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Breaking News epic drive proves electric cars are viable | Breaking News

Epic Drive Proves Electric Cars Are Viable

by: Naaman Zhou
epic drive proves electric cars are viable | Breaking News

A Dutchman who has driven 89,000km from Amsterdam to Adelaide in a small electric car says he is proving to Australians that his epic drive proves electric cars are viable.

Epic Drive

Since March 2016, adventurer Wiebe Wakker has driven across 33 countries from Europe to the Middle East to south-east Asia and finally to Australia in a 2009 Volkswagen Golf, converted to electric. Over the past seven months, he has continued the journey around Australia from Darwin down to Perth, across the Nullarbor to Newcastle, up to Queensland, and back down to Adelaide. After Adelaide, Wakker will finish once he reaches Melbourne and then Sydney.

Electric Cars And Charging Stations In Australia

“I expected that by this time, I would be exhausted and starving, but I’m still having a lot of fun,” he told Guardian Australia from Adelaide. “I’m actually a little bit sad that I’m coming to the end of the journey,” Wakker said he hoped to bust Australian anxieties over the lack of charging stations and how far electric cars can travel by driving such extreme distances. Australia has one of the slowest uptakes of electric vehicles in the developed world. In 2016, only 0.1% of all new car sales were electric, compared to 29% in Norway, 6% in Wakker’s native Netherlands, and 1.5% in China and the UK.

“In Australia, the infrastructure for electric cars is still getting off the ground, but it’s already possible to drive all around Australia using charging stations,” he said. A lot of people say they are just waiting for the price to come down. Others say the electric car is just not viable for Australia because the distances are so big, which is a bit weird, I think. The average daily commute is just 20km or so.

A Volkswagen Electric Car From 2009?

“My car is from 2009, and it has a limited range of 200km. Most cars available on the market now do 300km to 500km, so you won't have this problem if you buy a current car in Australia. You can cover the whole country.” Wakker's car, which he calls “Blue Bandit,” is a first-generation electric car that can be charged on domestic power sockets. “When I started this journey, I thought I would mainly charge at people’s homes, and whenever I get a charging station, that will be a bonus,” he said. He said those with newer electric cars would find the journey even easier.

Recommended: Electric Car Might Fix China’s Mobility Problem

Charging Electric Cars In Australia

The Royal Automobile Club has built a chain of charges in WA, and the Queensland state government has built a 2,000km superhighway of chargers from Cairns to Coolangatta, which Wakker used. “Some states are supportive of installing infrastructure – Queensland has been doing very well. But it’s a pity that the (federal) government doesn’t really support it,” he said. “Most western countries where electric cars are taking off, the government is giving a lot of incentives for electric cars.” In Norway, electric cars are exempt from import taxes and the 25% VAT. Users are exempt from tolls and sometimes get free parking and the right to bus lanes.

Recommended: Electric Bicycle EBIQ Sustainable City Transport

Despite his positive experience, Wakker said he found the journey between Glendambo to Coober Pedy in South Australia a challenge in his 2009 car. “It was 255km – I knew I wasn’t going to make it,” he said. “So I checked on my app to see how the wind was going, I saw that 12 hours later I would have a tailwind. I waited and drove very slow to save energy – 60km. I did 235km, which was my record. Just 20km from Coober Pedy, I ran out; I put on many sunscreens and waited for someone who could give me a tow. Someone came by within 10 minutes and said yes.”

Cover photo by Photograph: -/AFP/Getty Images. Wiebe Wakker, with the electric car he made a round-the-world trip in. Electric vehicles have become a point of difference between the Coalition and Labor in the Australian election. 

Source Naaman Zhou. 

Before you go!

Recommended: EV Cars: The Difference Between US And EU EV Cars

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Breaking News, as the world changes…

In our world, WhatsOrb refuses to turn away from the changes in our society and environment which succeeds each other at a rapid pace.

For WhatsOrb, publishing on the environment is a priority. We give reporting on climate, nature, waste, lifestyle and sustainable solutions the prominence it deserves.

At this turbulent time for ‘all’ species and our planet, we are determined to inform readers about threats, consequences and solutions based on facts, not on political prejudice or business interests.

WhatsOrb Breaking News will be published as soon as urgent events from around the world and startling sustainable innovations reach us.

If there is anything we should know and publish about, please send a note to: [email protected] or write your own story on: www.whatsorb.comthe only news site which gives you a ‘sustainable voice!’

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Epic Drive Proves Electric Cars Are Viable

A Dutchman who has driven 89,000km from Amsterdam to Adelaide in a small electric car says he is proving to Australians that his e pic drive proves electric cars are viable. Epic Drive Since March 2016, adventurer Wiebe Wakker has driven across 33 countries from Europe to the Middle East to south-east Asia and finally to Australia in a 2009 Volkswagen Golf, converted to electric. Over the past seven months, he has continued the journey around Australia from Darwin down to Perth, across the Nullarbor to Newcastle, up to Queensland, and back down to Adelaide. After Adelaide, Wakker will finish once he reaches Melbourne and then Sydney. Electric Cars And Charging Stations In Australia “I expected that by this time, I would be exhausted and starving, but I’m still having a lot of fun,” he told Guardian Australia from Adelaide. “I’m actually a little bit sad that I’m coming to the end of the journey,” Wakker said he hoped to bust Australian anxieties over the lack of charging stations and how far electric cars can travel by driving such extreme distances. Australia has one of the slowest uptakes of electric vehicles in the developed world. In 2016, only 0.1% of all new car sales were electric, compared to 29% in Norway, 6% in Wakker’s native Netherlands, and 1.5% in China and the UK. “In Australia, the infrastructure for electric cars is still getting off the ground, but it’s already possible to drive all around Australia using charging stations,” he said. A lot of people say they are just waiting for the price to come down. Others say the electric car is just not viable for Australia because the distances are so big, which is a bit weird, I think. The average daily commute is just 20km or so. A Volkswagen Electric Car From 2009? “My car is from 2009, and it has a limited range of 200km. Most cars available on the market now do 300km to 500km, so you won't have this problem if you buy a current car in Australia. You can cover the whole country.” Wakker's car, which he calls “Blue Bandit,” is a first-generation electric car that can be charged on domestic power sockets. “When I started this journey, I thought I would mainly charge at people’s homes, and whenever I get a charging station, that will be a bonus,” he said. He said those with newer electric cars would find the journey even easier. Recommended:  Electric Car Might Fix China’s Mobility Problem Charging Electric Cars In Australia The Royal Automobile Club has built a chain of charges in WA, and the Queensland state government has built a 2,000km superhighway of chargers from Cairns to Coolangatta, which Wakker used. “Some states are supportive of installing infrastructure – Queensland has been doing very well. But it’s a pity that the (federal) government doesn’t really support it,” he said. “Most western countries where electric cars are taking off, the government is giving a lot of incentives for electric cars.” In Norway, electric cars are exempt from import taxes and the 25% VAT. Users are exempt from tolls and sometimes get free parking and the right to bus lanes. Recommended:  Electric Bicycle EBIQ Sustainable City Transport Despite his positive experience, Wakker said he found the journey between Glendambo to Coober Pedy in South Australia a challenge in his 2009 car. “It was 255km – I knew I wasn’t going to make it,” he said. “So I checked on my app to see how the wind was going, I saw that 12 hours later I would have a tailwind. I waited and drove very slow to save energy – 60km. I did 235km, which was my record. Just 20km from Coober Pedy, I ran out; I put on many sunscreens and waited for someone who could give me a tow. Someone came by within 10 minutes and said yes.” Cover photo by Photograph: -/AFP/Getty Images. Wiebe Wakker, with the electric car he made a round-the-world trip in. Electric vehicles have become a point of difference between the Coalition and Labor in the Australian election.  Source Naaman Zhou.  Before you go! Recommended:  EV Cars: The Difference Between US And EU EV Cars Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about electric cars? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input  or subscribe .
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