Agri & Gardening

About: <p><strong>Growing food, either commercially or as a hobby, is one of the most satisfying things you can do. It is, however, not without challenges. Protection against natural or human-made threats, irrigation, or other soil treatments must be done with care.</strong></p> <h2>Agriculture And Gardening Makes The World Go Round</h2> <p>Agriculture is producing food, feed, fiber, and many other desired products by cultivating certain plants. The practice of agriculture is also known as &lsquo;farming,&rsquo; while scientists, inventors, and others devoted to improving farming methods and implements are also said to be engaged in agriculture.<br />Subsistence farming; who farms a small area with limited resource inputs and produces only enough food to meet the needs of his/her family. At the other end is commercial intensive agriculture, including industrial agriculture. Such farming involves large fields, large resource inputs (pesticides, fertilizers, etc.), and a high mechanization level.</p> <p>Nowadays, critical attention is given to industrial agriculture. Alternatives are proposed, such as regenerative agriculture, drones, <a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/agri-gardening/smart-agriculture-will-be-data--ai--driven-agriculture">smart techniques</a>, and blockchain. The use of fertilizer and water in large quantities is also criticized. The risks of monocultures are large. In combination with the depletion of agricultural land, the reduction of insects, and <a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/category/climate">climate change</a>, it is necessary to change our view on industrial agriculture and growing crops.</p> <p>If there was an urge to develop sustainable agriculture and gardening solutions and share these topics globally, it&rsquo;s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers, and influencers to write about tiny houses, your experiences, and expectations for the future at home and globally.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Boost Global Sustainability Now, that&rsquo;s what you can do together with WhatsOrb.&nbsp;<a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/newsletter/your-shared-sustainable-ideas-make-our-earth-a-better-place">What's in for me?</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
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Circular Economy: The Project Polar Permaculture
We've heard about how holistic and nature-inspired permaculture design techniques can green a desert and transform ordinary gardens into ultra-productive 'food forests.' But what about practicing permaculture principles to help grow food in the cold Arctic region is it possible?  The Circular Economy Created With The Project: Polar Permaculture That's something that American-born professional chef and foodie Benjamin Vidmar is exploring with his project, 'Polar Permaculture.' Based out of Longyearbyen, a town of 2,500 that's located on Svalbard, Norway's archipelago of islands (yes, the same place with the so-called doomsday seed vault), Vidmar is experimenting with innovative ways to grow fresh food and creating a 'circular economy' in a rugged, cold place that is dark for three months out of the year, and where most supplies have to be shipped in.  Benjamin Vidmar, founder of Polar Permaculture Solutions Vidmar is trained as a professional chef and has worked in hotels and cruise ships around the world. Years ago, he landed a job in one of Longyearbyen's hotels and has stayed there since, raising his family. However, since childhood, Vidmar has always been interested in sustainable agriculture, and a few years ago, he got turned into permaculture, recently getting trained in permaculture design practices. {youtube}                                                          Longyearbyen - Polar Permaculture Dome He's since brought these skills back to Longyearbyen, setting up a geodesic greenhouse, and bringing in red worms to help with composting the locally produced organic waste, which can then be used to grow food here. This is an important point that's not to be taken for granted; on Svalbard, the soil is impoverished and unsuited for growing food, so if it were not for the worms and compost, the soil would have to be shipped in. Recommended:  Sustainable Arctic Architecture: A Geodesic Dome On an island where everything is transported in, and waste is either dumped into the ocean or shipped back to the mainland for disposal, Vidmar aims to look for ways to close the loop, reusing and recycling outputs back into inputs whenever possible. Recommended:  Copenhagen's Sustainable Experimental Greenhouse Biotope I had initially wanted to do a permaculture project in Florida, where I presently spend a month each year, but something told me to do it here in Longyearbyen. There was a massive need for it is as we currently dump all sewage directly into the sea without any treatment facility. We also mine and burn coal. All produce is shipped and flown in, so I believe the place chose me to complete this mission, to help make this place more sustainable. Surprisingly, one of the biggest obstacles has been local politics: the island is socially conservative and has no agricultural zoning regulations in place. It took Vidmar a year and a half to get permission to import his worms. "So with our permaculture project, we are rewriting all of the history books, looking to change the laws and grow food here once again," says Vidmar. Currently, Polar Permaculture is the only supplier of fresh, locally produced food on the island, serving all the major hotels and restaurants. The greenhouse is used only when the sun is out, otherwise, they grow their veggies - mostly microgreens, chilies, tomatoes, onions, peas, herbs, and so on - inside their lab, basically a converted room in one of the local hotels. They've also recently set up a small quail farm, and are producing eggs to eat. The future goal is to scale things up, and to increase food security and reduce waste on this remote island, says Vidmar. Inside the hydroponics lab Before we started this project, there was no one speaking about composting or having locally grown food. All around the Arctic, many people are farming and growing food, but here we were only relying on shipments. After starting this, we now have much more support to expand and increase what we can produce. We want to install a biogas digester and also set up a system that can process most of the city’s sewage and turn it into biogas that we can use to heat our greenhouses. Growing food in one of the planet's harshest regions seems like an impossible task, but it appears that through the principles of permaculture, and a lot of dedication, it can be done. Besides growing food, Polar Permaculture offers courses, tours, and gourmet cooking classes.  Cover photo by Francisco, Mattos Before you go! Recommended:  New Foodscape Alternatives Gets Lots Of Attention In The Netherlands Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about growing your own food? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'.
We've heard about how holistic and nature-inspired permaculture design techniques can green a desert and transform ordinary gardens into ultra-productive 'food forests.' But what about practicing permaculture principles to help grow food in the cold Arctic region is it possible?  The Circular Economy Created With The Project: Polar Permaculture That's something that American-born professional chef and foodie Benjamin Vidmar is exploring with his project, 'Polar Permaculture.' Based out of Longyearbyen, a town of 2,500 that's located on Svalbard, Norway's archipelago of islands (yes, the same place with the so-called doomsday seed vault), Vidmar is experimenting with innovative ways to grow fresh food and creating a 'circular economy' in a rugged, cold place that is dark for three months out of the year, and where most supplies have to be shipped in.  Benjamin Vidmar, founder of Polar Permaculture Solutions Vidmar is trained as a professional chef and has worked in hotels and cruise ships around the world. Years ago, he landed a job in one of Longyearbyen's hotels and has stayed there since, raising his family. However, since childhood, Vidmar has always been interested in sustainable agriculture, and a few years ago, he got turned into permaculture, recently getting trained in permaculture design practices. {youtube}                                                          Longyearbyen - Polar Permaculture Dome He's since brought these skills back to Longyearbyen, setting up a geodesic greenhouse, and bringing in red worms to help with composting the locally produced organic waste, which can then be used to grow food here. This is an important point that's not to be taken for granted; on Svalbard, the soil is impoverished and unsuited for growing food, so if it were not for the worms and compost, the soil would have to be shipped in. Recommended:  Sustainable Arctic Architecture: A Geodesic Dome On an island where everything is transported in, and waste is either dumped into the ocean or shipped back to the mainland for disposal, Vidmar aims to look for ways to close the loop, reusing and recycling outputs back into inputs whenever possible. Recommended:  Copenhagen's Sustainable Experimental Greenhouse Biotope I had initially wanted to do a permaculture project in Florida, where I presently spend a month each year, but something told me to do it here in Longyearbyen. There was a massive need for it is as we currently dump all sewage directly into the sea without any treatment facility. We also mine and burn coal. All produce is shipped and flown in, so I believe the place chose me to complete this mission, to help make this place more sustainable. Surprisingly, one of the biggest obstacles has been local politics: the island is socially conservative and has no agricultural zoning regulations in place. It took Vidmar a year and a half to get permission to import his worms. "So with our permaculture project, we are rewriting all of the history books, looking to change the laws and grow food here once again," says Vidmar. Currently, Polar Permaculture is the only supplier of fresh, locally produced food on the island, serving all the major hotels and restaurants. The greenhouse is used only when the sun is out, otherwise, they grow their veggies - mostly microgreens, chilies, tomatoes, onions, peas, herbs, and so on - inside their lab, basically a converted room in one of the local hotels. They've also recently set up a small quail farm, and are producing eggs to eat. The future goal is to scale things up, and to increase food security and reduce waste on this remote island, says Vidmar. Inside the hydroponics lab Before we started this project, there was no one speaking about composting or having locally grown food. All around the Arctic, many people are farming and growing food, but here we were only relying on shipments. After starting this, we now have much more support to expand and increase what we can produce. We want to install a biogas digester and also set up a system that can process most of the city’s sewage and turn it into biogas that we can use to heat our greenhouses. Growing food in one of the planet's harshest regions seems like an impossible task, but it appears that through the principles of permaculture, and a lot of dedication, it can be done. Besides growing food, Polar Permaculture offers courses, tours, and gourmet cooking classes.  Cover photo by Francisco, Mattos Before you go! Recommended:  New Foodscape Alternatives Gets Lots Of Attention In The Netherlands Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about growing your own food? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'.
Circular Economy: The Project Polar Permaculture
Circular Economy: The Project Polar Permaculture
Future Healthy Food is Shaped In The Netherlands
The University of Wageningen - WUR - (Netherlands) has built a greenhouse where plants are growing in rock wool and coco peat. If there would be an innovative solution to feeding the growing population of the world, it is probably coming from Wageningen, a small town in the Netherlands that is the link in the global healthy food science industry. Future Healthy Food: What Can Wageningen Do? The Dutch University, located in the Gelderse Valley, a region located in the central Netherlands, is transforming the way people eat. At the University, they have built a greenhouse to grow bananas in both coco peat and stone wool. In the greenhouse works, a world-famous banana scientist who cannot wait to introduce Europeans the many varieties of bananas eaten across Latin America, Asia, and Africa. When was the WUR established?  In 1876 the Rijkslandbouwschool (National Agricultural College) was established in Wageningen. Due to the development of the training to a higher educational level it changed in 1896 to the Hoogere Land- en Boschbouwschool (Agricultural and Forestry College) and in 1904 in Rijks Hoogere Land-, Tuin- en Boschbouwschool (National Agricultural, Horticulture and Forestry College). Cocopeat In every direction, for kilometers, you can find crops. Drones monitor soil fertility from some plants, and at night light panels illuminate the greenhouses. This is big! Recommended:  Drones Safeguarding Your Food: Future Farming Worldwide Did you know that The Netherlands is one of the biggest food exporting nations in the world? This small country exports a large number of tomatoes, onions, dairy, and potatoes. The Dutch export more eggs than any country in the world. The question of how the Netherlands attracts government delegations, multinationals, and agricultural students from all over the world to wonder about the significant innovation juggernaut of the Netherlands. The answer is the University of Wageningen. According to estimation, there will be 9,7 billion people to feed by 2050. To feed the entire humanity, we need to produce 56 percent more food while at the same time prevent further deforestation. Climate change does not help. Temperature is rising, and there will be floods, droughts and crops will be destroyed due to these weather conditions. Recommended:  Climate Change: Water Scarcity, Hunger, Agriculture, And Food People have two options to choose from to face what is going to happen. One possibility: we innovate our way out. Take Wageningen University; scientists are developing plant-based meat, gene-editing technology, bananas to feed the world. If we need food from the laboratory to survive, there is a big chance it is from Wageningen. Which studies can you follow at the WUR WUR consists of Wageningen University and the former agricultural research institute of the Dutch Ministry of Agriculture. Wageningen University trains specialists (BSc, MSc and PhD) in life and social sciences and focuses its research on scientific, social and commercial problems in the field of life sciences and natural resources. It is widely known for its agriculture, forestry, and environmental studies programs Multinationals and energetic start-ups donate money to this University so that they can innovate and develop. The second option is a bit more drastic. Hunger continues, agriculture takes up 70 percent of all freshwater, 40-50 percent of earth's habitable land and is responsible for 10-12 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions created by humans. A third of food is wasted. Will the Wageningen model be enough to avoid all these problems? {youtube} Are you a game-changer, and do you want to develop and research new products for the most significant business sector in the world? Discover the Bachelor’s Food Technology at Wageningen University & Research! Wageningen: Experimenting With Gene-editing Technology. The president of Wageningen University, Louise Fresco, was born in the aftermath of the human-induced starvation known as the Hunger Winter. Since she was 15 years old, she has been thinking about feeding the world. She traveled to Papua New Guinea and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, where she witnessed first-hand scarcity. She thought about how little was available in the world.  There was a great sense that something had to be done, that there is more than just going about your own life and being rich and happy. Photo by: Adri Mouthaan. Professor L.O. Fresco, Wageningen University, the Netherlands In the years after the war, The Netherlands' agriculture minister Sicco Mansholt wanted to guarantee the food supply of the country by increasing production. This change included heavy machinery, chemical fertilizers, and new technology and research. He tried to build a post-war Europe of abundance and, at the same time, lift small farmers out of poverty and integrate the European economies. But by the 1980's we dealt with environmental devastation and a lot of food waste. Europe paid millions to store unwanted meat, undrinkable "wine lakes" and mountains of grain and butter. Wageningen was facing an existential crisis. Wageningen's settlement turned to the giants of the industry to keep the University alive. Recommended:  Food Future: Serving Lab-Meat In Restaurants Reality? Nowadays, you see little of the fear and suffering during the war. What you see is the futuristic Wageningen in the modernist buildings. Wageningen, also known for 'Food Valley', has one goal: shaping the future of food. What about the WUR’s ECTS label? Wageningen University was the first Dutch university or school that was allowed to use the European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS) label. This label is awarded by the European Commission and guarantees the quality of the study programme. The university consequently applies this system, thus promoting the mobility of students within Europe and preventing study delay. Photo by I.O. Eindhoven. Philips LED lights, NASA As mentioned before, Wageningen provides stunning solutions for the threat of humanity's food problem. In highly monitored labs, plants are growing to produce more food. But there is a downside to all of this:  the plants need a lot of artificial light. Philips partly provides the lamps. Not everyone is happy about the close relationship between scientists and industry in Wageningen. Students are wondering: is it only about financing? Do researchers choose their topic based on funding? If so, how dependent is academic research? Wageningen University Has Close Ties With Industry Fresco says that the collaboration between private companies and scientists is necessary and could be positive. They work together because big companies have a considerable influence on the world. They need help to create sustainable ideas and products. It is about research into food products that are not only healthy for people but also good for the planet. Recommended:  Does Rising CO2 Benefit Plants? At Wageningen, a couple of students is planting a forest on an abandoned apple orchard. There they will grow walnuts, berries, and pumpkins. Their goal is to prove that small-scale farming is viable and environmentally friendly than big industrial farms. Before you go! Recommended:  Agrivoltaics Mutually Beneficial: Food, Water And Energy Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about agriculture? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
The University of Wageningen - WUR - (Netherlands) has built a greenhouse where plants are growing in rock wool and coco peat. If there would be an innovative solution to feeding the growing population of the world, it is probably coming from Wageningen, a small town in the Netherlands that is the link in the global healthy food science industry. Future Healthy Food: What Can Wageningen Do? The Dutch University, located in the Gelderse Valley, a region located in the central Netherlands, is transforming the way people eat. At the University, they have built a greenhouse to grow bananas in both coco peat and stone wool. In the greenhouse works, a world-famous banana scientist who cannot wait to introduce Europeans the many varieties of bananas eaten across Latin America, Asia, and Africa. When was the WUR established?  In 1876 the Rijkslandbouwschool (National Agricultural College) was established in Wageningen. Due to the development of the training to a higher educational level it changed in 1896 to the Hoogere Land- en Boschbouwschool (Agricultural and Forestry College) and in 1904 in Rijks Hoogere Land-, Tuin- en Boschbouwschool (National Agricultural, Horticulture and Forestry College). Cocopeat In every direction, for kilometers, you can find crops. Drones monitor soil fertility from some plants, and at night light panels illuminate the greenhouses. This is big! Recommended:  Drones Safeguarding Your Food: Future Farming Worldwide Did you know that The Netherlands is one of the biggest food exporting nations in the world? This small country exports a large number of tomatoes, onions, dairy, and potatoes. The Dutch export more eggs than any country in the world. The question of how the Netherlands attracts government delegations, multinationals, and agricultural students from all over the world to wonder about the significant innovation juggernaut of the Netherlands. The answer is the University of Wageningen. According to estimation, there will be 9,7 billion people to feed by 2050. To feed the entire humanity, we need to produce 56 percent more food while at the same time prevent further deforestation. Climate change does not help. Temperature is rising, and there will be floods, droughts and crops will be destroyed due to these weather conditions. Recommended:  Climate Change: Water Scarcity, Hunger, Agriculture, And Food People have two options to choose from to face what is going to happen. One possibility: we innovate our way out. Take Wageningen University; scientists are developing plant-based meat, gene-editing technology, bananas to feed the world. If we need food from the laboratory to survive, there is a big chance it is from Wageningen. Which studies can you follow at the WUR WUR consists of Wageningen University and the former agricultural research institute of the Dutch Ministry of Agriculture. Wageningen University trains specialists (BSc, MSc and PhD) in life and social sciences and focuses its research on scientific, social and commercial problems in the field of life sciences and natural resources. It is widely known for its agriculture, forestry, and environmental studies programs Multinationals and energetic start-ups donate money to this University so that they can innovate and develop. The second option is a bit more drastic. Hunger continues, agriculture takes up 70 percent of all freshwater, 40-50 percent of earth's habitable land and is responsible for 10-12 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions created by humans. A third of food is wasted. Will the Wageningen model be enough to avoid all these problems? {youtube} Are you a game-changer, and do you want to develop and research new products for the most significant business sector in the world? Discover the Bachelor’s Food Technology at Wageningen University & Research! Wageningen: Experimenting With Gene-editing Technology. The president of Wageningen University, Louise Fresco, was born in the aftermath of the human-induced starvation known as the Hunger Winter. Since she was 15 years old, she has been thinking about feeding the world. She traveled to Papua New Guinea and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, where she witnessed first-hand scarcity. She thought about how little was available in the world.  There was a great sense that something had to be done, that there is more than just going about your own life and being rich and happy. Photo by: Adri Mouthaan. Professor L.O. Fresco, Wageningen University, the Netherlands In the years after the war, The Netherlands' agriculture minister Sicco Mansholt wanted to guarantee the food supply of the country by increasing production. This change included heavy machinery, chemical fertilizers, and new technology and research. He tried to build a post-war Europe of abundance and, at the same time, lift small farmers out of poverty and integrate the European economies. But by the 1980's we dealt with environmental devastation and a lot of food waste. Europe paid millions to store unwanted meat, undrinkable "wine lakes" and mountains of grain and butter. Wageningen was facing an existential crisis. Wageningen's settlement turned to the giants of the industry to keep the University alive. Recommended:  Food Future: Serving Lab-Meat In Restaurants Reality? Nowadays, you see little of the fear and suffering during the war. What you see is the futuristic Wageningen in the modernist buildings. Wageningen, also known for 'Food Valley', has one goal: shaping the future of food. What about the WUR’s ECTS label? Wageningen University was the first Dutch university or school that was allowed to use the European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS) label. This label is awarded by the European Commission and guarantees the quality of the study programme. The university consequently applies this system, thus promoting the mobility of students within Europe and preventing study delay. Photo by I.O. Eindhoven. Philips LED lights, NASA As mentioned before, Wageningen provides stunning solutions for the threat of humanity's food problem. In highly monitored labs, plants are growing to produce more food. But there is a downside to all of this:  the plants need a lot of artificial light. Philips partly provides the lamps. Not everyone is happy about the close relationship between scientists and industry in Wageningen. Students are wondering: is it only about financing? Do researchers choose their topic based on funding? If so, how dependent is academic research? Wageningen University Has Close Ties With Industry Fresco says that the collaboration between private companies and scientists is necessary and could be positive. They work together because big companies have a considerable influence on the world. They need help to create sustainable ideas and products. It is about research into food products that are not only healthy for people but also good for the planet. Recommended:  Does Rising CO2 Benefit Plants? At Wageningen, a couple of students is planting a forest on an abandoned apple orchard. There they will grow walnuts, berries, and pumpkins. Their goal is to prove that small-scale farming is viable and environmentally friendly than big industrial farms. Before you go! Recommended:  Agrivoltaics Mutually Beneficial: Food, Water And Energy Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about agriculture? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Future Healthy Food is Shaped In The Netherlands
Future Healthy Food is Shaped In The Netherlands
Vertical Agriculture Is The Future Of Farming
The future of farming is about to get off the ground – quite literally. In a brand new warehouse in Wageningen, The Netherlands, vertical farming is taking shape, with crops being grown above one another instead of next to each other. Vertical Agriculture And Purple Light When you enter the warehouse, the first thing that stands out is purple. The plants, stacked one above the other in KeyGene’s research greenhouse, are bathing in a sea of ​​purple light. And we haven’t even seen the true extent of it yet. “We have just added some more green (light), so you can see the plants better,” says Rolf Mank. “Normally, the plants are surrounded by even more purple.” He pulls up the controls for the lights on his tablet and increases the red value – and indeed, the purple light in the greenhouse becomes even brighter. Photo by Simon Lenskens A quiet, sun-lit field and a farmer plowing it on his tractor – this image feels hopelessly out-dated when you are walking around KeyGene’s Crop Innovation Center. The center is a greenhouse that is tucked away in an industrial area on the outskirts of Wageningen, and it is where the latest technologies in the field of agriculture are tested. One of the fascinating techniques is vertical farming, the cultivation of crops above each other instead of next to each other - agriculture in 3D. Revolutionizing Urban Farming Rolf Mank is KeyGene’s expert in vertical agriculture. In the new research greenhouse, Mank has three mini-greenhouses for studying crops that are grown one on top of each other. The sides of these greenhouses, which resemble large walk-in coolers, have unique shelving for steel planters to hang in. KeyGene helps growers solve problems posed by vertical agriculture, often providing innovations for breeders that allow them to develop new varieties of plants. These problems can crop up in all sorts of unexpected ways. 'Take that purple light, for example,” says Mank. “Plants look almost black in it. This makes it very difficult for you as a grower to see if there is something wrong with the plant. So you have to add a little bit of green light to observe the plant.” The term “vertical agriculture” is often used one-to-one with urban farming; agriculture within the city limits. The idea comes from metropolises in the US and Japan, where the demand for fresh vegetables is high, and the costs of getting those vegetables into the city are high as well. This is where vertical agriculture can become the solution. When you stack empty apartment buildings full of planters, you can fill supermarket shelves with locally grown vegetables. In Tokyo and New York, as well as other places, there are already large-scale urban farms where leafy vegetables and herbs are grown under artificial light. LED Lights: The Future Of Farming Social demand isn’t the only driver behind the increasing popularity of vertical agriculture – technological innovations are also driving its growth. Indoor farming generally utilizes sodium lamps, which are the same as the ones used in streetlights. “These lamps convert a large part of the energy that they use not into light, but into heat. You must hang them at least three meters above the crops. Otherwise, they will burn.” The rapid rise of LED lighting offers a solution to this issue. Mank explains that LED lamps are much more efficient at converting energy into light and can thus be hung right above the plants. Moreover, you can play with colors. Erik Toussaint, the spokesman for KeyGene, drew a wavelength of a light wave in his notepad. “The wavelengths associated with blue, red and far-red are the ones that the plants enjoy the most,” he says, drawing arrows in his notepad. “They don’t perform as well under green. With LED lights, you can extract the green spectrum from the light beam, so that you do not have to put any energy into it anymore.” Square Roots' greenhouse in Brooklyn, New York. Image by: James en Karla Murray Vertical Agriculture: But Is The Grass Any Greener? Square Roots gives a good impression of how vertical farming looks in practice. This American company, founded by Kimbal Musk - the younger brother of Elon Musk - grows basil and lettuce in containers bathed in purple light in the heart of Brooklyn. That looks impressively advanced, but it also raises the question: is such an artificial environment good for the crop? There are indeed disadvantages to vertical agriculture. Or “disadvantages,” as Mank prefers to speak of them as of “opportunities.” "Take the tomato plant. In its current form, it is too high for vertical agriculture. At KeyGene, we have to ask: how can we adapt the plant so that it becomes shorter and thrives in a vertical greenhouse?” Mank acknowledges that they are still looking for solutions for some of the problems that vertical agriculture suffers. For example, in the case of agriculture in an enclosed space, air humidity increases rapidly, requiring expensive dehumidifiers. "And pests and diseases, which we do not know about yet, can play a role," says Mank. “Besides, many insect species cannot find their way in LED light. How does that affect plant development? And do biological pest control agents, such as predatory mites or parasitic wasps, still, do their job well? These are questions that we can answer with the help of the new research greenhouse.” Vertical Agriculture: A Logical Step Forward Or Simply A Trend? Marie-Christine Van Labeke, professor of plant physiology at the University of Ghent, agrees that vertical farming is on the rise. “The term has been known to researchers for twenty years,” she says over the phone. "But the new lighting technology has attracted a lot of attention." Van Labeke expects vertical agriculture to become commonplace in large cities in about ten to fifteen years. “Although much will depend on the price. Are the multi-layer system and the energy for the lamps cheap enough for the grower to be profitable?” In Ghent, they are researching a form of vertical agriculture that is more familiar: in greenhouses. In principle, it is possible to build a so-called 'migrating' system, in which the layers slide one by one to the top of the greenhouse to bask in the sunlight. KeyGene has a similar design, where more than ten thousand plants move slowly through two layers and stand in the sun for half the time. This means that no energy from lamps is needed. Yet Mank and Toussaint do not expect much from vertical agriculture in greenhouses. “In the Netherlands, there is sufficient light for the greenhouses and the infrastructure is up to par. The immediate demand for fresh vegetables is already very well served, "says Toussaint. Mank adds: “In vertical agriculture, we think mainly of cities like Moscow, Mumbai, and Dubai. In the Netherlands, it will at most serve a niche market. Think of a vertical greenhouse in the supermarket, where herbs are grown for promotion.” Combining New Technology With An Old Practice Those who cast aside their doubts regarding vertical agriculture quickly see the creative possibilities that the technology entails. Van Labeke shares one such example: “Exploratory studies show that plants produce antioxidants under certain light wavelengths. This can potentially be applied by putting plants under the light at that wavelength a week before harvesting. This way, you could use specific ‘light recipes’ to grow extra nutritious plants.” Marco van Schriek, the expert in digital phenotyping, which is the fully automatic measuring of plants, is tasked with taking KeyGene’s innovation one step further into the future. Van Schriek points to a large metal compartment. “The plants will enter the photo area via the conveyor belt,” he says. “The computer analyzes the photos and automatically puts measurement data on growth into the system.” By linking a system such as digital phenotyping to vertical agriculture, in which you can regulate all conditions such as light, temperature, and air humidity, you get a fully automatic, computer-controlled agriculture, in which an algorithm determines how much water and what light the plants are being administered. And what about the farmer on his tractor? "In the end, we also help that farmer," says Toussaint. “With our advanced research, we look at questions such as: how do we make a plant resistant to certain diseases? Then you will have to spray fewer pesticides, and that is better for everyone.” Important Vertical Agriculture Companies Square Roots   - Vertical agriculture in containers in the heart of Brooklyn by Kimbal Musk. AeroFarms - Large-scale domestic builder from America. Opened a 6,500 m² vertical farm in 2016, where they produce almost one million kilos of vegetables annually. Fujitsu - Japanese ICT giant, transforming one of its semiconductor plants into a vertical lettuce farm - reportedly to convince farmers to use ICT services. Plenty - New player on the market. Applies 'tower agriculture,' where the crops do not grow in stacked containers, but sideways in towers of sorts. GROWx – Amsterdam-based vertical farm that is the first to run entirely on renewable energy. This article is a translation of a Dutch piece by Volkskrant. Our Dutch readers can read it  here.   Before you go! Recommended:  Algae Canopy Miracle Works Better Than A Forrest: How? Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about Vertical Agriculture? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
The future of farming is about to get off the ground – quite literally. In a brand new warehouse in Wageningen, The Netherlands, vertical farming is taking shape, with crops being grown above one another instead of next to each other. Vertical Agriculture And Purple Light When you enter the warehouse, the first thing that stands out is purple. The plants, stacked one above the other in KeyGene’s research greenhouse, are bathing in a sea of ​​purple light. And we haven’t even seen the true extent of it yet. “We have just added some more green (light), so you can see the plants better,” says Rolf Mank. “Normally, the plants are surrounded by even more purple.” He pulls up the controls for the lights on his tablet and increases the red value – and indeed, the purple light in the greenhouse becomes even brighter. Photo by Simon Lenskens A quiet, sun-lit field and a farmer plowing it on his tractor – this image feels hopelessly out-dated when you are walking around KeyGene’s Crop Innovation Center. The center is a greenhouse that is tucked away in an industrial area on the outskirts of Wageningen, and it is where the latest technologies in the field of agriculture are tested. One of the fascinating techniques is vertical farming, the cultivation of crops above each other instead of next to each other - agriculture in 3D. Revolutionizing Urban Farming Rolf Mank is KeyGene’s expert in vertical agriculture. In the new research greenhouse, Mank has three mini-greenhouses for studying crops that are grown one on top of each other. The sides of these greenhouses, which resemble large walk-in coolers, have unique shelving for steel planters to hang in. KeyGene helps growers solve problems posed by vertical agriculture, often providing innovations for breeders that allow them to develop new varieties of plants. These problems can crop up in all sorts of unexpected ways. 'Take that purple light, for example,” says Mank. “Plants look almost black in it. This makes it very difficult for you as a grower to see if there is something wrong with the plant. So you have to add a little bit of green light to observe the plant.” The term “vertical agriculture” is often used one-to-one with urban farming; agriculture within the city limits. The idea comes from metropolises in the US and Japan, where the demand for fresh vegetables is high, and the costs of getting those vegetables into the city are high as well. This is where vertical agriculture can become the solution. When you stack empty apartment buildings full of planters, you can fill supermarket shelves with locally grown vegetables. In Tokyo and New York, as well as other places, there are already large-scale urban farms where leafy vegetables and herbs are grown under artificial light. LED Lights: The Future Of Farming Social demand isn’t the only driver behind the increasing popularity of vertical agriculture – technological innovations are also driving its growth. Indoor farming generally utilizes sodium lamps, which are the same as the ones used in streetlights. “These lamps convert a large part of the energy that they use not into light, but into heat. You must hang them at least three meters above the crops. Otherwise, they will burn.” The rapid rise of LED lighting offers a solution to this issue. Mank explains that LED lamps are much more efficient at converting energy into light and can thus be hung right above the plants. Moreover, you can play with colors. Erik Toussaint, the spokesman for KeyGene, drew a wavelength of a light wave in his notepad. “The wavelengths associated with blue, red and far-red are the ones that the plants enjoy the most,” he says, drawing arrows in his notepad. “They don’t perform as well under green. With LED lights, you can extract the green spectrum from the light beam, so that you do not have to put any energy into it anymore.” Square Roots' greenhouse in Brooklyn, New York. Image by: James en Karla Murray Vertical Agriculture: But Is The Grass Any Greener? Square Roots gives a good impression of how vertical farming looks in practice. This American company, founded by Kimbal Musk - the younger brother of Elon Musk - grows basil and lettuce in containers bathed in purple light in the heart of Brooklyn. That looks impressively advanced, but it also raises the question: is such an artificial environment good for the crop? There are indeed disadvantages to vertical agriculture. Or “disadvantages,” as Mank prefers to speak of them as of “opportunities.” "Take the tomato plant. In its current form, it is too high for vertical agriculture. At KeyGene, we have to ask: how can we adapt the plant so that it becomes shorter and thrives in a vertical greenhouse?” Mank acknowledges that they are still looking for solutions for some of the problems that vertical agriculture suffers. For example, in the case of agriculture in an enclosed space, air humidity increases rapidly, requiring expensive dehumidifiers. "And pests and diseases, which we do not know about yet, can play a role," says Mank. “Besides, many insect species cannot find their way in LED light. How does that affect plant development? And do biological pest control agents, such as predatory mites or parasitic wasps, still, do their job well? These are questions that we can answer with the help of the new research greenhouse.” Vertical Agriculture: A Logical Step Forward Or Simply A Trend? Marie-Christine Van Labeke, professor of plant physiology at the University of Ghent, agrees that vertical farming is on the rise. “The term has been known to researchers for twenty years,” she says over the phone. "But the new lighting technology has attracted a lot of attention." Van Labeke expects vertical agriculture to become commonplace in large cities in about ten to fifteen years. “Although much will depend on the price. Are the multi-layer system and the energy for the lamps cheap enough for the grower to be profitable?” In Ghent, they are researching a form of vertical agriculture that is more familiar: in greenhouses. In principle, it is possible to build a so-called 'migrating' system, in which the layers slide one by one to the top of the greenhouse to bask in the sunlight. KeyGene has a similar design, where more than ten thousand plants move slowly through two layers and stand in the sun for half the time. This means that no energy from lamps is needed. Yet Mank and Toussaint do not expect much from vertical agriculture in greenhouses. “In the Netherlands, there is sufficient light for the greenhouses and the infrastructure is up to par. The immediate demand for fresh vegetables is already very well served, "says Toussaint. Mank adds: “In vertical agriculture, we think mainly of cities like Moscow, Mumbai, and Dubai. In the Netherlands, it will at most serve a niche market. Think of a vertical greenhouse in the supermarket, where herbs are grown for promotion.” Combining New Technology With An Old Practice Those who cast aside their doubts regarding vertical agriculture quickly see the creative possibilities that the technology entails. Van Labeke shares one such example: “Exploratory studies show that plants produce antioxidants under certain light wavelengths. This can potentially be applied by putting plants under the light at that wavelength a week before harvesting. This way, you could use specific ‘light recipes’ to grow extra nutritious plants.” Marco van Schriek, the expert in digital phenotyping, which is the fully automatic measuring of plants, is tasked with taking KeyGene’s innovation one step further into the future. Van Schriek points to a large metal compartment. “The plants will enter the photo area via the conveyor belt,” he says. “The computer analyzes the photos and automatically puts measurement data on growth into the system.” By linking a system such as digital phenotyping to vertical agriculture, in which you can regulate all conditions such as light, temperature, and air humidity, you get a fully automatic, computer-controlled agriculture, in which an algorithm determines how much water and what light the plants are being administered. And what about the farmer on his tractor? "In the end, we also help that farmer," says Toussaint. “With our advanced research, we look at questions such as: how do we make a plant resistant to certain diseases? Then you will have to spray fewer pesticides, and that is better for everyone.” Important Vertical Agriculture Companies Square Roots   - Vertical agriculture in containers in the heart of Brooklyn by Kimbal Musk. AeroFarms - Large-scale domestic builder from America. Opened a 6,500 m² vertical farm in 2016, where they produce almost one million kilos of vegetables annually. Fujitsu - Japanese ICT giant, transforming one of its semiconductor plants into a vertical lettuce farm - reportedly to convince farmers to use ICT services. Plenty - New player on the market. Applies 'tower agriculture,' where the crops do not grow in stacked containers, but sideways in towers of sorts. GROWx – Amsterdam-based vertical farm that is the first to run entirely on renewable energy. This article is a translation of a Dutch piece by Volkskrant. Our Dutch readers can read it  here.   Before you go! Recommended:  Algae Canopy Miracle Works Better Than A Forrest: How? Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about Vertical Agriculture? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Vertical Agriculture Is The Future Of Farming
Vertical Agriculture Is The Future Of Farming
Superfood! Murnong Gets Back To Our Plates
Our diets have always been an important part of our lifestyles and they have changed a lot over the centuries. Foods that were previously considered delicacies are now available at any supermarket and some of our ancestor’s staples have been forgotten. This is the case with murnong, also known as yam daisy, a root vegetable from Australia that has once dominated Indigenous Australians’ menus. Today, historian, author, and agriculturalist, Bruce Pascoeis hoping to re-introduce this “superfood” and chefs across Australia are very keen to help. Key Role In Aboriginal People’s Daily Lives At first glance, murnong doesn’t look very special – in fact, one could easily mistake it for a dandelion – but the root of the plant has played a key role in Aboriginal people’s daily lives before European settlement. The root is nutty and starchy and according to Pascoe, it is eight times as nutritious as a potato. Image by: Adobe Stock, Murnong Recommended:  Urban Agriculture: Growing Healthy Food In Cities Yam daisies were easy to grow and harvest and provided a steady supply of food all year round, which made them a perfect crop for Indigenous farmers. However, when settlers came to Australia they brought over farm animals and rabbits. Rabbits, sheep, and cattle have taken a liking to the plant, and farm fields that used to be carpets of yellow yam flowers were now bare. Livestock’s hooves have also damaged the ground, making it impossible for murnong to grow back. Today can still find some yam daisies growing in the bushland in South Eastern Australia, but the plant is still quite rare in the wild. Combining Traditional Food And Modern Gastronomy Bruce Pascoe is very passionate about reviving methods of traditional horticulture and bringing back traditional foods. He is doing so with the help of Gurandgi Munjie, a group of Aboriginal men and women sharing the same dream of making native foods mainstream. Together they have been propagating various native grains, fruits, and herbs, but murnong has always been the star of the show. Pascoe calls it a superfood for its nutritional properties and chefs around the country experiment with the different ways yam daisies can be cooked and the unique flavors they can bring to the table. Recommended:  Future Food: Would You Like To Eat Lab-Meat? Ben Shewry is the chef of Melbourne’s Attica and one of Pascoe’s most enthusiastic supporters. He is known for his creativity and passion for Indigenous foods and was quoted saying: “I’m longing for the day when we can all buy them [murnong] from Gurandgi Munjie and support Aboriginal men and women to grow the crops of their culture”. It is interesting to note the versatility of murnong when it comes to gastronomy, as it can be eaten both raw and roasted or fried. When eaten raw, the root is similar in texture to radish and has a sweet coconutty and grassy taste. Once roasted or fried the flavor transforms into something similar to a salty potato. And chef Shewry recommends trying the leaves of the plant as well – with their slightly bitter taste they are perfect for salads with some red-wine vinegar dressing. It will be a while before we would be able to see murnongs aplenty, but it is already gathering a lot of attention and hopefully, more of us will be able to enjoy this 'superfood' very soon. Are there any native foods from your region that have been forgotten or perhaps even gone extinct? Share your responses with us in the comments! Before you go! Recommended:  Eating insects Is Healthy, Tasty, And Cool: the United States . Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about 'super' food? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Our diets have always been an important part of our lifestyles and they have changed a lot over the centuries. Foods that were previously considered delicacies are now available at any supermarket and some of our ancestor’s staples have been forgotten. This is the case with murnong, also known as yam daisy, a root vegetable from Australia that has once dominated Indigenous Australians’ menus. Today, historian, author, and agriculturalist, Bruce Pascoeis hoping to re-introduce this “superfood” and chefs across Australia are very keen to help. Key Role In Aboriginal People’s Daily Lives At first glance, murnong doesn’t look very special – in fact, one could easily mistake it for a dandelion – but the root of the plant has played a key role in Aboriginal people’s daily lives before European settlement. The root is nutty and starchy and according to Pascoe, it is eight times as nutritious as a potato. Image by: Adobe Stock, Murnong Recommended:  Urban Agriculture: Growing Healthy Food In Cities Yam daisies were easy to grow and harvest and provided a steady supply of food all year round, which made them a perfect crop for Indigenous farmers. However, when settlers came to Australia they brought over farm animals and rabbits. Rabbits, sheep, and cattle have taken a liking to the plant, and farm fields that used to be carpets of yellow yam flowers were now bare. Livestock’s hooves have also damaged the ground, making it impossible for murnong to grow back. Today can still find some yam daisies growing in the bushland in South Eastern Australia, but the plant is still quite rare in the wild. Combining Traditional Food And Modern Gastronomy Bruce Pascoe is very passionate about reviving methods of traditional horticulture and bringing back traditional foods. He is doing so with the help of Gurandgi Munjie, a group of Aboriginal men and women sharing the same dream of making native foods mainstream. Together they have been propagating various native grains, fruits, and herbs, but murnong has always been the star of the show. Pascoe calls it a superfood for its nutritional properties and chefs around the country experiment with the different ways yam daisies can be cooked and the unique flavors they can bring to the table. Recommended:  Future Food: Would You Like To Eat Lab-Meat? Ben Shewry is the chef of Melbourne’s Attica and one of Pascoe’s most enthusiastic supporters. He is known for his creativity and passion for Indigenous foods and was quoted saying: “I’m longing for the day when we can all buy them [murnong] from Gurandgi Munjie and support Aboriginal men and women to grow the crops of their culture”. It is interesting to note the versatility of murnong when it comes to gastronomy, as it can be eaten both raw and roasted or fried. When eaten raw, the root is similar in texture to radish and has a sweet coconutty and grassy taste. Once roasted or fried the flavor transforms into something similar to a salty potato. And chef Shewry recommends trying the leaves of the plant as well – with their slightly bitter taste they are perfect for salads with some red-wine vinegar dressing. It will be a while before we would be able to see murnongs aplenty, but it is already gathering a lot of attention and hopefully, more of us will be able to enjoy this 'superfood' very soon. Are there any native foods from your region that have been forgotten or perhaps even gone extinct? Share your responses with us in the comments! Before you go! Recommended:  Eating insects Is Healthy, Tasty, And Cool: the United States . Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about 'super' food? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Superfood! Murnong Gets Back To Our Plates
Superfood! Murnong Gets Back To Our Plates
Urban Agriculture: Growing Healthy Food In Cities
All names for this trend, which seems to take a lot of steps in several world cities. The cultivation of vegetables, fruit, edible flowers, and the keeping of bees in the city. And we are not talking about that private garden on your roof terrace, but about edible green on a large scale.  Urban Agriculture: The Floating Food Garden In New York This can be done in rooms with no daylight, but it can also be on walls, roofs, vacant lot, or even on boats. In this way, you bring fresh food, in a shorter chain, with a smaller ecological footprint, to the residents of the city. And that is badly needed because more than half of the world's population lives in the city and the United Nations predicts that by 2050 this will have risen to 66 percent. The floating food garden Swale has moored in New York. This barge with vegetables, fruit, and edible flowers is located throughout the summer at various locations in Brooklyn and the Bronx. The inventor of this project is artist Mary Mattingly. She observed two years ago that all food in New York came from outside the city. As a result, it was not only less fresh but also caused pollution by the transport and packaging that was needed. Moreover, it was not as easy to buy fresh fruit and vegetables everywhere in New York at an affordable price. That is why residents of the city can come to pick and taste for free on this boat and take home what they need.                                                         Swale, The Floating Garden in New York City Urban Agriculture: Paris Changes One Third Of It's Green Space   Paris came with the message that the municipality wants to change a third of the green space into urban agriculture. Mayor Anne Hidalgo stated that she wanted to make the French capital a greener city. The goal is to cover 100 hectares of roofs and walls with fruit and vegetables by 2020. There are already more than 70 companies that would like to participate in this project. But urban farming started earlier in Paris: in 2014, La REcyclerie already built a vast urban farm around a café located in a converted train station. Recommended:  Urban Agriculture Growing Food On A Rooftop Shanghai Want To Realize Urban City Agriculture The 100-hectare project spread throughout Paris sounds modest when you look at the initiative of the American landscape architects Sasaki Associates. They want to realize one city farm for agriculture with the same surface area in the Chinese city of Shanghai to create a sustainable food network. On this farm, several crops are grown in layers above each other. Besides, fish are also bred. Using aquaponics, the water in which the fish swim can be used as food for the plants. With this project, the architects expect to meet the growing demand for sustainable and locally produced meals in Shanghai. Urban Agriculture: Linköping's Half Office Half Vegetables Buildings The Swedish Plantagon (not to be confused with the Pentagon) designs office buildings where one half of the building consists of offices and the other half of a gigantic inner farm. The facility must, therefore, be called the World Food Building. The building in the Swedish city Linköping, should be completed by 2020. Then fruit and vegetables are grown using the hydroponic method so that not a massive amount of land is needed to be successful. The inner farm is located on the south side of the building and has a huge glass facade to let in as much light as possible. Vegetables, Fruit, Edible Flowers: The Hague Has Opened 'The Farm' The New Farm has opened its doors in The Hague with six floors and a roof full of urban agriculture. In 2016, Urban Farmers opened the doors on the roof of the former Philips building. They built here Europe's largest commercial aquaponic roof farm where urban vegetables and fish are grown. The manure from the fish is used again for the cultivation of the plants. The trend of urban agriculture can not be stopped here either, because now - two years later - not only is the roof devoted to urban farming, but the whole building has newcomers such as Haagse Zwam and Rebel Urban Farms. Recommended:  Circular Architecture 'The GreenHouse': Utrecht, Netherlands Before you go! Recommended:  Algae Canopy Miracle Works Better Than A Forrest: How? Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about urban farming? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
All names for this trend, which seems to take a lot of steps in several world cities. The cultivation of vegetables, fruit, edible flowers, and the keeping of bees in the city. And we are not talking about that private garden on your roof terrace, but about edible green on a large scale.  Urban Agriculture: The Floating Food Garden In New York This can be done in rooms with no daylight, but it can also be on walls, roofs, vacant lot, or even on boats. In this way, you bring fresh food, in a shorter chain, with a smaller ecological footprint, to the residents of the city. And that is badly needed because more than half of the world's population lives in the city and the United Nations predicts that by 2050 this will have risen to 66 percent. The floating food garden Swale has moored in New York. This barge with vegetables, fruit, and edible flowers is located throughout the summer at various locations in Brooklyn and the Bronx. The inventor of this project is artist Mary Mattingly. She observed two years ago that all food in New York came from outside the city. As a result, it was not only less fresh but also caused pollution by the transport and packaging that was needed. Moreover, it was not as easy to buy fresh fruit and vegetables everywhere in New York at an affordable price. That is why residents of the city can come to pick and taste for free on this boat and take home what they need.                                                         Swale, The Floating Garden in New York City Urban Agriculture: Paris Changes One Third Of It's Green Space   Paris came with the message that the municipality wants to change a third of the green space into urban agriculture. Mayor Anne Hidalgo stated that she wanted to make the French capital a greener city. The goal is to cover 100 hectares of roofs and walls with fruit and vegetables by 2020. There are already more than 70 companies that would like to participate in this project. But urban farming started earlier in Paris: in 2014, La REcyclerie already built a vast urban farm around a café located in a converted train station. Recommended:  Urban Agriculture Growing Food On A Rooftop Shanghai Want To Realize Urban City Agriculture The 100-hectare project spread throughout Paris sounds modest when you look at the initiative of the American landscape architects Sasaki Associates. They want to realize one city farm for agriculture with the same surface area in the Chinese city of Shanghai to create a sustainable food network. On this farm, several crops are grown in layers above each other. Besides, fish are also bred. Using aquaponics, the water in which the fish swim can be used as food for the plants. With this project, the architects expect to meet the growing demand for sustainable and locally produced meals in Shanghai. Urban Agriculture: Linköping's Half Office Half Vegetables Buildings The Swedish Plantagon (not to be confused with the Pentagon) designs office buildings where one half of the building consists of offices and the other half of a gigantic inner farm. The facility must, therefore, be called the World Food Building. The building in the Swedish city Linköping, should be completed by 2020. Then fruit and vegetables are grown using the hydroponic method so that not a massive amount of land is needed to be successful. The inner farm is located on the south side of the building and has a huge glass facade to let in as much light as possible. Vegetables, Fruit, Edible Flowers: The Hague Has Opened 'The Farm' The New Farm has opened its doors in The Hague with six floors and a roof full of urban agriculture. In 2016, Urban Farmers opened the doors on the roof of the former Philips building. They built here Europe's largest commercial aquaponic roof farm where urban vegetables and fish are grown. The manure from the fish is used again for the cultivation of the plants. The trend of urban agriculture can not be stopped here either, because now - two years later - not only is the roof devoted to urban farming, but the whole building has newcomers such as Haagse Zwam and Rebel Urban Farms. Recommended:  Circular Architecture 'The GreenHouse': Utrecht, Netherlands Before you go! Recommended:  Algae Canopy Miracle Works Better Than A Forrest: How? Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about urban farming? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Urban Agriculture: Growing Healthy Food In Cities
Urban Agriculture: Growing Healthy Food In Cities
Agri & Gardening

Growing food, either commercially or as a hobby, is one of the most satisfying things you can do. It is, however, not without challenges. Protection against natural or human-made threats, irrigation, or other soil treatments must be done with care.

Agriculture And Gardening Makes The World Go Round

Agriculture is producing food, feed, fiber, and many other desired products by cultivating certain plants. The practice of agriculture is also known as ‘farming,’ while scientists, inventors, and others devoted to improving farming methods and implements are also said to be engaged in agriculture.
Subsistence farming; who farms a small area with limited resource inputs and produces only enough food to meet the needs of his/her family. At the other end is commercial intensive agriculture, including industrial agriculture. Such farming involves large fields, large resource inputs (pesticides, fertilizers, etc.), and a high mechanization level.

Nowadays, critical attention is given to industrial agriculture. Alternatives are proposed, such as regenerative agriculture, drones, smart techniques, and blockchain. The use of fertilizer and water in large quantities is also criticized. The risks of monocultures are large. In combination with the depletion of agricultural land, the reduction of insects, and climate change, it is necessary to change our view on industrial agriculture and growing crops.

If there was an urge to develop sustainable agriculture and gardening solutions and share these topics globally, it’s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers, and influencers to write about tiny houses, your experiences, and expectations for the future at home and globally. 

Boost Global Sustainability Now, that’s what you can do together with WhatsOrb. What's in for me?

 

 

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