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Climate climate change  ticks and oak processionary caterpillars | Newsletter General

Climate Change: Ticks And Oak Processionary Caterpillars

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by: Yvonne Doff
climate change  ticks and oak processionary caterpillars | Newsletter

You might think that ticks and oak processionary caterpillars are annoying insects but cannot do much harm. Think again! These little creatures have gone through some changes in the last decades, and they are expanding worldwide. The ticks are going further north to new places, where we cut forests or creating grasslands. But what can we do and what should we not do?

Tick species

There are thousands of ticks. For example, in North America, you have the American dog tick, the black-legged tick, the Gulf Coast tick, the Rocky Mountain tick, the brown dog tick, the lone star tick, and the western black-legged tick. Maybe they are invisible for the untrained eye, but they could be dangerous. It most likely has to do with the climate change, these creatures live in warm circumstances. The cold we know is changing, so it is not as cold as it used to, so it might be warmer in spring than before. A lot of tropical areas around the world have horrible problems with ticks, also dogs struggle with these little animals. 

Recommended: Climate Change Causes Nature To Change: The World Affected

Tick on your skin? What to do?

A tick on your skin could make you anxious. But it does not mean the pathogen has spread. Not every tick carries the illness; the creature would have to stick to your skin in order to transmit infections. The longer the tick is on your skin, the more likely it is to be infected. Humans can handle a small number of pathogens, but the higher the dose, the higher the risk of transmission.

Lyme disease

In order to get Lyme disease, the tick has to be attached for over a day. Researchers have shown that there is at least a one-day window before an infectious dose has been transmitted from a black-legged tick. The Rocky Mountain tick carries an infection which can be transmitted way more rapidly, within the first 12 hours of tick attachment. 

Enormous tick hunts its prey in the Netherlands

We all are aware of the existence of the tick, but can we imagine a giant and much more horrifying tick? Now, these giant ticks have shown up in the Netherlands for the first time. The tick, Hyalomma, actively hunts down his prey and can chase you for 100 metres, even if you run as hard as you can. This giant tick is seen in Germany, and people were wondering if it would cross borders with the Netherlands. And, unfortunately, this is true. This kind of tick has very long legs and is super fast and is about three times bigger than the regular ticks we know. The main difference with the 'regular' tick is that these giant ticks are actively searching for hosts, instead of passively waiting and then jump on their prey. The Hyalomma tick is familiar in North Africa and Asia, but nowadays can be found in South and East Europe. It prefers larger animals and can see his prey from nine metres away.



                                                   Climate Change: Ticks 

Ticks, 14 essential facts you have to know 

  1. Ticks are not insects

Did you know that ticks are not insects? They are arachnids, which means that they are related to spiders. They even look a lot like spiders with their legs, no antennae and they do not fly or jump. They camp out on leaves, blades of grass or something like that, waiting on their prey (an animal or human) and then stretch out their first legs to crawl into a thin area of skin near a small blood vessel. 

  1. Not every tick spread diseases

There are thousands of ticks around the world, but only a few types of ticks spread diseases. The black-legged tick is familiar for his Lyme disease, which is an infection that can cause you a lot of pain, an inflammation of the brain, and more things. But some ticks are more dangerous and could be fatal for us. The fever is called Rocky Mountain spotted fever, carried by the American dog tick and brown dog tick. They are both found in the United States.

  1. A tick stays around for a few days if they bite you

A tick is not quite similar to a mosquito, which bites you and stays on you for a few minutes. When a tick is on your skin, he wants to wait around for a few days. When they found an excellent spot to extract blood, they will start their meal prep, and this could last for two hours. There is a good chance you will not notice them. But when they burry its little head into your skin, it unpacks its feeding tube and spits out saliva what our body is trying to protect. The tick will feed itself for about two or three days. Only if a female is on your skin, she will swell up in double its standard size. 

  1. Ticks do not spread disease immediately

It is not likely that a tick spread an infection quickly. Some ticks spread a disease called anaplasmosis within eight hours, but most ticks take longer. If you remove the tick within 24 hours, you will probably not get Lyme disease. In most cases, it takes 36 to 48 hours before the bacteria can infect you with the virus.

  1. Unfortunately, ticks can spread multiple diseases at once

Ticks do not only like human blood, but also blood from animals, like mice, deer, rabbits and birds. These animals carry diseases as well. They pick up certain bacteria and this way they can bring three different kinds of diseases at once. For example, the black-legged deer tick can spread anaplasmosis, Lyme disease and babesiosis at once. 

  1. Most of the internet home remedies do not work

On the internet, you will find many suggestions to remove the tick, but do not believe everything you will read. Rubbing petroleum jelly, nail polish or gasoline will not help you to remove the tick. Alcohol will not help either. The problem is that these little creatures can survive long periods without air, so trying the above will not help. But if you want to know how to remove a tick correctly, please read on.

  1. Take a pair of tweezers to remove the little bastard

Almost every household has tweezers and believe it or not, but with tweezers, you can remove this creature. So do not scratch it but remove the tick carefully and efficiently with tweezers. Grasp the tick as close to the skin as possible. Pull it upwards carefully and flush it down the toilet or put it in a sealed bag if your doctor wants to ID it. Clean up your skin afterwards with water and soap or an alcohol wipe. Do not worry if you do not remove the entire head. The tick is already dead, and the mouthpiece will get out eventually. 

tick tweezer, removal

  1. The symptoms can show up within a few days

This is partly true. People with the Rocky Mountain spotted fever usually have a fever the first few days and get a rash later on. With Lyme disease, the rash could appear from three days to one month after the bite. The rash arrives before the fever. The symptoms could be a fever, headache, muscle aches, fatigue and some rash. 

  1. Not all with Lyme disease will get a rash

Not everyone with Lyme disease will get a rash. About 20 to 30 per cent will not get the so-called bullseye rash, but they can develop other symptoms like arthritis in the joints, meningitis, muscle pain of encephalitis. 

  1. Not every tick transmits a disease

Only one to three per cent of the people who are bitten by an infected tick will end up getting Lyme disease. So, it is a good chance you will not get it once you spot a tick on your skin.

  1. No vaccines for humans yet

There used to be a vaccine for humans back in 1998, but it was not perfect. It caused a lot of side effects, and therefore, the manufacturer decided to take it off the market. There are vaccines for animals, but it is not clear how protective they are.

  1. You have more risk to get a tick bite in the summer

Ticks are here during the entire year, but summer is peak point: Lyme disease season. 

  1. How can you protect yourself?

Know where the little animals camp out. They are in forests, in open grassy areas. When you are in a tick area, tuck your jeans into your boots or socks and get some insecticide or insect repellant. 

  1. Check your skin every two to three hours

You might find it exaggerated, but you should check your skin every two to three hours, especially when you are still outdoors. Check your belly button, armpits, scalp, the back of your knees, ears and between your legs. 

Watch out for the oak processionary caterpillars!

In recent weeks the oak processionary caterpillars made their way in the Netherlands, and it became the subject of national crisis in no time. It set foot in this European country in 1991, in the south, but over the years it expanded itself to the north-east. Oak trees are their favourite snack and let there be a lot of oak trees in the Netherlands. 

Last few months significant parts of trees in the Netherlands had a rather strange look: wrapped in red-white warning tape because the caterpillars took their place in oak trees. They are poisonous, capable of causing a lot of discomforts and severe itching. 

The trees are everywhere: forests, densely populated areas, but also in cities and towns. The oak trees are being woven in silky nests. Avoiding them might not even help, because the caterpillars can fire bristles which sting and can be carried by the wind for 500 metres.

Processionary catarpillars

What are the health risks?

Contact with the bristles can cause health complaints such as bumps, skin rashes, itching and redness of the skin and red, puffy eyes. Sometimes it feels like getting a cold: a runny nose, difficulties to swallow, shortness of breath and coughing. In addition to the symptoms mentioned above, vomiting, fever and dizziness may occur. 

Prevention is better than cure

Try to avoid contact with trees that carry oak processionary caterpillars. For example, you can teach children to take distance from (invested) oak trees. Keep your animals and pets away from the invested oak trees. And, to make sure you will not get any bristle, cover your neck, legs and arms. Please stay away from nests and caterpillars, and do not try to remove the nests yourself. Report the nest to local authorities who can arrange to remove them. 

What to do when you get in contact with oak processionary caterpillars?

  • Rinse your skin and eyes with lukewarm water.
  • Try not to scratch, but if you do, please as little as possible. 
  • Use sticky tape on your skin to strip it. This way you will remove the poisonous caterpillar hairs. 
  • You can use ointment or cream with menthol, aloe vera or calendula in case of intense itching. You can find in the drugstores or pharmacies.
  • In general, should the symptoms disappear within a few days up to two weeks.

When do you need medical help?

  • If you have difficulties breathing, getting thick lips, eyes or tongue, call a doctor right away.
  • You should seek medical advice when you have eye problems or if you think a bristle caught your eye. It can cause severe eye problems, which can lead to blindness. 

Recommended: Environment And Insects: Bullet Ant Delivers 24 Hours Agony

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profileimage

Breaking News, as the world changes…

In our world, WhatsOrb refuses to turn away from the changes in our society and environment which succeeds each other at a rapid pace.

For WhatsOrb, publishing on the environment is a priority. We give reporting on climate, nature, waste, lifestyle and sustainable solutions the prominence it deserves.

At this turbulent time for ‘all’ species and our planet, we are determined to inform readers about threats, consequences and solutions based on facts, not on political prejudice or business interests.

WhatsOrb Breaking News will be published as soon as urgent events from around the world and startling sustainable innovations reach us.

If there is anything we should know and publish about, please send a note to: [email protected] or write your own story on: www.whatsorb.comthe only news site which gives you a ‘sustainable voice!’

Climate Change: Ticks And Oak Processionary Caterpillars

You might think that ticks and oak processionary caterpillars are annoying insects but cannot do much harm. Think again! These little creatures have gone through some changes in the last decades, and they are expanding worldwide. The ticks are going further north to new places, where we cut forests or creating grasslands. But what can we do and what should we not do? Tick species There are thousands of ticks. For example, in North America, you have the American dog tick, the black-legged tick, the Gulf Coast tick, the Rocky Mountain tick, the brown dog tick, the lone star tick, and the western black-legged tick. Maybe they are invisible for the untrained eye, but they could be dangerous. It most likely has to do with the climate change, these creatures live in warm circumstances. The cold we know is changing, so it is not as cold as it used to, so it might be warmer in spring than before. A lot of tropical areas around the world have horrible problems with ticks, also dogs struggle with these little animals.  Recommended:  Climate Change Causes Nature To Change: The World Affected Tick on your skin? What to do? A tick on your skin could make you anxious. But it does not mean the pathogen has spread. Not every tick carries the illness; the creature would have to stick to your skin in order to transmit infections. The longer the tick is on your skin, the more likely it is to be infected. Humans can handle a small number of pathogens, but the higher the dose, the higher the risk of transmission. Lyme disease In order to get Lyme disease, the tick has to be attached for over a day. Researchers have shown that there is at least a one-day window before an infectious dose has been transmitted from a black-legged tick. The Rocky Mountain tick carries an infection which can be transmitted way more rapidly, within the first 12 hours of tick attachment.  Enormous tick hunts its prey in the Netherlands We all are aware of the existence of the tick, but can we imagine a giant and much more horrifying tick? Now, these giant ticks have shown up in the Netherlands for the first time. The tick, Hyalomma, actively hunts down his prey and can chase you for 100 metres, even if you run as hard as you can. This giant tick is seen in Germany, and people were wondering if it would cross borders with the Netherlands. And, unfortunately, this is true. This kind of tick has very long legs and is super fast and is about three times bigger than the regular ticks we know. The main difference with the 'regular' tick is that these giant ticks are actively searching for hosts, instead of passively waiting and then jump on their prey. The Hyalomma tick is familiar in North Africa and Asia, but nowadays can be found in South and East Europe. It prefers larger animals and can see his prey from nine metres away. {youtube}                                                    Climate Change: Ticks   Ticks, 14 essential facts you have to know  Ticks are not insects Did you know that ticks are not insects? They are arachnids, which means that they are related to spiders. They even look a lot like spiders with their legs, no antennae and they do not fly or jump. They camp out on leaves, blades of grass or something like that, waiting on their prey (an animal or human) and then stretch out their first legs to crawl into a thin area of skin near a small blood vessel.  Not every tick spread diseases There are thousands of ticks around the world, but only a few types of ticks spread diseases. The black-legged tick is familiar for his Lyme disease, which is an infection that can cause you a lot of pain, an inflammation of the brain, and more things. But some ticks are more dangerous and could be fatal for us. The fever is called Rocky Mountain spotted fever, carried by the American dog tick and brown dog tick. They are both found in the United States. A tick stays around for a few days if they bite you A tick is not quite similar to a mosquito, which bites you and stays on you for a few minutes. When a tick is on your skin, he wants to wait around for a few days. When they found an excellent spot to extract blood, they will start their meal prep, and this could last for two hours. There is a good chance you will not notice them. But when they burry its little head into your skin, it unpacks its feeding tube and spits out saliva what our body is trying to protect. The tick will feed itself for about two or three days. Only if a female is on your skin, she will swell up in double its standard size.  Ticks do not spread disease immediately It is not likely that a tick spread an infection quickly. Some ticks spread a disease called anaplasmosis within eight hours, but most ticks take longer. If you remove the tick within 24 hours, you will probably not get Lyme disease. In most cases, it takes 36 to 48 hours before the bacteria can infect you with the virus. Unfortunately, ticks can spread multiple diseases at once Ticks do not only like human blood, but also blood from animals, like mice, deer, rabbits and birds. These animals carry diseases as well. They pick up certain bacteria and this way they can bring three different kinds of diseases at once. For example, the black-legged deer tick can spread anaplasmosis, Lyme disease and babesiosis at once.  Most of the internet home remedies do not work On the internet, you will find many suggestions to remove the tick, but do not believe everything you will read. Rubbing petroleum jelly, nail polish or gasoline will not help you to remove the tick. Alcohol will not help either. The problem is that these little creatures can survive long periods without air, so trying the above will not help. But if you want to know how to remove a tick correctly, please read on. Take a pair of tweezers to remove the little bastard Almost every household has tweezers and believe it or not, but with tweezers, you can remove this creature. So do not scratch it but remove the tick carefully and efficiently with tweezers. Grasp the tick as close to the skin as possible. Pull it upwards carefully and flush it down the toilet or put it in a sealed bag if your doctor wants to ID it. Clean up your skin afterwards with water and soap or an alcohol wipe. Do not worry if you do not remove the entire head. The tick is already dead, and the mouthpiece will get out eventually.  The symptoms can show up within a few days This is partly true. People with the Rocky Mountain spotted fever usually have a fever the first few days and get a rash later on. With Lyme disease, the rash could appear from three days to one month after the bite. The rash arrives before the fever. The symptoms could be a fever, headache, muscle aches, fatigue and some rash.  Not all with Lyme disease will get a rash Not everyone with Lyme disease will get a rash. About 20 to 30 per cent will not get the so-called bullseye rash, but they can develop other symptoms like arthritis in the joints, meningitis, muscle pain of encephalitis.  Not every tick transmits a disease Only one to three per cent of the people who are bitten by an infected tick will end up getting Lyme disease. So, it is a good chance you will not get it once you spot a tick on your skin. No vaccines for humans yet There used to be a vaccine for humans back in 1998, but it was not perfect. It caused a lot of side effects, and therefore, the manufacturer decided to take it off the market. There are vaccines for animals, but it is not clear how protective they are. You have more risk to get a tick bite in the summer Ticks are here during the entire year, but summer is peak point: Lyme disease season.  How can you protect yourself? Know where the little animals camp out. They are in forests, in open grassy areas. When you are in a tick area, tuck your jeans into your boots or socks and get some insecticide or insect repellant.  Check your skin every two to three hours You might find it exaggerated, but you should check your skin every two to three hours, especially when you are still outdoors. Check your belly button, armpits, scalp, the back of your knees, ears and between your legs.  Watch out for the oak processionary caterpillars! In recent weeks the oak processionary caterpillars made their way in the Netherlands, and it became the subject of national crisis in no time. It set foot in this European country in 1991, in the south, but over the years it expanded itself to the north-east. Oak trees are their favourite snack and let there be a lot of oak trees in the Netherlands.  Last few months significant parts of trees in the Netherlands had a rather strange look: wrapped in red-white warning tape because the caterpillars took their place in oak trees. They are poisonous, capable of causing a lot of discomforts and severe itching.  The trees are everywhere: forests, densely populated areas, but also in cities and towns. The oak trees are being woven in silky nests. Avoiding them might not even help, because the caterpillars can fire bristles which sting and can be carried by the wind for 500 metres. What are the health risks? Contact with the bristles can cause health complaints such as bumps, skin rashes, itching and redness of the skin and red, puffy eyes. Sometimes it feels like getting a cold: a runny nose, difficulties to swallow, shortness of breath and coughing. In addition to the symptoms mentioned above, vomiting, fever and dizziness may occur.  Prevention is better than cure Try to avoid contact with trees that carry oak processionary caterpillars. For example, you can teach children to take distance from (invested) oak trees. Keep your animals and pets away from the invested oak trees. And, to make sure you will not get any bristle, cover your neck, legs and arms. Please stay away from nests and caterpillars, and do not try to remove the nests yourself. Report the nest to local authorities who can arrange to remove them.  What to do when you get in contact with oak processionary caterpillars? Rinse your skin and eyes with lukewarm water. Try not to scratch, but if you do, please as little as possible.  Use sticky tape on your skin to strip it. This way you will remove the poisonous caterpillar hairs.  You can use ointment or cream with menthol, aloe vera or calendula in case of intense itching. You can find in the drugstores or pharmacies. In general, should the symptoms disappear within a few days up to two weeks. When do you need medical help? If you have difficulties breathing, getting thick lips, eyes or tongue, call a doctor right away. You should seek medical advice when you have eye problems or if you think a bristle caught your eye. It can cause severe eye problems, which can lead to blindness.  Recommended:  Environment And Insects: Bullet Ant Delivers 24 Hours Agony
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