Close Welcome writers, influencers and dreamers, make the world a greener place
Register here
Forgot password
Forgot password
or
or

Close
Close For sustainability news hunters! The WhatsOrb newsletter!

Receive monthly the newest updates about sustainability from influencers and fellow writers. Cutting edge innovations and global environmental developments.

Close For sustainability news hunters! The WhatsOrb newsletter!

Receive monthly the newest updates about sustainability from influencers and fellow writers. Cutting edge innovations and global environmental developments.

Close Reset password
your profile is 33% complete:
33%
Update profile Close
Close WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-Change

For writers, influencers and dreamers who want to make the world a greener place.

WhatsOrb reaches monthly about 28.000 thousand visitors who want - like you - to make the world a greener place. Share your expertise and all can benefit.

Become an influencer and write and share sustainable news and innovations globally
Are you a writer or do you have ideas about sustainability which you want to share? Register and share your green knowledge and news. WhatsOrb offers you global exposure for your article.

If your article meets certain standards, you receive promotional gains like Facebook promotions and Google Ads advertising.

Community heat waves  how can you cool down effectively  tips   tricks | Newsletter Lifestyle

Heat Waves: How Can You Cool Down Effectively. Tips & Tricks

Share this post
by: Marieke Boonstra
heat waves  how can you cool down effectively  tips   tricks | Newsletter

Chances are that you will read this message while sitting behind the fan: several European cities and towns broke heat records. Also, there are extreme heat warnings for much of the Eastern United States. A few days ago, in the Netherlands, temperatures rose to 40,7 degrees, breaking the record of 1944. A national heat plan was set out. And that’s just one of the many examples. Last month was the hottest June in 139 years of record-keeping, according to NASA. Heatwaves are not only very uncomfortable, but dangerous: Red Cross even calls them silent killers. That’s why one of the largest disaster relief agencies has a message for the world: with simple (and often inexpensive) steps heat waves don’t have to be deadly.

Warming climate

Our planet is getter hotter, and heat waves (Also interesting: Heatwaves Worldwide: Nothing New! How to Protect Your Self) are becoming a more dangerous enemy for people vulnerable people. The worst heat waves in Europe over the last 500 years, for instance, have all come in the previous 17 years. If the emissions of heat-trapping gases continue to increase at the current pace, the United States and Europe are projected to have twice the number of sweltering and humid days that feel like at least 38 degrees Celsius, says this Union of Concerned Scientist study. They are not the only ones concerned. “Heat waves are silent killers,” according to Francesco Rocca, president of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies. “They take the lives of people who are already vulnerable.” Those include older people, people that are overweight, and the poor.

Soaring temperatures broke records in Germany, France, Britain and the Netherlands as a heat wave gripped Europe for the second time in a month in 2019

Cities and companies should deal with heatwaves

With industrial emissions having increased average global temperatures over the last 150 years, scientists say heat waves are becoming more frequent and longer-lasting. Heat records are being broken in cold and hot places and the heat spikes that were once considered rare are growing more prevalent. With the knowledge of this distressing information, cities and companies should prepare for more record-breaking hot days over the long term.

One of the things a city can do to beat the heat is, for example, painting rooftops and sidewalks in reflective white paint. Companies should add heat waves to their list of occupational hazards, and especially make allowances for outdoor workers to rest during peak heat hours. It is also essential for a company to have enough fluids available for the employees in times of severe heat.

Things you can do to cool down; Tips & Tricks

Heat waves can be a silent killer for those who are already vulnerable, but heat can also affect seemingly healthy people. Especially dangerous for human health is when night-time temperatures don’t drop sufficiently to allow the body to cool down. We all must know how to cool down effectively if we want to avoid things like heatstroke. You can do more than drink water and wear sunscreen: here are some tips.

Heatstroke graphic

1. Recognize the symptoms of overheating

If you are starting to feel at all unwell, with symptoms such as a headache, dizziness, excessive sweating, or a fast pulse, it might be heat exhaustion. If untreated, heat exhaustion can turn into heatstroke, which is much more severe. If this happens to you or someone else: lay down in a cool place, drink flinty of fluids, and call emergency services if the condition doesn’t improve after 30 minutes.

2. Make sure your house is cool

Is your house well equipped to keep you cool? To ensure your windows can be opened and if they are exposed to direct sunlight, make sure shutters, blinds or curtains are installed which can help to keep heat out. Keep blinds and curtains closed during the day as a preventative measure to stop your room from overheating. Also, check if your fridge and fans are working correctly, and make sure you have enough food and water you need in case you are unable to leave your property during the hottest times of the day. Extra trip: freeze your fan freeze by placing a bowl of ice in front of the blowing fan. Your room will become cooler as the ice melts!

3. Eat smaller portions and stay hydrated

Eat smaller portions throughout the day, as larger meals will warm your body up as it works to process. Stay hydrated by drinking cool glasses of water throughout the day. It can be enough to bring your body temperature down. Also, always bring lots of water (or other fluids) with you when you’re going out.

4. How to dress

Opting for lightweight cotton clothing is the best option when it's scorching outside. Wear a hat and sunglasses, apply a sunscreen with a high SPF and excellent UVA protection, and go for clothing made of lightweight, natural materials to make your skin breathe in hot weather. Go for clothes in lighter tints, like white of creams.

5. Cover yourself up

Cover your head with a cap, hat or sombrero. Wear a sunblock, to not only avoid the skin tan, but also other skin diseases caused by sun’s ultraviolet rays.

6. Keep your body cool

If you want to lower your body temperature, you can rinse tour wrists with cold water. Also, keep your moisturizers in the fridge for a cooling effect by applying a cold moisturizer to your body. A quick and straightforward way to help take your temperature down is to dunk your feet into an ice bucket.

7. Breathe in, breathe out

The cheapest way to cool off is to inhale through the mouth and exhale through the nose. You will create a naturally refreshing effect. In theory, when taking in breath this way, your saliva should help cool the air before it's taken to your lungs.

8. Get in the shade

If you still want to go outside during a heat wave, it's advisable to step into the shade between 11am and 3pm from March to October. Don’t forget your sunscreen! (Also interesting: Airbnb Tripadvisor, Hospitality Influencers : Tourism Damage

9. Go low for a better sleep

Can´t sleep because of the heat? Hot air rises, so get down as low as you can to make sure you’re surrounded by cool air. Sleep on the floor, or even head downstairs, if you’re getting desperate to escape the heat.

At home and while traveling

10. Always carry water with you

Many of us don’t have the habit of carrying a bottle of water while travelling. You should re-look at this habit and carry water more than you usually drink.

girl lake, backpack, waterbottle
Photo by: Ryan Everton 

11. Carry electrolytes and oral rehydration solution

Water is very much essential, but it is equally important to have a packet of either electrolytes or oral rehydration solution twice a day if you sweat a lot. The reason is very straightforward. You lose a lot of electrolytes and minerals out of perspiration. You may also mix it with coconut water, khus sharbat or nimbu paani (lemonade). This will replenish the minerals lost due to excessive sweating.

12. Know what to eat and what to avoid

When the temperatures are soaring outside, it is better to have light food. Avoid spicy and oily stuff. Oily foods reduce the percentage of naturally present water in your body. So, junks are a complete no-no. Eat healthy food that will help you increase your immunity. Have more succulent veggies that rehydrate - bottle gourd, turai, pumpkin, lotus stem and the like.

13. Eat loads of fruits

Fruits contain 80-90% water, natural sugar and essential vitamins. Watermelons, tomatoes, oranges, fresh apricots, peaches, plums and pineapples are great summer choices.

14. Avoid alcohol

As tempting as it might be, if you know that you are going to be travelling in the sun, then alcohol is best avoided. Consumption of alcohol drops down your hydration levels.

15. Step out early or after sunset

This may not be possible to do every time. However, avoid the scorching heat and charter out plans to fit in either early morning or post sunset excursions.

16. Carry insulated bags for food

The sweltering heat is not only bad for skin, but also spoils the food. Insulated bags will prevent them from getting perished.

17. Summer first aid

First of all, make sure that your first aid kit is insulated and waterproof. Carry wet tissues to wipe off your sweat. Aloe Vera gel is excellent for sunburns. Instant ice packs work well for soothing your body heat as well as for inflammation. Other items that should always be a part of your first aid kit are sanitiser, bandages, cotton, gloves, tweezers, thermometer, personal medication, antiseptic & antibiotic creams and medicines.

Enjoy your summer holiday!

Cover photo by: Christian Bowen

https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/lifestyle

Messange
You
Share this post
profilepic

Breaking News, as the world changes…

In our world, WhatsOrb refuses to turn away from the changes in our society and environment which succeeds each other at a rapid pace.

For WhatsOrb, publishing on the environment is a priority. We give reporting on climate, nature, waste, lifestyle and sustainable solutions the prominence it deserves.

At this turbulent time for ‘all’ species and our planet, we are determined to inform readers about threats, consequences and solutions based on facts, not on political prejudice or business interests.

WhatsOrb Breaking News will be published as soon as urgent events from around the world and startling sustainable innovations reach us.

If there is anything we should know and publish about, please send a note to: [email protected] or write your own story on: www.whatsorb.comthe only news site which gives you a ‘sustainable voice!’

profileimage

Breaking News, as the world changes…

In our world, WhatsOrb refuses to turn away from the changes in our society and environment which succeeds each other at a rapid pace.

For WhatsOrb, publishing on the environment is a priority. We give reporting on climate, nature, waste, lifestyle and sustainable solutions the prominence it deserves.

At this turbulent time for ‘all’ species and our planet, we are determined to inform readers about threats, consequences and solutions based on facts, not on political prejudice or business interests.

WhatsOrb Breaking News will be published as soon as urgent events from around the world and startling sustainable innovations reach us.

If there is anything we should know and publish about, please send a note to: [email protected] or write your own story on: www.whatsorb.comthe only news site which gives you a ‘sustainable voice!’

Heat Waves: How Can You Cool Down Effectively. Tips & Tricks

Chances are that you will read this message while sitting behind the fan: several European cities and towns broke heat records. Also, there are extreme heat warnings for much of the Eastern United States. A few days ago, in the Netherlands, temperatures rose to 40,7 degrees, breaking the record of 1944. A national heat plan was set out. And that’s just one of the many examples. Last month was the hottest June in 139 years of record-keeping, according to NASA. Heatwaves are not only very uncomfortable, but dangerous: Red Cross even calls them silent killers. That’s why one of the largest disaster relief agencies has a message for the world: with simple (and often inexpensive) steps heat waves don’t have to be deadly. Warming climate Our planet is getter hotter, and heat waves ( Also interesting: Heatwaves Worldwide: Nothing New! How to Protect Your Self ) are becoming a more dangerous enemy for people vulnerable people. The worst heat waves in Europe over the last 500 years, for instance, have all come in the previous 17 years. If the emissions of heat-trapping gases continue to increase at the current pace, the United States and Europe are projected to have twice the number of sweltering and humid days that feel like at least 38 degrees Celsius, says this Union of Concerned Scientist study. They are not the only ones concerned. “Heat waves are silent killers,” according to Francesco Rocca, president of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies. “They take the lives of people who are already vulnerable.” Those include older people, people that are overweight, and the poor. {youtube} Soaring temperatures broke records in Germany, France, Britain and the Netherlands as a heat wave gripped Europe for the second time in a month in 2019 Cities and companies should deal with heatwaves With industrial emissions having increased average global temperatures over the last 150 years, scientists say heat waves are becoming more frequent and longer-lasting. Heat records are being broken in cold and hot places and the heat spikes that were once considered rare are growing more prevalent. With the knowledge of this distressing information, cities and companies should prepare for more record-breaking hot days over the long term. One of the things a city can do to beat the heat is, for example, painting rooftops and sidewalks in reflective white paint. Companies should add heat waves to their list of occupational hazards, and especially make allowances for outdoor workers to rest during peak heat hours. It is also essential for a company to have enough fluids available for the employees in times of severe heat. Things you can do to cool down; Tips & Tricks Heat waves can be a silent killer for those who are already vulnerable, but heat can also affect seemingly healthy people. Especially dangerous for human health is when night-time temperatures don’t drop sufficiently to allow the body to cool down. We all must know how to cool down effectively if we want to avoid things like heatstroke. You can do more than drink water and wear sunscreen: here are some tips. 1. Recognize the symptoms of overheating If you are starting to feel at all unwell, with symptoms such as a headache, dizziness, excessive sweating, or a fast pulse, it might be heat exhaustion. If untreated, heat exhaustion can turn into heatstroke, which is much more severe. If this happens to you or someone else: lay down in a cool place, drink flinty of fluids, and call emergency services if the condition doesn’t improve after 30 minutes. 2. Make sure your house is cool Is your house well equipped to keep you cool? To ensure your windows can be opened and if they are exposed to direct sunlight, make sure shutters, blinds or curtains are installed which can help to keep heat out. Keep blinds and curtains closed during the day as a preventative measure to stop your room from overheating. Also, check if your fridge and fans are working correctly, and make sure you have enough food and water you need in case you are unable to leave your property during the hottest times of the day. Extra trip: freeze your fan freeze by placing a bowl of ice in front of the blowing fan. Your room will become cooler as the ice melts! 3. Eat smaller portions and stay hydrated Eat smaller portions throughout the day, as larger meals will warm your body up as it works to process. Stay hydrated by drinking cool glasses of water throughout the day. It can be enough to bring your body temperature down. Also, always bring lots of water (or other fluids) with you when you’re going out. 4. How to dress Opting for lightweight cotton clothing is the best option when it's scorching outside. Wear a hat and sunglasses, apply a sunscreen with a high SPF and excellent UVA protection, and go for clothing made of lightweight, natural materials to make your skin breathe in hot weather. Go for clothes in lighter tints, like white of creams. 5. Cover yourself up Cover your head with a cap, hat or sombrero. Wear a sunblock, to not only avoid the skin tan, but also other skin diseases caused by sun’s ultraviolet rays. 6. Keep your body cool If you want to lower your body temperature, you can rinse tour wrists with cold water. Also, keep your moisturizers in the fridge for a cooling effect by applying a cold moisturizer to your body. A quick and straightforward way to help take your temperature down is to dunk your feet into an ice bucket. 7. Breathe in, breathe out The cheapest way to cool off is to inhale through the mouth and exhale through the nose. You will create a naturally refreshing effect. In theory, when taking in breath this way, your saliva should help cool the air before it's taken to your lungs. 8. Get in the shade If you still want to go outside during a heat wave, it's advisable to step into the shade between 11am and 3pm from March to October. Don’t forget your sunscreen! ( Also interesting: Airbnb Tripadvisor, Hospitality Influencers : Tourism Damage )  9. Go low for a better sleep Can´t sleep because of the heat? Hot air rises, so get down as low as you can to make sure you’re surrounded by cool air. Sleep on the floor, or even head downstairs, if you’re getting desperate to escape the heat. At home and while traveling 10. Always carry water with you Many of us don’t have the habit of carrying a bottle of water while travelling. You should re-look at this habit and carry water more than you usually drink. Photo by:  Ryan Everton   11. Carry electrolytes and oral rehydration solution Water is very much essential, but it is equally important to have a packet of either electrolytes or oral rehydration solution twice a day if you sweat a lot. The reason is very straightforward. You lose a lot of electrolytes and minerals out of perspiration. You may also mix it with coconut water, khus sharbat or nimbu paani (lemonade). This will replenish the minerals lost due to excessive sweating. 12. Know what to eat and what to avoid When the temperatures are soaring outside, it is better to have light food. Avoid spicy and oily stuff. Oily foods reduce the percentage of naturally present water in your body. So, junks are a complete no-no. Eat healthy food that will help you increase your immunity. Have more succulent veggies that rehydrate - bottle gourd, turai, pumpkin, lotus stem and the like. 13. Eat loads of fruits Fruits contain 80-90% water, natural sugar and essential vitamins. Watermelons, tomatoes, oranges, fresh apricots, peaches, plums and pineapples are great summer choices. 14. Avoid alcohol As tempting as it might be, if you know that you are going to be travelling in the sun, then alcohol is best avoided. Consumption of alcohol drops down your hydration levels. 15. Step out early or after sunset This may not be possible to do every time. However, avoid the scorching heat and charter out plans to fit in either early morning or post sunset excursions. 16. Carry insulated bags for food The sweltering heat is not only bad for skin, but also spoils the food. Insulated bags will prevent them from getting perished. 17. Summer first aid First of all, make sure that your first aid kit is insulated and waterproof. Carry wet tissues to wipe off your sweat. Aloe Vera gel is excellent for sunburns. Instant ice packs work well for soothing your body heat as well as for inflammation. Other items that should always be a part of your first aid kit are sanitiser, bandages, cotton, gloves, tweezers, thermometer, personal medication, antiseptic & antibiotic creams and medicines. Enjoy your summer holiday! Cover photo by: Christian Bowen https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/lifestyle
Get updates on environmental sustainability in your mailbox every month.