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Climate climate law in sweden the most ambitious in the world | Breaking News General

Climate Law In Sweden The Most Ambitious In The World

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by: By Rianne Lachmeijer
climate law in sweden the most ambitious in the world | Breaking News

With the beginning of the new year, the new climate law of Sweden was introduced. This law provides a framework that the country can follow in order to be climate neutral by 2045. Sweden is one of the first countries to set the climate approach by law.

Swedisch landscape with grass and a house in a valley

Climate policy gets priority

This Climate Act obliges Sweden to pursue climate policy that is based on objectives set by an independent committee, writes Business Green. The target is five years more ambitious than the original goal set by the country in the Climate Agreement. 
"From now on it is illegal to give climate policy no priority," says Isabella Lövin, Minister for International Development Cooperation, in a written response. According to Lövin, the Swedish climate law is the most ambitious climate law in the world.

Climate in the budget

River flowing in a gorge

In order to become climate-neutral, Sweden has to reduce CO2 emissions by 85 percent up to 2045, compared to CO2 emissions in 1990. Every year, the country has to report on the progress in its budget. In addition, Sweden is expected to publish an action plan every four years in which the country indicates how it will meet its CO2 targets.
In June, the Swedish Parliament adopted the Climate Law with an overwhelming majority: 254 against 41. "Every country must actively demonstrate that it takes responsibility in the area of ​​climate change," said Lövin.

Sweden’s carbon tax

Climate change is one of the most pressing challenges facing the international community. A broad range of policy instruments can be used to curb carbon emissions, and economic instruments such as taxes and emissions trading are critical elements of any comprehensive mitigation strategy.

Development GDP and GHG Sweden
Graphic by: Government Offices of Sweden

'Polluter pays' principle

Pricing carbon emissions is a way of applying the 'polluter pays' principle, in which the costs of pollution are borne by those who cause it. This ensures that emissions are reduced in the most cost-effective way, while stimulating the development and deployment of new, clean technologies.
Energy sources were first taxed in Sweden in the 1920s. A carbon tax was instituted in 1991, alongside an already existing energy tax, and it remains a cornerstone of Swedish climate policy. Over time, the carbon tax has increased in importance, contributing to a broad range of environmental and climate objectives. For example, the carbon tax provides incentives to reduce energy consumption, improve energy efficiency and increase the use of renewable energy alternatives.

Carbon tax easy to implement

Swedish experience shows that a carbon tax can be easy to implement and administer, at low costs to authorities and operators. This is particularly true if existing revenue collecting systems, such as systems for levying other excise taxes on fuels, are already in place. Another feature of the carbon tax that reduces costs associated with its administration is that tax rates in Swedish tax law are expressed in common trade units (volume or weight).

The carbon tax is levied on all fossil fuels in proportion to their carbon content, as carbon dioxide emissions released in burning any fossil fuel are proportional to the carbon content of the fuel. It is therefore not necessary to measure actual emissions, which greatly simplifies the system. Combustion of sustainable biofuels doesn't result in a net increase of carbon in the atmosphere and hence are not subject to carbon taxation.

Swedish carbon tax rates

The carbon tax was introduced in 1991 at a rate corresponding to SEK 250 (EUR 24) per tonne fossil carbon dioxide emitted, and has gradually been increased to SEK 1 180 (EUR 114) in 2019 (currency conversion based on an exchange rate of SEK 10.33 per EUR). By increasing the tax level gradually and in a stepwise manner, households and businesses have been given time to adapt, which has improved the political feasibility of tax increases. A lower tax rate has historically been applied to industry outside the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS), while industry covered by the system is entirely exempt from carbon tax. As of 2018, however, the industry rate outside the EU ETS is the same as the general rate.

general and non EU ETS industry rate
Graphic by: Government Offices of Sweden

Sweden's carbon tax generates considerable revenues for the general budget (there is no 'earmarking' of tax revenues in Sweden). General budget funds may, however, be used for specific purposes linked to the carbon tax, such as addressing undesirable distributional consequences of taxation or financing other climate-related measures.

Meanwhile in Germany

While Sweden is fully committed to the climate, the German Conservative CDU / CSU of Chancellor Angela Merkel and the Social Democrats of the SPD have just given up their climate goals for 2020. They wanted to reduce CO2 emissions by 40 percent by 2020 compared to 1990.
Now the parties want to focus on a climate target for 2030. In that year, CO2 emissions must have dropped by 55 percent compared to 1990. The government parties are still negotiating the priorities of the new government policy.

By: Rianne Lachmeijer

https://www.whatsorb.com/category/climate

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In our world, WhatsOrb refuses to turn away from the changes in our society and environment which succeeds each other at a rapid pace.

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At this turbulent time for ‘all’ species and our planet, we are determined to inform readers about threats, consequences and solutions based on facts, not on political prejudice or business interests.

WhatsOrb Breaking News will be published as soon as urgent events from around the world and startling sustainable innovations reach us.

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Climate Law In Sweden The Most Ambitious In The World

With the beginning of the new year, the new climate law of Sweden was introduced. This law provides a framework that the country can follow in order to be climate neutral by 2045. <span title="Zweden is een van de eerste landen die klimaataanpak wettelijk heeft vastgelegd. ">Sweden is one of the first countries to set the climate approach by law. Climate policy gets priority This Climate Act obliges Sweden to pursue climate policy that is based on objectives set by an independent committee, writes Business Green. <span title="De doelstelling is vijf jaar ambitieuzer dan de originele doelstelling die het land heeft vastgesteld in het Klimaatakkoord. ">The target is five years more ambitious than the original goal set by the country in the Climate Agreement.&nbsp; "From now on it is illegal to give climate policy no priority," says Isabella L&ouml;vin, Minister for International Development Cooperation, in a written response. <span title="Volgens L&ouml;vin is de Zweedse klimaatwet de meest ambitieuze klimaatwet ter wereld. ">According to L&ouml;vin, the Swedish climate law is the most ambitious climate law in the world. <span title="Klimaat in de begroting ">Climate in the budget In order to become climate-neutral, Sweden has to reduce CO2 emissions by 85 percent up to 2045, compared to CO2 emissions in 1990. Every year, the country has to report on the progress in its budget. <span title="Daarnaast wordt Zweden geacht om elke vier jaar een actieplan te publiceren waarin het land aangeeft hoe het de CO2-doelstellingen gaat halen. ">In addition, Sweden is expected to publish an action plan every four years in which the country indicates how it will meet its CO2 targets. <span title="In juni nam het Zweedse parlement de Klimaatwet met een overweldigende meerderheid aan: 254 tegen 41. &ldquo;Elk land moet actief demonsteren dat het verantwoordelijkheid neemt op het gebied van klimaatverandering&rdquo;, stelde L&ouml;vin destijds. ">In June, the Swedish Parliament adopted the Climate Law with an overwhelming majority: 254 against 41. "Every country must actively demonstrate that it takes responsibility in the area of ​​climate change," said L&ouml;vin. Sweden&rsquo;s carbon tax Climate change is one of the most pressing challenges facing the international community. A broad range of policy instruments can be used to curb carbon emissions, and economic instruments such as taxes and emissions trading are critical elements of any comprehensive mitigation strategy. Graphic by: Government Offices of Sweden 'Polluter pays' principle Pricing carbon emissions is a way of applying the 'polluter pays' principle, in which the costs of pollution are borne by those who cause it. This ensures that emissions are reduced in the most cost-effective way, while stimulating the development and deployment of new, clean technologies. Energy sources were first taxed in Sweden in the 1920s. A carbon tax was instituted in 1991, alongside an already existing energy tax, and it remains a cornerstone of Swedish climate policy. Over time, the carbon tax has increased in importance, contributing to a broad range of environmental and climate objectives. For example, the carbon tax provides incentives to reduce energy consumption, improve energy efficiency and increase the use of renewable energy alternatives. Carbon tax easy to implement Swedish experience shows that a carbon tax can be easy to implement and administer, at low costs to authorities and operators. This is particularly true if existing revenue collecting systems, such as systems for levying other excise taxes on fuels, are already in place. Another feature of the carbon tax that reduces costs associated with its administration is that tax rates in Swedish tax law are expressed in common trade units (volume or weight). The carbon tax is levied on all fossil fuels in proportion to their carbon content, as carbon dioxide emissions released in burning any fossil fuel are proportional to the carbon content of the fuel. It is therefore not necessary to measure actual emissions, which greatly simplifies the system.&nbsp;Combustion of sustainable biofuels doesn't result in a net increase of carbon in the atmosphere and hence are not subject to carbon taxation. Swedish carbon tax rates The carbon tax was introduced in 1991 at a rate corresponding to SEK 250 (EUR 24) per tonne fossil carbon dioxide emitted, and has gradually been increased to SEK 1 180 (EUR 114) in 2019 (currency conversion based on an exchange rate of SEK 10.33 per EUR). By increasing the tax level gradually and in a stepwise manner, households and businesses have been given time to adapt, which has improved the political feasibility of tax increases. A lower tax rate has historically been applied to industry outside the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS), while industry covered by the system is entirely exempt from carbon tax. As of 2018, however, the industry rate outside the EU ETS is the same as the general rate. Graphic by: Government Offices of Sweden Sweden's carbon tax generates considerable revenues for the general budget (there is no 'earmarking' of tax revenues in Sweden). General budget funds may, however, be used for specific purposes linked to the carbon tax, such as addressing undesirable distributional consequences of taxation or financing other climate-related measures. <span title="Ondertussen in Duitsland ">Meanwhile in Germany While Sweden is fully committed to the climate, the German Conservative CDU / CSU of Chancellor Angela Merkel and the Social Democrats of the SPD have just given up their&nbsp; climate goals for 2020. <span title="Zij wilden tegen 2020 de CO2-uitstoot met 40 procent hebben verlaagd ten opzichte van 1990. ">They wanted to reduce CO2 emissions by 40 percent by 2020 compared to 1990. <span title="Nu willen de partijen focussen op een klimaatdoel voor 2030. In dat jaar moet de CO2-uitstoot met 55 procent zijn gedaald ten opzichte van 1990. De regeringspartijen zijn nog in onderhandeling over de prioriteiten van het nieuwe regeringsbeleid. ">Now the parties want to focus on a climate target for 2030. In that year, CO2 emissions must have dropped by 55 percent compared to 1990. The government parties are still negotiating the priorities of the new government policy. By: Rianne Lachmeijer https://www.whatsorb.com/category/climate