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Community vegan food for a better healthier planet and you | Upload Lifestyle

Vegan Food For A Better Healthier Planet And You

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by: Annette Lavrijsen
vegan food for a better healthier planet and you | Upload

According to figures published by Eurostat the greenhouse gases generated in the EU stood at 4.466 million tonnes in 2017, with households remaining one of its most significant contributors, accounting for 20 to 25% of the European total. On carbonfootprint.com you can calculate your individual carbon footprint by month or by year, and gain insight in your ecological impact.

Green leaves as a foot

What we eat matters. Better choices in the kitchen help to improve your health and reduce your environmental footprint  

Be warned: after seeing the result you may drastically want to reform your lifestyle to reduce your personal footprint by leaving your car at home and use the public transport more often, use less water in and around the house and switch to alternative sources of energy (solar panels) and more efficient heating and cooling systems. A relatively easy and cost-efficient way to reduce your footprint is by changing the way you eat. 

The following diet tweaks will not only improve your health and fitness, but also help to fight global warming and pollution by reducing your carbon ‘foodprint’: the greenhouse gases produced on the farm, in the factory, on the road, in the shop, in your home and at the waste disposal. 

1. Cook at home

Channel your inner Jamie Oliver and prepare a fresh, home-cooked meal. By cooking at home you’ll eat healthier (because additive-free), get more satisfaction out of your meal, reduce wastage and take control of the food you eat. Plan ahead and choose natural ingredients that you can use for different meals such as lentils, beans, vegetables, fruits and whole-grains.

2. Buy local and organic

Did you know around 11% of our carbon foodprint is linked to the transportation of food? Invest in the local economy and the planet by buying your groceries at the local farmer or vegetable shop, and choose merely products that are grown in the vicinity – this will often mean that you buy your fruits and veggies in season, when they are at their best.

And if you have the option, opt for fresh and organic produce. organic farming of crops – which uses natural methods for pest control, soil fertilisation and weed prevention ­– has a lower impact on the environment than conventional farming. Crops are grown in fertile soils that are pesticide-free yet full of healthy nutrients that will end up on your plate. Even though organic livestock farming, without the use of antibiotics and growth hormones, is preferred over its conventional counterpart, it is still more polluting than the cultivation of vegetables, wholegrains and fruit.

3. Eat plant-based

mix of fruit many colours

Did you know that the carbon footprint of a plant-based diet is about half that of a carnivore’s diet? Meat, cheese, eggs and farmed fish generate much more greenhouse gases than fruit, vegetables, beans and nuts – with livestock farming accounting for 20 to 50% of all man-made greenhouse gases while being of the biggest polluters of the air and ground.

Replace meat, farmed fish and cheese by plant-based proteins such as tofu, lentils, quorn and vegan milk and yoghurt, and include lots of fresh vegetables, beans and wholegrains. Bonus: this will reduce your risk of getting high blood pressure, diabetes and heart disease.

4. Reduce waste

Bring your own shopping bag and reusable produce bags for your fruit and vegetables, and try to reuse and recycle plastic containers (for storage) and glass jars (which can make a nice vase or drinking glass) as much as possible. Don’t use plastic water bottles, separate your waste and try to limit the use of plastic packaging.

5. Find inspiration

Invest in a few vegan cookbooks and browse magazines and blogs for inspiration about healthy and plant-based eating. Challenge yourself to make a new dish every week, eating vegan is so much more versatile and exciting than you may think. To give you some guidance we have listed 3 types of meals in order of their impact on our health and on the planet. We leave it up to you to separate the winners from the losers... 

Healthy and climate-friendly

A vegan meal with oven-roasted cauliflower with Indian spices and lentil salad with spinach, mint and tomatoes; dessert: pear, apple and yoghurt. 

Healthy yet less climate-friendly

A meal with many flown-in products: pasta with snowpeas and long beans, grilled tilapia (olive oil); dessert: papaya, lime and 2 scoops of ice cream.

Healthy nor climate-friendly

A dinner with many animal products: grilled steak (with butter)' potato gratin with cream, old cheese and bacon; creamed spinach; dessert: a cheeseboard.

https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/lifestyle

Get updates on environmental sustainability in your mailbox every month.

Vegan Food For A Better Healthier Planet And You

According to figures published by Eurostat the greenhouse gases generated in the EU stood at 4.466 million tonnes in 2017, with households remaining one of its most significant contributors, accounting for 20 to 25% of the European total. On carbonfootprint.com you can calculate your individual carbon footprint by month or by year, and gain insight in your ecological impact. What we eat matters. Better choices in the kitchen help to improve your health and reduce your environmental footprint   Be warned: after seeing the result you may drastically want to reform your lifestyle to reduce your personal footprint by leaving your car at home and use the public transport more often, use less water in and around the house and switch to alternative sources of energy (solar panels) and more efficient heating and cooling systems. A relatively easy and cost-efficient way to reduce your footprint is by changing the way you eat.  The following diet tweaks will not only improve your health and fitness, but also help to fight global warming and pollution by reducing your carbon ‘foodprint’: the greenhouse gases produced on the farm, in the factory, on the road, in the shop, in your home and at the waste disposal.  1. Cook at home Channel your inner Jamie Oliver and prepare a fresh, home-cooked meal. By cooking at home you’ll eat healthier (because additive-free), get more satisfaction out of your meal, reduce wastage and take control of the food you eat. Plan ahead and choose natural ingredients that you can use for different meals such as lentils, beans, vegetables, fruits and whole-grains. 2. Buy local and organic Did you know around 11% of our carbon foodprint is linked to the transportation of food? Invest in the local economy and the planet by buying your groceries at the local farmer or vegetable shop, and choose merely products that are grown in the vicinity – this will often mean that you buy your fruits and veggies in season, when they are at their best. And if you have the option, opt for fresh and organic produce.  organic farming of crops – which uses natural methods for pest control, soil fertilisation and weed prevention ­– has a lower impact on the environment than conventional farming. Crops are grown in fertile soils that are pesticide-free yet full of healthy nutrients that will end up on your plate. Even though organic livestock farming, without the use of antibiotics and growth hormones, is preferred over its conventional counterpart, it is still more polluting than the cultivation of vegetables, wholegrains and fruit. 3. Eat plant-based Did you know that the carbon footprint of a plant-based diet is about half that of a carnivore’s diet? Meat, cheese, eggs and farmed fish generate much more greenhouse gases than fruit, vegetables, beans and nuts – with livestock farming accounting for 20 to 50% of all man-made greenhouse gases while being of the biggest polluters of the air and ground. Replace meat, farmed fish and cheese by plant-based proteins such as tofu, lentils, quorn and vegan milk and yoghurt, and include lots of fresh vegetables, beans and wholegrains. Bonus: this will reduce your risk of getting high blood pressure, diabetes and heart disease. 4. Reduce  waste Bring your own shopping bag and reusable produce bags for your fruit and vegetables, and try to reuse and recycle plastic containers (for storage) and glass jars (which can make a nice vase or drinking glass) as much as possible. Don’t use plastic water bottles, separate your waste and try to limit the use of plastic packaging. 5. Find inspiration Invest in a few vegan cookbooks and browse magazines and blogs for inspiration about healthy and plant-based eating. Challenge yourself to make a new dish every week, eating vegan is so much more versatile and exciting than you may think. To give you some guidance we have listed 3 types of meals in order of their impact on our health and on the planet. We leave it up to you to separate the winners from the losers...  Healthy and climate-friendly A vegan meal with oven-roasted cauliflower with Indian spices and lentil salad with spinach, mint and tomatoes; dessert: pear, apple and yoghurt.  Healthy yet less climate-friendly A meal with many flown-in products: pasta with snowpeas and long beans, grilled tilapia (olive oil); dessert: papaya, lime and 2 scoops of ice cream. Healthy nor climate-friendly A dinner with many animal products: grilled steak (with butter)' potato gratin with cream, old cheese and bacon; creamed spinach; dessert: a cheeseboard. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/lifestyle