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Community sustainable air travel  climate change mindset and tips | Newsletter Lifestyle

Sustainable Air Travel: Climate Change Mindset And Tips

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by: WhatsOrb
sustainable air travel  climate change mindset and tips | Newsletter

Recent news reports emphasized what we secretly already knew for much longer - air travel is damaging our planet and any attempts to reduce its carbon footprint have been lackluster, to say the least. All too often, the airline companies are given a unique position by the countries in which they reside. They do not have to comply with the same rules for emissions as the rest of the (transportation) industry, with regulatory bodies citing their importance to the economy.

Waste solutions from airlines worldwide

Airlines have been given a part of the responsibility and oversight themselves, although the steps that they have taken seem small and rather insignificant in comparison. It includes options such as letting passengers buy an additional carbon offset-supplement with their airline ticket; or tentatively opting for more efficient fuels to fly on.

Other initiatives include the limiting of disposable plastic cups and packaging for the inflight meals and drinks, streamlining maintenance efforts to the point of preventive maintenance applications, and offering more vegan and locally sourced meals. The increased reliance on the autopilot will help to reduce any excess emissions, while airlines actively encourage their passengers to use public transport to get to the airport instead of the car.

Still, it barely puts a dent in the share of global air travel in climate change as a whole. The problem that the industry faces appears to be complicated - and twofold. First, the majority of commercial aircraft today still run on fossil fuel. Especially with the biggest producers still holding on to this type of fuel, and aircraft typically staying in service for decades before being retired, this will be a tough hurdle to overcome.

Second, more of us are flying than ever before in history. Our increased wealth and connectivity, combined with a greater world population, will lead to close to 5 billion passengers boarding commercial flights this year alone. A number that will, as per recent predictions made by the IATA, double in the next 15 to 20 years.

Climate change and our mindset. (Read also: Flygskam, The Trend Of Scandinavian: Shame Of Flying)

At the present time, commercial flights alone produce more than 850 tons of CO2 per year. This makes up 2% of the global carbon dioxide emissions as caused by humans. A number that may seem deceivingly small, although it is actually quite shocking - considering that there are only a small handful of actual countries who have a higher share than this. And as we are putting strict limits on the CO2 emissions of individual countries, we surely should not forego the industry that would rank just below Germany as the 7th largest polluting country in the world.

Does that mean that you should make different plans for your summer break, opting for a destination close to home? Not exactly. While it would help, it is unrealistic to assume that air travel can be easily substituted or foregone. And so you not getting on that flight would quite literally be a mere drop in the ocean. Not flying will not solve climate change. Changing our mindset will.

So what the air travel industry needs is a change of mindset. A real and coordinated attempt to drastically increase the sustainability of air travel, starting with the development of truly renewable fuel sources to cut emissions.

Planes use less fuel than in the past

Let’s start with a positive right here: there is a real and undergoing effort to switch to more fuel-efficient planes. Airline companies are more than motivated to go along in this trend, as fuel has historically been by and large their largest expense. Thus, any efforts to reduce this cost figure will make an airline increasingly more price-competitive. In recent fleet updates, every introduction of a new plane type has led to lower fuel consumption on the whole.

For comparison’s sake: today’s airplanes only use about 20% of the fuel that an airplane back in the 1960s would use. New additions to the fleet are decreasing this number even further. For all its flaws, the Boeing 787 does boast a status as being more fuel-efficient than a car - using less than 3 liters of fuel for every 100 kilometers flown. At the same time, older plane types like the Airbus A380 are being discontinued as a result of their fuel inefficiency.

Slowly, we are seeing the first stirrings of a low-emission airline industry, partially fueled - excuse the pun - by the Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation, or CORSIA - a global industry agreement setting forth ambitious targets and strict reporting rules for emissions. In order to even get close to the promised target and really start making an effort to attack climate change, we ought to explore every avenue possible to cut back the carbon footprint.

For instance, while it is great that newer planes boast a higher fuel efficiency, wouldn’t it be amazing if they would not use any fuel at all? Well, some type of fuel would obviously always be needed, but what if it were a much cleaner variety? Enter biofuels (Read also: Energy Miracle Algae. 10.000 Barrels A Day, Less CO2: 2015) one of the most sought-after solutions for sustainable air travel. Biofuels are renewable, made up of, for instance, algae, used cooking oil, forestry slash, municipal waste, or even industrial waste gases. All of those varieties have been tested in regular jet engines, with some pretty impressive results.

Last year, Quantas made headlines with the first biofuel-fueled transpacific flight, and others are quickly following suit. A number of airports already offer supplies of sustainable aviation fuel, with more and more airlines using it - lured by the proposition of it cutting emissions by up to 80%.

Electric planes by Airbus and Boeing (Read also: Electric Flying With Eveation's Alice Commuter Plane: Israel)

Even less polluting would be electric planes, which is the solution hailed by many as the future of air travel. Airbus and Boeing, the world’s largest manufacturers, are working on projects to eventually introduce an electric plane that is capable of flying long distances. For now, we’ll have to do with hybrid models, part electric and part fuel. Perhaps solar-electric planes, powered by photovoltaic cells on the wings and lithium batteries, will prove to be the holy grail - truly powered by nature.

Quicklist for a more sustainable trip

For now, these solutions may still be a long way off. In the interim, there are some things that you can do to help reduce the impact of air travel on the environment. Let’s take a look at a quick list of the most helpful tips:

  1. Avoid stopovers. Landings and takeoffs generate most of the emissions on your flight, so it’s best to stick to one takeoff and one landing per trip only.
  2. Pack light. The heavier a plane, the more fuel it will burn. Every extra kilo in your suitcase will make a difference. Even better: leave the suitcase at home and opt for carry-on packs only.
  3. Take short flights. It may seem obvious, but long flights - classified as 1500 km or more - are the largest polluters, responsible for some 80% of the industry’s total emissions.
  4. Select your plane. When booking your flight, you will see what type of plane you will be flying with. Generally, smaller planes - including the Boeing 787 Dreamliners and Airbus A350s - boast a higher fuel-efficiency. Avoid four-engined giants like the 747 or the A380.
  5. Invest in biofuels. And no, you do not have to be a real-life investor to be able to do this. Some airlines will allow their passengers to offset some of their carbon footprint by funding the development and purchase of sustainable aviation fuels.

With the right mindset and some help from us, as travelers, the future of the air travel industry looks relatively bright. Let’s keep it it that way.

https://www.whatsorb.com/category/waste

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profileimage

Breaking News, as the world changes…

In our world, WhatsOrb refuses to turn away from the changes in our society and environment which succeeds each other at a rapid pace.

For WhatsOrb, publishing on the environment is a priority. We give reporting on climate, nature, waste, lifestyle and sustainable solutions the prominence it deserves.

At this turbulent time for ‘all’ species and our planet, we are determined to inform readers about threats, consequences and solutions based on facts, not on political prejudice or business interests.

WhatsOrb Breaking News will be published as soon as urgent events from around the world and startling sustainable innovations reach us.

If there is anything we should know and publish about, please send a note to: [email protected] or write your own story on: www.whatsorb.comthe only news site which gives you a ‘sustainable voice!’

