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Breaking News trade in insects  bees overtaken by other insects  europe | Breaking News

Trade In Insects: Bees Overtaken By Other Insects: Europe

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by: Hans van der Broek
trade in insects  bees overtaken by other insects  europe | Breaking News

Out of all EU countries, the Netherlands spends the largest amount of money on the import of live insects. In the first half of 2017, the import value was nearly five times as high as five years previously. There are relatively fewer imports of bees, while imports of other insects are on the increase.

Green Grasshopper

Who spent the most on insects?

The main country of origin is Israel. Statistics Netherlands (CBS) reports this based on new analyses of trade figures Insects are used for the pollination of agricultural crops (e.g. bees) and for natural crop protection (e.g. parasitic wasps). They are also increasingly utilised for human and animal consumption, e.g. mealworms and grasshoppers. The Netherlands is recognised globally for its innovative approach towards the use of insects.

Utilisation mainly domestic

In the first half of 2017, the Netherlands imported 8.2 million euros (390 thousand kg) worth of live insects making it the largest importer of insects in the European Union, followed by Belgium and France. These three countries together account for almost 60 percent of total insect imports into the EU. Around one-third of insect imports are re-exported. In other words, the bulk of insects of foreign origin is for domestic use. Insects are also being bred locally by Dutch farmers.

Bees overtaken by other insects

In the first six months of 2012, the trade in bees accounted for 60 percent of total insect imports, representing an import value of slightly over 1 million euros. This flew up to 6 million euros one year later, in 2013. By the first half of 2017, it had decreased to 2.5 million euros or 30 percent of the total import value of insects. Other insects comprised seventy percent of live insect imports. Over a period of five years, their import value increased eightfold to 5.7 million euros. 4-2 million euros. 

Parasatic wasp eggs on pillar
Parasitic wasp eggs

Third largest insect exporter

The Netherlands takes up third place in exports of live insects with an export value of 5.6 million euros. The largest exporter is Belgium with15 million euros, followed by Slovakia with 6.2 million euros (almost entirely consisting of bees exports). Assassin bugs from Israel Many of the imported insects originate from Israel. Imports from Israel accounted for 5.6 million euros over the entire year of 2016, equivalent to 40 percent of total imports. Most of these insects were assassin bugs for natural crop protection. Dutch imports of insects from Slovakia amounted to 2.6 million euros; these were almost exclusively bees. The United Kingdom supplies nearly 2 million euros worth of insects. Dutch insect exports have Mexico as their main destination with nearly 2.6 million euros worth of insects from the Netherlands in 2016, i.e.30 percent of total insect exports.

https://www.whatsorb.com/category/agri-gardening

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At this turbulent time for ‘all’ species and our planet, we are determined to inform readers about threats, consequences and solutions based on facts, not on political prejudice or business interests.

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Breaking News, as the world changes…

In our world, WhatsOrb refuses to turn away from the changes in our society and environment which succeeds each other at a rapid pace.

For WhatsOrb, publishing on the environment is a priority. We give reporting on climate, nature, waste, lifestyle and sustainable solutions the prominence it deserves.

At this turbulent time for ‘all’ species and our planet, we are determined to inform readers about threats, consequences and solutions based on facts, not on political prejudice or business interests.

WhatsOrb Breaking News will be published as soon as urgent events from around the world and startling sustainable innovations reach us.

If there is anything we should know and publish about, please send a note to: [email protected] or write your own story on: www.whatsorb.comthe only news site which gives you a ‘sustainable voice!’

Trade In Insects: Bees Overtaken By Other Insects: Europe

Out of all EU countries, the Netherlands spends the largest amount of money on the import of live insects. In the first half of 2017, the import value was nearly five times as high as five years previously. There are relatively fewer imports of bees, while imports of other insects are on the increase. Who spent the most on insects? The main country of origin is Israel. Statistics Netherlands (CBS) reports this based on new analyses of trade figures Insects are used for the pollination of agricultural crops (e.g. bees) and for natural crop protection (e.g. parasitic wasps). They are also increasingly utilised for human and animal consumption, e.g. mealworms and grasshoppers. The Netherlands is recognised globally for its innovative approach towards the use of insects. Utilisation mainly domestic In the first half of 2017, the Netherlands imported 8.2 million euros (390 thousand kg) worth of live insects making it the largest importer of insects in the European Union, followed by Belgium and France. These three countries together account for almost 60 percent of total insect imports into the EU. Around one-third of insect imports are re-exported. In other words, the bulk of insects of foreign origin is for domestic use. Insects are also being bred locally by Dutch farmers. Bees overtaken by other insects In the first six months of 2012, the trade in bees accounted for 60 percent of total insect imports, representing an import value of slightly over 1 million euros. This flew up to 6 million euros one year later, in 2013. By the first half of 2017, it had decreased to 2.5 million euros or 30 percent of the total import value of insects. Other insects comprised seventy percent of live insect imports. Over a period of five years, their import value increased eightfold to 5.7 million euros. 4-2 million euros.  Parasitic wasp eggs Third largest insect exporter The Netherlands takes up third place in exports of live insects with an export value of 5.6 million euros. The largest exporter is Belgium with15 million euros, followed by Slovakia with 6.2 million euros (almost entirely consisting of bees exports). Assassin bugs from Israel Many of the imported insects originate from Israel. Imports from Israel accounted for 5.6 million euros over the entire year of 2016, equivalent to 40 percent of total imports. Most of these insects were assassin bugs for natural crop protection. Dutch imports of insects from Slovakia amounted to 2.6 million euros; these were almost exclusively bees. The United Kingdom supplies nearly 2 million euros worth of insects. Dutch insect exports have Mexico as their main destination with nearly 2.6 million euros worth of insects from the Netherlands in 2016, i.e.30 percent of total insect exports. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/agri-gardening
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