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Breaking News vegan food  is what you see really what you eat  | Breaking News

Vegan Food: Is What You See Really What You Eat?

by: National Geographic, Papadakis Publisher
vegan food  is what you see really what you eat  | Breaking News

Looking at the photos below will forever change the way you look at food. Under a microscope, you will find a world within a world. Everything looks so different; it is hardly recognizable anymore
as plants or food. Anyway, in this case. Vegan food: is what you see really what you eat?

Vegan Food And Small Things

In the past (late 1600), Dutch scientist Anton van Leeuwenhoek was obsessed with the 'small things.' He put everything under his own build microscope like pondered kitchen spices, including black peppercorns.

'The source' Of Their Origin: Great Photographers Of 'Our Time.'

Basil plant

Basil plant green background with dots and red hairs

Recommended: Foodscape Alternatives: Hot In The Netherlands

This green landscape is a section of a single leaf of the basil plant (Ocimum basilicum). The small round structures on the leaf, each of which looks as though it might house elves or other magical creatures, are glands containing the chemicals that produce the basil plant's flavors and aroma. There are many varieties of basil, each having a unique set of chemicals in its glands.

Photo by Martin Oeggerli, National Geographic

Strawberry green leaves red fruit green pettals 

Strawberry

This young fruit is of the widely grown garden strawberry variety. The individual "hairs" can be clearly seen. They are the remnant reproductive organs of the individual seeds on the berry's surface.

Photo by Wolfgang Stuppy, Rob Kesseler & Madeline Harley/Papadakis Publisher

Broccoli green grouped bulbs

Broccoli

Close-up of a broccoli head showing a cluster of immature buds. The tiny pits visible on the surface are stomata, or breathing pores.

Photo by Wolfgang Stuppy, Rob Kesseler & Madeline Harley/Papadakis Publisher

Peach Light brown surface with brown dots and brown hairs

Peach

Microscopic detail of the surface of a peach. The downy texture of peach skin is due to thousands of hairs, most of which are very short. Stomata, or breathing pores, are marked in red.

Photo by Wolfgang Stuppy, Rob Kesseler & Madeline Harley/Papadakis Publisher

Black Mulberry red bulb surface and light brow hairsn dots

Black Mulberry

The black mulberry has been cultivated since antiquity and is probably originally from China. Here, the microscopic detail shows the individual fruitlets. The hairy texture is withered reproductive organs (stigma).

Photo by Wolfgang Stuppy, Rob Kesseler & Madeline Harley/Papadakis Publisher

Leek green triangle shaped border with honeycomb structure

Leek

Cross-section through the leaf of a leek. The spongy tissue, called mesophyll, is typical of leaves. Here the leaf shown magnified is just 1.2 millimeters thick.

Photo by Wolfgang Stuppy, Rob Kesseler & Madeline Harley/Papadakis Publisher

Potato light brown surface with grey rare shaped bulbs

Potato

This is a close-up of an "eye" of a potato with three emerging shoots, the longest of which is about 4 millimeters long.

Photo by Wolfgang Stuppy, Rob Kesseler & Madeline Harley/Papadakis Publisher

Lavender green background, yellow dots and grey stars on top

Lavender

Lavender (Lavandula spp.) has long been used to perfume homes, food, and drinks. It offers a feeling of warmth, a sort of aromatic welcoming. Up close, it is something else entirely, a desert scene complete with spiny, cactus-like hairs meant to keep herbivores away and hold water in.

Photo by Martin Oeggerli, National Geographic

Cover photo: Japanese Wineberry

This relative to the raspberry and blackberry is native to northern China, Korea, and Japan. Curiously, the whole plant, including the sepals that encase the fruit, is covered in sticky hairs.

Photo by Wolfgang Stuppy, Rob Kesseler & Madeline Harley/Papadakis Publisher

Before you go!

Recommended: Agrivoltaics: Food, Water, Energy At Its Best

Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below.
We try to respond the same day.

Like to write your own article about food?
Send your writing & scribble with a photo to [email protected], and we will write an interesting article based on your input.

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Breaking News, as the world changes…

In our world, WhatsOrb refuses to turn away from the changes in our society and environment which succeeds each other at a rapid pace.

For WhatsOrb, publishing on the environment is a priority. We give reporting on climate, nature, waste, lifestyle and sustainable solutions the prominence it deserves.

At this turbulent time for ‘all’ species and our planet, we are determined to inform readers about threats, consequences and solutions based on facts, not on political prejudice or business interests.

WhatsOrb Breaking News will be published as soon as urgent events from around the world and startling sustainable innovations reach us.

If there is anything we should know and publish about, please send a note to: [email protected] or write your own story on: www.whatsorb.comthe only news site which gives you a ‘sustainable voice!’

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Breaking News, as the world changes…

In our world, WhatsOrb refuses to turn away from the changes in our society and environment which succeeds each other at a rapid pace.

For WhatsOrb, publishing on the environment is a priority. We give reporting on climate, nature, waste, lifestyle and sustainable solutions the prominence it deserves.

At this turbulent time for ‘all’ species and our planet, we are determined to inform readers about threats, consequences and solutions based on facts, not on political prejudice or business interests.

WhatsOrb Breaking News will be published as soon as urgent events from around the world and startling sustainable innovations reach us.

If there is anything we should know and publish about, please send a note to: [email protected] or write your own story on: www.whatsorb.comthe only news site which gives you a ‘sustainable voice!’

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More like this:

Vegan Food: Is What You See Really What You Eat?

Looking at the photos below will forever change the way you look at food. Under a microscope, you will find a world within a world. Everything looks so different; it is hardly recognizable anymore as plants or food. Anyway, in this case. Vegan food: is what you see really what you eat? Vegan Food And Small Things In the past (late 1600), Dutch scientist Anton van Leeuwenhoek was obsessed with the 'small things.' He put everything under his own build microscope like pondered kitchen spices, including black peppercorns. 'The source' Of Their Origin: Great Photographers Of 'Our Time.' Basil plant Recommended:  Foodscape Alternatives: Hot In The Netherlands This green landscape is a section of a single leaf of the basil plant (Ocimum basilicum). The small round structures on the leaf, each of which looks as though it might house elves or other magical creatures, are glands containing the chemicals that produce the basil plant's flavors and aroma. There are many varieties of basil, each having a unique set of chemicals in its glands. Photo by  Martin Oeggerli , National Geographic   Strawberry This young fruit is of the widely grown garden strawberry variety. The individual "hairs" can be clearly seen. They are the remnant reproductive organs of the individual seeds on the berry's surface. Photo by Wolfgang Stuppy, Rob Kesseler & Madeline Harley/Papadakis Publisher Broccoli Close-up of a broccoli head showing a cluster of immature buds. The tiny pits visible on the surface are stomata, or breathing pores. Photo by Wolfgang Stuppy, Rob Kesseler & Madeline Harley/Papadakis Publisher Peach Microscopic detail of the surface of a peach. The downy texture of peach skin is due to thousands of hairs, most of which are very short. Stomata, or breathing pores, are marked in red. Photo by Wolfgang Stuppy, Rob Kesseler & Madeline Harley/Papadakis Publisher Black Mulberry The black mulberry has been cultivated since antiquity and is probably originally from China. Here, the microscopic detail shows the individual fruitlets. The hairy texture is withered reproductive organs (stigma). Photo by Wolfgang Stuppy, Rob Kesseler & Madeline Harley/Papadakis Publisher Leek Cross-section through the leaf of a leek. The spongy tissue, called mesophyll, is typical of leaves. Here the leaf shown magnified is just 1.2 millimeters thick. Photo by Wolfgang Stuppy, Rob Kesseler & Madeline Harley/Papadakis Publisher Potato This is a close-up of an "eye" of a potato with three emerging shoots, the longest of which is about 4 millimeters long. Photo by Wolfgang Stuppy, Rob Kesseler & Madeline Harley/Papadakis Publisher Lavender Lavender (Lavandula spp.) has long been used to perfume homes, food, and drinks. It offers a feeling of warmth, a sort of aromatic welcoming. Up close, it is something else entirely, a desert scene complete with spiny, cactus-like hairs meant to keep herbivores away and hold water in. Photo by  Martin Oeggerli , National Geographic Cover photo:  Japanese Wineberry This relative to the raspberry and blackberry is native to northern China, Korea, and Japan. Curiously, the whole plant, including the sepals that encase the fruit , is covered in sticky hairs. Photo by Wolfgang Stuppy, Rob Kesseler & Madeline Harley/Papadakis Publisher Before you go! Recommended:  Agrivoltaics: Food, Water, Energy At Its Best Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about food? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations