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Breaking News climate change  locust second wave and a lockdown | Breaking News

Climate Change: Locust Second Wave And A Lockdown

by: ITV-Report
climate change  locust second wave and a lockdown | Breaking News

A second wave of desert locusts is threatening East Africa with estimates that it will be 20 times worse than the plague that descended two months ago.

Climate Change: Locust Second Wave And A Lockdown

Jump quickly to 'The First Wave' by clicking on:

Locust First Wave: January 2020

The locusts present ‘an extremely alarming and unprecedented threat’ to food security and livelihoods, according to the UN. A swarm of just more than a third of a square mile can eat the same amount of food in one day as 35,000 people. This second invasion from breeding grounds in Somalia includes more young adults which are especially voracious eaters.

In its latest locust watch update, the UN said the situation was ‘extremely alarming’ as an increasing number of new swarms form in north and central Kenya, Ethiopia and Somalia. Uganda reported two swarms arriving from neighbouring Kenya, further destabilising food security and the livelihoods of people in the east and north of the country. The insects follow spring rains, seeking emerging crops and other vegetation.

Man, motorbike, locust

Hellen Adoa, a minister at Uganda’s agriculture department, said: "This is very active, destructive and we are worried it has come at the time of lockdown. We are a bit overwhelmed. The insects can travel about 90 miles a day and eat their own body weight in crops."

Locust Second Wave And A Lockdown: Heavy Rains

Heavy rains in late March established favourable breeding conditions for yet another generation of locusts in the Horn of Africa. By now, most farmers have planted the first season annual crops. Immature swarms are the most voracious stage of locust development. They are aggressive feeders and as such can cause a lot of damage to crops and forage.

We were hopeful of to receive some relief food to support the situation on ground, the locust invaded and Covid-19 lockdown is moving towards devastating the economy. We expect government, number of partners and World Food Programme to come to our rescue with relief food. Otherwise our people will end with starvation.

Recommended: Lockdown Caused By The Coronavirus: A Relieve For Our Planet 

Locust First Wave: January 2020

Locust swarm 37 miles long and 25 miles wide threatens crops across swathes of east Africa and Pakistan. The swarm of locusts has been tracked in Kenya and the insects are now threatening to decimate crops across swatches of east Africa and Pakistan.

Locust Swarm Pakistan: Blamed The Chaos On War-Torn Yemen 

Pakistan's worst locust plague in decades has devastated parts of the south west as swarms have ravaged wheat, cotton and vegetable crops, farmers' leaders said. The country is battling its worst infestation of the marauding insects since the 1990s and a swarm earlier this month (January 2020) descended on the port metropolis of Karachi for the first time since the 1960s.

Locusts struck first earlier this year, but the United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organisation has warned a serious threat remains as swarms now start to leave their summer breeding grounds along the India-Pakistan border. The insects are hitting some of the poorest rural parts of Pakistan, where malnutrition is already common and farmers are often heavily in debt.

Buildings, Locust

Locust swarms can fly up to 90 miles (144 km) per day and if good rains fall and conditions are favourable, can increase their numbers 20-fold in three months. Locust adults can eat their own weight every day and a swarm can consume vast quantities of food.

Locusts impact much of the Middle East and Asia and officials have blamed the chaos in war-torn Yemen for this year's blight in Pakistan. A failure to control the pests in Yemen meant they gradually grew in number as they passed through Saudi Arabia and Iran before entering Western Pakistan. Swarms have now started to leave their summer breeding grounds along the border with India and head West.

Locust on green leave

Climate Change Africa: Locust Swarm

The most serious outbreak of desert locusts in 25 years is posing an unprecedented threat to food security in some of the world’s most vulnerable countries, authorities say. Unusual climate conditions are partly to blame.

Recommended: Water War Brewing Over New River Nile Dam: Egypt, Ethiopia

2 men, swarm locust
Locusts swarm near the village of Sissia, in Samburu county, Kenya

Locust, what are they do?
Locusts are sometimes solitary insects with lifestyles much like grasshoppers. But locusts have another behavioral phase called the gregarious phase. When environmental conditions produce many green plants and promote breeding, locusts can congregate into thick, mobile, ravenous swarms

Kenya's Intergovernmental Authority on Development said: "A typical desert locust swarm can contain up to 150 million locusts per square kilometre. "Swarms migrate with the wind and can cover 100 to 150 kilometres in a day. An average swarm can destroy as much food crops in a day as is sufficient to feed 2,500 people."


                                                Climate Change Africa: Largest Locust Swarm In 25 Years
                                                Locust swarm threatens food security in several countries


Roughly the length of a finger, the insects fly together by the millions and are devouring crops and forcing people in some areas to bodily wade through them. The outbreak of desert locusts, considered the most dangerous locust species, also has affected parts of Somalia, Ethiopia, Sudan, Djibouti and Eritrea and IGAD warns that parts of South Sudan and Uganda could be next.

Are Locusts harmful to humans?
Locusts do not attack people or animals. There is no evidence that suggests that locusts carry diseases that could harm humans.

Recommended: African Agricultural Revolution Falters: Food Grow Is Low

map Somalia, Ethiopia, Sudan, Djibouti

The "extremely dangerous" outbreak is making the region's bad food security situation worse, the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organisation has warned. Hundreds of thousands of acres of crops have been destroyed.

How long do locusts live for?
It takes approximately two weeks for the fledgling locust to reach sexual maturity. Adults often group together into swarms containing thousands of locusts. Adult locusts typically live about 10 weeks.

The further increase in locust swarms could last until June as favorable breeding conditions continue, IGAD said, helped along by unusually heavy flooding in parts of the region in recent weeks.

Recommended: Climate Change Causes Nature To Change: The World Affected

Man, locust, hand
A man holds a desert locust, considered to be the most dangerous of the locust species

Climate Change Africa: Major Locust Outbreaks Can Be Devastating

A major one between 2003 and 2005 cost more than $500 million to control across 20 countries in northern Africa, the FAO has said, with more than $2.5billion in harvest losses. To help prevent and control outbreaks, authorities analyse satellite images, stockpile pesticides and conduct aerial spraying. In Ethiopia, officials said they have deployed four small planes to help fight the invasion.

Before you go!

Recommended: Hunger, Not Global Warming Will Impact Our Future

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Breaking News, as the world changes…

In our world, WhatsOrb refuses to turn away from the changes in our society and environment which succeeds each other at a rapid pace.

For WhatsOrb, publishing on the environment is a priority. We give reporting on climate, nature, waste, lifestyle and sustainable solutions the prominence it deserves.

At this turbulent time for ‘all’ species and our planet, we are determined to inform readers about threats, consequences and solutions based on facts, not on political prejudice or business interests.

WhatsOrb Breaking News will be published as soon as urgent events from around the world and startling sustainable innovations reach us.

If there is anything we should know and publish about, please send a note to: [email protected] or write your own story on: www.whatsorb.comthe only news site which gives you a ‘sustainable voice!’

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More like this:

Climate Change: Locust Second Wave And A Lockdown

A second wave of desert locusts is threatening East Africa with estimates that it will be 20 times worse than the plague that descended two months ago. Climate Change: Locust Second Wave And A Lockdown Jump quickly to 'The First Wave' by clicking on: Locust First Wave: January 2020 The locusts present ‘an extremely alarming and unprecedented threat’ to food security and livelihoods, according to the UN. A swarm of just more than a third of a square mile can eat the same amount of food in one day as 35,000 people. This second invasion from breeding grounds in Somalia includes more young adults which are especially voracious eaters. In its latest locust watch update, the UN said the situation was ‘extremely alarming’ as an increasing number of new swarms form in north and central Kenya, Ethiopia and Somalia. Uganda reported two swarms arriving from neighbouring Kenya, further destabilising food security and the livelihoods of people in the east and north of the country. The insects follow spring rains, seeking emerging crops and other vegetation. Hellen Adoa, a minister at Uganda’s agriculture department, said: "This is very active, destructive and we are worried it has come at the time of lockdown. We are a bit overwhelmed. The insects can travel about 90 miles a day and eat their own body weight in crops." Locust Second Wave And A Lockdown: Heavy Rains Heavy rains in late March established favourable breeding conditions for yet another generation of locusts in the Horn of Africa. By now, most farmers have planted the first season annual crops. Immature swarms are the most voracious stage of locust development. They are aggressive feeders and as such can cause a lot of damage to crops and forage. We were hopeful of to receive some relief food to support the situation on ground, the locust invaded and Covid-19 lockdown is moving towards devastating the economy. We expect government, number of partners and World Food Programme to come to our rescue with relief food. Otherwise our people will end with starvation. Recommended:  Lockdown Caused By The Coronavirus: A Relieve For Our Planet   Locust First Wave: January 2020 Locust swarm 37 miles long and 25 miles wide threatens crops across swathes of east Africa and Pakistan. The swarm of locusts has been tracked in Kenya and the insects are now threatening to decimate crops across swatches of east Africa and Pakistan. Locust Swarm Pakistan: Blamed The Chaos On War-Torn Yemen  Pakistan's worst locust plague in decades has devastated parts of the south west as swarms have ravaged wheat, cotton and vegetable crops, farmers' leaders said. The country is battling its worst infestation of the marauding insects since the 1990s and a swarm earlier this month (January 2020) descended on the port metropolis of Karachi for the first time since the 1960s. Locusts struck first earlier this year, but the United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organisation has warned a serious threat remains as swarms now start to leave their summer breeding grounds along the India-Pakistan border. The insects are hitting some of the poorest rural parts of Pakistan, where malnutrition is already common and farmers are often heavily in debt. Locust swarms can fly up to 90 miles (144 km) per day and if good rains fall and conditions are favourable, can increase their numbers 20-fold in three months. Locust adults can eat their own weight every day and a swarm can consume vast quantities of food. Locusts impact much of the Middle East and Asia and officials have blamed the chaos in war-torn Yemen for this year's blight in Pakistan. A failure to control the pests in Yemen meant they gradually grew in number as they passed through Saudi Arabia and Iran before entering Western Pakistan. Swarms have now started to leave their summer breeding grounds along the border with India and head West. Climate Change Africa: Locust Swarm The most serious outbreak of desert locusts in 25 years is posing an unprecedented threat to food security in some of the world’s most vulnerable countries, authorities say. Unusual climate conditions are partly to blame. Recommended:  Water War Brewing Over New River Nile Dam: Egypt, Ethiopia Locusts swarm near the village of Sissia, in Samburu county, Kenya Locust, what are they do? Locusts are sometimes solitary insects with lifestyles much like grasshoppers. But locusts have another behavioral phase called the gregarious phase. When environmental conditions produce many green plants and promote breeding, locusts can congregate into thick, mobile, ravenous swarms Kenya's Intergovernmental Authority on Development said: "A typical desert locust swarm can contain up to 150 million locusts per square kilometre. "Swarms migrate with the wind and can cover 100 to 150 kilometres in a day. An average swarm can destroy as much food crops in a day as is sufficient to feed 2,500 people." {youtube}                                                 Climate Change Africa: Largest Locust Swarm In 25 Years                                                 Locust swarm threatens food security in several countries Roughly the length of a finger, the insects fly together by the millions and are devouring crops and forcing people in some areas to bodily wade through them. The outbreak of desert locusts, considered the most dangerous locust species, also has affected parts of Somalia, Ethiopia, Sudan, Djibouti and Eritrea and IGAD warns that parts of South Sudan and Uganda could be next. Are Locusts harmful to humans? Locusts do not attack people or animals. There is no evidence that suggests that locusts carry diseases that could harm humans. Recommended:  African Agricultural Revolution Falters: Food Grow Is Low The "extremely dangerous" outbreak is making the region's bad food security situation worse, the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organisation has warned. Hundreds of thousands of acres of crops have been destroyed. How long do locusts live for? It takes approximately two weeks for the fledgling locust to reach sexual maturity. Adults often group together into swarms containing thousands of locusts. Adult locusts typically live about 10 weeks. The further increase in locust swarms could last until June as favorable breeding conditions continue, IGAD said, helped along by unusually heavy flooding in parts of the region in recent weeks. Recommended:  Climate Change Causes Nature To Change: The World Affected A man holds a desert locust, considered to be the most dangerous of the locust species Climate Change Africa: Major Locust Outbreaks Can Be Devastating A major one between 2003 and 2005 cost more than $500 million to control across 20 countries in northern Africa, the FAO has said, with more than $2.5billion in harvest losses. To help prevent and control outbreaks, authorities analyse satellite images, stockpile pesticides and conduct aerial spraying. In Ethiopia, officials said they have deployed four small planes to help fight the invasion. Before you go! Recommended:  Hunger, Not Global Warming Will Impact Our Future Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about environmental issues? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations