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Climate heatwaves  nothing new  how to protect your self | Newsletter General

Heatwaves: Nothing New! How To Protect Your Self

by: Hans van der Broek
heatwaves  nothing new  how to protect your self | Newsletter

Unless you have been living under a rock, you won’t have failed to notice that it’s rather hot outside. While many of us are basking in the glorious sunshine, it’s not great news for everyone.

Heatwaves: Nothing New! How To Protect Your Self

Authorities have urged children and older people to stay indoors and issued severe warnings against dehydration and heatstroke as an unprecedented week-long heatwave begins its advance across continental Europe. Meteorologists said temperatures would reach or even exceed 40C from Spain to Switzerland as hot air was sucked up from the Sahara by combining a storm stalling over the Atlantic and high pressure over central Europe.

'El inferno (Hell) Is Coming,'

High humidity meant it would feel like 47C, experts warned. 'El inferno (hell) is coming,' tweeted the TV meteorologist Silvia Laplana in Spain, where the AEMET weather service forecast temperatures of 42C by Thursday (27-06-2019) in the Ebro, Tagus, Guadiana, and Guadalquivir valleys and warned of an ‘extreme risk’ of forest fires.

In France, officials in Paris set up 'cool rooms' in municipal buildings, opened pools for late-night swimming, and installed extra drinking fountains as temperatures in the capital reached 34C on Monday and were forecast to climb further later week. “I’m worried about people who are downplaying this, who are continuing to exercise as usual or stay out in the sun,” the health minister, Agnès Buzyn, said. “This affects all of us; nobody is a superman when it comes to dealing with the extreme heat we’re going to see on Thursday and Friday,” she told a press conference. Emmanuel Demaël of Météo-France said the heatwave was unprecedented “because it’s hitting so early in June – we haven’t seen this since 1947.” Record monthly and all-time highs were likely to be set in several parts of the country, Demaël predicted, and night-time temperatures were unlikely to fall below 20C.
School exams were postponed until next week, charities distributed water to homeless people, and sales of fans quadrupled. France’s deadliest recent heatwave was in August 2003, when almost 15,000 mainly older adults died as hospitals were overwhelmed.

In Italy, “the most intense heatwave in a decade” was underway, with hospitals preparing to deal with a wave of heat-related illnesses and the health ministry suggesting army doctors may be needed to counter a shortage of medics. Highs of 37C to 40C were forecast across the north and center, including Rome, Florence, Bologna, Milan, and Turin. Several Italian cities expected to set new records for the highest ever June temperatures. Authorities in Rome warned of the health risk from uncollected rubbish piled up on the capital’s streets, and eight tourists – including a Briton – were fined €450 each on Sunday for cooling off in the city’s fountains.

Man-in-yellow-shirt-and-woman-in-inflatable-pool

Recommended: Heat Waves In The Past And Recently This is the follow-up to this article!

Sabine Krüger of the German state meteorological service, DWD, said the June record of 38.2C, set in Frankfurt in 1947, was likely to be beaten by the middle or end of this week, with 100 hours of the sunshine forecast before Friday, temperatures in Frankfurt set to reach 39C or even 40C by Wednesday and Berlin predicted to swelter in 37C. DWD on Monday warned citizens to take extra precaution because of the extreme heat and high UV radiation over the coming days: “Avoid staying outdoors for long periods between 11 am and 3 pm,” it said, adding that sunblock, sunglasses, and a sun hat were advisable even in the shade. Animal protection groups also warned pet owners to avoid leaving dogs or cats in cars unattended.
The heatwave comes after storms, and records rainfall caused significant problems in parts of Bavaria this weekend, with the Munich fire brigade called out 50 times and flights into and out of Munich airport suspended on Saturday evening.

In Switzerland, MeteoSwiss issued a “severe danger” level four heat alert for several parts of the country, warning of temperatures over 33C and reaching 37C or even 39C in some places from Tuesday until Thursday. Several all-time highs were likely to be recorded, it said.

Even Scandinavia looks unlikely to be spared, with parts of southern Denmark and Sweden predicted to reach 30C by Tuesday – and to feel more like a thoroughly un-Scandinavian 35C, the Danish broadcaster TV2 said.

More extended-range weather forecasts show summer temperatures throughout July and August are expected to be higher than average this year, rivaling those of 2018. According to the European Environment Agency, it was one of the three warmest years on record on the continent.

Scientists have said last year’s heatwave, which led to increased mortality rates, a dramatic decline in crop yields, the shutdown of nuclear power plants, and wildfires inside the Arctic Circle, was linked to the climate emergency. Meteorologists warn that such heatwaves are likely to become more frequent even if countries succeed in their commitments to limit global temperature increases to 1.5C as part of the 2015 Paris climate accord. The EU has pledged to cut carbon emissions to 40% below 1990 levels by 2030.

crowded-beach-with-sun-umbrellas
Photo by: Aldric RIVAT Unsplash

How to cope with the hot weather 

For millions more, it means a daily struggle in the rising temperatures, which are expected to peak at 37C-40C. There are some steps, however, that you can take to make life a little more bearable. The main problems likely to occur in hot weather are dehydration, heat exhaustion, or heat stroke. Overheating could also be an issue for people who already have issues with their heart or breathing. The health service says that the very young and very old are the most vulnerable plus people with mobility problems, mental health issues, people who misuse drugs or alcohol, and people on medication that affect body temperature. Even those who are physically active are also at risk of some problems, such as people who do sports or manual work.
The elderly and people with lung or heart problems have been advised to reduce strenuous exercise and physical exertion. However, there are things that you can do to try to help yourself during the hot spell.

  • Avoid the heat by not going out between 11 am and 3 pm, which is the hottest part of the day.
  • Keep rooms cool by using shutting the windows and pulling down the shades if the temperatures are hotter outdoors than inside.
  • Shut windows and pull down the shades when it is hotter outside
  • You can open the windows for ventilation when it is cooler.
  • Avoid the heat: stay out of the sun and don’t go out between 11 am and 3 pm (the hottest part of the day) if you’re vulnerable to the effects of heat.
  • Keep rooms cool by using shades or reflective material outside the windows. If this isn’t possible, use light-colored curtains and keep them closed (metallic blinds and dark curtains can make the room hotter). Have cool baths or showers, and splash yourself with cool water
  • Drink cold drinks regularly, such as water and diluted fruit juice
  • Eat small meals and eat more often.
  • Avoid excess alcohol, caffeine (tea, coffee, and cola), or drinks high in sugar.
  • Listen to alerts on the radio, TV, and social media about keeping cool. Plan to make sure you have enough supplies, such as food, water, and any medications you need
  • Identify the coolest room in the house so you know where to go to keep cool.
  • Wear loose, cool clothing and a hat and sunglasses if you go outdoors
  • Check up on friends, relatives, and neighbors who may be less able to look after themselves.
  • Never leave children or pets alone in enclosed vehicles.
  • Check on your animals frequently to ensure that they are not suffering from the heat.

     dog-joining-water-from-a-sprinkler

And remember, even if you are fine, others around you might not be, so check up on friends, relatives, and neighbors who might be less able to look after themselves!

Recognize a heatstroke

Heatstroke is the most severe form of heat injury and is considered a medical emergency. If you suspect that someone has a heat stroke - also known as sunstroke - call emergency immediately and give first aid until paramedics arrive.

  • Heatstroke can kill or cause damage to the brain and other internal organs. Although heat stroke mainly affects people over age 50, it also takes a toll on healthy young athletes.
  • Heatstroke often occurs as a progression from milder heat-related illnesses such as heat cramps, heat syncope (fainting), and heat exhaustion. But it can strike even if you have no previous signs of heat injury.
  • Heatstroke results from prolonged exposure to high temperatures, usually combined with dehydration, leading to its failure to control the body's temperature control system. The medical definition of heatstroke is a core body temperature greater than 104 degrees Fahrenheit (40C), with complications involving the central nervous system after exposure to high temperatures.
  • Other common symptoms include nausea, seizures, confusion, disorientation, and sometimes loss of consciousness or coma.

graph-with-info-about-a-heatstroke

Symptoms of Heat Stroke

  • The hallmark symptom of heatstroke is a core body temperature above 104 degrees Fahrenheit (40C). But fainting may be the first sign.
  • Throbbing headache
  • Dizziness and light-headedness
  • Lack of sweating despite the heat
  • Red, hot, and dry skin
  • Muscle weakness or cramps
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Rapid heartbeat, which may be either strong or weak
  • Rapid, shallow breathing
  • Behavioral changes such as confusion, disorientation, or staggering
  • Seizures
  • Unconsciousness

Treatment

Heatstroke treatment centers on cooling your body to an average temperature to prevent or reduce damage to your brain and vital organs. To do this, your doctor may take these steps:

  • Immerse you in cold water. A bath of cold or ice water has been proved to be the most effective way of quickly lowering your core body temperature. The quicker you can receive cold water immersion, the less risk of death and organ damage.
  • Use evaporation cooling techniques. If cold water immersion is unavailable, health care workers may try to lower your body temperature using an evaporation method. Cool water is misted on your body while warm air is fanned over you, causing the water to evaporate and cool your skin.
  • Pack you with ice and cooling blankets. Another method is to wrap you in a special cooling blanket and apply ice packs to your groin, neck, back, and armpits to lower your temperature.
  • Give you medications to stop your shivering. If treatments to lower your body temperature make you shiver, your doctor may give you a muscle relaxant, such as a benzodiazepine. Shivering increases your body temperature, making treatment less effective.

Before you go!

Recommended: Trumps Melting Head Is About Climate Change

Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day.

Like to write your article about how you cope with heatwaves?
Send your writing & scribble with a photo to [email protected], and we will write an interesting article based on your input.

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Breaking News, as the world changes…

In our world, WhatsOrb refuses to turn away from the changes in our society and environment which succeeds each other at a rapid pace.

For WhatsOrb, publishing on the environment is a priority. We give reporting on climate, nature, waste, lifestyle and sustainable solutions the prominence it deserves.

At this turbulent time for ‘all’ species and our planet, we are determined to inform readers about threats, consequences and solutions based on facts, not on political prejudice or business interests.

WhatsOrb Breaking News will be published as soon as urgent events from around the world and startling sustainable innovations reach us.

If there is anything we should know and publish about, please send a note to: [email protected] or write your own story on: www.whatsorb.comthe only news site which gives you a ‘sustainable voice!’

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More like this:

Heatwaves: Nothing New! How To Protect Your Self

Unless you have been living under a rock, you won’t have failed to notice that it’s rather hot outside. While many of us are basking in the glorious sunshine, it’s not great news for everyone. Heatwaves: Nothing New! How To Protect Your Self Authorities have urged children and older people to stay indoors and issued severe warnings against dehydration and heatstroke as an unprecedented week-long heatwave begins its advance across continental Europe. Meteorologists said temperatures would reach or even exceed 40C from Spain to Switzerland as hot air was sucked up from the Sahara by combining a storm stalling over the Atlantic and high pressure over central Europe. 'El inferno (Hell) Is Coming,' High humidity meant it would feel like 47C, experts warned. 'El inferno (hell) is coming,' tweeted the TV meteorologist Silvia Laplana in Spain, where the AEMET weather service forecast temperatures of 42C by Thursday (27-06-2019) in the Ebro, Tagus, Guadiana, and Guadalquivir valleys and warned of an ‘extreme risk’ of forest fires. In France, officials in Paris set up 'cool rooms' in municipal buildings, opened pools for late-night swimming, and installed extra drinking fountains as temperatures in the capital reached 34C on Monday and were forecast to climb further later week. “I’m worried about people who are downplaying this, who are continuing to exercise as usual or stay out in the sun,” the health minister, Agnès Buzyn, said. “This affects all of us; nobody is a superman when it comes to dealing with the extreme heat we’re going to see on Thursday and Friday,” she told a press conference. Emmanuel Demaël of Météo-France said the heatwave was unprecedented “because it’s hitting so early in June – we haven’t seen this since 1947.” Record monthly and all-time highs were likely to be set in several parts of the country, Demaël predicted, and night-time temperatures were unlikely to fall below 20C. School exams were postponed until next week, charities distributed water to homeless people, and sales of fans quadrupled. France’s deadliest recent heatwave was in August 2003, when almost 15,000 mainly older adults died as hospitals were overwhelmed. In Italy, “the most intense heatwave in a decade” was underway, with hospitals preparing to deal with a wave of heat-related illnesses and the health ministry suggesting army doctors may be needed to counter a shortage of medics. Highs of 37C to 40C were forecast across the north and center, including Rome, Florence, Bologna, Milan, and Turin. Several Italian cities expected to set new records for the highest ever June temperatures. Authorities in Rome warned of the health risk from uncollected rubbish piled up on the capital’s streets, and eight tourists – including a Briton – were fined €450 each on Sunday for cooling off in the city’s fountains. Recommended:  Heat Waves In The Past And Recently  This is the follow-up to this article! Sabine Krüger of the German state meteorological service, DWD, said the June record of 38.2C, set in Frankfurt in 1947, was likely to be beaten by the middle or end of this week, with 100 hours of the sunshine forecast before Friday, temperatures in Frankfurt set to reach 39C or even 40C by Wednesday and Berlin predicted to swelter in 37C. DWD on Monday warned citizens to take extra precaution because of the extreme heat and high UV radiation over the coming days: “Avoid staying outdoors for long periods between 11 am and 3 pm,” it said, adding that sunblock, sunglasses, and a sun hat were advisable even in the shade. Animal protection groups also warned pet owners to avoid leaving dogs or cats in cars unattended. The heatwave comes after storms, and records rainfall caused significant problems in parts of Bavaria this weekend, with the Munich fire brigade called out 50 times and flights into and out of Munich airport suspended on Saturday evening. In Switzerland, MeteoSwiss issued a “severe danger” level four heat alert for several parts of the country, warning of temperatures over 33C and reaching 37C or even 39C in some places from Tuesday until Thursday. Several all-time highs were likely to be recorded, it said. Even Scandinavia looks unlikely to be spared, with parts of southern Denmark and Sweden predicted to reach 30C by Tuesday – and to feel more like a thoroughly un-Scandinavian 35C, the Danish broadcaster TV2 said. More extended-range weather forecasts show summer temperatures throughout July and August are expected to be higher than average this year, rivaling those of 2018. According to the European Environment Agency, it was one of the three warmest years on record on the continent. Scientists have said last year’s heatwave, which led to increased mortality rates, a dramatic decline in crop yields, the shutdown of nuclear power plants, and wildfires inside the Arctic Circle, was linked to the climate emergency. Meteorologists warn that such heatwaves are likely to become more frequent even if countries succeed in their commitments to limit global temperature increases to 1.5C as part of the 2015 Paris climate accord. The EU has pledged to cut carbon emissions to 40% below 1990 levels by 2030. Photo by:  Aldric RIVAT  Unsplash How to cope with the hot weather  For millions more, it means a daily struggle in the rising temperatures, which are expected to peak at 37C-40C. There are some steps, however, that you can take to make life a little more bearable. The main problems likely to occur in hot weather are dehydration, heat exhaustion, or heat stroke. Overheating could also be an issue for people who already have issues with their heart or breathing. The health service says that the very young and very old are the most vulnerable plus people with mobility problems, mental health issues, people who misuse drugs or alcohol, and people on medication that affect body temperature. Even those who are physically active are also at risk of some problems, such as people who do sports or manual work. The elderly and people with lung or heart problems have been advised to reduce strenuous exercise and physical exertion. However, there are things that you can do to try to help yourself during the hot spell. Avoid the heat by not going out between 11 am and 3 pm, which is the hottest part of the day. Keep rooms cool by using shutting the windows and pulling down the shades if the temperatures are hotter outdoors than inside. Shut windows and pull down the shades when it is hotter outside You can open the windows for ventilation when it is cooler. Avoid the heat: stay out of the sun and don’t go out between 11 am and 3 pm (the hottest part of the day) if you’re vulnerable to the effects of heat. Keep rooms cool by using shades or reflective material outside the windows. If this isn’t possible, use light-colored curtains and keep them closed (metallic blinds and dark curtains can make the room hotter). Have cool baths or showers, and splash yourself with cool water Drink cold drinks regularly, such as water and diluted fruit juice Eat small meals and eat more often. Avoid excess alcohol, caffeine (tea, coffee, and cola), or drinks high in sugar. Listen to alerts on the radio, TV, and social media about keeping cool. Plan to make sure you have enough supplies, such as food, water, and any medications you need Identify the coolest room in the house so you know where to go to keep cool. Wear loose, cool clothing and a hat and sunglasses if you go outdoors Check up on friends, relatives, and neighbors who may be less able to look after themselves. Never leave children or pets alone in enclosed vehicles. Check on your animals frequently to ensure that they are not suffering from the heat.       And remember, even if you are fine, others around you might not be, so check up on friends, relatives, and neighbors who might be less able to look after themselves! Recognize a heatstroke Heatstroke is the most severe form of heat injury and is considered a medical emergency. If you suspect that someone has a heat stroke - also known as sunstroke - call emergency immediately and give first aid until paramedics arrive. Heatstroke can kill or cause damage to the brain and other internal organs. Although heat stroke mainly affects people over age 50, it also takes a toll on healthy young athletes. Heatstroke often occurs as a progression from milder heat-related illnesses such as heat cramps, heat syncope (fainting), and heat exhaustion. But it can strike even if you have no previous signs of heat injury. Heatstroke results from prolonged exposure to high temperatures, usually combined with dehydration, leading to its failure to control the body's temperature control system. The medical definition of heatstroke is a core body temperature greater than 104 degrees Fahrenheit (40C), with complications involving the central nervous system after exposure to high temperatures. Other common symptoms include nausea, seizures, confusion, disorientation, and sometimes loss of consciousness or coma. Symptoms of Heat Stroke The hallmark symptom of heatstroke is a core body temperature above 104 degrees Fahrenheit (40C). But fainting may be the first sign. Throbbing headache Dizziness and light-headedness Lack of sweating despite the heat Red, hot, and dry skin Muscle weakness or cramps Nausea and vomiting Rapid heartbeat, which may be either strong or weak Rapid, shallow breathing Behavioral changes such as confusion, disorientation, or staggering Seizures Unconsciousness Treatment Heatstroke treatment centers on cooling your body to an average temperature to prevent or reduce damage to your brain and vital organs. To do this, your doctor may take these steps: Immerse you in cold water. A bath of cold or ice water has been proved to be the most effective way of quickly lowering your core body temperature. The quicker you can receive cold water immersion, the less risk of death and organ damage. Use evaporation cooling techniques. If cold water immersion is unavailable, health care workers may try to lower your body temperature using an evaporation method. Cool water is misted on your body while warm air is fanned over you, causing the water to evaporate and cool your skin. Pack you with ice and cooling blankets. Another method is to wrap you in a special cooling blanket and apply ice packs to your groin, neck, back, and armpits to lower your temperature. Give you medications to stop your shivering. If treatments to lower your body temperature make you shiver, your doctor may give you a muscle relaxant, such as a benzodiazepine. Shivering increases your body temperature, making treatment less effective. Before you go! Recommended:  Trumps Melting Head Is About Climate Change Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about how you cope with heatwaves? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations