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Breaking News climate change stop  store co2  add phytoplankton by whales  | Breaking News

Climate Change Stop, Store CO2, Add Phytoplankton By Whales?

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by: Helena Horton
climate change stop  store co2  add phytoplankton by whales  | Breaking News

Saving the whale is more important than planting trees when it comes to climate change, scientists argue. Whales lock carbon in their bodies and encourage the production of phytoplankton, which produce 50 per cent of the world's oxygen.

Store CO2, Add Phytoplankton By Whales

Saving the whale is more important than planting trees to combat climate change, scientists have found, as they capture vast amounts of carbon in their bodies before sinking to the bottom of the ocean. Environmental scientists have been working against the clock to find the best ways for humans to reduce our carbon footprint by taking measures to allow more greenhouse gases to be absorbed from the atmosphere.

Whales And Planting Trees

Planting trees has commonly been understood as one of the best ways to save the planet. While trees are important and forests referred to as ‘the lungs of the Earth’, new research from the (IMF) has found that one whale is worth more than thousands of trees when it comes to carbon absorption.

What plants absorb the most co2?
While oak is the genus with the most carbon-absorbing species, there are other notable deciduous trees that sequester carbon as well. The common horse-chestnut (Aesculus spp.), with its white spike of flowers and spiny fruits, is a good carbon absorber.

People planting trees

Whales are currently under significant man-made threat, including ship strikes, entanglement in fishing nets, waterborne plastic waste, and noise pollution. Their population has been decimated over the last century from 5 million to 1.5 million. It is thought that without action, it could take more than 30 years to restore their population as they are still under siege from whalers and choking on plastic pollution.

whale

The mammals accumulate carbon in their bodies throughout their long lives, with some species living for up to 90 years, and then when they die they take that carbon to the bottom of the ocean, where it is stored for centuries.


                                                                       How Whales Change Climate
                                            Climate Change Stop, Store CO2, Add Phytoplankton By Whales?

Store CO2, Add Phytoplankton By Whales

What is the purpose of phytoplankton?
Phytoplankton are microscopic marine algae. Phytoplankton is the base of several aquatic food webs. In a balanced ecosystem, they provide food for a wide range of sea creatures including whales, shrimp, snails, and jellyfish

Each whale can lock almost 30,000 kilograms of carbon dioxide on average out of the atmosphere. A tree, meanwhile, absorbs only up to 21 kilograms of  carbon dioxide a year. As well as this, whales also support the production of phytoplankton, which contributes at least 50 per cent of all oxygen to the Earth’s atmosphere and captures as much carbon dioxide as 1.7 trillion trees, or four Amazon forests.

Recommended: Breaking: Did You Know, All You Read About CO2 Rise Is Half The Truth

They do this as when they swim up to the surface from deep waters, their large bodies move nutrients up with them. Bringing nutrients to the surface increases the food source for the tiny but crucial organisms. Whales bring minerals up to the ocean surface through their vertical movement, called the 'whale pump', and through their migration across oceans, called the 'whale conveyor belt'.

Fish, whale carbon pump graph

Increasing phytoplankton productivity by just 1 per cent would have the same effect as the sudden appearance of 2 billion mature trees, according to the study. Ralph Chami and Sena Oztosun from the IMF’s Institute for Capacity Development, along with professors from Duke University and the University of Notre Dame said increasing whale populations 'could lead to a breakthrough in the fight against climate change'.

Recommended: Climate Change Efforts On Reducing CO2 Why Not Recycle It?

“Coordinating the economics of whale protection must rise to the top of the global community’s climate agenda,” they wrote. “Since the role of whales is irreplaceable in mitigating and building resilience to climate change, their survival should be integrated into the objectives of the 190 countries that in 2015 signed the Paris Agreement for combating climate risk.”

What is the Paris agreement and why is it important?
The Paris Agreement is a landmark environmental accord that was adopted by nearly every nation in 2015 to address climate change and its negative impacts. ... The agreement includes commitments from all major emitting countries to cut their climate-altering pollution and to strengthen those commitments over time.

Recommended: Climate Agreement Paris And The Denial Of President Trump

The authors put the value of one animal at more than $2 million (£1.54m), taking into account the value of carbon sequestered over the whale’s lifetime as well as other economic contributions such as fishery enhancement and ecotourism. They recommended that governments compensate those causing the threats to the whale population if they stop doing so, a group that includes countries, businesses, and individuls.

Before you go!

Recommended: Algae-Based Bioreactor Swallows CO2 Faster Than Trees! How?

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At this turbulent time for ‘all’ species and our planet, we are determined to inform readers about threats, consequences and solutions based on facts, not on political prejudice or business interests.

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Breaking News, as the world changes…

In our world, WhatsOrb refuses to turn away from the changes in our society and environment which succeeds each other at a rapid pace.

For WhatsOrb, publishing on the environment is a priority. We give reporting on climate, nature, waste, lifestyle and sustainable solutions the prominence it deserves.

At this turbulent time for ‘all’ species and our planet, we are determined to inform readers about threats, consequences and solutions based on facts, not on political prejudice or business interests.

WhatsOrb Breaking News will be published as soon as urgent events from around the world and startling sustainable innovations reach us.

If there is anything we should know and publish about, please send a note to: [email protected] or write your own story on: www.whatsorb.comthe only news site which gives you a ‘sustainable voice!’

Climate Change Stop, Store CO2, Add Phytoplankton By Whales?

Saving the whale is more important than planting trees when it comes to climate change, scientists argue. Whales lock carbon in their bodies and encourage the production of phytoplankton, which produce 50 per cent of the world's oxygen. Store CO2, Add Phytoplankton By Whales Saving the whale is more important than planting trees to combat climate change, scientists have found, as they capture vast amounts of carbon in their bodies before sinking to the bottom of the ocean. Environmental scientists have been working against the clock to find the best ways for humans to reduce our carbon footprint by taking measures to allow more greenhouse gases to be absorbed from the atmosphere. Whales And Planting Trees Planting trees has commonly been understood as one of the best ways to save the planet. While trees are important and forests referred to as ‘the lungs of the Earth’, new research from the (IMF) has found that one whale is worth more than thousands of trees when it comes to carbon absorption. What plants absorb the most co2? While oak is the genus with the most carbon-absorbing species, there are other notable deciduous trees that sequester carbon as well. The common horse-chestnut (Aesculus spp.), with its white spike of flowers and spiny fruits, is a good carbon absorber. Whales are currently under significant man-made threat, including ship strikes, entanglement in fishing nets, waterborne plastic waste, and noise pollution. Their population has been decimated over the last century from 5 million to 1.5 million. It is thought that without action, it could take more than 30 years to restore their population as they are still under siege from whalers and choking on plastic pollution. The mammals accumulate carbon in their bodies throughout their long lives, with some species living for up to 90 years, and then when they die they take that carbon to the bottom of the ocean, where it is stored for centuries. {youtube}                                                                        How Whales Change Climate                                             Climate Change Stop, Store CO2, Add Phytoplankton By Whales? Store CO2, Add Phytoplankton By Whales What is the purpose of phytoplankton? Phytoplankton are microscopic marine algae.  Phytoplankton is the base of several aquatic food webs. In a balanced ecosystem, they provide food for a wide range of sea creatures including whales, shrimp, snails, and jellyfish Each whale can lock almost 30,000 kilograms of carbon dioxide on average out of the atmosphere. A tree, meanwhile, absorbs only up to 21 kilograms of  carbon dioxide a year. As well as this, whales also support the production of phytoplankton, which contributes at least 50 per cent of all oxygen to the Earth’s atmosphere and captures as much carbon dioxide as 1.7 trillion trees, or four Amazon forests. Recommended:  Breaking: Did You Know, All You Read About CO2 Rise Is Half The Truth They do this as when they swim up to the surface from deep waters, their large bodies move nutrients up with them. Bringing nutrients to the surface increases the food source for the tiny but crucial organisms. Whales bring minerals up to the ocean surface through their vertical movement, called the 'whale pump', and through their migration across oceans, called the 'whale conveyor belt'. Increasing phytoplankton productivity by just 1 per cent would have the same effect as the sudden appearance of 2 billion mature trees, according to the study. Ralph Chami and Sena Oztosun from the IMF’s Institute for Capacity Development, along with professors from Duke University and the University of Notre Dame said increasing whale populations 'could lead to a breakthrough in the fight against climate change'. Recommended:  Climate Change Efforts On Reducing CO2 Why Not Recycle It? “Coordinating the economics of whale protection must rise to the top of the global community’s climate agenda,” they wrote. “Since the role of whales is irreplaceable in mitigating and building resilience to climate change, their survival should be integrated into the objectives of the 190 countries that in 2015 signed the Paris Agreement for combating climate risk.” What is the Paris agreement and why is it important? The Paris Agreement is a landmark environmental accord that was adopted by nearly every nation in 2015 to address climate change and its negative impacts. ... The agreement includes commitments from all major emitting countries to cut their climate-altering pollution and to strengthen those commitments over time. Recommended:  Climate Agreement Paris And The Denial Of President Trump The authors put the value of one animal at more than $2 million (£1.54m), taking into account the value of carbon sequestered over the whale’s lifetime as well as other economic contributions such as fishery enhancement and ecotourism. They recommended that governments compensate those causing the threats to the whale population if they stop doing so, a group that includes countries, businesses, and individuls. Before you go! Recommended:  Algae-Based Bioreactor Swallows CO2 Faster Than Trees! How? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
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