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Breaking News black friday not sustainable at all especially for fashion | Breaking News

Black Friday Not Sustainable At All Especially For Fashion

by: Sarah Georg
black friday not sustainable at all especially for fashion | Breaking News

It's that time again; 'Black Friday', the biggest sales event of the year, as retailers stack high and sell low before Christmas. Sustainable Development Goal 12 (sustainable consumption and production patterns) seems all but forgotten for the time being.

Black Friday Not Sustainable At All

This must be a sustainability professional’s worst nightmare: watching a retail brand’s CSR (corporate social responsibility) and resource efficiency progress take a hit from sales and marketing teams that are ultimately encouraging consumers to buy goods beyond the point of necessity. But for how much longer can this business model based on aggressive discounts be profitable and sustainable for high-street retailers in its current form? My answer – and hope – would be not for much longer at all.

Why do they call it Black Friday?
Black Friday is the name given to the shopping day after Thanksgiving. It was originally called Black Friday because the volume of shoppers created traffic accidents and sometimes even violence. In the 1950s, people began calling in sick the day after Thanksgiving to give themselves a four-day weekend.

Crowd of people Black Friday
Black Friday shows how sick people are!

There is reason to have this hope - because society is demanding change for the better. I myself am part of a generation of environmentally conscious millennials that semand stronger ethical codes from businesses and actively favour resale and exchange platforms such as eBay, Amazon Used, Facebook and Depop.


                                                  Black Friday Not Sustainable At All Especially For Fashion
                                                                           Black Friday Madness 


Before You Jump On The Black Friday Sales Train Ask Yourself: Do You Need This?

We are producing and consuming fashion at a rate like never before – and mass shopping sales are simply fanning the flames.      ‘As a first step – starting today – I encourage you to think before jumping on the Black Friday train in the endless hunt for a bargain.

This morning I opened my inbox to find reams of emails – mid-season sale, 50% off, exclusive offer – enticing me to grab the best deal while it lasts. When we’re barraged by messages from the fashion industry to buy more, it’s hard to resist – and I have easily succumbed to these temptations in the past.

Recommended: Sustainable Fashion: Are Your Cloth Environmental Friendly?

We are now producing and consuming fashion at a rate like never before. Since 2000, Europeans have purchased more pieces of clothing but spent less money in doing so: clothing prices in the EU have dropped by over 30%, relative to inflation. Meanwhile, the average person buys 60% more clothing and keeps it for about half as long as they did 15 years ago.

Black Friday, window, sales

Yet we’re facing a climate crisis and rapidly exceeding the planet’s resources. With our global population predicted to grow to 9 billion, and an unprecedented culture of overproduction and mass consumption, we are pushing our planet to its limits. By 2030 the global apparel and footwear industry will grow by an estimated 80%, according to industry research. If business continues as usual, humanity may require two planets’ worth of resources by 2050.

Recommended: Consumerism In ‘The West’: A Society Built On Exploitation

Mass sales like Black Friday, Singles Day and Cyber Monday are only fanning the flames. This Friday, people across the globe will go crazy shopping for the cheapest offer available, some even physically fighting each other to grab products they could probably live without. In 2018, Black Friday generated $6.2bn in online sales in the US alone – a growth of 23.6% from the previous year. Earlier this month, China’s annual Singles Day generated a record $38bn in sales, up 25% since last year.

Yes, this growth drives the economy. But what strain are we putting on our planet and people to meet this rising demand? Who’s paying for the externalities when prices are pushed to below the cost of making the products? Our planet and people are footing the bill. We’re invoicing our rivers, oceans, forests, labor force and coming generations.

Black Friday Is coming sign

We used to think we could shop our way out of an economic crisis – but today, to sustain humanity, we’ll need to reduce our consumption and do business in an entirely different and sustainable way. This will entail consuming less and reusing more. But we will also have to reconsider how we think of prices. Our race to the bottom to supply low-cost products puts even more pressure on our resources and labor rights.

In the pursuit of short-term sales, many fashion companies (and their customers) still ignore the severe environmental and social impact of production. The global apparel and footwear industry accounts for an estimated 6% of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions, 17-20% of all industrial water pollution and up to 20% of pesticide use.

The Sourcing Of Natural Materials Also Damages Fragile Ecosystems And Threatens Biodiversity

Not only does fashion have harmful consequences in the manufacturing stage, but overconsumption is also generating an unparalleled amount of waste. While the demand for clothing is projected to increase at 2% a year, the number of times clothes are actually worn has dropped by a third compared to the early 2000s, according to our research. As new clothing comes into our lives, we also discard it at a shocking rate. Fashion is primarily produced in a linear system of “take, make, dispose”, and 73% of the world’s clothing eventually ends in landfills.

Recommended: Fashion From Algae Absorbs CO2: Is It possible To Wear?

In the past 10 years we have seen some promising progress in addressing the consequences of growth. Many fashion players of all sizes have committed to targets on “circularity”. François-Henri Pinault, CEO of the luxury group Kering, has recently succeeded in rallying over 35% of the market behind bold ambitions to tackle CO2 emissions, plastics in the oceans and biodiversity loss. Recycling and take-back systems are increasingly being adopted to reduce waste and reintegrate materials back into the supply chain to create new products. These are all important and valuable steps in the sustainability agenda.

Nevertheless, additional progress requires even bolder, more urgent approaches. We need to redesign the traditional way of doing business and disrupt the entire system. That means forecasting better, producing smarter and producing less. It means we must develop new business models for reusing, reselling, recycling and working collectively to avoid overproduction and thus prevent excess stock and dependency on sales. I believe there’s a compelling business case for those who invest in long-term social and environmental sustainability, not just short-term profit.

long term short term

To do this, brands will need to reassess their business priorities and the impact they want to make. Leaders must address the root of the problem. Of course, the fashion industry cannot tackle this alone: dramatic change will require collaboration across the entire value chain, including organizations, policymakers, manufacturers and investors.

As a first step – starting today – I encourage you to think before jumping on the Black Friday train in the endless hunt for a bargain. Instead, ask yourself: do I really need this?

Eva Kruse, The Guardian 

Black Friday Is The Antithesis Of Sustainable Business

Blackrock chief executive Larry Fink’s much-quoted letter to companies in which the firm is invested spelled this out pretty clearly: “Society is demanding that companies, both public and private, serve a social purpose. To prosper over time, every company must not only deliver financial performance, but also show how it makes a positive contribution to society. Companies must benefit all of their stakeholders, including shareholders, employees, customers, and the communities in which they operate.” Moreover, some of the country’s most ubiquitous brands are now concluding that our capitalist system simply cannot continue in its current form for much longer – even from a sales perspective. Ikea’s former chief sustainability officer Steve Howard made headlines last year by declaring that developed nations had 'reached peak stuff'.

When did Black Friday sales start?
Black Friday later became known in print, after an advertisement was published in The American Philatelist magazine in 1966. By the late 1980s, the term was commonly known across the nation and retailers soon linked it to their post-Thanksgiving sales.

Crowd of people Black Friday

The fact is that any retailers wishing to remain successful in this era of extreme climate challenges, resource scarcity and changing consumer demands must innovate away from the Black Friday approach; not just through supply chain management and design processes, but by rethinking entire business models. The good news is that this change is already taking shape in some sectors. Sticking with Ikea as a case in point, the furniture seller now runs textiles take-back schemes in the UK and last month moved to showcase upcycled goods, offer repair services and provide circular economy training in one of its Ireland stores for the first time.

Nowhere else is such a transformation more needed than in the fashion industry – an industry heavily involved in the Black Friday game of speedy sales and low costs to deliver frequent new collections inspired by catwalk looks and celebrity styles. I was therefore pleased to hear a group of fashion designers, academics and business leaders from some of the world’s biggest clothing brands recently stressing the urgency for alternative business models to bring about a “new era of capitalism”, where companies sell services or experiences rather than products.

Recommended: Sustainable Fashion: Fungi, Roots From MycoWorks, Inspidere

It was during a discussion on the future of fashion hosted by Bloomberg and the Environmental Audit Committee that Stella McCartney’s sustainability director Claire Bergkamp said: “There is a generation now that has probably never seen anything outside of low-quality products, and I think that once you have access to higher-quality product at a higher price point, new business models will start to arrive.” Stella McCartney is itself leading the way in this regard, having recently moved to sell its unsold good on US-based resale platform The RealReal at a cheaper price.

girls bags cloth fashion

Recommended: Stella McCartney Disposable Fashion: Palais Garnier Paris

Designer Phoebe English also spoke at the fashion event, citing the popularity of resale platforms such as Depop and Poshmark among teenage consumers as evidence of changing attitudes to reuse. “The generations of kids growing up currently will not be shopping in the way that we are now,” English said. “We are beginning to look into other business models. The sharing economy and post-ownership are strange, mythical things in discussion, but in practice, are actually a ground-breaking new route which can not only make a huge difference to how we consume clothes but generate real excitement from business.”

What is the need for reuse?
Reusing an item several times before repurposing or recycling it prevents waste. Some easy-to-reuse items include containers and packaging materials such as bags and boxes. Some things are easier to reuse than others because they are flimsy or you need to dismantle them to get at the primary item

Reduce, Rre-Use, Repair Instead Off Black Friday

Reuse, repair, reduce graph

Two other notable alternative retail models are that of rental-based offerings drawing on sharing economy principles; and servisisation-based models that champion repair and reuse. The latter is already being employed by the likes of H&M, Patagonia, and The North Face in the fashion industry (but also by the likes of Motorola elsewhere). As for the former, China-based clothing hire firm White Closet stands out as a leading example of rental models that work, having built up more than five million subscribers, each paying a monthly fee to borrow luxury fashion items rather than buying them outright.

Of course, it’s still early days for these alternative business models to become mainstream on the UK high street, and there is a frightfully long way to go to reach a properly integrated version of efficient and intelligent capitalism. But the fact remains that three-quarters of UK employees will be millennials by 2030 – the year by which we must achieve the Sustainable Development Goals – and they will not be shopping in the same ways as their baby-boomer counterparts.

Recommended: Waste In Oceans: Plastic Soup And The Great Bubble Barrier

Over the past year we have seen a radical transformation around single-use plastics. The speed of change we are continuing to see from retailers in this area serves to highlight how a radical shift in consumption and production is possible, when society demands it. Given that the negative environmental and social impacts of hyper-consumerism for other products are just as severe, and given that the alternative business models cited in this blog have been developed within the past couple of years, I am hopeful that we are now on the cusp of similar transformations happening across the retail industry, and that Black Friday will soon become a thing of the past.

Before you go!

Recommended: Best Sustainable Autumn Life: Exercise, Food, Lifestyle

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Breaking News, as the world changes…

In our world, WhatsOrb refuses to turn away from the changes in our society and environment which succeeds each other at a rapid pace.

For WhatsOrb, publishing on the environment is a priority. We give reporting on climate, nature, waste, lifestyle and sustainable solutions the prominence it deserves.

At this turbulent time for ‘all’ species and our planet, we are determined to inform readers about threats, consequences and solutions based on facts, not on political prejudice or business interests.

WhatsOrb Breaking News will be published as soon as urgent events from around the world and startling sustainable innovations reach us.

If there is anything we should know and publish about, please send a note to: [email protected] or write your own story on: www.whatsorb.comthe only news site which gives you a ‘sustainable voice!’

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Black Friday Not Sustainable At All Especially For Fashion

It's that time again; 'Black Friday', the biggest sales event of the year, as retailers stack high and sell low before Christmas. Sustainable Development Goal 12 (sustainable consumption and production patterns) seems all but forgotten for the time being. Black Friday Not Sustainable At All This must be a sustainability professional’s worst nightmare: watching a retail brand’s CSR (corporate social responsibility) and resource efficiency progress take a hit from sales and marketing teams that are ultimately encouraging consumers to buy goods beyond the point of necessity. But for how much longer can this business model based on aggressive discounts be profitable and sustainable for high-street retailers in its current form? My answer – and hope – would be not for much longer at all. Why do they call it Black Friday? Black Friday is the name given to the shopping day after Thanksgiving. It was originally called Black Friday because the volume of shoppers created traffic accidents and sometimes even violence. In the 1950s, people began calling in sick the day after Thanksgiving to give themselves a four-day weekend. Black Friday shows how sick people are! There is reason to have this hope - because society is demanding change for the better. I myself am part of a generation of environmentally conscious millennials that semand stronger ethical codes from businesses and actively favour resale and exchange platforms such as eBay, Amazon Used, Facebook and Depop. {youtube}                                                   Black Friday Not Sustainable At All Especially For Fashion                                                                             Black Friday Madness  Before You Jump On The Black Friday Sales Train Ask Yourself: Do You Need This? We are producing and consuming fashion at a rate like never before – and mass shopping sales are simply fanning the flames.      ‘As a first step – starting today – I encourage you to think before jumping on the Black Friday train in the endless hunt for a bargain. This morning I opened my inbox to find reams of emails – mid-season sale, 50% off, exclusive offer – enticing me to grab the best deal while it lasts. When we’re barraged by messages from the fashion industry to buy more, it’s hard to resist – and I have easily succumbed to these temptations in the past. Recommended:  Sustainable Fashion: Are Your Cloth Environmental Friendly? We are now producing and consuming fashion at a rate like never before. Since 2000, Europeans have purchased more pieces of clothing but spent less money in doing so: clothing prices in the EU have dropped by over 30%, relative to inflation. Meanwhile, the average person buys 60% more clothing and keeps it for about half as long as they did 15 years ago. Yet we’re facing a climate crisis and rapidly exceeding the planet’s resources. With our global population predicted to grow to 9 billion, and an unprecedented culture of overproduction and mass consumption, we are pushing our planet to its limits. By 2030 the global apparel and footwear industry will grow by an estimated 80%, according to industry research. If business continues as usual, humanity may require two planets’ worth of resources by 2050. Recommended:  Consumerism In ‘The West’: A Society Built On Exploitation Mass sales like Black Friday, Singles Day and Cyber Monday are only fanning the flames. This Friday, people across the globe will go crazy shopping for the cheapest offer available, some even physically fighting each other to grab products they could probably live without. In 2018, Black Friday generated $6.2bn in online sales in the US alone – a growth of 23.6% from the previous year. Earlier this month, China’s annual Singles Day generated a record $38bn in sales, up 25% since last year. Yes, this growth drives the economy. But what strain are we putting on our planet and people to meet this rising demand? Who’s paying for the externalities when prices are pushed to below the cost of making the products? Our planet and people are footing the bill. We’re invoicing our rivers, oceans, forests, labor force and coming generations. We used to think we could shop our way out of an economic crisis – but today, to sustain humanity, we’ll need to reduce our consumption and do business in an entirely different and sustainable way. This will entail consuming less and reusing more. But we will also have to reconsider how we think of prices. Our race to the bottom to supply low-cost products puts even more pressure on our resources and labor rights. In the pursuit of short-term sales, many fashion companies (and their customers) still ignore the severe environmental and social impact of production. The global apparel and footwear industry accounts for an estimated 6% of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions, 17-20% of all industrial water pollution and up to 20% of pesticide use. The Sourcing Of Natural Materials Also Damages Fragile Ecosystems And Threatens Biodiversity Not only does fashion have harmful consequences in the manufacturing stage, but overconsumption is also generating an unparalleled amount of waste. While the demand for clothing is projected to increase at 2% a year, the number of times clothes are actually worn has dropped by a third compared to the early 2000s, according to our research. As new clothing comes into our lives, we also discard it at a shocking rate. Fashion is primarily produced in a linear system of “take, make, dispose”, and 73% of the world’s clothing eventually ends in landfills. Recommended:  Fashion From Algae Absorbs CO2: Is It possible To Wear? In the past 10 years we have seen some promising progress in addressing the consequences of growth. Many fashion players of all sizes have committed to targets on “circularity”. François-Henri Pinault, CEO of the luxury group Kering, has recently succeeded in rallying over 35% of the market behind bold ambitions to tackle CO2 emissions, plastics in the oceans and biodiversity loss. Recycling and take-back systems are increasingly being adopted to reduce waste and reintegrate materials back into the supply chain to create new products. These are all important and valuable steps in the sustainability agenda. Nevertheless, additional progress requires even bolder, more urgent approaches. We need to redesign the traditional way of doing business and disrupt the entire system. That means forecasting better, producing smarter and producing less. It means we must develop new business models for reusing, reselling, recycling and working collectively to avoid overproduction and thus prevent excess stock and dependency on sales. I believe there’s a compelling business case for those who invest in long-term social and environmental sustainability, not just short-term profit. To do this, brands will need to reassess their business priorities and the impact they want to make. Leaders must address the root of the problem. Of course, the fashion industry cannot tackle this alone: dramatic change will require collaboration across the entire value chain, including organizations, policymakers, manufacturers and investors. As a first step – starting today – I encourage you to think before jumping on the Black Friday train in the endless hunt for a bargain. Instead, ask yourself: do I really need this? Eva Kruse, The Guardian  Black Friday Is The Antithesis Of Sustainable Business Blackrock chief executive Larry Fink’s much-quoted letter to companies in which the firm is invested spelled this out pretty clearly: “Society is demanding that companies, both public and private, serve a social purpose. To prosper over time, every company must not only deliver financial performance, but also show how it makes a positive contribution to society. Companies must benefit all of their stakeholders, including shareholders, employees, customers, and the communities in which they operate.” Moreover, some of the country’s most ubiquitous brands are now concluding that our capitalist system simply cannot continue in its current form for much longer – even from a sales perspective. Ikea’s former chief sustainability officer Steve Howard made headlines last year by declaring that developed nations had 'reached peak stuff'. When did Black Friday sales start? Black Friday later became known in print, after an advertisement was published in The American Philatelist magazine in 1966. By the late 1980s, the term was commonly known across the nation and retailers soon linked it to their post-Thanksgiving sales. The fact is that any retailers wishing to remain successful in this era of extreme climate challenges, resource scarcity and changing consumer demands must innovate away from the Black Friday approach; not just through supply chain management and design processes, but by rethinking entire business models. The good news is that this change is already taking shape in some sectors. Sticking with Ikea as a case in point, the furniture seller now runs textiles take-back schemes in the UK and last month moved to showcase upcycled goods, offer repair services and provide circular economy training in one of its Ireland stores for the first time. Nowhere else is such a transformation more needed than in the fashion industry – an industry heavily involved in the Black Friday game of speedy sales and low costs to deliver frequent new collections inspired by catwalk looks and celebrity styles. I was therefore pleased to hear a group of fashion designers, academics and business leaders from some of the world’s biggest clothing brands recently stressing the urgency for alternative business models to bring about a “new era of capitalism”, where companies sell services or experiences rather than products. Recommended:  Sustainable Fashion: Fungi, Roots From MycoWorks, Inspidere It was during a discussion on the future of fashion hosted by Bloomberg and the Environmental Audit Committee that Stella McCartney’s sustainability director Claire Bergkamp said: “There is a generation now that has probably never seen anything outside of low-quality products, and I think that once you have access to higher-quality product at a higher price point, new business models will start to arrive.” Stella McCartney is itself leading the way in this regard, having recently moved to sell its unsold good on US-based resale platform The RealReal at a cheaper price. Recommended:  Stella McCartney Disposable Fashion: Palais Garnier Paris Designer Phoebe English also spoke at the fashion event, citing the popularity of resale platforms such as Depop and Poshmark among teenage consumers as evidence of changing attitudes to reuse. “The generations of kids growing up currently will not be shopping in the way that we are now,” English said. “We are beginning to look into other business models. The sharing economy and post-ownership are strange, mythical things in discussion, but in practice, are actually a ground-breaking new route which can not only make a huge difference to how we consume clothes but generate real excitement from business.” What is the need for reuse? Reusing an item several times before repurposing or recycling it prevents waste. Some easy-to-reuse items include containers and packaging materials such as bags and boxes. Some things are easier to reuse than others because they are flimsy or you need to dismantle them to get at the primary item Reduce, Rre-Use, Repair Instead Off Black Friday Two other notable alternative retail models are that of rental-based offerings drawing on sharing economy principles; and servisisation-based models that champion repair and reuse. The latter is already being employed by the likes of H&M, Patagonia, and The North Face in the fashion industry (but also by the likes of Motorola elsewhere). As for the former, China-based clothing hire firm White Closet stands out as a leading example of rental models that work, having built up more than five million subscribers, each paying a monthly fee to borrow luxury fashion items rather than buying them outright. Of course, it’s still early days for these alternative business models to become mainstream on the UK high street, and there is a frightfully long way to go to reach a properly integrated version of efficient and intelligent capitalism. But the fact remains that three-quarters of UK employees will be millennials by 2030 – the year by which we must achieve the Sustainable Development Goals – and they will not be shopping in the same ways as their baby-boomer counterparts. Recommended:  Waste In Oceans: Plastic Soup And The Great Bubble Barrier Over the past year we have seen a radical transformation around single-use plastics. The speed of change we are continuing to see from retailers in this area serves to highlight how a radical shift in consumption and production is possible, when society demands it. Given that the negative environmental and social impacts of hyper-consumerism for other products are just as severe, and given that the alternative business models cited in this blog have been developed within the past couple of years, I am hopeful that we are now on the cusp of similar transformations happening across the retail industry, and that Black Friday will soon become a thing of the past. Before you go! Recommended:  Best Sustainable Autumn Life: Exercise, Food, Lifestyle Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations