Close Welcome writers, influencers and dreamers, make the world a greener place
Register here
Forgot password
Forgot password
or
or

Close
Close Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations
Close Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations
Close Reset password
your profile is 33% complete:
33%
Update profile Close
Close WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-Change

For writers, influencers and dreamers who want to make the world a greener place.

WhatsOrb reaches monthly about 28.000 thousand visitors who want - like you - to make the world a greener place. Share your expertise and all can benefit.

Become an influencer and write and share sustainable news and innovations globally
Are you a writer or do you have ideas about sustainability which you want to share? Register and share your green knowledge and news. WhatsOrb offers you global exposure for your article.

If your article meets certain standards, you receive promotional gains like Facebook promotions and Google Ads advertising.

Agri & Gardening are corals lunar freaks  romantic moon mating  | Newsletter General

Are Corals Lunar Freaks? Romantic Moon Mating!

by: Sharai Hoekema
are corals lunar freaks  romantic moon mating  | Newsletter

Now, for your educational piece today, let’s discuss the reproduction mechanism of corals. Yes, you heard that right. How do corals get their groove on? In a more surprising way than you might think. Turns out those little buggers are real romantics, waiting for the moonshine!

Are Corals Lunar Freaks? Romantic Moon Mating!

In a nutshell, there are three triggers that can be identified when it comes to procreation in corals. The mood-setters, if you wish. First of all, the rise in sea temperature must be gradual. Nothing too sudden, just a nice little warming up. Secondly, corals will release reproductive cells when the time is right - as dictated by the lunar cycle.

When the moon says so, usually a couple of days after the full moon, corals will release their sperm and/or eggs in order to get things underway. Although they will, thirdly, only do so at night - when it is dark. How is that for a romantic setting?

coral spawn

Recommended: Solar Powered Sea Slugs Shed Light On Perpetual Green Energy

So Are Corals Just Lunar Freaks?

It would be too easy to call ‘em lunar freaks for this reason alone. Although it is definitely not untrue. The moon is helping when we, as human beings, are often not.

Corals are a very large and important part of the sea species, making up more than 25% of it. They are also suffering from our current problems, like climate change, overfishing, and pollution. If we keep going, we might even drive those ecosystems to complete extinction in the next couple of decades.

As this would trigger a sequence where other sea life would be dragged down with it, scientists are understandably eager to prevent it. They are actively trying to restore coral reefs by bringing in ‘wild’ coral and breaking them up in fragments. They grow faster, as a result, and will produce hundreds of smaller corals. These cute little spawns will then be taken to nurseries to baby them for a while, before being transplanted back onto the reef.

There is just one problem here. As one piece of ‘wild coral’ is usually broken up in pieces, this means that all of those fragments are identical. That is, they have the same ‘father’. Then, as all the resulting coral has one common parent, they will be genetically identical to one another. Great for a close-knit family gathering, but not so good for diversity - something that will help ward off diseases and be more resilient against climate change.

Coral spawning
Coral spawning

Recommended: Agriculture Under Water: Farming At Sea In Italy

Corals Full Moon Mating

So, the technique of restoring corals as we do it today is not perfect. This is why scientists are now looking into the use of sexual reproduction to restore corals. They know that corals are ready to get it on, in mass spawning events, during full moons - when the tides are high. There is another reason for this, besides the great mood setter. Powerful currents will take the eggs with them for quite some distance, which means that they will ultimately be fertilized by sperm of far-away, non-related colonies. Mother Nature’s way of creating a diverse population.

Now it has to be done by scientists if we want our corals to have a shot at surviving past this century. We bring you: artificial coral insemination.

Coral Sex In The Lab

What do panda’s and coral reefs have in common? They are both struggling with limited fertility, as they are only fertile for a couple of days per year. This makes it so incredibly hard to get it done. Coral only spawns a handful of nights per year, with the date and time dependant upon complex and largely unknown circumstances.

Under water, man, coral
Kira Hughes, project manager at Ruth Gates’ lab, checks on the “super corals” they are growing in Kaneohe Bay.

Even worse, every time we take one step closer to understanding the process, climate change sets us two steps back. It changes the timing, making it even less frequent and predictable. As the goal is to get various colonies to spawn simultaneously, this makes the process even harder.

Recommended: Climate Change Stop, Store CO2, Add Phytoplankton By Whales?

Not a challenge that the folks at the CORALIUM Laboratory of the National Autonomous University of Mexico were about to back away from. During the full moon, divers collect coral sperm and eggs. These are carefully extracted and brought to the lab, where scientists attempt to fertilize them. The process relies on a lot of external factors, including water quality, temperature, and pathogens, so the larvae need to be monitored around the clock.

As they get older, they settle on hard surfaces: 3D shapes that closely resemble the coral rubble that the larvae prefer in the ‘real world’. After only a short while, they are ready to go out into the world themselves.

Coral Mating Getting Technical

The huge advantage of this technique is the genetically diverse offspring that it creates - genes that they will pass along to create even greater and more diverse offspring themselves. This keeps the pool healthy, allowing future generations to thrive as well.

Coral mating is something that has to be done if we want to keep our oceans healthy. The Caribbean alone already lost 80% of all its coral reefs over the last few decades, with the surviving colonies being like islands - too far away from one another to successfully reproduce. In the wild, they are barely able to do so. But with coral mating, a fertilization rate of over 80% has been achieved.

While the high costs are still a bit of an issue, the basic premise here is great. The healthy larvae can already be planted back into the reef after a mere few weeks, allowing for a swift and efficient restoration of damaged coral reefs; preserving diversity, and promoting further ‘natural’ reproduction. There are even courses being offered on how to do it on a low budget - making it a hobby that more of us should absolutely be getting into if we want to keep the oceans a thriving, healthy place. 

Before you go!

Recommended: Bushfires Australia Generate Their Weather

Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below.
We try to respond the same day.

Like to write your own experience with how nature can help us?
Send your writing & scribble with a photo to [email protected], and we will write an interesting article based on your input.

Messange
You
Share this post
profilepic

Breaking News, as the world changes…

In our world, WhatsOrb refuses to turn away from the changes in our society and environment which succeeds each other at a rapid pace.

For WhatsOrb, publishing on the environment is a priority. We give reporting on climate, nature, waste, lifestyle and sustainable solutions the prominence it deserves.

At this turbulent time for ‘all’ species and our planet, we are determined to inform readers about threats, consequences and solutions based on facts, not on political prejudice or business interests.

WhatsOrb Breaking News will be published as soon as urgent events from around the world and startling sustainable innovations reach us.

If there is anything we should know and publish about, please send a note to: [email protected] or write your own story on: www.whatsorb.comthe only news site which gives you a ‘sustainable voice!’

profileimage

Breaking News, as the world changes…

In our world, WhatsOrb refuses to turn away from the changes in our society and environment which succeeds each other at a rapid pace.

For WhatsOrb, publishing on the environment is a priority. We give reporting on climate, nature, waste, lifestyle and sustainable solutions the prominence it deserves.

At this turbulent time for ‘all’ species and our planet, we are determined to inform readers about threats, consequences and solutions based on facts, not on political prejudice or business interests.

WhatsOrb Breaking News will be published as soon as urgent events from around the world and startling sustainable innovations reach us.

If there is anything we should know and publish about, please send a note to: [email protected] or write your own story on: www.whatsorb.comthe only news site which gives you a ‘sustainable voice!’

Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations
SIGN UP FOR MONTHLY TIPS & TRICKS
More like this:

Are Corals Lunar Freaks? Romantic Moon Mating!

Now, for your educational piece today, let’s discuss the reproduction mechanism of corals. Yes, you heard that right. How do corals get their groove on? In a more surprising way than you might think. Turns out those little buggers are real romantics, waiting for the moonshine! Are Corals Lunar Freaks? Romantic Moon Mating! In a nutshell, there are three triggers that can be identified when it comes to procreation in corals. The mood-setters, if you wish. First of all, the rise in sea temperature must be gradual. Nothing too sudden, just a nice little warming up. Secondly, corals will release reproductive cells when the time is right - as dictated by the lunar cycle. When the moon says so, usually a couple of days after the full moon, corals will release their sperm and/or eggs in order to get things underway. Although they will, thirdly, only do so at night - when it is dark. How is that for a romantic setting? Recommended:  Solar Powered Sea Slugs Shed Light On Perpetual Green Energy So Are Corals Just Lunar Freaks? It would be too easy to call ‘em lunar freaks for this reason alone. Although it is definitely not untrue. The moon is helping when we, as human beings, are often not. Corals are a very large and important part of the sea species, making up more than 25% of it. They are also suffering from our current problems, like climate change, overfishing, and pollution. If we keep going, we might even drive those ecosystems to complete extinction in the next couple of decades. As this would trigger a sequence where other sea life would be dragged down with it, scientists are understandably eager to prevent it. They are actively trying to restore coral reefs by bringing in ‘wild’ coral and breaking them up in fragments. They grow faster, as a result, and will produce hundreds of smaller corals. These cute little spawns will then be taken to nurseries to baby them for a while, before being transplanted back onto the reef. There is just one problem here. As one piece of ‘wild coral’ is usually broken up in pieces, this means that all of those fragments are identical. That is, they have the same ‘father’. Then, as all the resulting coral has one common parent, they will be genetically identical to one another. Great for a close-knit family gathering, but not so good for diversity - something that will help ward off diseases and be more resilient against climate change. Coral spawning Recommended:  Agriculture Under Water: Farming At Sea In Italy Corals Full Moon Mating So, the technique of restoring corals as we do it today is not perfect. This is why scientists are now looking into the use of sexual reproduction to restore corals. They know that corals are ready to get it on, in mass spawning events, during full moons - when the tides are high. There is another reason for this, besides the great mood setter. Powerful currents will take the eggs with them for quite some distance, which means that they will ultimately be fertilized by sperm of far-away, non-related colonies. Mother Nature’s way of creating a diverse population. Now it has to be done by scientists if we want our corals to have a shot at surviving past this century. We bring you: artificial coral insemination. Coral Sex In The Lab What do panda’s and coral reefs have in common? They are both struggling with limited fertility, as they are only fertile for a couple of days per year. This makes it so incredibly hard to get it done. Coral only spawns a handful of nights per year, with the date and time dependant upon complex and largely unknown circumstances. Kira Hughes, project manager at Ruth Gates’ lab, checks on the “super corals” they are growing in Kaneohe Bay. Even worse, every time we take one step closer to understanding the process, climate change sets us two steps back. It changes the timing, making it even less frequent and predictable. As the goal is to get various colonies to spawn simultaneously, this makes the process even harder. Recommended:  Climate Change Stop, Store CO2, Add Phytoplankton By Whales? Not a challenge that the folks at the CORALIUM Laboratory of the National Autonomous University of Mexico were about to back away from. During the full moon, divers collect coral sperm and eggs. These are carefully extracted and brought to the lab, where scientists attempt to fertilize them. The process relies on a lot of external factors, including water quality, temperature, and pathogens, so the larvae need to be monitored around the clock. As they get older, they settle on hard surfaces: 3D shapes that closely resemble the coral rubble that the larvae prefer in the ‘real world’. After only a short while, they are ready to go out into the world themselves. Coral Mating Getting Technical The huge advantage of this technique is the genetically diverse offspring that it creates - genes that they will pass along to create even greater and more diverse offspring themselves. This keeps the pool healthy, allowing future generations to thrive as well. Coral mating is something that has to be done if we want to keep our oceans healthy. The Caribbean alone already lost 80% of all its coral reefs over the last few decades, with the surviving colonies being like islands - too far away from one another to successfully reproduce. In the wild, they are barely able to do so. But with coral mating, a fertilization rate of over 80% has been achieved. While the high costs are still a bit of an issue, the basic premise here is great. The healthy larvae can already be planted back into the reef after a mere few weeks, allowing for a swift and efficient restoration of damaged coral reefs; preserving diversity, and promoting further ‘natural’ reproduction. There are even courses being offered on how to do it on a low budget - making it a hobby that more of us should absolutely be getting into if we want to keep the oceans a thriving, healthy place.  Before you go! Recommended:  Bushfires Australia Generate Their Weather Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own experience with how nature can help us? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations