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Community how the music glamour scene gets environmentally conscious | Newsletter Society

How The Music Glamour Scene Gets Environmentally Conscious

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by: Harry May
how the music glamour scene gets environmentally conscious | Newsletter

How Musicians And DJ’s Get More Proactive On Climate Change. ‘Do we really need 27 scene changes? Do we need cars hanging from the ceiling?’ It might not be obvious questions for a superstar agent to be raising, but it's one Emma Banks, who co-founded the UK arm of one of the world's biggest music tour agents, is increasingly having to ask. She says your favourite artist's tours can have up to 60 trucks moving equipment all over the world.

1 Bands & Artists
2 Dj's
3 Glastonbury Festival

 

The Music Glamour Scene Gets Environmentally Conscious (1 Band & Artists)

And she says musicians ‘have to be proactive’ about the impact tours like that have on the environment. Emma's roster at the Creative Artists Agency ranges from other female superstars like Katy Perry, Lorde and Kylie to some of the biggest bands on the planet - including Arcade Fire, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Green Day and Muse.

Red Hot Chilli Peppers live
Red Hot Chilly Peppers Live

"The more shows you have, the more environmental impact it has."We need to think more about how we can actually not create the problem in the first place," Emma Banks tells. At any given moment it's likely one of those artists is on a world tour - flying around the world playing to thousands of fans every night.

What are the effects of noise on human health?
Exposure to prolonged or excessive noise has been shown to cause a range of health problems ranging from stress, poor concentration, productivity losses in the workplace, and communication difficulties and fatigue from lack of sleep, to more serious issues such as cardiovascular disease, cognitive impairment, tinnitus 

Celine de Joung Private plane
The Canadian singer Celine de Joung has been rated as one of the richest singers in the world over the years. So that’s a simple reason why she should have a private jet. She owns a Bombardier BD-700 Express. The plane is so special that comes in different categories and Celine choose the one that is the most comfortable for her.

Recommended: Are Bio Based Bottles Good For The Environment?

Emma's never had an act turn down a world tour because of its impact on the environment but hopes that will change soon. As fans become more conscious of their impact on the planet, there's more pressure on artists to show that they care about the impact they're having too.

Sheril Crow guitar live

Sheril Crow made a concerted effort to go green already during her 2010 tour by using biodegradable and compostable catering, reusable water bottles and biodiesel fuel, and neutralized nearly 1.5 million pounds of C02. That's the equivalent of 81 homes not using electricity for an entire year. Another co-founder of the Green Music Group, she's continued to live and tour in environmentally conscious ways, and her farming community in Tennessee is working with the NRDC to find ways to get completely off the grid.



                                                           The best of Glastonbury 2019 in 3 minutes!
                                          How The Music Glamour Scene Gets Environmentally Conscious

 

"Everybody, unless you're under a rock, is bombarded by ‘climate change’ on the TV, on the news, in the newspapers... people are talking about it. "We have to be proactive."
Emma Banks admits ‘change will be gradual’ but says "every little helps". "If everyone that's doing a huge tour cut five trucks, that would make an impact. "It's not going to make as much impact as if you didn't have any trucks, but we can't go and watch people in the dark with no microphones. That's not going to work."

Recommended: Climate Change Natural Man Made: Marching Towards Extinction

Pink Floyd equipment car 1969
Equipment and truck from Pink Floyd when equipment and transport was still very basic . Ummagumma is the fourth album by the English rock band Pink Floyd. It is a double album and was released on 7 November 1969 by Harvest Records

Emma says she's discussed the environmental cost of touring with lots of her acts - and recognises finding ways to reduce their carbon footprint ‘is a really tricky one’. "While I certainly don't want to be putting anybody out of business, I think we have to start being realistic and going, 'OK, let's just dial it down a bit'."

What level of noise is harmful?
Normal conversation is about 60 dB, a lawn mower is about 90 dB, and a loud rock concert is about 120 dB. In general, sounds above 85 are harmful, depending on how long and how often you are exposed to them and whether you wear hearing protection, such as earplugs or earmuffs.

Although it's difficult to calculate the exact impact of each individual tour, a 2016 report on the impact of live music events suggested the UK festival scene produced 19,778 tonnes of carbon emissions every year - excluding the travel of artists and fans.

Recommended: Breaking: Did You Know, All You Read About CO2 Rise Is Half The Truth

In comparison, football tournament Euro 2016 is reported to have produced a total on 2.8m tonnes, including travel of fans and players.
It's also been suggested that private jets, which many artists use to keep up with their hectic tour schedules, burn 40 times as much carbon per passenger as regular commercial flights.

Proactive Initiatives

The 1975's label Dirty Hit will donate £1 from every ticket they sell to One Tree Planted, a non-profit organisation that plants trees all over the world. Billie Eilish is banning plastic straws and offering fans a chance to win tickets by fighting climate change.

The singer has also announced a Billie Eilish Eco-Village at each show - an area where fans can learn about climate change and the importance of making a difference.

 

DJ BLOND:ISH Wants Zero-Plastic Shows (2 DJ's)

It was the end of one of the biggest shows of DJ Vivie-Ann Bakos' life, but she felt like something wasn't quite right. "I was playing at Warung in Brazil, one of the most iconic clubs in the world," says Vivie, who performs as BLOND:ISH. "At the end of the night you get a beautiful sunrise... but I could see cleaners coming out and picking up a mountain of plastic like robots. "That juxtaposition made me think, 'I need to do something about this'."

DJ BLOND:ISH plastic waste

It was there that her zero-plastic initiative, Bye Bye Plastic was born. The aim of the scheme is for venues to stop using single-use plastics like straws, cups and bottles.

Recommended: Straw Wars! The EU Sends You An Invitation

The first steps include encouraging artists to ask for ‘eco-riders’ at shows and offering promoters a hotline service to get advice on the alternatives to using plastics. A rider is a list of items musicians and artists ask for backstage at their shows.

Is noise pollution a serious threat to ecosystems?
Noise pollution has been recognized as an increasing threat for wildlife. So by affecting even one species, noise pollution – or any other environmental change – may generate indirect effects that spread from individual to individual, and eventually may affect entire communities
BLOND:ISH Bye Bye plastic

Although Vivie-Ann admits "nothing's going to change overnight" she's adamant the scheme is realistic. "Even though it seems like a huge task doesn't mean it's an impossible one.
"We're like the babysitter of the music industry. We've done a lot of the research for venues and can help hold their hands through the process. "Through small, actionable steps we can change this... it's a lot less overwhelming than it might seem to those on the outside.

"When I'm not doing music I'm talking about waste now - I had no idea this was my future." Speaking ahead of a panel on dance music's impact on the environment hosted by Newsbeat at the Brighton Music Conference, Vivie-Ann explains her recent performance at Coachella spurred her on. "Unless I was bringing it up I don't think a lot of people were talking about the plastic issue backstage."But when I did bring it up - agents, managers and DJs were super-excited to get on board and adopt the idea.”

Newsbeat Brighton Music Conference

"I don't know all the answers but I'm actively asking everyone about the topic." The DJ reminds promoters about the scheme "every time" she's booked for a show, no matter how big or small.
It's all part of her outlook that a "generational shift" is needed around attitudes towards plastics at shows so that future headliners and event organisers can help "solve the issue".

Recommended: Ibiza, Wants Sustainable Tourism Bans Disposable Plastic

"It's not easy to enforce... I wouldn't go as far to refuse a gig because I like to come with the advocate over activist approach. "This is a relevant conversation to be had and any time I've spoken about it, the conversation goes in a positive way. "Millennials want to be attached to causes and purpose-driven missions and this is one they can do that with."

What is the maximum dB for human ear?
Your ear can stand a maximum of 85 decibel as an average noise level over a day, before it is damaged by the noise. Anything above 85 decibels can damage your hearing. Normal conversation is typically situated in the 60-70 decibel range. Decibel is also known as dB or dB(A)

 

 

Proactive For A Greener Glastonbury Festival (3)

Anyone who's seen the aftermath of festivals will know that it can end up looking more like a rubbish tip than a celebration of music. About 23,500 tonnes of waste are produced each year at UK music festivals, according to Powerful Thinking - a group which looks at the festival industry. Roughly two thirds of that goes into landfill.

tents plastic Glastonbury Festival

Thousands of tents abandoned in fields (Glastonbury Festival) because festival goers think they will go to charity

But Glastonbury co-organiser Emily Eavis hopes measures the team there has taken will inspire fans to be greener at this year's event. "Sustainability and the need to live in harmony with the land, has always been vital to Glastonbury Festival," Emily says.

Single-use plastic bottles have been banned on site, anyone going to the festival has been asked to asked to leave non-essentials at home and non-compostable plates, cups, straws aren't allowed either.

Recommended: Waste In Oceans: Plastic Soup And The Great Bubble Barrier

So for anyone off to Worthy Farm this is how it's hoping to be that bit greener.

Food And Drinks Glastonbury Festival

This is the big one for Glastonbury. It won't sell single-use plastic water bottles this year. 40 tonnes of plastic bottles were recycled there in 2017. Live Nation, which run events like Reading and Leeds and Wireless, says it will get rid of single-use plastics by 2021.

Picking plastic Glastonbury festival 

"We're always thinking about how we can make Glastonbury more sustainable but the most dramatic change for this year is that we have banned the sale of single-use plastic drinks bottles on the festival site," Emily said. "Single-use plastic is a huge threat to our planet. It pollutes our environment and its unnecessary manufacture consumes too many of our natural resources and contributes massively to climate change."

Recommended: Sustainability Single-Use Care Products: Glorified Garbage

But getting round it is simple: "A lot of festivals now are keen on putting taps everywhere (Glastonbury included) but they might not have bottles for you to fill, so you might end up going to someone who's selling a single use plastic bottle instead." Bring a reusable one and also think about taking reusable cutlery, given non-recyclable utensils, plates, cups, straws and even sauce sachets have all been banned at Glastonbury.

Can music control emotions?
Most of us also listen to music in order to experience emotions. Perhaps the primary reason for music listening is the power that music has in stirring our emotions. Music has been reported to evoke the full range of human emotion (1, 2): from sad, nostalgic, and tense, to happy, relaxed, calm, and joyous

How The Music Glamour Scene Gets Environmentally Conscious: Re-use Your Raincoats 

3 people raincoats Glastonbury

But plastic isn't just a festival foe when it comes to bottles. After-all if you're going to a  you'll be lucky to avoid a smattering of rain. "If you do take a plastic poncho, afterwards pack it up and keep it in your bag so if it rains throughout the rest of the festival you can shove it back on. You can also sit on them, which is useful, if it gets muddy," she says. It's all part the push to reduce single use plastic. The best way to avoid plastic pollution and the wasting of resources that go into making it, is simply to reduce plastic use.

Recommended: Bioplastic From Fish Scale And Skin Composts Quickly: UK

Environmentally Conscious: Transport

With thousands of people making their way across the country, transport can have a huge impact on CO2 emissions. Those heading to Glastonbury are being urged to use public transport. Coaches are often organised by the festival companies. There are loads of options for Glasto, plus it saves you some petrol money and helps the planet.

Blue, white vintage bus lady
"They're super easy and drive you right up to the site. People usually come in twos or threes - on a coach you can have 50 or 60 people. That's saving on probably 20 cars worth of carbon emissions. "Also, coaches mean you get to meet people beforehand. You can start that festival vibe a couple of hours earlier."

Music Glamour Scene Gets Environmentally Conscious: Washing (or not washing)

Some events are lucky enough to have showers, but people who have camped at a lot of festivals will know the "wet wipe wash" all too well. Sadly, you guessed it, most wet wipes are not biodegradable.
Organisers at some festivals want you to bring a wash cloth and bar of soap for a strip wash, rather than use the former festival staple, the wet wipe.

Man in mud

But the best advice is simpler and smellier. "People worry too much about washing, people know you're at a festival and it's hot. Just enjoy it."

Environmentally Conscious: Tents

Emily Eavis says your Glastonbury tent can last a lifetime, rather than being binned after just one weekend. "It's awful to imagine any tent could be branded as single-use, especially as so many precious resources are used to make it," she said.

Glastonbury tents, water

"We would love everyone to come to the festival with a sturdy, fit-for-purpose tent that they will take home with them again and reuse over a lifetime of camping experiences.
There can be misconceptions about leaving tents at festivals. Some think they'll be given to charity, but often that's not the case.

What is the loudest sound?
The Loudest Sound Ever Heard. On 27 August 1883, the Earth let out a noise louder than any it has made since. It was 10:02 AM local time when the sound emerged from the island of Krakatoa, which sits between Java and Sumatra in Indonesia.

"Speak to somebody in your family and see if they've got a tent you can borrow. If you're a keen festival goer, having a tent you can rely on every year is much better than having to go out and buy one each year."

The Music Glamour Scene: The Surprising Stuff

More than 60 tonnes of paper and card, 32 tonnes of glass and 45 tonnes of cans were recycled from Glastobury 2017. But you know that stuff's bad for the planet. But you might not realise that even humble festival glitter can be a problem. Usually, it's not biodegradable, but some companies are changing their products. Just search for eco-glitters, once you've worn it you can wash it off and it will degrade away. Lots of people making small changes can achieve a lot.

Glastonbury glitter woman face

"We want to show everyone just what can be done if we all shift our mindset - we can change our behaviour and make a huge leap to going plastic-free."

Before you go!

Recommended: Earth Matters. Nature And Us: What Was, What’s Left: Hope?

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Breaking News, as the world changes…

In our world, WhatsOrb refuses to turn away from the changes in our society and environment which succeeds each other at a rapid pace.

For WhatsOrb, publishing on the environment is a priority. We give reporting on climate, nature, waste, lifestyle and sustainable solutions the prominence it deserves.

At this turbulent time for ‘all’ species and our planet, we are determined to inform readers about threats, consequences and solutions based on facts, not on political prejudice or business interests.

WhatsOrb Breaking News will be published as soon as urgent events from around the world and startling sustainable innovations reach us.

If there is anything we should know and publish about, please send a note to: [email protected] or write your own story on: www.whatsorb.comthe only news site which gives you a ‘sustainable voice!’

How The Music Glamour Scene Gets Environmentally Conscious

How Musicians And DJ’s Get More Proactive On Climate Change. ‘Do we really need 27 scene changes? Do we need cars hanging from the ceiling?’ It might not be obvious questions for a superstar agent to be raising, but it's one Emma Banks, who co-founded the UK arm of one of the world's biggest music tour agents, is increasingly having to ask. She says your favourite artist's tours can have up to 60 trucks moving equipment all over the world. 1 Bands & Artists 2 Dj's 3 Glastonbury Festival   The Music Glamour Scene Gets Environmentally Conscious (1 Band & Artists) And she says musicians ‘have to be proactive’ about the impact tours like that have on the environment. Emma's roster at the Creative Artists Agency ranges from other female superstars like Katy Perry, Lorde and Kylie to some of the biggest bands on the planet - including Arcade Fire, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Green Day and Muse. Red Hot Chilly Peppers Live "The more shows you have, the more environmental impact it has."We need to think more about how we can actually not create the problem in the first place," Emma Banks tells. At any given moment it's likely one of those artists is on a world tour - flying around the world playing to thousands of fans every night. What are the effects of noise on human health? Exposure to prolonged or excessive noise has been shown to cause a range of health problems ranging from stress, poor concentration, productivity losses in the workplace, and communication difficulties and fatigue from lack of sleep, to more serious issues such as cardiovascular disease, cognitive impairment, tinnitus  The Canadian singer Celine de Joung has been rated as one of the richest singers in the world over the years. So that’s a simple reason why she should have a private jet. She owns a Bombardier BD-700 Express. The plane is so special that comes in different categories and Celine choose the one that is the most comfortable for her. Recommended:  Are Bio Based Bottles Good For The Environment? Emma's never had an act turn down a world tour because of its impact on the environment but hopes that will change soon. As fans become more conscious of their impact on the planet, there's more pressure on artists to show that they care about the impact they're having too. Sheril Crow made a concerted effort to go green already during her 2010 tour by using biodegradable and compostable catering, reusable water bottles and biodiesel fuel, and neutralized nearly 1.5 million pounds of C02. That's the equivalent of 81 homes not using electricity for an entire year. Another co-founder of the Green Music Group, she's continued to live and tour in environmentally conscious ways, and her farming community in Tennessee is working with the NRDC to find ways to get completely off the grid. {youtube}                                                            The best of Glastonbury 2019 in 3 minutes!                                           How The Music Glamour Scene Gets Environmentally Conscious   "Everybody, unless you're under a rock, is bombarded by ‘climate change’ on the TV, on the news, in the newspapers... people are talking about it. "We have to be proactive." Emma Banks admits ‘change will be gradual’ but says "every little helps". "If everyone that's doing a huge tour cut five trucks, that would make an impact. "It's not going to make as much impact as if you didn't have any trucks, but we can't go and watch people in the dark with no microphones. That's not going to work." Recommended:  Climate Change Natural Man Made: Marching Towards Extinction Equipment and truck from Pink Floyd when equipment and transport was still very basic . Ummagumma is the fourth album by the English rock band Pink Floyd. It is a double album and was released on 7 November 1969 by Harvest Records Emma says she's discussed the environmental cost of touring with lots of her acts - and recognises finding ways to reduce their carbon footprint ‘is a really tricky one’. "While I certainly don't want to be putting anybody out of business, I think we have to start being realistic and going, 'OK, let's just dial it down a bit'." What level of noise is harmful? Normal conversation is about 60 dB, a lawn mower is about 90 dB, and a loud rock concert is about 120 dB. In general, sounds above 85 are harmful, depending on how long and how often you are exposed to them and whether you wear hearing protection, such as earplugs or earmuffs. Although it's difficult to calculate the exact impact of each individual tour, a 2016 report on the impact of live music events suggested the UK festival scene produced 19,778 tonnes of carbon emissions every year - excluding the travel of artists and fans. Recommended:  Breaking: Did You Know, All You Read About CO2 Rise Is Half The Truth In comparison, football tournament Euro 2016 is reported to have produced a total on 2.8m tonnes, including travel of fans and players. It's also been suggested that private jets, which many artists use to keep up with their hectic tour schedules, burn 40 times as much carbon per passenger as regular commercial flights. Proactive Initiatives The 1975's label Dirty Hit will donate £1 from every ticket they sell to One Tree Planted, a non-profit organisation that plants trees all over the world. Billie Eilish is banning plastic straws and offering fans a chance to win tickets by fighting climate change. The singer has also announced a Billie Eilish Eco-Village at each show - an area where fans can learn about climate change and the importance of making a difference.   DJ BLOND:ISH Wants Zero-Plastic Shows (2 DJ's) It was the end of one of the biggest shows of DJ Vivie-Ann Bakos' life, but she felt like something wasn't quite right. "I was playing at Warung in Brazil, one of the most iconic clubs in the world," says Vivie, who performs as BLOND:ISH. "At the end of the night you get a beautiful sunrise... but I could see cleaners coming out and picking up a mountain of plastic like robots. "That juxtaposition made me think, 'I need to do something about this'." It was there that her zero-plastic initiative, Bye Bye Plastic was born. The aim of the scheme is for venues to stop using single-use plastics like straws, cups and bottles. Recommended:  Straw Wars! The EU Sends You An Invitation The first steps include encouraging artists to ask for ‘eco-riders’ at shows and offering promoters a hotline service to get advice on the alternatives to using plastics. A rider is a list of items musicians and artists ask for backstage at their shows. Is noise pollution a serious threat to ecosystems? Noise pollution has been recognized as an increasing threat for wildlife. So by affecting even one species, noise pollution – or any other environmental change – may generate indirect effects that spread from individual to individual, and eventually may affect entire communities Although Vivie-Ann admits "nothing's going to change overnight" she's adamant the scheme is realistic. "Even though it seems like a huge task doesn't mean it's an impossible one. "We're like the babysitter of the music industry. We've done a lot of the research for venues and can help hold their hands through the process. "Through small, actionable steps we can change this... it's a lot less overwhelming than it might seem to those on the outside. "When I'm not doing music I'm talking about waste now - I had no idea this was my future." Speaking ahead of a panel on dance music's impact on the environment hosted by Newsbeat at the Brighton Music Conference, Vivie-Ann explains her recent performance at Coachella spurred her on. "Unless I was bringing it up I don't think a lot of people were talking about the plastic issue backstage."But when I did bring it up - agents, managers and DJs were super-excited to get on board and adopt the idea.” "I don't know all the answers but I'm actively asking everyone about the topic." The DJ reminds promoters about the scheme "every time" she's booked for a show, no matter how big or small. It's all part of her outlook that a "generational shift" is needed around attitudes towards plastics at shows so that future headliners and event organisers can help "solve the issue". Recommended: Ibiza, Wants Sustainable Tourism Bans Disposable Plastic "It's not easy to enforce... I wouldn't go as far to refuse a gig because I like to come with the advocate over activist approach. "This is a relevant conversation to be had and any time I've spoken about it, the conversation goes in a positive way. "Millennials want to be attached to causes and purpose-driven missions and this is one they can do that with." What is the maximum dB for human ear? Your ear can stand a maximum of 85 decibel as an average noise level over a day, before it is damaged by the noise. Anything above 85 decibels can damage your hearing. Normal conversation is typically situated in the 60-70 decibel range. Decibel is also known as dB or dB(A)     Proactive For A Greener Glastonbury Festival (3) Anyone who's seen the aftermath of festivals will know that it can end up looking more like a rubbish tip than a celebration of music. About 23,500 tonnes of waste are produced each year at UK music festivals, according to Powerful Thinking - a group which looks at the festival industry. Roughly two thirds of that goes into landfill. Thousands of tents abandoned in fields (Glastonbury Festival) because festival goers think they will go to charity But Glastonbury co-organiser Emily Eavis hopes measures the team there has taken will inspire fans to be greener at this year's event. "Sustainability and the need to live in harmony with the land, has always been vital to Glastonbury Festival," Emily says. Single-use plastic bottles have been banned on site, anyone going to the festival has been asked to asked to leave non-essentials at home and non-compostable plates, cups, straws aren't allowed either. Recommended:  Waste In Oceans: Plastic Soup And The Great Bubble Barrier So for anyone off to Worthy Farm this is how it's hoping to be that bit greener. Food And Drinks Glastonbury Festival This is the big one for Glastonbury. It won't sell single-use plastic water bottles this year. 40 tonnes of plastic bottles were recycled there in 2017. Live Nation, which run events like Reading and Leeds and Wireless, says it will get rid of single-use plastics by 2021.   "We're always thinking about how we can make Glastonbury more sustainable but the most dramatic change for this year is that we have banned the sale of single-use plastic drinks bottles on the festival site," Emily said. "Single-use plastic is a huge threat to our planet. It pollutes our environment and its unnecessary manufacture consumes too many of our natural resources and contributes massively to climate change." Recommended: Sustainability Single-Use Care Products: Glorified Garbage But getting round it is simple: "A lot of festivals now are keen on putting taps everywhere (Glastonbury included) but they might not have bottles for you to fill, so you might end up going to someone who's selling a single use plastic bottle instead." Bring a reusable one and also think about taking reusable cutlery, given non-recyclable utensils, plates, cups, straws and even sauce sachets have all been banned at Glastonbury. Can music control emotions? Most of us also listen to music in order to experience emotions. Perhaps the primary reason for music listening is the power that music has in stirring our emotions. Music has been reported to evoke the full range of human emotion (1, 2): from sad, nostalgic, and tense, to happy, relaxed, calm, and joyous How The Music Glamour Scene Gets Environmentally Conscious: Re-use Your Raincoats  But plastic isn't just a festival foe when it comes to bottles. After-all if you're going to a  you'll be lucky to avoid a smattering of rain. "If you do take a plastic poncho, afterwards pack it up and keep it in your bag so if it rains throughout the rest of the festival you can shove it back on. You can also sit on them, which is useful, if it gets muddy," she says. It's all part the push to reduce single use plastic. The best way to avoid plastic pollution and the wasting of resources that go into making it, is simply to reduce plastic use. Recommended:  Bioplastic From Fish Scale And Skin Composts Quickly: UK Environmentally Conscious: Transport With thousands of people making their way across the country, transport can have a huge impact on CO2 emissions. Those heading to Glastonbury are being urged to use public transport. Coaches are often organised by the festival companies. There are loads of options for Glasto, plus it saves you some petrol money and helps the planet. "They're super easy and drive you right up to the site. People usually come in twos or threes - on a coach you can have 50 or 60 people. That's saving on probably 20 cars worth of carbon emissions. "Also, coaches mean you get to meet people beforehand. You can start that festival vibe a couple of hours earlier." Music Glamour Scene Gets Environmentally Conscious: Washing (or not washing) Some events are lucky enough to have showers, but people who have camped at a lot of festivals will know the "wet wipe wash" all too well. Sadly, you guessed it, most wet wipes are not biodegradable. Organisers at some festivals want you to bring a wash cloth and bar of soap for a strip wash, rather than use the former festival staple, the wet wipe. But the best advice is simpler and smellier. "People worry too much about washing, people know you're at a festival and it's hot. Just enjoy it." Environmentally Conscious: Tents Emily Eavis says your Glastonbury tent can last a lifetime, rather than being binned after just one weekend. "It's awful to imagine any tent could be branded as single-use, especially as so many precious resources are used to make it," she said. "We would love everyone to come to the festival with a sturdy, fit-for-purpose tent that they will take home with them again and reuse over a lifetime of camping experiences. There can be misconceptions about leaving tents at festivals. Some think they'll be given to charity, but often that's not the case. What is the loudest sound? The Loudest Sound Ever Heard. On 27 August 1883, the Earth let out a noise louder than any it has made since. It was 10:02 AM local time when the sound emerged from the island of Krakatoa, which sits between Java and Sumatra in Indonesia. "Speak to somebody in your family and see if they've got a tent you can borrow. If you're a keen festival goer, having a tent you can rely on every year is much better than having to go out and buy one each year." The Music Glamour Scene: The Surprising Stuff More than 60 tonnes of paper and card, 32 tonnes of glass and 45 tonnes of cans were recycled from Glastobury 2017. But you know that stuff's bad for the planet. But you might not realise that even humble festival glitter can be a problem. Usually, it's not biodegradable, but some companies are changing their products. Just search for eco-glitters, once you've worn it you can wash it off and it will degrade away. Lots of people making small changes can achieve a lot. "We want to show everyone just what can be done if we all shift our mindset - we can change our behaviour and make a huge leap to going plastic-free." Before you go! Recommended:  Earth Matters. Nature And Us: What Was, What’s Left: Hope? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about your 'festival experience'? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
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