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Community climate change and allergies a bad match  tips   tricks  | Newsletter Lifestyle

Climate Change And Allergies A Bad Match: Tips & Tricks

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by: WhatsOrb
climate change and allergies a bad match  tips   tricks  | Newsletter

Springtime is great, especially now that the weather is taking a turn for the better. Flowers are blossoming, birds are chirping, the sun is shining. Even people out on the street seem happier. That is, most do. Those unlucky ones who are suffering from hay fever or related allergies might not be as smiley. Pollen floating around freely in the spring air are quite literally making their life a living hell, sneezing and huffing away while others enjoy the first BBQ of the season instead.

Attacking the pollen

How this works? Well, it is basically the story of the birds and the bees. The story of what happens after one tree meets another tree that he likes very much. The one tree releases pollen to fertilise the other tree - as well as any other trees that may just happen to be in the figurative line of fire. Now, if it happens to be windy, these pollen can be blown all over. We will then no longer be talking about tree procreation, but shifting our focus to allergies instead.

Thankfully, not all of us are susceptible to those pollen. Some will breeze through it without breaking a sweat - or a sneeze. For others, however, it may pose much greater problems. Their immune systems do not recognize it as being as harmless as it actually is. Instead, it will attack the pollen ferociously, as our bodies think that it is actually dealing with some kind of parasite.

All of the symptoms that rapidly develop when faced with allergies are meant to propel the foreign and seemingly dangerous entity out of our bodies. Through excessive sneezing, a runny nose, and all the other symptoms, we do what we can to get rid of what is, essentially, just the male reproduction product of trees. This excessive attack of a perceived threat to our health is what is referred to as an allergy.

A recent 'hype'

Funnily enough, this thing that we refer to as an allergy has not always been around. It is actually a recent 'hype', so to speak. One that seems to have been born around the time of the industrial revolution. Whether this was in any way caused by the increased pollution, a change in our diet, or the heightened hygiene, we cannot be sure.

One element can be pointed out as a proven culprit, though. And this is climate change. Plants grow more quickly as a result of warmer temperatures and the accompanying higher levels of CO2. That is a fact. This also means that they are increasing the speed with which they procreate - or, specifically, produce and release pollen. Simultaneously, the periods during which the plants release pollen will be extended.

In a warmer climate and in an atmosphere with more CO2, the pollen will have free reign. And with a higher pollen count in the air, people who are sensitive to it will suffer even more.

Hay fever is on the rise

Are you starting to feel relieved that you have never shown any signs of allergies in the past? Well, then keep reading, as this may ultimately be bad news for you, too. If you are exposed to an allergen for an extended period of time, you are more likely to become sensitized to it as well. This means that you may start to experience symptoms, even if you have not done so in the past. And for those who are already too familiar with allergies - well, your symptoms are likely to intensify even more as a result.

As such, it will come as no surprise that the prevalence of hay fever is on the rise. You may already be one of its victims - or soon, too, fall prey to its sniffing and sneezing. So, the next best thing would be to find ways of alleviating its annoying symptoms. That is, the next best thing to solving climate change as a whole and reversing at least some of this pollen epidemic.

The golden liquid or...

Some are absolutely convinced of the benefits of a 100% natural reliever - honey. Although it may sound counterintuitive - after all, isn’t honey a product that only came to exist because of pollen and plant reproduction? Well, yes, but this might be why it is such a great way of building up your pollen-resistance.

Unfortunately it isn’t quite that simple. This theory has been largely debunked, in particular because the pollen that will actually ‘wake up’ your immune system and invoke an allergic response do not come from flowers. Depending on the season, we will find ourselves sneezing exclusively as the result of pollen from trees (spring), grass (summer) and weeds (end of summer/beginning of fall). None of those include pollen that bees are attracted to. Hence, there is no way for any allergy-related pollen to wind up in that delicious spoonful of honey. So unfortunately this golden liquid will probably not be your magic cure.

Experts are no closer to finding a cure either, although they agree that it is best to simply stay clean. That is to say, to avoid pollen at all costs when their concentration in the air is high. This means keeping doors and windows closed and not go outside. Your best option is to go for a walk right after a rainstorm, when the air is cleaner. Avoid any exposure to outside air when the pollen counts are high - meaning, in warm and dry circumstances.

Tips & Tricks which make you feel better

There is some over-the-counter medication available that will at least alleviate some of the symptoms, if they really hinder you in your day to day life. Yet if you are not a fan of taking pills and are forced - either by work or personal disposition - to spent at least some of your time outdoors, there are some other things you can do to feel better.

  1. Get your hands on some Vaseline and rub it around the nostrils. This will ‘trap’ the pollen and prevent it from getting into your nose, where it will get stuck to the lining.
  2. Avoid particularly grassy areas. So stay away from that meadow or public park with a freshly mown lawn in the summer.
  3. Plan your outside activities in the late morning or early afternoon. Pollen count is usually the highest between 8am and 10am; and then again between 5pm and 7pm. Try to stay off the street - and in particular out of the park - between those hours.
  4. Frequently hit the gym. Although it is not quite clear why this is the case, it is a fact that people who exercise more exhibit milder symptoms than those who don’t.
  5. In the same category as point 4, we-don’t-know-why-but-it-works: try to keep the stress at bay. Studies have shown that hay fever symptoms are worse for those who report higher stress levels.
  6. Look into houseplants that provide hay fever relief. Some specific species, like peace lilies, have been found to take the edge of the symptoms. Plus, they will brighten up your home as well.
  7. Limit your alcohol intake. Alcoholic drinks contain histamine, a chemical that is known to start allergic reactions and increase your susceptibility to pollen.
  8. Get your hands on chamomile tea. Contrary to alcoholic drinks, you will find that chamomile is a natural antihistamine substance, known to be an effective means to combat allergic reactions.
  9. Food-wise, check out the darker colored berries in the supermarket - blackberries, red grapes and currants are great options. These are rich in antioxidants, a great natural inflammation reducer. The same goes for omega-3 rich foods, such as oily fish, nuts and seeds.
  10. Even if you are feeling worse for the wear and tired after a long day, get out that vacuum cleaner and dust and wipe down surfaces regularly. This will help to reduce the pollen count in your living area.
  11. Avoid hanging and/or drying your laundry outside. They will quite easily catch pollen, which you will then get in contact with as soon as you put your clothes on.

While these tips will admittedly not cure your hay fever or allergies, it may just be enough to keep the symptoms manageable. In the meantime, we will work on kicking climate change to the curb and hopefully call a halt to the related pollen-infestation.

https://www.whatsorb.com/category/climate

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At this turbulent time for ‘all’ species and our planet, we are determined to inform readers about threats, consequences and solutions based on facts, not on political prejudice or business interests.

WhatsOrb Breaking News will be published as soon as urgent events from around the world and startling sustainable innovations reach us.

If there is anything we should know and publish about, please send a note to: [email protected] or write your own story on: www.whatsorb.comthe only news site which gives you a ‘sustainable voice!’

profileimage

Breaking News, as the world changes…

In our world, WhatsOrb refuses to turn away from the changes in our society and environment which succeeds each other at a rapid pace.

For WhatsOrb, publishing on the environment is a priority. We give reporting on climate, nature, waste, lifestyle and sustainable solutions the prominence it deserves.

At this turbulent time for ‘all’ species and our planet, we are determined to inform readers about threats, consequences and solutions based on facts, not on political prejudice or business interests.

WhatsOrb Breaking News will be published as soon as urgent events from around the world and startling sustainable innovations reach us.

If there is anything we should know and publish about, please send a note to: [email protected] or write your own story on: www.whatsorb.comthe only news site which gives you a ‘sustainable voice!’

Climate Change And Allergies A Bad Match: Tips & Tricks

Springtime is great, especially now that the weather is taking a turn for the better. Flowers are blossoming, birds are chirping, the sun is shining. Even people out on the street seem happier. That is, most do. Those unlucky ones who are suffering from hay fever or related allergies might not be as smiley. Pollen floating around freely in the spring air are quite literally making their life a living hell, sneezing and huffing away while others enjoy the first BBQ of the season instead. Attacking the pollen How this works? Well, it is basically the story of the birds and the bees. The story of what happens after one tree meets another tree that he likes very much. The one tree releases pollen to fertilise the other tree - as well as any other trees that may just happen to be in the figurative line of fire. Now, if it happens to be windy, these pollen can be blown all over. We will then no longer be talking about tree procreation, but shifting our focus to allergies instead. Thankfully, not all of us are susceptible to those pollen. Some will breeze through it without breaking a sweat - or a sneeze. For others, however, it may pose much greater problems. Their immune systems do not recognize it as being as harmless as it actually is. Instead, it will attack the pollen ferociously, as our bodies think that it is actually dealing with some kind of parasite. All of the symptoms that rapidly develop when faced with allergies are meant to propel the foreign and seemingly dangerous entity out of our bodies. Through excessive sneezing, a runny nose, and all the other symptoms, we do what we can to get rid of what is, essentially, just the male reproduction product of trees. This excessive attack of a perceived threat to our health is what is referred to as an allergy. A recent 'hype' Funnily enough, this thing that we refer to as an allergy has not always been around. It is actually a recent 'hype', so to speak. One that seems to have been born around the time of the industrial revolution. Whether this was in any way caused by the increased pollution, a change in our diet, or the heightened hygiene, we cannot be sure. One element can be pointed out as a proven culprit, though. And this is climate change. Plants grow more quickly as a result of warmer temperatures and the accompanying higher levels of CO2. That is a fact. This also means that they are increasing the speed with which they procreate - or, specifically, produce and release pollen. Simultaneously, the periods during which the plants release pollen will be extended. In a warmer climate and in an atmosphere with more CO2 , the pollen will have free reign. And with a higher pollen count in the air, people who are sensitive to it will suffer even more. Hay fever is on the rise Are you starting to feel relieved that you have never shown any signs of allergies in the past? Well, then keep reading, as this may ultimately be bad news for you, too. If you are exposed to an allergen for an extended period of time, you are more likely to become sensitized to it as well. This means that you may start to experience symptoms, even if you have not done so in the past. And for those who are already too familiar with allergies - well, your symptoms are likely to intensify even more as a result. As such, it will come as no surprise that the prevalence of hay fever is on the rise. You may already be one of its victims - or soon, too, fall prey to its sniffing and sneezing. So, the next best thing would be to find ways of alleviating its annoying symptoms. That is, the next best thing to solving climate change as a whole and reversing at least some of this pollen epidemic. The golden liquid or... Some are absolutely convinced of the benefits of a 100% natural reliever - honey. Although it may sound counterintuitive - after all, isn’t honey a product that only came to exist because of pollen and plant reproduction? Well, yes, but this might be why it is such a great way of building up your pollen-resistance. Unfortunately it isn’t quite that simple. This theory has been largely debunked, in particular because the pollen that will actually ‘wake up’ your immune system and invoke an allergic response do not come from flowers. Depending on the season, we will find ourselves sneezing exclusively as the result of pollen from trees (spring), grass (summer) and weeds (end of summer/beginning of fall). None of those include pollen that bees are attracted to. Hence, there is no way for any allergy-related pollen to wind up in that delicious spoonful of honey. So unfortunately this golden liquid will probably not be your magic cure. Experts are no closer to finding a cure either, although they agree that it is best to simply stay clean. That is to say, to avoid pollen at all costs when their concentration in the air is high. This means keeping doors and windows closed and not go outside. Your best option is to go for a walk right after a rainstorm, when the air is cleaner. Avoid any exposure to outside air when the pollen counts are high - meaning, in warm and dry circumstances. Tips & Tricks which make you feel better There is some over-the-counter medication available that will at least alleviate some of the symptoms, if they really hinder you in your day to day life. Yet if you are not a fan of taking pills and are forced - either by work or personal disposition - to spent at least some of your time outdoors, there are some other things you can do to feel better. Get your hands on some Vaseline and rub it around the nostrils. This will ‘trap’ the pollen and prevent it from getting into your nose, where it will get stuck to the lining. Avoid particularly grassy areas. So stay away from that meadow or public park with a freshly mown lawn in the summer. Plan your outside activities in the late morning or early afternoon. Pollen count is usually the highest between 8am and 10am; and then again between 5pm and 7pm. Try to stay off the street - and in particular out of the park - between those hours. Frequently hit the gym. Although it is not quite clear why this is the case, it is a fact that people who exercise more exhibit milder symptoms than those who don’t. In the same category as point 4, we-don’t-know-why-but-it-works: try to keep the stress at bay. Studies have shown that hay fever symptoms are worse for those who report higher stress levels. Look into houseplants that provide hay fever relief. Some specific species, like peace lilies, have been found to take the edge of the symptoms. Plus, they will brighten up your home as well. Limit your alcohol intake. Alcoholic drinks contain histamine, a chemical that is known to start allergic reactions and increase your susceptibility to pollen. Get your hands on chamomile tea. Contrary to alcoholic drinks, you will find that chamomile is a natural antihistamine substance, known to be an effective means to combat allergic reactions. Food-wise, check out the darker colored berries in the supermarket - blackberries, red grapes and currants are great options. These are rich in antioxidants, a great natural inflammation reducer. The same goes for omega-3 rich foods, such as oily fish, nuts and seeds. Even if you are feeling worse for the wear and tired after a long day, get out that vacuum cleaner and dust and wipe down surfaces regularly. This will help to reduce the pollen count in your living area. Avoid hanging and/or drying your laundry outside. They will quite easily catch pollen, which you will then get in contact with as soon as you put your clothes on. While these tips will admittedly not cure your hay fever or allergies, it may just be enough to keep the symptoms manageable. In the meantime, we will work on kicking climate change to the curb and hopefully call a halt to the related pollen-infestation. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/climate
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