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Energy solar panel that fits on a soap bubble and robots | Newsletter Solar

Solar Panel That Fits On A Soap Bubble And Robots

by: Sharai Hoekema
solar panel that fits on a soap bubble and robots | Newsletter

When it comes to solar panels, the rule is usually that the bigger, the better - or, at least, the more energy that they generate. At the same time, people are eager for solar panels that are taking up less space. This is why I am so happy to introduce a revolutionary concept - that will be invaluable in creating wireless power sources for a wide range of applications.

Solar Panel That Fits On A Soap Bubble And Robots

Recently, professor Derya Baran and her team published a groundbreaking study in Advanced Materials Technologies: solar panels that are so thin and flexible that they could fit in a soap bubble and be printed on regular printers. Now that is quite a headline.

solar panel on soap bubble
Photo by: KAUST; Anastasia Serin

Recommended: Electric Solar Car 2020 Never Needs Charging

Solar Panel As Electronic Skin

There are too many innovations that find themselves hindered by the absence of a suitable, fitting power source. If we are to truly become sustainable, renewable energy generators embedded in the device itself is the way to go. Only if there is some kind of power-generating electronic skin for robots and sensors, the sky would be the limit.

Now, the team from the King Abdullah University of Science & Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia came up with a solution. According to lead researcher Eloïse Bihar, “Rather than bulky batteries or a connection to an electrical grid, we thought of using lightweight, ultrathin organic solar cells to harvest energy from light, whether indoors or outdoors.

These organic cells represent the future. They have already been used in the production of ultralight solar panels for small devices and applications, such as drones. These are, however, inherently difficult to produce under the current manufacturing practices.    

pincet, solar panel
Photo by Anastasia Serin

Solar Panels Created With An Inkjet Printer

The solution that the KAUST team came up with is refreshingly simple: inkjet printing. This conventional technique is easy to integrate with pretty much any manufacturing process, while it shows remarkable versatility, easy customization, and low costs.

Recommended: Sustainable Green 3D Printed Boulder House: Netherlands.

So basically, you can print your solar panel. How amazing is that? The workings are relatively simple, or so the team explains: “We formulated functional inks for each the layer of the solar cell architecture. Inkjet printing is a science on its own. The intermolecular forces within the cartridge and the ink need to be overcome to eject very fine droplets from the tiny nozzle. Solvents also play an important role once the ink is deposited because the drying behavior affects film quality.

For the construction, a conductive polymer is used to sandwiches the light-capturing material in a thin film. This is then sealed using a perylene coating, which provides flexibility and prevents degradation. All of this showed when printed on glass, a power conversion efficiency of 4.73 percent. While it may not sound impressive, it certainly is - the previous record was at 4.1%.

Recommended: Printing Without Cartridge Waste: Goodbye To Polluting

Next, the team moved on to an ultra-thin flexible substrate, for which efficiency of 3.6% was reached. This is a big deal - as it may become a power source for such objects as robots or skin-based or implanted medical devices. It would open up an entirely new wealth of opportunities. Definitely something worth being excited about!

Before you go!

Recommended: Gravitricity: Key Energy Storage, Or Too Good To Be True?

Do you like this article about Gravitricity, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day.

Like to write and publish your article about renewable energy?
Send your writing & scribble with a photo to [email protected], and we will write an interesting article based on your input.

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For WhatsOrb, publishing on the environment is a priority. We give reporting on climate, nature, waste, lifestyle and sustainable solutions the prominence it deserves.

At this turbulent time for ‘all’ species and our planet, we are determined to inform readers about threats, consequences and solutions based on facts, not on political prejudice or business interests.

WhatsOrb Breaking News will be published as soon as urgent events from around the world and startling sustainable innovations reach us.

If there is anything we should know and publish about, please send a note to: [email protected] or write your own story on: www.whatsorb.comthe only news site which gives you a ‘sustainable voice!’

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Breaking News, as the world changes…

In our world, WhatsOrb refuses to turn away from the changes in our society and environment which succeeds each other at a rapid pace.

For WhatsOrb, publishing on the environment is a priority. We give reporting on climate, nature, waste, lifestyle and sustainable solutions the prominence it deserves.

At this turbulent time for ‘all’ species and our planet, we are determined to inform readers about threats, consequences and solutions based on facts, not on political prejudice or business interests.

WhatsOrb Breaking News will be published as soon as urgent events from around the world and startling sustainable innovations reach us.

If there is anything we should know and publish about, please send a note to: [email protected] or write your own story on: www.whatsorb.comthe only news site which gives you a ‘sustainable voice!’

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Solar Panel That Fits On A Soap Bubble And Robots

When it comes to solar panels, the rule is usually that the bigger, the better - or, at least, the more energy that they generate. At the same time, people are eager for solar panels that are taking up less space. This is why I am so happy to introduce a revolutionary concept - that will be invaluable in creating wireless power sources for a wide range of applications. Solar Panel That Fits On A Soap Bubble And Robots Recently, professor Derya Baran and her team published a groundbreaking study in Advanced Materials Technologies: solar panels that are so thin and flexible that they could fit in a soap bubble and be printed on regular printers. Now that is quite a headline. Photo by: KAUST; Anastasia Serin Recommended:  Electric Solar Car 2020 Never Needs Charging Solar Panel As Electronic Skin There are too many innovations that find themselves hindered by the absence of a suitable, fitting power source. If we are to truly become sustainable, renewable energy generators embedded in the device itself is the way to go. Only if there is some kind of power-generating electronic skin for robots and sensors, the sky would be the limit. Now, the team from the King Abdullah University of Science & Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia came up with a solution. According to lead researcher Eloïse Bihar, “ Rather than bulky batteries or a connection to an electrical grid, we thought of using lightweight, ultrathin organic solar cells to harvest energy from light, whether indoors or outdoors. ” These organic cells represent the future. They have already been used in the production of ultralight solar panels for small devices and applications, such as drones. These are, however, inherently difficult to produce under the current manufacturing practices.     Photo by Anastasia Serin Solar Panels Created With An Inkjet Printer The solution that the KAUST team came up with is refreshingly simple: inkjet printing. This conventional technique is easy to integrate with pretty much any manufacturing process, while it shows remarkable versatility, easy customization, and low costs. Recommended:  Sustainable Green 3D Printed Boulder House: Netherlands . So basically, you can print your solar panel. How amazing is that? The workings are relatively simple, or so the team explains: “We formulated functional inks for each the layer of the solar cell architecture. Inkjet printing is a science on its own. The intermolecular forces within the cartridge and the ink need to be overcome to eject very fine droplets from the tiny nozzle. Solvents also play an important role once the ink is deposited because the drying behavior affects film quality. ” For the construction, a conductive polymer is used to sandwiches the light-capturing material in a thin film. This is then sealed using a perylene coating, which provides flexibility and prevents degradation. All of this showed when printed on glass, a power conversion efficiency of 4.73 percent. While it may not sound impressive, it certainly is - the previous record was at 4.1%. Recommended:  Printing Without Cartridge Waste: Goodbye To Polluting Next, the team moved on to an ultra-thin flexible substrate, for which efficiency of 3.6% was reached. This is a big deal - as it may become a power source for such objects as robots or skin-based or implanted medical devices. It would open up an entirely new wealth of opportunities. Definitely something worth being excited about! Before you go! Recommended:  Gravitricity: Key Energy Storage, Or Too Good To Be True? Do you like this article about Gravitricity, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write and publish your article about renewable energy? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations