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Agri & Gardening great garden trends for 2021 | Newsletter General

Great Garden Trends For 2021

by: Justine Guidry
great garden trends for 2021 | Newsletter

Many people discover the solace that comes from gardening and adding green to their lives with everything globally. Experienced gardeners are diving deeper into their gardening activities and trying new things. Discover great garden trends for 2021 and start!

We Share 9 Gardening Trends On The Rise In 2021

There’s something so satisfying about tending to something and watching it thrive—and even gardening failures hold important lessons to be learned. We foresee gardening activities in 2021 being all about adding a bit of joy to your life, whether your garden is a windowsill or an acre of land.

  1. Gardening. Period.

flowers-and-plants-grassin-a-garden
Photo by Proven Winners. Like this pollinator garden, pre-planned garden designs include plant lists and planting plans that make life easy for beginning gardeners. 

Recommended: Improve Your Life: Gardening Decreases Stress

The biggest garden activity gaining traction is…well, gardening. This increased interest in gardening has brought with it a slew of new gardeners. While many newbies are looking for ways to start growing their own food, they're also interested in the following:

  • Adding easy-to-grow flowers for brighter gardens or mood-boosting bouquets.
  • Tackling garden challenges, such as turning shady corners into lush areas with the right plants.
  • Learning more about gardening basics, such as soil, fertilizer, pests, and diseases.
  • Taking the guesswork out of designing with simple, pre-planned designs (like those found in the Proven Winners' Idea Book).

Recommended: Garden Tools And Products Shop

  1. Gardening Sustainably.

garden-with-plants-and-a-fence
Photo by Barbara Ries. This organic garden in Sonoma County, created by designer Mick Kopetski is tended with all organic materials. Frequent helpings of organic matter are the secret behind the potager’s bumper crops of summer squash and tomatoes. 

Recommended: Urban Gardening: Kill Grass, Grow Food Only

  • The sustainable gardening movement continues to gain traction. We’re happy to see that there’s been an uptick in interest from our readers looking for information about how they can make their gardens more environmentally friendly. Here are some ideas to get started:
  • Practice water conservation. Include drought-tolerant plants in your landscape. Put plants that need more water in spots where the soil stays moist. Other ideas: design a rain garden and/or collect and use rainwater.
  • Make your own compost. It’s better for the environment, your garden, and your wallet. Learn more about composting, including what to put in it (and what not to) to get the right balance and how to use compost in your garden.
  • Plant natives. Learn more about native plants and find out what is native in your area with The National Wildlife Federation’s Native Plant Finder.
  • Use organic methods. The benefits of organic gardening are far-reaching. Learn safe ways to deal with pests, weeds, and fertilizer.
  • Apply mulch. Mulching saves water by regulating soil temperature, thus preventing soil from drying out. It also suppresses weeds, adds nutrients to the soil, and prevents erosion.
  • Plant trees. Their beauty alone is noteworthy, but their ability to absorb CO2 and give off oxygen makes them remarkable. Trees also provide food, protection, and shelter for wildlife. When planted strategically, their shade can cool your home, saving energy and money.
  1. Creating Your Own Garden Getaway

garden-with-plants-a-stair-and-a-blockhut
Photo by Susan Teare. In this tranquil garden, this water rill provides water's soothing sound, helping make the garden a tranquil space. Julie Messervy and Anna Johansen designed the Garden. 

Recommended: Smart Communities: Eco-Living Through Technology

Many people are turning to their gardens for a place to relax. Small balconies and large backyards alike are being transformed in record numbers into places to escape and unwind. Choose low-maintenance plants that bring beauty but don't require unmanageable work from you throughout the year.

Create a space for quiet contemplation with a Zen garden design. Add the sound of water with a small tabletop fountain, built-in fountain, or small pond. Keep it cool on hot days with shade from an umbrella, shade sail, pergola, or (even better) a shade tree. Make it cozy and extend your time outside by adding a fire table, fire pit, or outdoor fireplace.

Work from home tip: If you have a window with a view to the outdoors, find ways to improve it. You can add a hanging planter, plant a climbing vine, or set out a group of containers with plants in colors you love.

  1. Growing Food in All Kinds of Spaces

garden-with-chair-pot-plants-and-a-fence
Photo by Christina Salwitz. In this container combination designed for fall, Toscano kale is mixed in with ornamental plants. 

Recommended: Regenerative Agriculture: Basics For Safe Food

Due to a nationwide increase in cooking at home and a growing concern about food scarcity, more and more people are starting their own kitchen gardens. Many have discovered that you don’t need raised beds in a dedicated vegetable garden to grow food at home. Here are some ideas we’ve seen:

  • Making use of a small space by growing food in containers or vertically
  • Creating aesthetic edible gardens by mixing edibles into existing ornamental beds and borders.
  • Growing plants provide big yields in small spaces such as tomatoes, herbs, peas, cucumbers, and more.
  1. Getting Creative With Containers

plants-with-white-leaves-in-garden
Photo by Proven Winners. Gardeners are getting more creative with container combinations and including tropicals like this Heart to Heart White Wonder' caladium, paired with Proven Accents Silver Falls dichondra.

Container gardening isn’t a new concept, but it continues to rise in popularity—probably because anyone can do it, no matter the size of your space. Increasingly, people are growing in smaller spaces like balconies and patios. And people are getting creative—container gardening isn’t just for annuals! There’s been an increased demand for the following plants:

  • Tropicals such as caladiums, canna, elephant ears, and crotons
  • Dwarf hybrids or small trees such as crape myrtles, Japanese maples, and olives
  • Dwarf fruit and citrus trees
  • Small shrubs that are perfectly sized for containers, like these 10 shrubs.

Container watering tip: If you're worried you'll forget to water your pots, install automatic drip irrigation that can be set on a schedule, or try these beautiful self-watering planters.

  1. Choosing One Color & Going For It

garden-plants-grass-a-house-and-wooden-chairs
Photo Janet Loughrey. This Adirondack-style moon garden was sited to be seen from the home’s second-story sleeping porch. Designers: Charles Atwood King and Karen Lamitie-King. 

Recommended: Farmers Tackle Pests With Flowers And Insects

If there’s a color you especially like, why not go all out? That’s the mentality of gardeners all across the country—as proven by the surge in popularity of monochromatic gardens. Before you write it off as boring, take a look at these gorgeous ideas:

  • Start small and give a monochromatic container or a single garden bed a try.
  • Make a statement with foliage combinations from a limited color palette.
  • Bring on the night with a moon garden full of shades of white and silver.
  • Single-color gardens don't need to be neutral. Go for a brighter palette that includes blue, purple, or orange.
  1. Learning & Buying Online

garden-with-white-table-white-chairs-flowers-grass-shed
Photo by Susan Teare. Online design services allow gardeners to get advice from landscape designers, even when an in-person meeting isn’t possible. This landscape was designed remotely by Home Outside.

With the shift in staying home, gardeners have figured out ways to learn and get their gardening "fix" online. Here are some of our favorite online resources available for gardeners who aren’t able to venture out:

  • Learn. With limited in-person learning opportunities, you can now learn just about anything from the comfort of your own home (or garden). To help narrow your search, we've rounded up a few of our favorite online gardening classes.
  • Get design advice. Thanks to technology, online design services like Home Outside give homeowners the ability to get professional advice from a landscape designer, no matter where they live.
  • Buy plants. Gardeners are sometimes hesitant to order plants online, but you’ll be pleasantly surprised at the quality of plant you’ll get in the mail from a respected brand such as Proven Winners.
  • Many botanical gardens are offering virtual tours right now. Search online for your favorite garden to see what they offer or find a new favorite from these suggestions.
  1. Adding More Houseplants

Snake-plants-close-together-with-yello-green-leaves
Snake plants (Sansevieria) are a favorite houseplant to grow, and it’s easy to see why: they’re easy to care for and adapt to a range of growing conditions. See some of our other favorite Sansevieria plants. 

Recommended: Houseplant Trends And Greening Up Your Houseplants

Yes, houseplants have been trendy for a long time, but their spotlight only continues to burn bright. It won’t be fading anytime soon—especially with the increase in home offices and the desire to make home spaces more enjoyable—and we are here for it! Make your home look like a stylish jungle.

  1. Getting Kids Involved

Woman-with-girl-and-boy-in-garden
Children anyway love being outside and playing in the dirt. Use that to teach them the importance of food and how difficult it is to grow one plant. Teach them how they can grow their own food when they put in enough time and effort. They can learn how to nurture life and also how to respect it and its process. Different plants need different things to grow; this can turn into a vital lesson of respecting the process of different things and being patient with things. Not everything comes to fruition equally.

The new skills that they learn are not only in the sense of physical activity but also in developing their personality. Because they care for the plants, they learn responsibility. They become more understanding because they get the first-hand experience in the cause and effect of their options, like how watering the plants every day will make them thrive and not watering will kill them.

Talking about what they learn – gardening also teaches them about growing plants' science, usually in the children’s syllabus. If you start them young, they will have practical knowledge of it already. Through this activity, they learn about plants and learn about animals and how to protect what plants from which animals and birds; they learn about the weather and the environment, and what effects they cause.

Because you are making them do this activity with you and having siblings, they also learn how to be cooperative and learn to work in teams. Hoe to do the task assigned to them and how to contribute to the team is a skill that is very valuable and will be needed throughout their lives, but it is also one of the things people are generally bad at. This gives them a chance to learn early.

Last but not least, with the current state of our planet, getting children interested in gardening, plants, and nature, in general, is the best thing to do in the grand scheme of things. Little steps towards a bright future

Source: Garden Design,2021 TRENDS IN GARDEN DESIGN

Before you go!

Recommended: Algae Canopy Miracle Works Better Than A Forrest: How?

Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below.
We try to respond the same day.

Like to write your article about gardens?
Send your writing & scribble with a photo to [email protected], and we will write an interesting article based on your input or subscribe.

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Breaking News, as the world changes…

In our world, WhatsOrb refuses to turn away from the changes in our society and environment which succeeds each other at a rapid pace.

For WhatsOrb, publishing on the environment is a priority. We give reporting on climate, nature, waste, lifestyle and sustainable solutions the prominence it deserves.

At this turbulent time for ‘all’ species and our planet, we are determined to inform readers about threats, consequences and solutions based on facts, not on political prejudice or business interests.

WhatsOrb Breaking News will be published as soon as urgent events from around the world and startling sustainable innovations reach us.

If there is anything we should know and publish about, please send a note to: [email protected] or write your own story on: www.whatsorb.comthe only news site which gives you a ‘sustainable voice!’

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More like this:

Great Garden Trends For 2021

Many people discover the solace that comes from gardening and adding green to their lives with everything globally. Experienced gardeners are diving deeper into their gardening activities and trying new things. Discover great garden trends for 2021 and start! We Share 9 Gardening Trends On The Rise In 2021 There’s something so satisfying about tending to something and watching it thrive—and even gardening failures hold important lessons to be learned. We foresee gardening activities in 2021 being all about adding a bit of joy to your life, whether your garden is a windowsill or an acre of land. Gardening. Period. Photo by Proven Winners. Like this pollinator garden, pre-planned garden designs include plant lists and planting plans that make life easy for beginning gardeners.  Recommended:  Improve Your Life: Gardening Decreases Stress The biggest garden activity gaining traction is…well, gardening. This increased interest in gardening has brought with it a slew of new gardeners. While many newbies are looking for ways to start growing their own food, they're also interested in the following: Adding easy-to-grow flowers for brighter gardens or mood-boosting bouquets. Tackling garden challenges, such as turning shady corners into lush areas with the right plants. Learning more about gardening basics, such as soil, fertilizer, pests, and diseases. Taking the guesswork out of designing with simple, pre-planned designs (like those found in the Proven Winners' Idea Book). Recommended:  Garden Tools And Products Shop Gardening Sustainably. Photo by Barbara Ries. This organic garden in Sonoma County, created by designer Mick Kopetski is tended with all organic materials. Frequent helpings of organic matter are the secret behind the potager’s bumper crops of summer squash and tomatoes.  Recommended:  Urban Gardening: Kill Grass, Grow Food Only The sustainable gardening movement continues to gain traction. We’re happy to see that there’s been an uptick in interest from our readers looking for information about how they can make their gardens more environmentally friendly. Here are some ideas to get started: Practice water conservation. Include drought-tolerant plants in your landscape. Put plants that need more water in spots where the soil stays moist. Other ideas: design a rain garden and/or collect and use rainwater. Make your own compost. It’s better for the environment, your garden, and your wallet. Learn more about composting, including what to put in it (and what not to) to get the right balance and how to use compost in your garden. Plant natives. Learn more about native plants and find out what is native in your area with The National Wildlife Federation’s Native Plant Finder. Use organic methods. The benefits of organic gardening are far-reaching. Learn safe ways to deal with pests, weeds, and fertilizer. Apply mulch. Mulching saves water by regulating soil temperature, thus preventing soil from drying out. It also suppresses weeds, adds nutrients to the soil, and prevents erosion. Plant trees. Their beauty alone is noteworthy, but their ability to absorb CO2 and give off oxygen makes them remarkable. Trees also provide food, protection, and shelter for wildlife. When planted strategically, their shade can cool your home, saving energy and money. Creating Your Own Garden Getaway Photo by Susan Teare. In this tranquil garden, this water rill provides water's soothing sound, helping make the garden a tranquil space. Julie Messervy and Anna Johansen designed the Garden.  Recommended:  Smart Communities: Eco-Living Through Technology Many people are turning to their gardens for a place to relax. Small balconies and large backyards alike are being transformed in record numbers into places to escape and unwind. Choose low-maintenance plants that bring beauty but don't require unmanageable work from you throughout the year. Create a space for quiet contemplation with a Zen garden design. Add the sound of water with a small tabletop fountain, built-in fountain, or small pond. Keep it cool on hot days with shade from an umbrella, shade sail, pergola, or (even better) a shade tree. Make it cozy and extend your time outside by adding a fire table, fire pit, or outdoor fireplace. Work from home tip: If you have a window with a view to the outdoors, find ways to improve it. You can add a hanging planter, plant a climbing vine, or set out a group of containers with plants in colors you love. Growing Food in All Kinds of Spaces Photo by Christina Salwitz. In this container combination designed for fall, Toscano kale is mixed in with ornamental plants.  Recommended:  Regenerative Agriculture: Basics For Safe Food Due to a nationwide increase in cooking at home and a growing concern about food scarcity, more and more people are starting their own kitchen gardens. Many have discovered that you don’t need raised beds in a dedicated vegetable garden to grow food at home. Here are some ideas we’ve seen: Making use of a small space by growing food in containers or vertically Creating aesthetic edible gardens by mixing edibles into existing ornamental beds and borders. Growing plants provide big yields in small spaces such as tomatoes, herbs, peas, cucumbers, and more. Getting Creative With Containers Photo by Proven Winners. Gardeners are getting more creative with container combinations and including tropicals like this Heart to Heart White Wonder' caladium, paired with Proven Accents Silver Falls dichondra. Container gardening isn’t a new concept, but it continues to rise in popularity—probably because anyone can do it, no matter the size of your space. Increasingly, people are growing in smaller spaces like balconies and patios. And people are getting creative—container gardening isn’t just for annuals! There’s been an increased demand for the following plants: Tropicals such as caladiums, canna, elephant ears, and crotons Dwarf hybrids or small trees such as crape myrtles, Japanese maples, and olives Dwarf fruit and citrus trees Small shrubs that are perfectly sized for containers, like these 10 shrubs. Container watering tip: If you're worried you'll forget to water your pots, install automatic drip irrigation that can be set on a schedule, or try these beautiful self-watering planters. Choosing One Color & Going For It Photo Janet Loughrey. This Adirondack-style moon garden was sited to be seen from the home’s second-story sleeping porch. Designers: Charles Atwood King and Karen Lamitie-King.  Recommended:  Farmers Tackle Pests With Flowers And Insects If there’s a color you especially like, why not go all out? That’s the mentality of gardeners all across the country—as proven by the surge in popularity of monochromatic gardens. Before you write it off as boring, take a look at these gorgeous ideas: Start small and give a monochromatic container or a single garden bed a try. Make a statement with foliage combinations from a limited color palette. Bring on the night with a moon garden full of shades of white and silver. Single-color gardens don't need to be neutral. Go for a brighter palette that includes blue, purple, or orange. Learning & Buying Online Photo by Susan Teare. Online design services allow gardeners to get advice from landscape designers, even when an in-person meeting isn’t possible. This landscape was designed remotely by Home Outside. With the shift in staying home, gardeners have figured out ways to learn and get their gardening "fix" online. Here are some of our favorite online resources available for gardeners who aren’t able to venture out: Learn. With limited in-person learning opportunities, you can now learn just about anything from the comfort of your own home (or garden). To help narrow your search, we've rounded up a few of our favorite online gardening classes. Get design advice. Thanks to technology, online design services like Home Outside give homeowners the ability to get professional advice from a landscape designer, no matter where they live. Buy plants. Gardeners are sometimes hesitant to order plants online, but you’ll be pleasantly surprised at the quality of plant you’ll get in the mail from a respected brand such as Proven Winners. Many botanical gardens are offering virtual tours right now. Search online for your favorite garden to see what they offer or find a new favorite from these suggestions. Adding More Houseplants Snake plants (Sansevieria) are a favorite houseplant to grow, and it’s easy to see why: they’re easy to care for and adapt to a range of growing conditions. See some of our other favorite Sansevieria plants.  Recommended:  Houseplant Trends And Greening Up Your Houseplants Yes, houseplants have been trendy for a long time, but their spotlight only continues to burn bright. It won’t be fading anytime soon—especially with the increase in home offices and the desire to make home spaces more enjoyable—and we are here for it! Make your home look like a stylish jungle. Getting Kids Involved Children anyway love being outside and playing in the dirt. Use that to teach them the importance of food and how difficult it is to grow one plant. Teach them how they can grow their own food when they put in enough time and effort. They can learn how to nurture life and also how to respect it and its process. Different plants need different things to grow; this can turn into a vital lesson of respecting the process of different things and being patient with things. Not everything comes to fruition equally. The new skills that they learn are not only in the sense of physical activity but also in developing their personality. Because they care for the plants, they learn responsibility. They become more understanding because they get the first-hand experience in the cause and effect of their options, like how watering the plants every day will make them thrive and not watering will kill them. Talking about what they learn – gardening also teaches them about growing plants' science, usually in the children’s syllabus. If you start them young, they will have practical knowledge of it already. Through this activity, they learn about plants and learn about animals and how to protect what plants from which animals and birds; they learn about the weather and the environment, and what effects they cause. Because you are making them do this activity with you and having siblings, they also learn how to be cooperative and learn to work in teams. Hoe to do the task assigned to them and how to contribute to the team is a skill that is very valuable and will be needed throughout their lives, but it is also one of the things people are generally bad at. This gives them a chance to learn early. Last but not least, with the current state of our planet, getting children interested in gardening, plants, and nature, in general, is the best thing to do in the grand scheme of things. Little steps towards a bright future Source: Garden Design,2021 TRENDS IN GARDEN DESIGN Before you go! Recommended:  Algae Canopy Miracle Works Better Than A Forrest: How? Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about gardens? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input or  subscribe .
Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations