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Climate climate change pictures  weird global anomalies | Newsletter General

Climate Change Pictures: Weird Global Anomalies

by: George Miller
climate change pictures  weird global anomalies | Newsletter

Earth’s climate systems are extraordinarily complex, producing every moment of the day weather, strangest weather and climate conditions of all varieties. Predicting the weather even a few days into the future remains an imperfect science riddled with challenges only made larger by climate change. 

Climate Strangest Weather

Some of these unusual weather events appear to be occurring with greater frequency as shifts in the Earth’s climate continue to accelerate. Last year - 2019 - was the second hottest recorded year on earth.

Below You Can Find 38 Examples Of The Strangest Weather Events Incl. Video:

1. Lenticular Clouds

Lenticular Clouds have a round disc shape that has actually meant they have explained some UFO sightings. The stationary clouds normally form in perpendicular alignment to the wind direction.

 Mountain, lenticular clouds

El Chaltén

A rare flying saucer-shaped cloud known as a lenticular appears over a rock formation in Argentina.

flying saucer shaped cloud, mountains

2. Electrical tentacles of red jellyfish sprite lightning

If you’ve ever looked up during a thunderstorm and glimpsed a red jellyfish sitting high in the sky, you weren’t hallucinating. These tentacle-like spurts of red lightning are called sprites. According to the European Space Agency, they’re ultrafast bursts of electricity that crackle through the upper regions of the atmosphere – between 37 and 50 miles up in the sky – and move towards space.

red lightning, yellyfish

The phenomenon is a rare sighting: It lasts just tenths of a second and can be hard to see from the ground since storm clouds generally obscure it. But Stephen Hummel, a dark-skies specialist at the McDonald Observatory, captured a spectacular image of one of these sprites on July 2 (shown above) from a ridge on

Mount Locke in Texas.

“Sprites usually appear to the eye as very brief, dim, grey structures. It would help if you looked for them to spot them, and oftentimes I am not certain I actually saw one until I check the camera footage to confirm,” Hummel told Business Insider.

In the video below: Fire Devil, Fog Tsunami, Water Spout, Morning Glory clouds, Penienties, Ice Tsunami, Lenticular clouds, sand storm, red Rainbow.

 


                                                         20 Strangest Weather Phenomena - That Actually Exist

 

3. Gustnadoes

Gustnadoes are not a type of tornado. NOAA classifies the weather phenomenon as 'thunderstorm wind events.' Unlike tornadoes, the root of a gustnado is not connected to a cloud; rather, the vortex rises from the ground.

Triple Gustnadoes

4. Asperitas clouds

Scientists named asperities clouds after the Latin word 'aspero,' which means aggravate, enrage, and roughen and was used during the classical era to describe stormy seas. NOAA considers these clouds 'other cloud phenomenon', characterized by long rippling waves through the cloud base.

Asperitas clouds

Recommended: Climate Change: Hurricane Season With Big And Wet Storms

5. Microbursts

A microburst is a small version of a downburst, a column of sinking air with high-speed winds associated with thunderstorms. Similar to a tornado, microbursts can cause significant damage to buildings and landscapes and are also a threat to aircraft. Microbursts are less than 2.5 miles in scale, and extreme ones can produce wind speeds up to 150 mph. They can be either wet, dry, or a hybrid of the two.

landscape, houses Microburst

6. Brinicle

First discovered in the 1960s, brinicle forms below sea ice when a flow of icy saline water meets an area of ocean water, forming the equivalent of an underwater icicle.

Water, sea star, brinicle

Recommended: Breaking: Did You Know, All You Read About CO2 Rise Is Half The Truth

7. Hail glaciers

Hail glaciers are large accumulations of hail that can stay frozen for some time. In 2004, in Clayton, New Mexico, 15-foot deep ice “glaciers” formed along riverbanks following a summer hail storm. The ice remained for nearly a month. Such hail glaciers have been documented on a few other occasions in locations in the American Southwest, including Dalhart and Amarillo, Texas, and most recently in the Mexican city of Guadalajara in June of 2019.

Hailglacier

Recommended: Delay Climate Change With Submarines Which Produce Icebergs

8. Derechos

A derecho is a rare type of severe thunderstorm event. It is a long-lived, wide wind storm with showers or thunderstorms that typically moves in a straight line. A derecho often creates striking visual formations as an ominous shelf clouds approach. By definition, Derechos must include winds of at least 58 mph along most of their length and produce a swath of wind damage at least 240 miles long.

houses, landscape, derechos

9. Mammatus clouds

Mammatus clouds occur when a large base cloud develops a series of smaller, round protuberances on the underside. While they can occur in different clouds, they are most often seen on cumulonimbus clouds, towering cloud formations with flat bases. They occur when ice crystals fall out of the cloud and turn to water vapor, cooling the air around them, creating the sunken pockets indicative of Mammatus formations.

Tree crown mammatus clouds

10. Frost Flowers

These frost flowers in the Arctic ocean form from imperfections on the ice's surface in sub-zero temperatures, normally around the -20C mark. The spikes have been found to contain microorganisms making them temporary miniature ecosystems similar to a coral reef.

ice, frost flowers

11. Kelvin-Helmholtz clouds

Resembling a series of rolling ocean waves, Kelvin-Helmholtz clouds often form when two adjacent atmospheric air layers are moving at different speeds. Their presence may indicate atmospheric instability and turbulence for aircraft. They may also have been the inspiration behind Van Gogh’s famous painting Starry Night.

Recommended: Solar Geo-Engineering As The Ultimate Answer To Climate Change

12. St. Elmo’s fire

Most often occurring during thunderstorms at sea, St. Elmo’s Fire is a burst of plasma or ionized air that glows blue and can cause tall structures such as ship masts or church steeples to appear to be on fire. It occurs when an imbalance in electrical charge causes molecules to rip apart.

Blue lightning St. Elmo’s fire

13. Thundersleet

Thunder sleet happens when a thunderstorm occurs simultaneously with a sleet storm. Like thundersnow, this phenomenon is infrequent and occurs when the friction created by strong up and downdrafts causes charged particles to collide within a cloud.

man, mountain, snow, Thundersleet

14. Fallstreak holes

These picturesque elliptical holes that can appear in cirrocumulus or altocumulus clouds are caused by tiny water droplets within the cloud that are colder than freezing but have yet to turn to ice. Once a triggering event such as a plane flying through the clouds causes the supercooled droplets to start freezing, they rapidly crystalize and fall, leaving a hole in the cloud layer.

Clouds, sky, Fallstreak holes

15. Twin tornadoes

With about 1,200 occurrences every year, tornadoes are relatively common weather events in the United States. While it is also normal for clusters of tornadoes to form simultaneously, multiple smaller vortexes almost always combine or orbit a single parent tornado. For more than one tornado of a sizable magnitude to coexist, conditions have to be unusually balanced. This dangerous and rare phenomenon occurs on average once every 10 to 15 years.

Recommended: Rescue Globally: Human Blood Can Help Prevent Climate Change

Twin tornadoes, gras, road

16. Nacreous clouds

Rare but made more common by climate change, nacreous or noctilucent clouds form ice crystals and methane at high altitudes. Nick-named “mother of pearl” clouds, they appear in temperatures of approximately negative 110 F. The ice crystals refract light, producing a glimmery, iridescent look. According to NOAA, it is likely that these weather phenomena did not exist before 1885.

Tree tops, tower, Nacreous clouds

17. Tubular clouds

Tubular clouds, a type of arcus cloud also known as a roll cloud, form low and horizontally in the sky. They tend to form along with the edges or in the downdrafts of thunderstorms. While relatively rare and ominous-looking, these clouds are not usually a sign of dangerous weather.

tree tops, Tubular clouds

Before you go!

Recommended: Bushfires Australia Generate Their Own Weather

Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below.
We try to respond the same day.

Like to write your own experience with strange weather?
Click on 'Register' or push the button 'Write An Article' on the 'HomePage.'

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Breaking News, as the world changes…

In our world, WhatsOrb refuses to turn away from the changes in our society and environment which succeeds each other at a rapid pace.

For WhatsOrb, publishing on the environment is a priority. We give reporting on climate, nature, waste, lifestyle and sustainable solutions the prominence it deserves.

At this turbulent time for ‘all’ species and our planet, we are determined to inform readers about threats, consequences and solutions based on facts, not on political prejudice or business interests.

WhatsOrb Breaking News will be published as soon as urgent events from around the world and startling sustainable innovations reach us.

If there is anything we should know and publish about, please send a note to: [email protected] or write your own story on: www.whatsorb.comthe only news site which gives you a ‘sustainable voice!’

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More like this:

Climate Change Pictures: Weird Global Anomalies

Earth’s climate systems are extraordinarily complex, producing every moment of the day weather, strangest weather and climate conditions of all varieties. Predicting the weather even a few days into the future remains an imperfect science riddled with challenges only made larger by climate change.  Climate Strangest Weather Some of these unusual weather events appear to be occurring with greater frequency as shifts in the Earth’s climate continue to accelerate. Last year - 2019 - was the second hottest recorded year on earth. Below You Can Find 38 Examples Of The Strangest Weather Events Incl. Video: 1. Lenticular Clouds Lenticular Clouds have a round disc shape that has actually meant they have explained some UFO sightings. The stationary clouds normally form in perpendicular alignment to the wind direction. El Chaltén A rare flying saucer-shaped cloud known as a lenticular appears over a rock formation in Argentina. 2. Electrical tentacles of red jellyfish sprite lightning If you’ve ever looked up during a thunderstorm and glimpsed a red jellyfish sitting high in the sky, you weren’t hallucinating. These tentacle-like spurts of red lightning are called sprites. According to the European Space Agency, they’re ultrafast bursts of electricity that crackle through the upper regions of the atmosphere – between 37 and 50 miles up in the sky – and move towards space. The phenomenon is a rare sighting: It lasts just tenths of a second and can be hard to see from the ground since storm clouds generally obscure it. But Stephen Hummel, a dark-skies specialist at the McDonald Observatory, captured a spectacular image of one of these sprites on July 2 (shown above) from a ridge on Mount Locke in Texas. “Sprites usually appear to the eye as very brief, dim, grey structures. It would help if you looked for them to spot them, and oftentimes I am not certain I actually saw one until I check the camera footage to confirm,” Hummel told Business Insider. In the video below: Fire Devil, Fog Tsunami, Water Spout, Morning Glory clouds, Penienties, Ice Tsunami, Lenticular clouds, sand storm, red Rainbow.   {youtube}                                                          20 Strangest Weather Phenomena - That Actually Exist   3. Gustnadoes Gustnadoes are not a type of tornado. NOAA classifies the weather phenomenon as 'thunderstorm wind events.' Unlike tornadoes, the root of a gustnado is not connected to a cloud; rather, the vortex rises from the ground. 4. Asperitas clouds Scientists named asperities clouds after the Latin word 'aspero,' which means aggravate, enrage, and roughen and was used during the classical era to describe stormy seas. NOAA considers these clouds 'other cloud phenomenon', characterized by long rippling waves through the cloud base. Recommended:  Climate Change: Hurricane Season With Big And Wet Storms 5. Microbursts A microburst is a small version of a downburst, a column of sinking air with high-speed winds associated with thunderstorms. Similar to a tornado, microbursts can cause significant damage to buildings and landscapes and are also a threat to aircraft. Microbursts are less than 2.5 miles in scale, and extreme ones can produce wind speeds up to 150 mph. They can be either wet, dry, or a hybrid of the two. 6. Brinicle First discovered in the 1960s, brinicle forms below sea ice when a flow of icy saline water meets an area of ocean water, forming the equivalent of an underwater icicle. Recommended: Breaking: Did You Know, All You Read About CO2 Rise Is Half The Truth 7. Hail glaciers Hail glaciers are large accumulations of hail that can stay frozen for some time. In 2004, in Clayton, New Mexico, 15-foot deep ice “glaciers” formed along riverbanks following a summer hail storm. The ice remained for nearly a month. Such hail glaciers have been documented on a few other occasions in locations in the American Southwest, including Dalhart and Amarillo, Texas, and most recently in the Mexican city of Guadalajara in June of 2019. Recommended:  Delay Climate Change With Submarines Which Produce Icebergs 8. Derechos A derecho is a rare type of severe thunderstorm event. It is a long-lived, wide wind storm with showers or thunderstorms that typically moves in a straight line. A derecho often creates striking visual formations as an ominous shelf clouds approach. By definition, Derechos must include winds of at least 58 mph along most of their length and produce a swath of wind damage at least 240 miles long. 9. Mammatus clouds Mammatus clouds occur when a large base cloud develops a series of smaller, round protuberances on the underside. While they can occur in different clouds, they are most often seen on cumulonimbus clouds, towering cloud formations with flat bases. They occur when ice crystals fall out of the cloud and turn to water vapor, cooling the air around them, creating the sunken pockets indicative of Mammatus formations. 10. Frost Flowers These frost flowers in the Arctic ocean form from imperfections on the ice's surface in sub-zero temperatures, normally around the -20C mark. The spikes have been found to contain microorganisms making them temporary miniature ecosystems similar to a coral reef. 11. Kelvin-Helmholtz clouds Resembling a series of rolling ocean waves, Kelvin-Helmholtz clouds often form when two adjacent atmospheric air layers are moving at different speeds. Their presence may indicate atmospheric instability and turbulence for aircraft. They may also have been the inspiration behind Van Gogh’s famous painting Starry Night. Recommended:  Solar Geo-Engineering As The Ultimate Answer To Climate Change 12. St. Elmo’s fire Most often occurring during thunderstorms at sea, St. Elmo’s Fire is a burst of plasma or ionized air that glows blue and can cause tall structures such as ship masts or church steeples to appear to be on fire. It occurs when an imbalance in electrical charge causes molecules to rip apart. 13. Thundersleet Thunder sleet happens when a thunderstorm occurs simultaneously with a sleet storm. Like thundersnow, this phenomenon is infrequent and occurs when the friction created by strong up and downdrafts causes charged particles to collide within a cloud. 14. Fallstreak holes These picturesque elliptical holes that can appear in cirrocumulus or altocumulus clouds are caused by tiny water droplets within the cloud that are colder than freezing but have yet to turn to ice. Once a triggering event such as a plane flying through the clouds causes the supercooled droplets to start freezing, they rapidly crystalize and fall, leaving a hole in the cloud layer. 15.  Twin tornadoes With about 1,200 occurrences every year, tornadoes are relatively common weather events in the United States. While it is also normal for clusters of tornadoes to form simultaneously, multiple smaller vortexes almost always combine or orbit a single parent tornado. For more than one tornado of a sizable magnitude to coexist, conditions have to be unusually balanced. This dangerous and rare phenomenon occurs on average once every 10 to 15 years. Recommended:  Rescue Globally: Human Blood Can Help Prevent Climate Change 16. Nacreous clouds Rare but made more common by climate change, nacreous or noctilucent clouds form ice crystals and methane at high altitudes. Nick-named “mother of pearl” clouds, they appear in temperatures of approximately negative 110 F. The ice crystals refract light, producing a glimmery, iridescent look. According to NOAA, it is likely that these weather phenomena did not exist before 1885. 17.  Tubular clouds Tubular clouds, a type of arcus cloud also known as a roll cloud, form low and horizontally in the sky. They tend to form along with the edges or in the downdrafts of thunderstorms. While relatively rare and ominous-looking, these clouds are not usually a sign of dangerous weather. Before you go! Recommended:  Bushfires Australia Generate Their Own Weather Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own experience with strange weather? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations