate the energy consumption of the car or truck, so that electricity costs per vehicle and user can be written off. Is a road with  electricity dangerous? Even then it may seem dangerous: a road with rails with electricity, but the road is designed so that people and animals walking over it are not at risk. The rails on the surface are grounded to prevent shocks, and the conductor itself is buried deeper. To get a power shock, you should sit on your hands and knees with a fork between the rails, but then a fast moving car is the immediate danger. We will continue, because rain is no problem for the e-road. The road section contains a drainage system that drains the water and the contact arm attached to the vehicle is designed to push water out of the channel, as well as gravel and other small obstacles. Moreover, the space between the rails is too small for  cyclists to get stuck between them (that is different with tram rails). Provide all of Sweden The road runs between the Cargo Terminal of Stockholm Arlanda airport and the Rosersberg logistics area outside the capital, and will now only be used by trucks. If that goes well, the Swedish transport administration plans to provide more highways in the country with the rails.We only wonder how they deal with thick packs of snow. Sources: eRoadArlanda, The Guardian, New Atlas Image: eRoadArlanda By: Laurien Onderwater https://www.whatsorb.com/category/transportation
Charging your electric car while driving
Charging your electric car while driving
Automotive

Easy transportation of goods is one of the backbones of our modern society. Unfortunately a lot of energy is involved in getter your goods from A to B. In these articles we try to tell you all about carbon neutral fuel and other sustainable efforts to move goods around the world.

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