Sustainable Air Travel: Climate Change Mindset And Tips

Recent news reports emphasized what we secretly already knew for much longer - air travel is damaging our planet and any attempts to reduce its carbon footprint have been lackluster, to say the least. All too often, the airline companies are given a unique position by the countries in which they reside. They do not have to comply with the same rules for emissions as the rest of the (transportation) industry, with regulatory bodies citing their importance to the economy. Waste solutions from airlines worldwide Airlines have been given a part of the responsibility and oversight themselves, although the steps that they have taken seem small and rather insignificant in comparison. It includes options such as letting passengers buy an additional carbon offset-supplement with their airline ticket; or tentatively opting for more efficient fuels to fly on. Other initiatives include the limiting of disposable plastic cups and packaging for the inflight meals and drinks, streamlining maintenance efforts to the point of preventive maintenance applications, and offering more vegan and locally sourced meals. The increased reliance on the autopilot will help to reduce any excess emissions, while airlines actively encourage their passengers to use public transport to get to the airport instead of the car. Still, it barely puts a dent in the share of global air travel in climate change as a whole. The problem that the industry faces appears to be complicated - and twofold. First, the majority of commercial aircraft today still run on fossil fuel. Especially with the biggest producers still holding on to this type of fuel, and aircraft typically staying in service for decades before being retired, this will be a tough hurdle to overcome. Second, more of us are flying than ever before in history. Our increased wealth and connectivity, combined with a greater world population, will lead to close to 5 billion passengers boarding commercial flights this year alone. A number that will, as per recent predictions made by the IATA, double in the next 15 to 20 years. Climate change and our mindset. ( Read also:   Flygskam, The Trend Of Scandinavian: Shame Of Flying ) At the present time, commercial flights alone produce more than 850 tons of CO2 per year. This makes up 2% of the global carbon dioxide emissions as caused by humans. A number that may seem deceivingly small, although it is actually quite shocking - considering that there are only a small handful of actual countries who have a higher share than this. And as we are putting strict limits on the CO2 emissions of individual countries, we surely should not forego the industry that would rank just below Germany as the 7th largest polluting country in the world. Does that mean that you should make different plans for your summer break, opting for a destination close to home? Not exactly. While it would help, it is unrealistic to assume that air travel can be easily substituted or foregone. And so you not getting on that flight would quite literally be a mere drop in the ocean. Not flying will not solve climate change. Changing our mindset will. So what the air travel industry needs is a change of mindset. A real and coordinated attempt to drastically increase the sustainability of air travel, starting with the development of truly renewable fuel sources to cut emissions. Planes use less fuel than in the past Let’s start with a positive right here: there is a real and undergoing effort to switch to more fuel-efficient planes. Airline companies are more than motivated to go along in this trend, as fuel has historically been by and large their largest expense. Thus, any efforts to reduce this cost figure will make an airline increasingly more price-competitive. In recent fleet updates, every introduction of a new plane type has led to lower fuel consumption on the whole. For comparison’s sake: today’s airplanes only use about 20% of the fuel that an airplane back in the 1960s would use. New additions to the fleet are decreasing this number even further. For all its flaws, the Boeing 787 does boast a status as being more fuel-efficient than a car - using less than 3 liters of fuel for every 100 kilometers flown. At the same time, older plane types like the Airbus A380 are being discontinued as a result of their fuel inefficiency. Slowly, we are seeing the first stirrings of a low-emission airline industry, partially fueled - excuse the pun - by the Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation, or CORSIA - a global industry agreement setting forth ambitious targets and strict reporting rules for emissions. In order to even get close to the promised target and really start making an effort to attack climate change, we ought to explore every avenue possible to cut back the carbon footprint. For instance, while it is great that newer planes boast a higher fuel efficiency, wouldn’t it be amazing if they would not use any fuel at all? Well, some type of fuel would obviously always be needed, but what if it were a much cleaner variety? Enter biofuels ( Read also: Energy Miracle Algae. 10.000 Barrels A Day, Less CO2: 2015 ) one of the most sought-after solutions for sustainable air travel. Biofuels are renewable, made up of, for instance, algae, used cooking oil, forestry slash, municipal waste, or even industrial waste gases. All of those varieties have been tested in regular jet engines, with some pretty impressive results. Last year, Quantas made headlines with the first biofuel-fueled transpacific flight, and others are quickly following suit. A number of airports already offer supplies of sustainable aviation fuel, with more and more airlines using it - lured by the proposition of it cutting emissions by up to 80%. Electric planes by Airbus and Boeing ( Read also: Electric Flying With Eveation's Alice Commuter Plane: Israel ) Even less polluting would be electric planes, which is the solution hailed by many as the future of air travel. Airbus and Boeing, the world’s largest manufacturers, are working on projects to eventually introduce an electric plane that is capable of flying long distances. For now, we’ll have to do with hybrid models, part electric and part fuel. Perhaps solar-electric planes, powered by photovoltaic cells on the wings and lithium batteries, will prove to be the holy grail - truly powered by nature. Quicklist for a more sustainable trip For now, these solutions may still be a long way off. In the interim, there are some things that you can do to help reduce the impact of air travel on the environment. Let’s take a look at a quick list of the most helpful tips: Avoid stopovers . Landings and takeoffs generate most of the emissions on your flight, so it’s best to stick to one takeoff and one landing per trip only. Pack light. The heavier a plane, the more fuel it will burn. Every extra kilo in your suitcase will make a difference. Even better: leave the suitcase at home and opt for carry-on packs only. Take short flights . It may seem obvious, but long flights - classified as 1500 km or more - are the largest polluters, responsible for some 80% of the industry’s total emissions. Select your plane. When booking your flight, you will see what type of plane you will be flying with. Generally, smaller planes - including the Boeing 787 Dreamliners and Airbus A350s - boast a higher fuel-efficiency. Avoid four-engined giants like the 747 or the A380. Invest in biofuels . And no, you do not have to be a real-life investor to be able to do this. Some airlines will allow their passengers to offset some of their carbon footprint by funding the development and purchase of sustainable aviation fuels. With the right mindset and some help from us, as travelers, the future of the air travel industry looks relatively bright. Let’s keep it it that way. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/waste
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